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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 1987

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TJBC Archives Serial
Soviets aim proposals at Europe
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Although the United States has
been the focus of Soviet arms control initiatives, European states may
be the real target, said a UBC
political science professor, Thursday.
Doug Ross said Japan and
Western European nations such as
Germany and France, which belong
to NATO, may become the major
target of Soviet arms reduction proposals.
Ross   said   because
Union's gross national product is
half that of the United States it
must spend twice as much as the
U.S. in order to keep up in the arms
race. Soviet premier Mikhail Gor-
ev wants internal social reform
and feels increased
spendnTg otwOns, especially in light
of the AmeT-fiflfftetrategic Defence
.'___-_   w'"   *Vce   (he   Soviet
nicnrfNio a state fcf low economic
LIBftnt*1' said Rossi
He said JlgjWwiets could better
,QQt2JtJw-nS_factor of American
orninance by detatching
America's allies.
Ross said ther is a growing rift
between   the   Europeans   and
Americans, and if tensions could be
increased and heightened by the
Soviets it would be good for
Moscow.
"NATO would be buried sooner
than later for the Societs," said
Ross.
But Ross said the demise of
NATO might not be all good for the
Soviets as increased anxieties could
lure China into the arms race and
leave the Soviets surrounded by
enemies.
Since the announcement of SDI
on March 23, 1983 three successive
Soviet leadership groups have
rigrously condemned it, saying SDI
represents a determined American
drive for nuclear superiority and
criticized it as part of a U.S. first
strike plan.
Ross said there has been a
dramatic modernization of
American nuclear weaponry. The
U.S. he said displays aggressive
counter-offensive behaviour.
He said the addition of stealth
technology including cruise
missiles, advance aircraft and
nuclear submarines are the beginning, or preliminary process, of
nuclear superiority for the
Americans. Ross said it is difficult
to tell how many years ahead of the
Soviets stealth technology is.
See page 6: GORBACHEV
Charest speaks to youth
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
0 Canada's   youngest   cabinet
1 minister swooshed in and out of the
g Soft Rock Cafe Tuesday afternoon
i selling a flashy new handbook on
I what the federal government is of-
g fering Canada's youth.
1 Jean Charest, Canada's 28-year-
old Minister of State for Youth, is a
JEAN CHAREST, MINISTER of State for Youth ... his ministry has no   witty speaker who will not make
money, but boy, can he dress sharp
Canadian youth, least of all B.C.
students, laugh.
Charest needs all the pizazz he
can get because the Ministry of
State for Youth has no budget.
Although Charest briefly mentioned B.C.'s 23 per cent unemployment rate for those under 25 years,
he failed to outline what his
ministry would do to improve the
situation.
"When the economy is down
WW
STUDENTS CRUISE THROUGH UBC on a warm summers day.
:¥:.:::*:*:::$:::-:*^
•.•.•.••s*.*.*.*.***.:.*.*.:.*.:.*.w^^^^
young people are the first to lose
their jobs and when it goes back up
they are the last to get hired,"
Charest told a small crowd of Vancouver Junior Chamber of Commerce members.
Charest said the most urgent problem for youth is the transition
from school to work. He said there
is a particular problem with young
people not completing high school.
"Contrary to what was happening 20 or 30 years ago you cannot
leave high school now and get a job.
There will be less and less jobs for
unskilled laborers in Canada," he
said.
. Charest then launched his new
handbook put out by the ministry
of youth, called the Hot-100,
designed to tell young Canadians
options the Federal government is
offering them.
"It is a flashy, visually attractive
book designed not to put you to
sleep," said Charest.
Charest said for years to come,
the key to success in the labor
market will be the continual acquisition of knowledge. He said
most of the growth in the economy
would be in the services sector.
In line with his entire bid to make
the Conservative party of Canada
sound like the avant-garde, Charest
spoke of resistance the party had
met to its plans, citing Katimavik, a
volunteer work program for youth,
as an example.
He said Katimavik was a pro-
gramfor the 1970's and that the
Conservatives put it aside in the
context of their new job creation
strategy because the program did
See page 6: INCREASED
Radiation hoalHi risk alleged on UBC campus
By MARGARET MOSS
Special to The Ubyssey
UBC students, faculty, and staff
may be experiencing dangerously
high levels of radiation originating
from the Triumf particle accelerator, a particle physics professor said yesterday.
John Washborn said that a
routine experiment by one of his
graduate students revealed an
unusually high level of radiation on
UBC campus.
"The level indicated is 100
r.e.m.s, ten times higher than the
safety level?' said Washborn in an
interview Thursday.
An official at Triumf, who refused to be named, said that levels are
constantly monitored, and that
there has been no recent increase.
He questioned Washborn's experiment.
"I believe we're in a better position to make these evaluations," he
said.
President David Strangway said
he is concerned about the discovery
but said "the evidence is inconclusive. There's no point in
over-reacting."
He added he has no plans to investigate the findings.
But Washborn insists the experiment, which he repeated himself, is
conclusive, and advises students,
staff, and faculty to be sensitive to
changes in their health.
"Anyone experiencing nausea,
hair loss, rashes, sores that won't
heal, significant decrease in sex
drive,   gastro-intestinal   distress,
weakened eyesight, excessive thirst,
or loss of appetite should consult a
doctor immediately," said
Washborn.
UBC student health director Dr.
Patrick Archibald said the centre
has not treated radiation poisoning
in the past, but he and his colleagues are qualified to recognize
symptoms and recommend treatment. He said, "it does not fall
within student health's mandate to
determine the health risk. That is up
to the administration.''
He said he was surprised at
Strangway's lack of response to the
finding, and suggested an outside
study should be commissioned immediately. "We're talking about
human lives," he said.
Vancouver public health officer
John Blatherwick said he is "concerned" that a radiation leak of the
proportion indicated by
Washborn's experiment could have,
gone undetected. He said that a
radiation study conducted by the city of Vancouver last year indicated
normal levels of radiation within
the city limits, "but UBC is outside
of our jurisdiction," he said.
Annet Dickerson, press secretary
for the ministry of health, said "the
minister is concerned for the health
of aU British Columbians, and will
take steps necessary to insure there
are no health risks on the campus if
UBC's administration requests an
investigation." Health minister
Peter Dueck was unavailable for
comment.
In anticipation of wide student
concern, student health has arranged a system by which students can
arrange appointments for radiation
testing, or make general inquiries,
alphabetically by last name: A-G,
call 228-2121; H-M, call 228-3972;
N-R, call 228-2307; S-Z, call
228-3930.
Students interviewed about the
discovery were surprised and concerned. Dana Wakunaa, arts 3,
said, "I think it's preposterous. It's
sneaky and highly unethical of Dr.
Strangway not to investigate the
report. It's criminal and unfair to
students."
Douglas Dundas, commerce 1,
said, "It's a cover up. I think there
should be a full investigation."
But Bill Woodhead, engineering
See page 2: PREMIER Page 2
THE    U _Y S S E Y
Friday, March 27, 1987
!___&'
-S*^' 'N***'
Premier lauds less mommies
From page 1
4, said, "I have nothing but praise
for Dr. Strangway. I trust him "
Phil Laird, Arts 1, said "I know
absolutely nothing about radiation,
but I guess it could be really serious.
You can't play football if you are
suffering from gastro-intestinal
distress."
Radiologist Angela Will of the
UBC Health Sciences center said
that UBC should expect an increasing amount of fatalities in the next
few weeks. "There's going to be
people dropping dead all over the
place. You can tell they are not the
usual fatalities due to SUB food due
to the fact that these corpses glow in
the dark, but it's a serious problem
just the same."
Rick Hansen said, when contacted near the Alberta border,
"That's it, I'm going back to Alberta!"
Jim Bakker was unavailable for
comment, his secretary claiming he
had "business affairs" to attend to.
Premier Bill Vander Zalm, interviewed Thursday at his Fantasy
Gardens office, said "Well, one
faaaantastic side effect of the radia
tion would be that,  er,  students
would be steril-, er, uh, students
guess, heh, if you look at the bright
side, the new funding increase for
post-secondary education would go
a bit further if a few thousand
students bought the farm."
Moammar Quaddafi said:
"Death to all infidel North
American imperialist students!"
and hung up.
When contacted by a Ubyssey
reporter, Sean Penn said "What are
you looking at my wife for?" and
beat him up.
Richard Nixon, when asked
whether he felt that Dr. Strangway
was engaging in a cover up said
"Could you speak a little clearer
and slower please, my mikes have
been acting up lately. Let me make
one thing perfectly clear, Trish got
David as a gift and regardless of
what anyone says, we're going to
keep him. And as for Pat's good,
Republican cloth coat. . .argh, what
gross meatloaf. I am not a cook."
Dr. Wolfgang von Seyffertitz, of
the UBC biology faculty, commented on the disastrous effects
Triumf radiation will have on
Western Civilization. "Ach, du
lieber, we viil haf genetic mutations
walkink around all over das place.
People will start to mutate into
bizarre new life forms like Diving,
Doug Collins undt Don Cherry.
People vill start dressink like
Liberace. People will start sinkink
Johnny Kidd and the Pirates songs.
Thinks vill be, all gefucked up."
VANDER ZALM. . .already
mutating
couldn't become, uh, mommies and
daddies and there certainly
wouldn't be as many abortions. I
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THANK
YOU
I want to thank all the student volunteers who
worked so hard to make Open House '87 the
outstanding success it was.
From the student guide "yellowst-ins'' who
manned kiosks, to the students who worked
long nights to set up displays in their faculties,
to the students who supported our kick-off
Celebrity Alumni Concert and Auction ... all
these efforts to provide a warm welcome to the
community were extraordinary and enormously appreciated.
In the last few days, I have received enthusiastic calls and letters from the public who
feel they've experienced UBC as never before.
For your important contribution to our efforts
to bring the University and the community
closer together, I say, BRAVO, we couldn't
have done it without you!
David W. Strangway
President Friday, March 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
PageG
UBC's Triumf battles for funding
By SCOT MacDONALD
The directors of UBC's Triumf
Cyclotron are hoping to obtain
$480 million from the federal and
provincial governments to keep the
research centre in the forefront of
subatomic physics in the 1990's and
beyond.
Director of Triumf, Eric Vogt,
said Thursday "We have an excellent chance of getting the money,
which is far more compelling than
when Triumf first began."
Construction of Triumf began in
1968 and took six years to complete. The cyclotron is worth about
$200 million today.
Vogt said the funds Triumf is
asking for will be spent over'five or
six years to upgrade the present
cyclotron.
The   provincial   government   is
presently deciding whether or not to
fund $100 million of the $480
million total price tag. Vogt pointed
out that the Alberta government
provides about $480 million annually to support the province's oil industry.
"We're asking for the equivalent
amount of money but over five
years," said Vogt. "These are
heroic times in subatomic physics
and it is very important for students
and for Canada to have a home
base and be a major player in the
field," adding that the expansion of
the project would ensure Triumf's
contribution to a world network of
about half a dozen cyclotrons.
Vogt denied Triumf is obsolete
and said the plan is not to save a
"faltering project," but to
guarantee a healthy future and a
Club addresses issues of disabled
By CAROL PEDLAR
A new Alma Mater Society club
has been formed to serve the needs
of disabled students on campus.
Lee Grenon, president of the
Disabled Students' Association said
the club is meant to aid students
with a wide range of physical and
mental disabilities.
"It's easier to organize an all-
disabilities group," he said.
The club intends to set up an effective communications network
among disabled students, campus
administration and the special
needs counselling centre, said
Grenon.
It will also serves as an advocacy
group for greater access in and
around campus for the disabled,
not only in the area of mobility, but.
also in participation in class discussions and access to learning
materials such as Braille textbooks
and books on tape, he said.
Among the club's immediate
goals is the re-establishment of the
President's Committee on Concerns
of the Handicapped.
Grenon said the club is having a
great deal of trouble getting the
committee started and there have
been unnecessary delays but would
not elaborate further.
The club is also organizing, with
financial help from the Secretary of
State, a B.C. Conference of Disabled Post-Secondary Students, he
said.
On campus, the club is working
to have program study time requirements changed for disabled
students. Grenon said many programs, such as engineering, require
full time study. "The distinction
between full and part-time study is
given a lot of weight both in the job
market and within the university."
Grenon said he would like to see
the distinction removed for disabled
students. "It is not a reasonable expectation for many disabled
students, given the barriers they experience," he said.
The club is also working to ensure the continued funding of
Students Helping Students, a program in which full-time students are
hired to help disabled students on
campus. Provincial government
funding for this propaganda runs
out this month.
"It's very important that this
program continue because it really
has provided a great deal of
assistance to  disabled  students,"
said Grenon.
"We'd like to see as much support as possible from both the administration and the AMS to encourage the government to continue
this program," he said.
The club wants to see handicapped access to the Student Union
Building improved.
Modifications done to the
building in the past have included
the repositioning of the control
panel in the main elevator to make
it accessible to the wheelchair-
bound, and changing its buttons to
include Braille.
Tactile strips that warn the blind
of the presence of stairs have been
placed at the top and bottom of
some stairways outside SUB and
ramps have been built behind
Tortellini's and beside Snack Attack.
The washrooms on the lower and
main floors of SUB have also been
made wheelchair-accessible.
Michael Kingsmill, AMS architect, said ... an elevator into
SUB auditorium, and some spaces
for wheelchairs, will be completed
this summer at a cost of $16,000.
He also said that negotiations are
underway concerning "the idea of a
ramp into the Pit that would
remove the hazard of the stairs and
improve access for all."
"Graduating class gifts have been
instrumental in providing funds,"
said Kingsmill.
"Every graduating class for the
past three years has earmarked a
portion of their gift for handicapped access and for the Crane
Library (a library for the blind),"
he said.
Membership in the Disabled
Students' Association is not confined to the handicapped. Anyone interested in improving life for the
disabled is invited to join, and
should phone Lee Grenon, president, at 224-0538; or Theresa Andrews, vice-president, at 224-4541.
"world leading position." But he
said that "any high status project
worth anything receives
opposition," while noting that
Triumf's plan has received high
ratings from the scientific community.
He complained that while B.C.
houses about 10 per cent of
Canada's population, it receives
less than five per cent of federal
funding.
Triumf presently employs about
400 people. Vogt said twice as many
people would be hired during and
after construction of the synchrotron.
"For every direct job, five more
would be created in the surrounding
area," said Vogt.
The Canadian scientist Allen
Ashbury, currently at the University of Victoria, led the Triumf team
in 1983 which discovered the
subatomic W and Z particles.
Although the discovery, which won
a Nobel prize, was made in Europe,
researchers at Triumf were the first
to find that both particles are left
handed and spin in the same direction as the sun.
"Although North American
governments did not like it, we proved that the world moves inexorably to the left not to the right,"
said Vogt.
Too few women hired
NATIVE TOTEM POLE grimaces at axe weilder
— dan andrews photo
HALIFAX (CUP) —
Universities are still hiring
women mainly to fill positions in
"traditional" female faculties, such
as nursing and education, says the
chair of the Status of Women committee of the Canadian Association
of University Teachers.
"On the surface, it looks as if
universities have been-hiring-more
women", said Jane Gordon, a
sociology professor at Mount Saint
Vincent University. "But they are
probably hiring fewer women in
mainstream faculties."
In most Nova Scotia universities,
the percentage of faculty positions
filled by women runs between 14 to
30 per cent. At Mount Saint Vincent, where 85 per cent of students
are women, the figure is 60 per cent,
but at the Technical University of
Nova Scotia, the figure drops to
just two per cent.
Paula Chegwidden, a sociology
professor at Acadia University in
Wolfville, said only four per cent of
Acadia's science professors are
female. Chegwidden said more
women are needed in technical and
scientific areas to "provide role
models for women. Not having
women in the sciences may
discourage women going into the
sciences."
Gordon is concerned that the
number of female faculty at Mount
Saint Vincent has declined from 100
per cent 20 years ago to 60 per cent
today.
"There are more and more
women being turned out of
graduate programs," but not all are
being hired as professors, she said.
Gordon said universities seem
"to value men's credentials more
highly than women's." She said
many women often take time off
after finishing graduate school, and
this may hinder their chances for
academic employment.
Gordon suggests that universities
"are reluctant to hire older
women," preferring to hire "someone fresh out of graduate school
who goes directly into the system."
"There is no conscious decision
not to hire women," says Chegwidden. "But people like to hire people
like themselves," she said, noting
hiring committees are often made
up of men.
Although Acadia has had an affirmative action policy for two
years. Chegwidden said it's just "a
motherhood statement." There's
no way to enforce the hiring of
women, she said.
Dalhousie philosophy professor
Sue Sherwin said Dai's "very
weak" affirmative action policy
states that a woman is to be hired
only if there is no better qualified
male. Sherwin thinks universities
should iiite . wellrqualified women
even if a male candidate is perceived
to have higher qualifications.
What people consider to be
'qualified' is "very subjective,"
said Sherwin. "A department head
may prefer a person because she or
he fits into the style of the department. That works against women
because departments are usually
male dominated."
If hiring committees relied solely
on grades and publications, the
system would be fairer to women,
said Sherwin.
Sherwin also said that most
women professors at Dalhousie are
in the junior ranks, and very few
head departments. "There are 13
female full professors compared to
237 male full professors, and there
is only one woman in senior administration," she said.
Gordon said these figures are
similar for most universities across
Canada.
"The only way to change these
statistics is to hire more women,"
said Sherwin. But because many
universities are suffering budget
restraints, it is unlikely women
faculty will be hired in great
numbers in the near future.
Women faculty also earn less
than their male colleagues. On
average, women professors make 12
per cent less than men. Gordon says
salary disparity "is attributed not to
gender, but to the initial salary the
professor negotiates with administration."
At the Nova Scotia College of
Art and Design, differences in initial salary negotiations accounted
for "as much as a $5,000 difference" in the salaries of equally
qualified men and women, says college environmental planning professor Jill Grant.
Grant said the wage disparity has
been reduced because of a collective
agreement reached this fall between
administration and faculty. "Now
about half as many women as
before are being underpaid." Page 4
THE    U BY S
Hallelujah!
They haven't got a prayer.
At least not yet. UBC's Alma Mater Society council members
just haven't been keeping pace with their provincial counterparts in
Victoria. Bill Vander Zalm and his gang have installed a prayer room
in the legislature to ensure divine intervention in the democratic
decision-making process. It is a non-denominational room as long
as the religion practiced is Social Credit.
The Ubyssey would like to encourage our AMS to follow suit. To
some, university politics may not rate a spiritual priority, but God
loves all creatures, great and small — it's just up to the AMS to ask
for a little help.
What we currently lack is a place for it all to come together. The
Ubyssey would like to suggest the AMS business office as a
meeting place for daily prayers. It's the hub of activity for the
students union, and where better to ask God for guidance than in a
setting where one can check the books and make constructive
criticism.
Some non-believers criticize the prayer room philosophy as a
step backwards, mixing religion with the state, but we cry nav!
May we suggest that council get a head start this year on their
annual budget, by clasping their hands together and praying to
God that next year's budget comes out on time.
Friday, March 27,1987
Gilligan & the Skipper land on the wrong island
University 'country club' caters to privileged
I would like to respond to your
March 17th front page article by
James Young regarding "Students
Facing Tough Times."
The facts are cogent and the
situation well described, but it is a
misrepresentation to include all
students in it. Rather, look at their
clothes and look at the cars they are
driving to school; and it appears
that a majority of UBC students are
not poor. The pattern at financial
aid office is hundreds of thousands
of dollars of awards are not being
collected because there are not
enough poor students who are eligible.
The heterogeneity of the student
population is due to two interacting
normal distributions, namely
wealth and intelligence. These are
somewhat correlated, but no one
can agree how closely, or what may
be the intermediate variables.
In any case, these factors do have
a systematic effect upon the student
population. Now in B.C. wealth
goes much further to compensate
for lack of intelligence, than can intelligence compensate for poverty.
The result is that the majority of
mediocre students are materially
quite comfortable.
I doubt that even doubling the
tuition fees would disturb most of
this group of the average students.
Child care workers well-rounded
What does child care mean to
you? Babysitting? Daycare? Social
Work? Do you believe a child care
worker works solely with infants or
very young children?
Then you, like many other people
are misinformed. Child Care
workers   are   well-trained   profes
sionals who concentrate on the
social, emotional, physical,
cognitive, and language development of children and adolescents,
aged zero to eighteen years, and
their families, in a variety of different work settings. These settings
can include schools, hospitals,
residentials   group   homes,   infant
Transcend info-glut}
t
At the Open House panel discussion "Why bother with ancient
Greece in a world of microchips?" I
was thinking about a comment Dr.
Suzuki had made. "We live not in
an age of information but an age of
info-glut." What can we do about
it? How can we know what pieces
of information are important and
which ones to let race by? We sit in
class and take in all this 'important
stuff and then at exam time we
cram it into our exploding minds to
spit out for two hours. Much of it
will remain with the paper, gone
from our minds forever.
Yet when I was strolling home
afterwards, my head still racing
with thoughts, it struck me! The
answer to my question, and thrown
in, the answer to the panel question.
The reason for being here at UBC is
not solely to learn about economics,
science, our engineering, information that will become obsolete long
before we do. The reason for being
here is to learn about values, about
people and the environment we live
in, and about how to distinguish
between right and wrong.
Only then can we transcend info-
glut. Knowing how to deal with
knowledge, how to decide what is
important and what is not, that is
an education. It's what makes a
university essential.
Thanks, UBC!
Chris Lemon
economics 3
development centers, counselling
centers, correction facilities, as well
as many others.
After four years of intensive
study and training, child care
graduates receive their Bachelor of
Art's Degree, specializing in Child
Care, which validates their professionalism. In light of this, child care
workers should be valued and
respected as professionals, with
their wages reflecting their acquired
knowledge and skills.
Unfortunately this is not the case
for most child care workers of today! Instead, they tend to be undervalued, underpaid, and perhaps
even unknown by many people.
The students of the University of
Victoria's School of Child Care
believe that it is time for child care
workers to be recognized as important professionals who are a vital
part of the faculty of Human and
Social Development!
We invite you to learn more
about the field and profession of
child care. Any interested parties
can call 721-7979 and request an
information speaker.
Brenda Kraushaar
2nd year child care student
University of Victoria
All students are not in equal circumstances, most are relatively
privileged, and to them the university is a country club.
Where the facts which Young
organized really have a significant
statistical bearing is not to make the
times tough for the average student
at UBC, but instead to prevent
many young people from ever even
becoming students. The times are
not tough for most, because those
facing tough times are no longer
university students.
If we roughly calculate upoirthe
standard deviations involving
wealth and intelligence in our society, I would guess that only the very
small percentage of exceptionally
intelligent, poor high school
students actually become university
students; they have to borrow tens
of thousands of dollars to get
educated,   and  only  a  first  class
honours degree is worth having at
that price.
The vast majority of mediocre
poor students, looking at the prospect of a second class bachelor's
degree and an enormous student
loan debt, simply do not continue
to enroll at university. The poor,
average student, considering their
probable family background and
expectations, sensibly enough drops
out.
Therefor, to return to my main
argument, I believe that the majority of students at UBC are not facing
hard times, are not incurring large
student loans, and are not personally concerned or worried about those
who do. The "ordinary" UBC student comes from the families of the
top ten percent of wealth in British
Columbia, and will get a degree
because their family background
and expectations demand it of
them. Blair Longley
Everyone loves a winner
Rob Reinhold's letter to the
Ubyssey on March 17, 1987 entitled
"Teams Bring Visible Benefits," is
right on the ball. I fully agree with
his attitude towards student
athletes.
Whether they are winners or not
does not determine their degree of
commitment and drive. Sure
everyone loves a winner and that is
what we all strive for. But the most
important lessons to be learned
from athletics are of commitment,
to yourself and your teammates,
discipline, and when to push
yourself and when to ease up. I
have watched others around me
learn these lessons and, as a result,
my respect for these people, these
athletes, has increased severalfold.
On March 27, tonight, at the
Grad Center Ballroom, I will have
the opportunity to acknowledge the
achievements of the athletes which
are a part of this university.
The Bird's Night Boogie is a
dance which will enable the campus
to meet the male and female
athletes of the year, the All-
Canadians and athletes who all take
pride and share the privilege in being a UBC T-Bird.
Do you support the competitive
athletes on this campus? Show it
tonight by being at the Bird's Night
Boogie.
Linda Diano
science 4
THE UBYSSEY
March 27, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily
those of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial, 228-2301/2305. Advertising, 228-3977.
It was midnight at College Flats. The fabulous winged writer Jeffrey Swartz was flapping away on a
broken typewriter. Jody Woodland, visiting from the asinine morality school gaped in amazement as
David Ferman chased a squealing Evelyn Jacob around the darkroom. "I'm so tired," she said.
Malcolm Pearson, who still had no control over his water, muttered, "It doesn't matter. The safe light
is on." Svetozar Kontic frustrated over not being able to have a hot shower was trying to stuff Rick
Hiebert down Chew Wong's throat. Corinne Bjorge fascinated by this suggested a slightly different
manouver with Ron Stewart. "But I really do have a foot fetish," groaned Michael Groberman during a
5 a.m. phone call to Carol Pedlar. Dan Andrews was busy thinking up cures for the Martian Flu.
Enterprise vs News Hour: The Final Battle
I am writing in response to David
Juliusson's letter of March 24 regarding TV reception in Gage
Residence. He complained that the
quality of reception, especially on
American stations, deteriorated in
October, and has not been fixed.
You may be interested to know that
off-campus residents in Vancouver
have experienced similar problems.
In October, Rogers Cablevision
moved Vancouver Community
Cablevision to channel 4, bumping
KIRO to 8, an impaired channel.
They have since moved it to channel
15, whole continuing to broadcast it
on 8 as well. Q-13, the movie channel, which is channel 17 on the cable
has   terrible   reception.   We   have
been forced to abandon the adventures of the Star Ship Enterprise in
favour of Tony Parson's News
Hour because the picture is so bad.
There was a major expose on a
Canadian news magazine program
in January. (I forget which one).
The Canadian cable companies are
juggling the positions of all stations
on the cable so they will have all the
Canadian networks on one band.
This will put them in a position to
charge subscribers extra for
American channels, which they will
scramble. They hotly denied any
such intention when interviewed,
but continue to juggle the channels
even today.
As   for   the   remarks   from  the
housing office that you should be
studying instead of watching TV,
they must not realize the need for
mindless release after studying. TV
allows you to simply watch without
thinking or responding, a welcome
respite after long hours of book
work and typing, and for some, a
necessary winding down that
enables them to sleep. I am not a
teeny-bopper videophile, but a
37-year old nurse and house-wife
completing my degree part time.
I don't know what you can do to
improve reception in Gage. A converter   might   help.   They  can   be
found cheaply in the Buy and Sell.
Linda Adam
nursing 4 Friday, March 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Warm vision helps unite humanity
I am writing in response to Greg
Davis's letter called The Great
Society. How deeply it warms my
heart to hear such eloquent words
of hope, love, and peace. Your article is comprehensive, acknowledging the "grave injustices that
permeate life on this planet". Yet
you do not dwell on this fact. You,
with great vision and logic present
what you believe is necessary for, as
you say, "the entire human race
(to) stand together."
To summarize, you give these
prerequisites for the great society:
1) We must usher in a new world
order, an "enlightened world community" made up of people that
will use their reason and
knowledge, together with their
spiritual capacities of love and
justice; 2) We must strive to lessen
extremes of wealth and poverty; 3)
We must work towards the achievement of full equality between the
sexes; 4) We must eliminate racial
Thus Spake Martin...
In response to Greg Davis'
response to my 'Violent Video
Games . . .' letter: thank you for
not being able to agree more, but
my intellectual pride has been injured.
I have indeed read Thus Spake
Zarathustra and I am right with you
Hypocryssey
I am quite dismayed with the present condition of The Ubyssey.
Student activities are glossed
over, and student club competitions
with other universities are ignored.
Clubs and societies are told that
"we (the Ubyssey) don't want to
show partiality to any one group."
Special interest organizations
such as Gays and Lesbians on Campus and others are different. At
least that is what The Ubyssey says,
openly and loudly.
A fire of hypocrisy burns brightly
at this newspaper, threatening to
destroy what is left of its credibility.
Please, be consistent. Don't say one
thing, and do another. Stop
devoting entire newspapers to
special interest groups. Thank you.
Steven H. Preece
arts 1
in resenting those who misunderstand and sensationalize its author.
You saw an opportunity to voice a
pet peeve, but you did it at my expense. As I understand him, Nietzsche meant (when he proclaimed
that God is dead) that faith in God
is dead, and thus man must face the
challenge of creating his own meaning — through the overcoming of
his all-too-human self.
Perhaps it was the mentioning of
Nietzsche and Star Trek in the same
breath that offended, but it is not at
all an un-Nietzschean thing to do.
Please bitch at those who've earned
(for starters, may I suggest the
Christians?).
Martin Dawes
music 3
All letters must be typed, triple-
spaced, on a 70 character line.
Please keep letters to under 500
words. Letters will be edited for
spelling, grammar, and brevity.
Letters must be brought, in person, to The Ubyssey office, SUB
241k, and presented with a piece of
identification that suggest the writer
is the person delivering the letter.
hatred and all forms of prejudice;
5) We must learn to accept each
other as individuals; 6) and, "We
must work collectively" in our duty
to bring about this new "consciousness" so that society may be
uplifted. "Revising the old order
will not provide solutions" . . .
"The whole system needs to be reconstructed from the ground up."
I would like to respond to your
article by saying that today there is
a world community which shares
these ideas and also has a dynamic
structure, a new world order based
on reason and spiritual principles.
The Baha'i community is made
up "of some three to four million
people drawn from many nations,
cultures, classes and creeds, engaged in a wide range of activities serving the spiritual, social and
economic needs of the peoples of
many lands."
It is important to realize that
these ideas are shared by many people in the world and that individuals
must "submerge their ideological
and theological differences in a
great spirit of mutual forbearance
that will enable them to work
together for the advancement of
human understanding and peace."
For, "it is not for him to pride
himself who loveth his country. But
rather for him who loveth the whole
world. The earth is but one country
and mankind its citizens."
Stephen Gergely
education 3
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Going YourWay! Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 27,1987
Gorbachev wants social reform, prof says
From page 1
Ross said, "SDI is the cap — the
needed gap filler in the whole
American plan?' explaining that
"the Americans couldn't be aggressive without proper defensive
measures."
Ross said the Americans know
they could never perfect the
astrodome effect, and screen out all
Soviet missiles, but it really is not
necessary to be able to stop all
missiles for SDI to cause a significant shift in nuclear dominace.
Ross said the American plan is to
strike first and hard — deplete the
other sides forces dramatically —
"decapitate and disarm the opposition splendidly."
Ross said there would be a
dramatic effect in reducing the
Soviet attack especially after a
firststrike by the Americans.
"If you are a worst case analyst
in Moscow you have a lot to work
with," said Ross.
Ross   said   Gorbachev's   major
worry is that if SDI continues to
grow it might be impossible to
reverse pressure for a matching
scheme in the Soviet Union which
would stunt domestic growth and
reform.
He said one of the significant ef-,
fects of SDI would be dramatic improvements in sensor technology,
creating changes in the battlefield.
At this pace Ross said the Soviets
could be relegated to the position of
a third rate power by the year 2020.
Ross   said   the   Soviets   have
Increased funds promised
relented from previous demands for
total disarmament (including
demands to abandon SDI) because
they can read the balance of opinion in the U.S. congress.
"There    is    a    Democratic
dominance in the congress and the
Soviets know the program (SDI) is
in trouble," he said.
Another large factor, said Ross,
is the enormous array of military
options available to the Soviets to
neutralize SDI for only a fraction of
the cost the Americans incur in
building it.
From page 1
not respond to the problems of the
80s.
"We had to face a fight for status
quo from the opposition?' said
Charest.
Asked about federal transfer
payments to universities, Charest
said the government would increase
funding five per cent each year for
the next five years. He pointed out
that the increase would be large
compared to what social assistance
and discretionary expenditures
would receive. Funds from
Challenge '86, a summer employment program which was primarily
designated for students, went in-
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stead to the private sector. Charest
said the private sector was brought
in to Challenge as a partner.
"The program is not designed for
the private sector, but for students
to help create career-related jobs or
work experience?' said Charest.
He said the proportion of funding that went to the private sector
was 32 per cent while 67 per cent
went to the non-profit sector, which
he thought was fair.
He said this years Challenge '87
program is regionally sensitive, giving 10 per cent more funding to
B.C. this year.
Premier Showing
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Is this a solution for South Africa?
By RICK HIEBERT
We in the West would like to see
an end to South African apartheid
but we don't give thought to what
South Africa should be like after
apartheid.
print
South Africa: The Solution
By Leon Louw and Frances Kendall
A magi Publications
1986
Two South Africans have proposed an intelligent, well reasoned
proposal for a free and democratic
South Africa without apartheid that
everyone interested in South
Africa's problems should weigh for
themselves.
Leon Louw and Frances
Kendall's South Africa: The Solution is itself making news. It has
sold over 25,000 copies, and topped
the best seller charts in South
Africa, where a non-fiction book
sells well if it sells 5,000 copies. Prominent South Africans as diverse as
anti-apartheid activist Winnie
Mandela    and     Zulu     Chief
Mangosuthu Buthelezi have endorsed the ideas of this book. South
Africans are talking about South
Africa: The Solution and the ideas
it proposes could well be used to
end apartheid.
South Africa: The Solution
argues that South Africa, with its
racial and ethnic minorities, could
suffer if these minorities struggled
minorities to develop,
democratically, the economy and
society they would like in their canton. Such a system, the book
argues, would allow the citizen to
feel close to their government and
in control of their own destiny.
The national government would
only take care of purely national
matter   like   defense,    national
plaining the ramifications of their
ideas to the reader as they go. They
write very coherently, but they
challenge the readers' minds at the
same time. These authors make you
think, but aren't as verbose as one
would expect in a book that proposes to fix most of a country's problems. South Africa: The Solution
is pithily written (only 234 pages)
"It should be pointed out that apartheid is a cancer which can be destroyed in one of two
ways. Either the patient can be clubbed to death, through war or divestment, or^ the cancer
can be removed through careful surgery and the patient nursed back to health."
— South Africa: The Solution
for control over a strong national
government. Therefore, in order to
make a transition to a new South
Africa easier, Louw and Kendall
suggest that South Africa adopt a
canton system of government, like
Switzerland, of 306 cantons.
These cantons would be the
main body of government in the
new South Africa, with responsibility for almost every government
activity. The strongly decentralized
government, the authors argue,
would  allow  political  and  ethnic
finance and foreign relations. Louw
and Kendal also advocate an independent judiciary, and a constitution that would maximize individual, civil and economic
freedom, guarantee a democratic
government in all cantons, and
destroy apartheid by insisting that
all laws apply equally to all citizens.
Louw and Kendall argue very
convincingly for what seems to be a
sensible ideal for South Africa.
They write very well, carefully ex-
and    coherently    and    logically
argued.
Louw and Kendall also do the
foreign reader a big favour. Many
books that discuss the problems of
countries assume the reader already
knows much about the country in
question. This book, however, explains both the ministry of South
Africa and the current political
situation in a simple and logical
fashion. Even if the reader thinks
that the idea advocated by the
authors are ridiculous, this book
will teach much about apartheid
and its roots, even to those who
think they know much about South
Africa already.
The liberatarian beliefs of the
authors adds a new and welcome
facet to the debate over South
Africa's future, but it takes some
getting used to for those readers not
used to hearing arguments for maximizing human freedom. However,
as the authors cogently argue, the
value of a canton system would be
both that South Africans would be
able to have democratic control
over localized governments they
had a stake in, and that by trial and
error, most South African cantons
would advocate the economy and
society that worked best.
Therefore, readers of all political
stripes can find value in Louw and
Kendall's idea.
The authors are a little presump-
tuos in subtitling their book "The
Solution", but Louw and Kendall's
canton system sounds feasible,
logical and laudable. In any event,
this book is valuable in that it
presents a new idea that can get
South Africans, and concerned
Westerners thinking about other
alternatives for South Africa's
future.
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Hello there. Didn't expect to ever have a typewriter speak to you from the pages of a newspaper, eh? Don't worry, I won't keep you long.
just want some company. It's really lonely sitting all by myself in The Ubyssey office when someone could be typing out a news story, an entertainment
review or a sports report on me. I wish I could convince somebody that the people in The Ubyssey office
would love to have new staffers who can contribute in any way.
We think the typewriter's serious.
But even if you don't care about the feelings of a lonely typewriter, we'd love to have you.
Drop by SUB room 241k anytime. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Fairy flight heavy with speeches
ROBERT, BOYD, MacDONALD . . . preachy, dull, uneven
_3 %*wt\_*|'_«r
The Fairies are Thirsty
By Denise Boucher
Directed by Donna Spencer
The Firehall Theatre
until April 5
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
The Fairies are Thirsty is the
most interesting, insightful, provocative theatre Vancouver has seen
in some time. It's also preachy,
visually dull, and dramaturgically
uneven. * '*:
This is a new English translation
of a French (Quebecois) play that
caused a big stirr when it was originally produced in Quebec. It attacks
the Catholic church quite mercilessly.
— brian lynch photo
It is an impressionistic treatment
of the woman's position in our
culture. The victim. The weaker
sex. Dependent on men.
Three women: a housewife, a
prostitute and the Virgin Mary,
represent aspects of this culture.
They begin the play trapped into
roles, and develop inner strength
and imagination that allows them to
break free.
It's a complex concept that is
clearly presented. The Madonna is
.J^d^gffthat^
worship her, believing their respect
for her excuses their universal
mistreatment of women. She yearns
to be free of this superficial adulation, and feels traitorous to her sex
for having allowed men to worship
her.
Marie is the housewife, played by
Lynda Boyd, Magenta in the Arts
Club's   Rocky  Horror  Show  five
years ago. Her remarkable, powerful voice brings clear levels of sorrow   and   determination   to   her
songs. She finally leaves her abusive
husband, no longer making excuses
for him, recognizing her duty and
position is not to serve him, but to
serve herself. He's been the lucky
one, not her. "All those years were
one long lucky night" she proclaims
to him in leaving.
Madeleinge,   the   prostitute,
'played by Nicole Robert, is raped in
.the   most   devastating,   theatrical
jscene in this play.  Pamela MacDonald (Mary) and  Lynda Boyd
[speak the lines of the rapist ("you
jknow you  want  it;  spread  your
legs") from the side of thestage,
while Robert writhes on the ground,
trying to fight off an invisible attacker, finally relenting, closing her
|eyes, defeated.
She rises, humiliated, furious,
frustrated. The Song of the Rape,
j* which follows, presents the trial in
which the key question becomes
"Did she or did she not 'have an
orgasm' " Robert's lament, I Have
No Right to Walk on La rue Maria,
is haunting.
But the narrative of the trial,
spoken by Boyd and MacDonald, is
performed with overt disgust,
rather than cold reason, so the audience feels talked down to.
The final sequence is speeches,
"Imagine . . . just imagine . . . there
is no beaten path ..." The performers describe women's lack of
role models for independence. This
is reminiscent of Helen Reddy's I
am Woman Hear Me Roar. It's
preachy, and the audience is lectured.
The performances are excellent, -
but the text is uneven. Some vignettes are very good, Marie leaving her
husband, the rape, but this play is
mostly speeches, angry speeches
which lose their dramatic impact as
they lecture a mainly converted audience.
»■"'"%
BUDDY GUY
Real estate hucksters good and slimey in fine
By RONALD STEWART
David Mamet has found a back
door to the mainstream.
The playwright's Pulitzer prize-
winning drama Glengarry Glen
Ross is filled with unappealing
characters, obscene language and
criticism of capitalism's dark side.
Hot stuff, which the usually stodgy
Arts Club Theatre wouldn't look
at. But Mamet has broken through
because he's too damn good to ignore.
The play follows a handful of
real estate salesmen in the last days
of a sales contest. These free enterprise scavengers are the guys who
sell swampland in Florida or desert
plots in Arizona to pensioners.
When   they   can't   feed  on   their
customers, they turn on each other.
All the salesmen have to get on
the board — the sales board that
lists the month's top salesmen;
otherwise, they lose their jobs.
Levene (Wes Tritter) tries to convince Williamson (Kevin McNulty),
the office manager, to give him
some good leads so he can get on
the  board.   Moss  (David  Berner)
McNULTY,
TRITTER,
CUFFLING
ugly underbelly
despises the contest system and tells
Aaronow (Bernard Cuffling) who
isn't on the board either, how to get
back at the company's invisible
owners: steal the leads and sell them
to a rival.
In the second act, the plot lines
come together. The leads have been
stolen, the office trashed. The
salesmen turn on each other, and
deals, self-respect, jobs, and lives
get destroyed in the process.
Mamet's play displays the ugly
underbelly of capitalism, the logical
extreme of an amoral business
world. Overly-competitive consumerism eventually consumes the
people who have devoted their lives
to it. The salesmen occasionally;
make desperate grabs at a code of
ethics, but only to use it against
each other.
Glengarry Glen Ross
By David Mamet
Directed by Janet Wright
Arts Club Seymour Street
The Arts Club Seymour production, directed by Janet Wright, is
very good but it could have been
better. Tritter stands out as the ageing salesman Shelly 'the machine'
Levene. He gives his performance
the perfect combination of desperation and anger.
Berner is also very good with the
loudmouth Moss. He delivers the Friday, March 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Baby, don't you wanna go?
<♦/♦*
*_*•>
SB-^ar-si*--      -rf
malcolm pearson photos
married to the blues
reduction
play's best line: "Their wives, they
all look-like they've been fucked up
the ass with a dead cat."
All the actors do very well with
Mamet's script, talking over one
another, using the incomplete
sentences and significant pauses as
Mamet intended. Like their lives,
the language is breaking down as
well.
Ted Roberts contributes an excellent set design to the enhancement of the production. Act one
takes place in a Chinese restaurant;
Roberts gets all the tacky details in
right down to the patches on the imitation leather seats. This isn't real
Chinese culture, but a version
deteriorated by the same forces that
destroy the salesmen.
The real estate office of the second Act also looks appropriately
cheap. Roberts' set includes trashy
Venetian blinds and an equally
trashy painting. It also offers a
visual joke: the diagonal angles the
walls are placed at make the office
look as crooked as its inhabitants.
McNulty is the weak point in the
production; he and director Wright
give the role of Williamson too
much sympathetic depth.
He isn't cold enough, or confident enought, or guiltless enough to
get across the mercilessness with
which he destroys Levene. He isn't
enough of a bastard.
Despite this problem, the production is still well worth seeing. You
never know when the Arts Club will
feel this adventurous again.
By BUDDY JUNIOR, with
MOJO MAGS and
LIGHTNIN' IKE
C'mon, baby don't you wanna go,
C'mon, baby don't you wanna go,
To that same ol' place,
Sweet home, Chicago.
Buddy Guy and Junior Wells
The Commodore Ballroom
March 20
9:55 P.M. Friday Night
Can't say I have a mojo hand.
So I say to Mojo Mags and
Lightnin' Ike I'm going to need
some insight into this blues thing I
have to review, and sure they're going on down anyways to the Commodore Ballroom, so it's really me
that's tagging along. We sit in the
corner to avoid the barrel-armed
bikers wearing ACE Cycle t-shirts,
their thumbs hooked into the jeansy
pockets of pointy-assed biker
chicks.
On stage the Wailin* Demons try
to get in as many notes as possible
before their set ends, double-pickin,
and hammerin' and pullin'. We're
waiting for Chicago bluesmen Buddy Guy and Junior Wells.
—So Mojo, what's all this about
three chords? Why just this three
chord progression.
— Well, it's like fucking you see.
This 12 bar thing is like the rhythm
of fucking.
Bvtf, all I .hear is. these Demons
turned to 78 rpm. It's not like any
screwing I've ever known or heard
about. But the bikers roar in approval.
11:15 P.M.
We're pressed agains the stage as
the sidemen move through some
Rand B number just to warm us up,
set us up slowly for the real thing.
These guys are young, just kids.
The bass player is even white and
baby-faced, good if a bit technical.
The beret-top tenorman is tall and
lean.
Then arrives Buddy Guy, in stuf-
fcuff boots and safari pants circa
1975. Louisiana-born about 50
years back, Buddy moved to
Chicago in the fifties, has been
there since, even had his own
club on the southside.
From the first notes his voice is
clear. Cascades of high fuzz in
rapid fire betray an early Texas connection a la T-Bone Burnett. But
Buddy is ready tonight, his hips are
waving at all the pretty faces in the
crowd, he's telling us "I could play
all night," and laughs.
When he gets close I see there's a
ring on his right ring finger with the
initials "BG" in diamonds embedded in silver. And on the left ring
finger the diamonds dance the word
"BLUES". Buddy Guy is married
to them, I guess.
Buddy Guy uses a Jimi Hendrix
fuzzbox, which kicked off half way
through and it did not matter. Buddy Guy cannot exhale without saying the word "Shit!"
During the intermission Mojo is
teaching about how the music is
sooo sexy.
The object here is to get people
very hot. He's just teasin, you see,
he's wagging his finger sayin' "Now
quiet now, quiet down and I'll teach
you something about the blues. "So
that's why he's got all these biting
hard notes, then he comes in soft
and sparse. It's like holding off
orgasm just a bit longer.
But I still look a bit too blank,
like this music is just a bit beyond
me. So Mojo tries to make it even
more simple.
-It was rock and roll before it
was music.
Then there was  Junior  Wells.
He's got on this three-piece dark     /
pin-stripe with the pants pressed
a forward crease and the pressed
jacket points to the side.
Junior is inhabited by three or
four skittish demons which made
their way from Mali over to Haiti
and on up to Memphis where he
was born in the early thirties. They
fling his fingers and limbs into low
Richter contortions, flitting him
across the stage as if he was a
marionette.
But Junior sings a bit, and plays a
little harp, and they seem to calm
down, if only for a few moments.
Junior Wells and B uddy Guy they
are snakes as far as I can see, two
young snakes out for a night of vandalism and arson. They take us
through some Muddy Waters and
Willie Dixon, they play Sweet
Home Chicago twice and the crowd
is singing with them the whole time.
When they quit at 2:15, it's only
because of the laws in these parts.
2:45 A.M.
From the taxi we see Junior
striding down Howe with a lady on
his arm. We call his name and he
jumps happy at the sound. "I feel
good!" he calls out, still in that
suit, his knees bouncin' around at
the final word."I feel GOOD!"
Lightnin' turns to me.
— You write this down in that
review of yours. You tell them that
these Negro men are comin' up to
Vancouver and stealin' our music.
The Blues was invented in Vancouver, right here. The Wailin'
demons invented the blues.
All right Lightnin'. I'll put that
down.
JUNIOR WELLS . . . feels good
-malcolm pearson photos
CITR urges blank cassette purchases
UBC's fab radio station is
celebrating its fifth birthday with a
new innovative way of bypassing
big business. It works like this:
Tape the live concerts broadcast
on CITR April 1 (presented in convenient 25 minute sets), cut out the
cassette covers published in
Discorder, and you've got it. And
Capitol, A&M, WEA, etc., get
nothing. That is, until you decide to
buy a commercial album once these
guys get big.
"This is is the first time
anybody's been encouraged to tape
off the radio," says Tape-a-Mania
organizer Ian Hunter. "We use the
consumer to do the master recording, manufacturing and
distributing. By doing this, it's
essentially eliminating the ad
nauseum air play you get with new
commercial bands."
music
Tape-a-Mania with
Terminal City, Red Herring,
The Hip Type, Stubborn Blood,
on CITR fm 102 cable 100
6 p.m. to midnight
April 1.
Hunter explains that new bands
must often conform to commercial
standards in order for their demo
tapes to receive airplay to get fans
and a recording contract.
Hunter says Tape-a-Mania offers
"a great alternative to the lower end
of the commercial rock market."
It all begins at 6 p.m. You'll need
four cassettes. Terminal City opens,
followed by Red Herring at 7:30,
The Hip Type at 9, and CITR's
1986 Shindig winner. Stubborn
Blood, at 10:30. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 27, 1987
vista
stage
The Flirts* ara Thlrtsty, a provocative,
deep, but lumpy treatment of the woman's
place in our culture, at The Fireball Theatre
1280 East Cordova, 889-0926), Wednesday to
Friday, and Sunday, at 8 p.m., Saturday at
6:30 and 9:30 p.m., matinee Thursday at 5:30,
until April 5.
The Importance of Being Earnest, a new
play by a local playwright which examines the
importance of Ernest Hemmingway in
America literature, at Tha Arts Club Granville Island (887-1644), Monday to Friday at
8:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:15 and 9:30 p.m.,
Wednesday matinee at 5:15 p.m.
Angry Housewives, a musical about
housewives who aren't really very angry, at
Tha Arts Club Revue Theatre (Granville
Island, 687-1644), same times as Earnest
above.
Glengarry Glen Rosa, a play by David
Mamet, which deals with vile real estate
hucksters. Arts Club Seymour Stage (1181
Seymour, 687-1644), same time as Earnest,
above the above.
Gimme that Prime Time Religion, a
satire on TV evangelists, like Jim Bakker, in
this irreverent attack on the good people who
devote their lives to helping the spiritual well-
being of others, at Richmond Gateway
Theatre (6600 Gilbert, Richmond, 270-1812),
until tomorrow night, at 8 p.m.
Backyard Beguine, David (Lifeskills)
King's latest comedy, this one about the fictional relationship between the U.S. and a
small country in Central America, at The
Waterfront Theatre (Granville Island,
686-6217), until April 18, at 8 p.m.
I'm Not Rappapport, The Playhouse
rounds out its season without that dumb Elvis
musical that Walter wanted so bad, but with
this sensitive comedy about two oc-
togenerians who refuse to settle into the humdrum patterns expected to of them, at The
Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton and
Dunsmuir), Monday to Saturday at 8 p.m.,
Saturday at 2:30 p.m., opens tomorrow night,
until April 25.
True Wast, Sam Sheperd's comedy-drama
about two brothers, directed by Catherine
Caines.   at   Presentation   House's   Anne
MadDonald Hall. (333 Chesterfield, North
Van, 986-1351), tonight and tomorrow night,
at 8 p.m.
Ths Sound of Music, a musical by John
Gray about the cancellation (fictional) of the
Tommy Hunter Show, at John Oliver
Secondary School (530 East 41st, 327-8341),
tonight at 7:30 p.m.
Tha Canterbury Tales, scenes from the
Prologue, The Wife of Bath's Tale, The Nun's
Tale, and the dirtiest of all . . . The Reeve's
Tale (remember Lit 12?), at Studio 68
(Langara College, 100 W. 49th, 324-5227),
Monday to Friday at noon, opens Monday, to
April 3.
Tha Body, a British comedy by Nick Darke,
staged by the actors on the mountain, at
Studio II Simon Fraser Theatre (SFU,
291-3514), Thursday to Saturday at 8 p.m.,
until April 11, free matinees March 31, April 1,
7, 8 at noon.
Theatresports. improvisational comedy,
competitive, often good and occasionally
tasteless, at The BAck Alley Theatre (751
Thurlow, 688-7013), Friday and Saturday at 8
p.m. and 11.
Scared Scriptless. more improvisational
comedy, at The Arts Club Revue Theatre
(Granville Island), Friday at 11:30 p.m.
A Night in the Alley, a prime time, midweek, variety of improv fare, including a
typical tournament, an installment of Times of
Your Life, in which an obnoxious audience
member is interviewed, and an episode of the
fifties sit-com parody, Leave it to Weasel, in
which the audience decides Dad's occupation, at The Back Alley Theatre (751
Thurlow, 688-7013), Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m.
donee
Dancemakers, choreography by Lar
Lubovitch of New York, with James Kudelka
of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, at SFU
Theatre (on the mountain, 291-3514),
tonight.
Naked and Unafraid, a new original performance by Vancouver's EDAM, at The
New York Theatre (639 Commercial,
876-9559), April 3, 4 at 8:30 p.m.
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre, 29
dancers  create  a   rich   blend  of  classical,
UBC
MEDICAL
SCIENTIFIC
EQUIPMENT SHOW
[April 8 &9—10a.m.—4 p.m.!
I SUB Ballroom & Partyroom
■2nd Floor 228-2348
THE GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
The results of the recent vote to select
the grad gifts are as follows:
1) Infrared Assistive Listening System     $3000
(Disabled Students Association)
2) Neville Scarfe Children's Garden $3000
(Education & Landscape Architecture)
3) U.E.L. Public Information Display        $1430
(Forestry Undergraduate Society)
4) Interactive Language Library $3000
(International Relations Students Assoc.)
5) Law Students Legal Advice Program   $3000
(Law Students Association)
6) SUB South Plaza Benches $3000
(Alma Mater Society)
7) Annual Decorative Christmas Light
Display $2800
(Science Undergraduate Society)
8) David Lam Research Library $3000
(Commerce Undergraduate Society)
Funds shall be allocated by descending order of
priority until all moneys are exhausted.
Tom Dallimore,
Social Convener Grad Class Council.
modern jazz, gospel and new wave dance, at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre (Hamilton at
Georgia, 280-4444), April 7, 8 at 8 p.m.
Spring Sketchbook, The Judith Marcuse
Repertory Dance Company presents a series
of dance performances with Karen Jamieson
Dance Company, at Arcadian Hall (2214
Main, 986-6459), April 8-11 at 8 p.m.
music
Chantal Morin, choreographed, original
rock/funk/jazz compositions, at Centre
Cultural Columbian (795 West 16th,
874-9105), tonight and tomorrow night at 8:30
p.m.
Wired, a tribute to a the Blues Brothers,
capping off Rick Hansen Week, sponsored by
the Engineering Undergraduate Society, in
SUB Ballroom, tonight at 8 p.m.
Grapes of Wrath/Oversoul Seven/A
Day in Paris, in a benefit for the Arts Council
of New Westminster, at New Westminster
Secondary School Gym (10th and Canada
Way, 684-2325), tomorrow night.
Burl Ives, the old guy who hosts Frosty the
Snowman every Christmas, at The Orpheum
(Smithe at Seymour, 280-4444), tomorrow
night.
The Rake's Progress, Stravinsky's opera,
presented by UBC Opera Theatre, at UBC
Old Auditorium (where MUSSOC does its
thing, 228-3113), tonight and tomorrow night
at 8 p.m.
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
______-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon   Fn. 11:30 9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
i     Sundavs and Holidays   '
4:00 p m   9 p m
2142 Wastern Parkway    ,
UBC Village
.   Opposite Chevron Station
Cheers to... mark
Chair of the board
FOR A DAY!
1 he Natioi
launching
tho Board tor
contest is ope
residents be
and N.The
have the privilege ol becoming Chair
of the Board ol the National Bank of
Canada lor a day .
Again this year, the contest will be held
in three stages and will consist ol written
and oral competitions. Winners will be
chosen bv a jurv.
ONDITIONS OF ENTRY
In (he lirst siage of the vontest.
participants send a typed essay ot a
maximum ot three ^ pages to their
nearest National Bank ol Canada bran, h,
explaining: "//ow doyou 111 vision an
ideal society und what ain today's youth
do to help achieve it?" The essn s judged
the most interesting will be retained
and their authoi.s will be invited to meet
with the jury for the >etond stage ol
the contest: the regional semi Tin,lis ol
the oral competitions. The regional
semi final winners will then be invited
to the Bank?s Mead C-fiuc on |une ?A
ial! expenses paid** to meet wah ihe jury
ioi the final of the oral competitions.
obtained ai aiw National Bank
branch.
s nu\ be
M Canada
/ESCRIPTION OF PRIZES
In addition to becoming Chair
Board ot the National Bank ol
tor a dav, (he grand prize winr
final in Montreal will receive s
the National Bank ot Canada .,
$^.000V Prizes ol $l.?o0 and
N\MI_.
Al'MKL.
of the
?anada
ei o! (he
rates ot
1 he contest opens |-ehi nar\ ?o
y\nA es*->av -. must be ic^vw ?? b\
hefe/v midnight.   \prj !      / ■ >o? "
entr\ iotm uiui hnih *.*.■! :iii* aie n
eiuiosi'd wilh (he e-^a\ ?.v the \
■ written4 y,\w oi ihe vO-ue-o
Ao: urn-
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA Friday, March 27,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Magazine's funding cut off
By SUZETTE CHAN
Canadian University Press
Among the glossy covers of
Chatelaine and Ladies' Home Journal, there was always a radical alternative. But Herizons, billed as
Canada's national feminist
magazine, proved too shocking a
change for right-wing lobbyists. In
early March, Herizons discovered
the federal grant they had relied on
to operate was cut off — for
political reasons.
Herizons editor Penni Mitchell
said the magazine had an Employment and Immigration grant called
Local Employment Assistance
development (LEAD) to pay for its
operating expenses.
Mitchell said the magazine received its last grant  installment,  in
January, late. It also included a
notice that the Herizons would
receive no further funding from
LEAD.
"Normally, it takes two to three
weeks (to receive money after the
renewal process), but it took two to
three months. We couldn't do
anything about it because we didn't
know."
During the three-month delay,
LEAD officers were debating
whether to extend funding to
Herizons beyond the usual five-year
life of the program. Some projects
do get extensions, but Herizons did
not.
"Herizons wasn't considered (for
further funding) basically because
of the political pressure groups have
mounted against it. The govern -
•
*
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pick it up in SUB in late April . . .
•••••••*••*•*•*•••••
Engineering Undergraduate Society for Rick Hansen *
Presents *
'«*_rM. m *
v___p_r-.____r- *
a tribute to the Blues Brothers +
8 pm, FRIDAY, MARCH 27 •
SUB BALLROOM *
TIX $4 box orftc«/«u» r«p $5 at ttM door ^
Happy Hour 8-9 *
NO MINORS •
•••••••••••••••••••••
Send Your Belongings Home
The Easy Way
We will custom package, insure and send your books, computers, stereos, clothes, etc., . . . door to door ... in B.C.
across Canada, U.S.A., and World-Wide.
•  Phone for a Free Estimate
•  Pick-Ups Available
• We do it all . . . Economically
5524 CAMBIE STREET
325-9966
ment wanted the heat off," a
LEAD official told the Western
Report. He was reportedly suspended for the remark.
Other LEAD staff members said
Herizons was simply financially
non-viable. The magazine had
already used $800,000 since its first
installments in 1982.
Mitchell said the magazine needed only two more years of LEAD
money to reach its goal of 20,000
subscribers (there were 7,000 by
March 1987), the subscription base
she felt a national magazine needs
to be stable.
She said Herizons was already
carrying a very low percentage of
debt ($25,000 on a $500,000) budget
and had received about $4,000 in
donations as a result of the latest
crisis. The magazine might have
continued, but the staff voted
against it.
"A change in format would only
(save) $1,000," said Mitchell. "If
it's not in colour, then it's not good
for distribution. People say they
will read it if it's on cheaper paper,
but statistics show that's not true. If
it were way-scaled down, there
would be no chance of self-
sufficiency."
Mitchell hopes Herizons will
eventually reincarnate itself, but
said staff is too shocked to think
about the immediate future.
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amugropij
fctuiiOB Ctb.
Phone now for your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews (proofs!
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos as low as
75c in colour.
EURAIL PASSES
Save yourself time and money with a EURAIL PASS OR YOUTHPASS-
Youthpass Eurail Pass
One Month       $434   15 Day $392  One Month       $616
Two Month       $560   21 Day $490  Two Month       $868
FREE "Lef* Go Europe" or Travel Bag or Money Belt with purchase!
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
STUDENT UNION BULDING
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r^TRAVELCUTS
Going YourWay!
Tell Us What You Think
About Liquor Policy
We Need Your Opinion
Members of the Liquor Policy Review Panel, chaired
by John Jansen, M.L.A., will be in the Greater
Vancouver area to hear briefs from interested
groups and individuals on issues concerning liquor
control and licensing policy and the question of
privatization of the Liquor Distribution Branch.
 THE PANEL WILL BE AT:	
April 13 — Hotel Vancouver
April 14 — Sheraton Villa, Burnaby
April 15 — Student Union Bldg. — Room 207, UBC
9:00 a.m. - Noon — 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. — 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to come and discuss these important issues. Those unable to attend are invited to
send their views.
An information kit is available upon request.
Those wishing to  make oral presentations should
contact the Government Agent's Office. Tel. 660-8666.
Please forward written submissions by April 3, 1987
to: Mr. John Jansen, M.L.A.
Liquor Policy Review
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.,.V8V 1X4
Province of British Columbia
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
APPLIED INDUSTRIAL COMPUTING
ONE YEAR POST-DIPLOMA PROGRAMS
Students with a relevant diploma or degree are invited to apply.
SPATIAL INKOHMATION
SYSTEMS
CAD/CAM
ADVANCED
MANUFACTURING
Designed to assist students with earth sciences backgrounds:
survey, civil, mining, forestry management, to use computers to
solve problems within their disciplines. Courses include Computer
Programming Fundamentals, Mini/Microcomputer Environments,
Computer-aided Mapping, Digital Elevation Modelling, Communications and Networking, Data Collection Techniques and Remotely
Sensed Data Processing.
Equipment is state-of-the-art mini (Intergraph i and microsystems.
Designed to assist students with general engineering backgrounds
to use computers effectively in all phases of engineering — design,
drafting and production. Courses include Computer Programming
Fundamentals, Mini/Microcomputer Environments, Communications and Networking, Graphics Programming, CAD System
Optimization, Parametric Parts Programming, File Handling and
Databases.
Equipment is state-of-the-art mini i Intergraph i and micro i Auto-
cad, Computervisioni systems.
Designed to assist students with mechanical engineering or technology backgrounds to update their production skills by more
effective use of computers. Courses include NC Parts Programming, CNC Higher Level Languages, Computer Drafting and
Model Production, Graphics Parts Programming, Computer Programming Fundamentals, NC Machine Operation, Robotics and
Scheduling Techniques.
Equipment is state-of-the-art NC with mini/microcomputer
operation.
Program information: Student Services, Building 1A, 2nd Floor, (604) 432-8433 or Charles Goodbrand (604) 432-8488.
BCIT, 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby. B.C., V5G 3H2. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 27,1987
SUMMER
at
Simon Fraser University
SFU offers a full semester of
courses for the visiting student
MAY 4 to AUGUST 7
Complete courses are also offered during the shorter
periods of MAY 4 to JUNE 26 and
JUNE 29 to AUGUST 7
Whatever time YOU have available this summer, we
have the courses . . .
Archaeology
Biochemistry
Biology
Business Administration/Economics
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication
Computing Science
Criminology
Economics
Education
Engineering Science
English
Fine and Performing Arts
French
General Studies
Geography
History
Humanities
Kinesiology
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics/Computing Science
Marine Science
Mathematics and Statistics
Management and Systems Science
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology and Anthropology
Spanish
Women's Studies
APPLY NOW-REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER COURSES IS
APRIL 22 & 23 Friday, March 27,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
The
Great Ubyssey Survey
Fill in. Tear out. Drop off.
We know you're full of opinions about your student
newspaper. And, believe it or not, we want to hear
them. Please take the time to fill out this survey (attach
another sheet of paper if you're feeling verbose) and bring it to The Ubyssey table in SUB concourse, from 12
to 2, or SUB 241k all day. And tear the contest entry
form off the survey and deposit in the contest box, to
win dinner for two at The Eatery. Contest deadline is
April 1, at noon.
Please answer any or all questions. Only one
answer per line.
A. The Ubyssey regularly contains a number of different
sections or elements. Mark whether there should be
more, less, or the same, of the following aspects in the
Ubyssey:
more
less
same
News
Sports
Entertainment
Opinion
Letters
Features
Photography /Graphics
B. The Ubyssey carries a variety of news items in every
issue. Please mark whether there should be more, less,
or the same amount of coverage of the following:
more                  less same
Student activities
on campus             	
UBC Administration        	
Student Council
and Faculty societies
(eg. EUS, SUS)             	
Academics/Research             	
Clubs             	
Frats/Sororites             	
Speakers  	
Student Services
(Housing, Parking)             	
Other Student news
Events at other
B.C. campuses             	
Events at other
Canadian campuses             	
Events at campuses
outside Canada             	
Municipal news             	
Provincial news             	
Federal Student news             	
News from other
provinces             	
C. The Ubyssey covers Sports each Tuesday edition.
Please mark whether there should be more, less or the
same amount of the following aspects:
more                less same
University Athletics             	
Intramural        	
Club Athletics             	
Professional Sports             	
Features/Interviews             	
Stats             	
D. The Ubyssey covers entertainment in each Friday edition. Please mark whether there should be more, less,
or the same coverage of the following:
more                less same
Campus             	
Mainstream             	
Alternate/Underground                  	
Features/Interviews            	
Reviews             	
Arts News             	
Rim             	
Theatre             	
T.V.             	
Live Music             	
Records             	
Dance             	
Visual Art             	
Video/Performance             	
Literature  	
Cultural Policy             	
E. The Ubyssey runs a number of special editions
throughout the year dealing with specific issues.
What is your opinion of the following special editions run in 1986-87?
liked disliked
Peace (Nov. issue)       	
Provincial Election (Oct. issue)        '
Students in 1987 (Feb. issue)       	
Gays and Lesbians (Feb. issue)       	
Women's (Mar. issue)       ____	
Do you have any suggestions for other special editions?
F. Photography/Graphics. Mark whether there should be
more, less, or the same amount of photography and
graphics of the following:
more less same
News             	
Sports             	
Entertainment             	
Campus Shots             	
Editorial Cartoons             	
Cutlines
(beneath photos)
Serious             	
Humourous             	
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I.   Please   include  any  general   comments  about The
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J. We would appreciate the following personal information to help us analyze the survey results with greater
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Contest Entry Form. Please drop off entries before noon
on April 1 at The Ubyssey office or at The Ubyssey tables
in SUB Lower concourse, Tuesday to Friday, noon to 2:00
p.m. Prize is dinner for two at The Eatery*
Name:
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 27, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
BAHA'I CLUB
Talk on introduction to Baha'i faith by Reggie
NewhirV, 8:00 p.m., 5957 Chancellor Blvd.
CIRCLE K CLUB
General meeting, we always welcome new people, noon-1:20 p.m., SUB 215.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Talk: Dr. Pauline Jewett, federal NDP External
Affairs critic, "Canada and Star Wars," noon,
SUB 207/209.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Bob Williams, MLA NDP Forests critic, wilt talk
on recent developments concerning B.C.'s
forests, noon, MacMillan 166.
ZEN SOCIETY UBC
Meditation and instruction, all welcome, 3:30
p.m., Grad Centre Penthouse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Collegium of Music Ensembles, free admission,
noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Spring banquet, 5:30-1:30 p.m.. Graduate Student Centre Dining Room.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Navigational Car Rally, free pizza at finish, 7:30
p.m., outside the Bookstore.
SEXUAL HARASSMENT COMMITTEE
Presentation of Sexual Harassment in the
University Setting by speakers from sexual
harassment clinic, all women welcome, noon,
Asian Centre 604.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Skits from Western Washington University,
noon, SUB ???.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Love, Sex and Dating Part 2, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Opera Theatre, The Rake's Progress, 8 p.m.,
UBC Old Auditorium.
SATURDAY
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION/INTERNATIONAL
RELATIONS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Graduation dinner and dance, no tickets sold
after Wednesday March 25 evening, 6:30 p.m.,
Hyatt Regency Ballroom.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Potluck dinner, 6:30-12:00 a.m., SUB 207/209.
SUBFILMS
Walt   Disney's   "Dumbo,"   plays   cartoons,
children-Si.50,  adults-»2.00,  2:00  p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC   OPERA  THEATRE   -   French  Tickner,
director — "The Rake's Progress," by Igor
Stravinsky, admission $10 for students, seniors
»5, 8:00 p.m., UBC Old Auditorium.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS' MOVEMENT
Picnic, 9:00 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SATURDAY UNLIMITED VANCOUVER
PARKS BOARD
Dance for Rick Hansen, 11:00-3:00 p.m., SUB
partyroom.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
No name dance — for a generic good time. All
brands welcome, tickets 95 at SUB 237B, or little
sisters music by Boystown, 8:00 p.m., SUB partyroom.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Annual general  meeting of  Lutheran  Campus
Ministry,  1:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Also, Lenten study series, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
SUBFILMS
Walt Disney's "Dumbo," plus cartoons,
children-Si.50, adults-$2, 2:00 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
MONDAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Free  noon  hour films:  Traditional  Music  Instruments of  Korea,   Korean treasures,  noon.
Seminar room 604, Asian Centre.
GRADUATE STUDENTS' SOCIETY
Video night — "Body Heat" and "Romancing
the Stone," 7:30 p.m., Grad Centre Fireside
Lounge.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC percussion ensemble — John Rudolph,
director, free admission, UBC School of Music
Recital Hall.
SUBFILMS
"Richard the Third," starring Lawrence Olivier,
5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., SUB auditorium.
TUESDAY
SUBFILMS
"An American in Paris," starring Gene Kelly and
Leslie Caron, 7:00 p.m., SUB auditorium. Also,
"Easter Parade," starring Fred Astaire and Judy
Garland, 9:30 p.m.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Edmonds College Symphonic Choir from Seattle, Wash., Richard Asner, director, free admission, 3:30 p.m., UBC School of Music Recital
Hatl.
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Petition   drop-off   and   meeting,   all   welcome,
noon. Graduate Student Centre Garden Room.
Join The Ubyssey
AUDITION FOR BANFF
MUSIC THEATRE
Training/Performance Opportunities for
Singer/Actors
Dancers
Composers & Writers
in Vancouver
April 22
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE
For information, contact:
Office of the Registrar
(403) 762-6180
®
The Banff Centre
School of
Fine Arts
ATTENTION
UBC SCUBA DIVERS!
Inventory Reduction Sale Now On
INCREDIBLE SA VINGS
ALL OVER THE STORE!
-80K Aluminum Tanks    $189
— US Diver's Regulators from    v IO*/
-Stock Brooks Drysuits, Reg. $950    $729
— Chronosport Watches     IO /O off
— Ex-Rental %"Wetsuits    $ 100
Special Savings on Masks, Fins, Snorkels, Knives,
Lights & Accessories
UBC Aqua Society
Lower Floor, Student Union Building
228-3329
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van, B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phono Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
75 - WANTED
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, March 28
The Molecular Dance
In Chemical Reactions
Nobel Laureate John Polanyi
University of Toronto
Lecture Hall 2,
UBC Woodward Building
8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
'81 DATSUN 310. H.B.. 4 sp.,
FWD, regularly maint. AM/FM cassette, 2
new all-season radials, rear brakes, muffler.
2 snows on rims. $2960. 228-3977 days.
Great Carl
TAKECARE
Quality condoms. Shop in the privacy ft
convenience of your home. Discretion
guaranteed. Prices/box of 12(7% p.s. tax
incl.): Sheik non-lub. $6.50. Sheik lub.
$6.50, Ramses Sensitol $7.50, Ramses
regular $7.50, Ramses Fiesta $8.00; Add
$1.50 shipping each box. Cheque or money
order payable to: TakeCare Personal Products, Dept. U.B. P.O. Box 7520, Victoria,
B.C. V9B 5B8.
COMPLETE  SANYO  STEREO  SYSTEM,
immac. cond. incl. tuner, am/fm tape deck,
record changer Er 2 speakers. Orig. price
$2400. A sacrifice at $750, 4 drawer legal
size filing cabinet with lock $200, 3 large
indoor plants (jade, palm, hybiscus) $25
ea. IBM Selectric Typewriter (avail. Apr.
15) $150. 222-3032. On Campus, Gage
Apts.
WINDSURFERS
Australia's Top Selling
Boards Now In Canada!
TYRONSEA
• revolutionary NEW hull shapes
• hard rails & dble concaves
• RAF sails (Neil Prydel
Limited Time Offer by Importer.
All boards (fully rigged) at Dealer
cost (save $500-$600).
DEMOS AVAILABLE
Steve at 733-8474
RUNAWAY!
Thailand - 1 month adventure
Extensions avail. Open 1 yr.
Call now 266-2743.
15 - FOUND
EDDIE L., I have found your penl Call Poli.
Sci. Office 228-2717, or 224-3040.
20 - HOUSING
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION - Beta
House, 2140 Wesbrook Mall. Close to
classes, full kitchen, inexpensive. Apply
Nowl I Phone 222-3186.
$1BB/mth. Beautiful, Shaughnessy home
with 3 furn. br, 2 full bathr, microwave,
laun. facil., Ige yard, near 41st Er Granville.
We need a female UBC student to share
main floor with same in mixed house.
266-2636 eves, wknds or leave message for
Lisa or Tom.
MONTREAL — Downtown. Lge, furnished
studio apt. near McGill, Concordia. Avail.
May 3-Aug. 31. Rent negot. For more info
call 732-1432.
ROOMS FOR RENT — Furnished rms on
W. 19th Ave. near Arbutus, convenient
location, rent $200-250. Ph 731-8702.
30 - JOBS
MARINE BIOLOGIST Lab. Tech: Job
continuous to B.Sc. degree, $10/h, wknds
8- holidays, Sept.-April. Full time summer.
1st or 2nd yr. Biology/Oceanography
students call 686-3364. Dr. Marliave.
OPENINGS IN VAN.. N. Shore, Victoria &
throughout B.C. for College Pro Painters.
Earn $3000 to $6000 plus. Professional
training provided. Call 879-4105 or visit the
Employment Centre.
WE ARE LOOKING for enthusiastic
people (female preferred) for full-time summer employment at University Golf Club.
Successful applicants will enjoy working
with the public in roles traditionally held by
males. Golf background helps but not mandatory; . Send brief outline of qualifications
to: Jim McLaughlin, Golf Professional,
P.O. Box 46138, Station G, Vancouver,
B.C. V6R 4G5.
MATURE STUDENTS NEEDED for full
summer time employment. No direct sales
but must be sales oriented and enjoy people. Pre-set appts. for our consultants
through mall displays, stores, etc. Should
average $500-$600/wk. Good opportunity
for on job experience. Call Bob at 590-3151,
9-4:30 p.m.
EARL'S ON TOP is looking for hot, summer
staff. Interviews: Thursday, April 2, 3-4
p.m. 1185 Robson St.
REO RAFTING ADVENTURES needs
white-water paddle rafting guides, adventure coordinators, photographers. UBC info meeting Thur. April 2.12:30 P.M. SUB
Lower Level Plaza North. Call 684-4438 or
687-7611 for more info.
PERMANENT PART-TIME typist/ receptionist/bookkeeper req. immed. for physician's
office. Approx. 30 hrs/wk. Flexible hrs.
$9.62/hr. Call 224-7769.
NANNY, with live-in arrangem. poss. until
June. Live-out pref. remaind. of summer.
Exp. with young children DL. N/S Refs
req. 732-8566.
SUMMER JOBS
FOREMAN fr PAINTERS
EARN $3000 to $0000 this summer
(Vane. _> Okanagan areas)
Painting exp. preferred but not necessary
Apply at CEC - Brock Hall
or ph. 732-7273
TRIPLE A STUDENT PAINTERS
40 - MESSAGES
YOUNG MAN, recent grad from UBC
(BA.Sc.) would like to meet a female student
or graduate. Object: romance. While working toward by degree I neglected the social
aspects of university life and now that I'm
out in the real world, I've found that the
quality of women that I met at university is
rare out here. If you are a basically happy person with a child's curiosity about the world
and a zest for life, send me a note at the
Ubyssey c/o Box 2000, 6138 Sub Blvd.
V6T 2A5. Maybe we can dine and dance the
summer away together.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm SE 228-5496
50% OFF FIRST MONTH
Economical heated units. Monitored burglar
alarm ft sprinklers. 325-5400.
KEEP SAFE MINI STORAGE
1680 B Southeast Marine Drive
SPECIAL TRAVEL
DISCOUNTS
HONGKONG   924JDRT
BANGKOK      123BJBRT.
SINGAPORE     1242JDRT.
L0NOON    M8JBRT.
LONDON FR SEA  US029JD0W.
SAN FRANCISCO FR SEA   USD 11B_0 RT.
LOS ANGELES HI SEA   US013BJJORT.
LOSANGEESFRVAN   CDN MUD RT
HAWAII    3WJXRT.
TORONTO      3_00RT.
MONTREAL      3_00RT.
EMONTON    13BJBRT.
PRINCEGEORGE      112JBRT.
VENTURE TRAVEL
2860 W. 4th Ave. Vancouver
736-8686
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, MARCH 29
Morna Russell
& Evensong Choir:
AFRICAN FREEDOM
SONGS
For transport from student residences
call 224-5846, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
AMS COPYRIGHT
Why wait for the rush?
We copy class notes NOW!
Lower Level SUB     228-4388
ROBERT ALLIN
COMMUNICATIONS
• Resume specialists
• Editing & writing
• Word processing
738-0466
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Main Concourse
Phone 228-3777
VANCOUVER-MONTREAL Drive brand new
car to Montreal around May 1 Er return in
Fall by air (female) for $200. References req.
NS. 736-0266.
SUBLET OR TRADE FOR THE SUMMER.
Teacher Er family (2 kids: 3 Et 12) need
apartm/hse for July Et '/4 of Aug. willing to
sublet or trade (up to you). Own hse is
modern, 3 br, situated on a lake in rural area
of central B.C., near Tweedsmuir Park.
CONTACT: Jim Wilson, R. R. #2, Burns
Lake, B.C. VOJ 1E0, 694-3604.	
80 - TUTORING	
FRENCH OR SPANISH with Franco-
Argentine ph.D. Student. Oscar: 738-4102.
85 - TYPING	
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0629.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor Et IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U ft del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STU DENT/ FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding Er
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333 M/C Er Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
ft Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIAUST.   U-
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
JUDITH FILTNESS
Quality Typist
 263-0351	
AMS CUSTOMIZED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
Lower Level SUB Rm. 60 228-5640
WORDWEAVERS - Word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st, Kerrisdale.
266^814.	
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a professional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing Er writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud ofl 324-9924.
WORD PROCESSINGI Xerox 860 system.
Student rates. Editing avail. Erika Taylor,
B.A. 734-1105 (o); 327-0026 (h).
TYPING Quick Right By UBC $1.25/page
Rob 228-8989
K.E.R. WORDPROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBM-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby 15 876-2895.
WORD PROCESSING fast and reliable
editing and graphics available. Call Jack
eves. 224-0486.
WORD PROCESSING, fast, expert, quality
service. If you want the best call: 266-2536.
ON-LINE TYPING SERVICE. Fast, accurate
typing on IBM Word Processor
@$1.25/dble-sp. pg. Richmond &
downtown p/u & drop-off. Call Glenna
277-0410.
TYPING/FAST/ACCURATE. Knight/
Kingsway. Patti 876-2488.
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Professional elec., typing, fast accurate,
reas. call Jan 271-6756 Richmond.
TYPING? YOU BETI Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227, 24
hours.
W/P ft TYPING: Term papers, theses, reports, tech., equational, letters, resumes,
mscpts., bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641. Friday, March 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Students march for education
By PETER KUITENBROUWER
Canadian University Press
MEXICO CITY — More than
half of Mexico's population is
under the age of 20 — the city is
almost literally crawling with kids.
They can be divided into two
groups: Chavos (most kids) and
Juniors (a few kids). Chavos are the
kids with tight jeans, dark skin, and
running shoes — they ride the
Metro, often to sell gum or
newspapers in order to have enough
money to survive. The live in the
dust-blown periphery of the city,
and they hang out in the street
drinking caguamas (tall bottles of
beer) and listening to loud rock 'n'
roll.
Juniors live in big houses mostly
in the west or south of the city.
They shop for loose cotton prints
and topsiders at Liverpool and
Paris-Londres department stores.
They have cars; none of them
would be caught dead on the
Metro. They go to private schools
and spend weekends at discotheques whose admission price is at
least a day's work at minimum
wage.
The National Autonomous
University of Mexico (UNAM) is
about the only place where these
two worlds meet. It is also the only
path open to poor kids aspiring to
become professionals.
UNAM is the oldest university in
the western hemisphere. Founded in
1553, it grew in reputation for hundreds of years until the population
explosion after the Mexican revolution (1910 to 1917) pushed the
school into a new role: educating
Mexico's emerging middle class.
The current struggle pits the two
slogans of the university against
each other — is UNAM a "university of the masses" or is it "the
highest house of studies in
Mexico?"
UNAM has 300,000 students on
dozens of campuses spread across
the city. M'ost students are in grades
10-12 in UNAM-affiliated high
schools which feed into the university. Many of these "prepas" are
carved out of the urban jungle in
poor neighbourhoods, and here the
line between street gang member
and university student is drawn very
thin.
Until last September, any prepa
student in a UNAM-affiliated
school who finished her/his
coursework was guaranteed entrance to UNAM, if s/he earned an
average of seven. Tuition was about
30 cents Canadian a semester. But
overcrowding forced standards
down and underpaid teachers often
didn't show up. Sylvia Munez Martinez, a first-year political science
student, said she and her classmates
mounted a protest at the prepa last
year after their teacher came in to
say he'd been granted time to do
research, and then never came
back. "We marched through the
campus chanting 'We want a
teacher!'," she said.
In an attempt to push the
school's standards back up and
make money, Jorge Carpizo acted
quickly when he was appointed rector in 1984. In April, 1986, he
published "Strengths and
Weaknesses of UNAM," and
started consultations on reforming
the school. After digesting 1,760
submissions, the University Council
met in an extra-ordinary session last
September — while most students
were on vacation — and approved
three big reforms. The university
restricted admission to those
finishing prepa in three years with
an average grade of eight out of 10,
hike fees for enrolment and remaking exams, and instituted departmental exams to replace exams written by each teacher. The last
reform, Carpizo argued, would cut
corruption (students bribing
teachers to give them good grades)
and regularize learning standards.
Student   reaction   was   equally
swift. Chavo students revolted, saying their only ticket out the slums
had been revoked. "All the people
here are the children of workers,"
Javier Espinoza, a student at a high
school in a poor part of town, said
during a big rally. "They want to
make this a university of the
bourgeoisie," a fellow student added.
Three weeks and several information sessions after the reforms passed, student representatives from
various    faculties    formed    the
University Student Council or CEU
— the acronym which now adorns,
walls all over the city and strikes terror in the heart of Mexico's rich.
The movement grew quickly.
Twenty-five thousand students
marched in the first CEU rally Nov.
11. By Dec. 16, 100,000 students
blocked Mexico City streets demanding the repeal of the reforms. The
students also called for a university
congress, in which students,
teachers, researchers, workers and
See page 16: STUDENTS
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UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 27, 1987
Students fight back
From page 15
administrators, would
democratically elect representatives
to write and approve a new reform
plan.
When Carpizo could not longer
ignore the CEU, he invited them to
a series of talks with the rector's
commission — but not with the rector himself. That's where the fun
started.
The yellow Televiso microphone
(Televisa is Mexico's giant private
television network) is lying on the
table, so the press conference can
start. Carlos Imaz walks in, wearing
the navy blue ski-army jacket he
never takes off. He pushes back his
long, greasy blond hair. He's tired.
The room is filling with students
and getting louder.
It's a democratic movement: the
press conference doesn't start until
there are 300 students in the lecture
hall.
Outside the law building, the
campus walls are sprayed with graffitti: "Viva el maximalismo infan-
til," loosely translating to "hurray
for kids' power." Posters read: "Illiterate: don't throw garbage. Read
what the honorable cleanliness
commission writes." Students in
grimy clothing are eating strike
committee food; piles of half-
burned wood spot the parking lot.
Further out, a strip of chain-link
fencing is stretched across a university entrance. Rocks and branches
complete the barricade, in front of
which hangs the black and red CEU
banner. The students have taken
over Mexico's largest university;
they've shut down every campus
across the city.
The 19-day strike came as what
students called their "last resort"
after weeks of negotiations with the
UNAM administration, hundreds
of advocacy ads in city newspapers
bought by every side in the university conflict, dozens of assemblies at
departments and high schools, marches, posters, press conferences, offers and counter-offers.
The university had no choice but
to buckle under. At a University
Council session Feb. 10, the 100
councillors — watched by an equal
number of reporters — voted to
suspend the reforms and create a
university congress to propose a
new reform plan. At the largely
conciliatory session, one councillor
said the mobilization was no different from those currently rocking
France and Spain. "Youth rise up
against the policies of austerity
which reduce the spaces in which
students can form themselves," he
said.
In the end, it was the huge student power which swayed the councillors. Students took over the street
outside the meeting, smoking, leaning on their pickets, their red and
black strike flags slung over their
shoulders. Two hundred sat in a
driveway watching the councillors
on closed-circuit TV. As a councillor spoke of the rector's exemplary behavior, the crowd
hooted and whistled. Some had
marijuana-leaf T-shirts — they
weren't your stunning examples of
Liverpool department store
patrons. Maybe the councillors, in
the end, were swayed by fear for
their own skins.
The air has turned misty above
the stage at the packed Che
Guevara auditorium. There is no
sneezing room in this steam bath.
Students are slumped in chairs,
sleeping, or fanning themselves
with sheets of paper, talking quietly, chewing on gum or cookies.
Most are in jeans, T-shirt and running shoes. They take off sweaters,
push back sticky black hair. One
guy is wearing a red cape knotted
around his neck, with letters in
white paint: "Resolutive congress
or indefinite strike."
The students are not giving up so
easily: it takes a week of debate, at
individual schools and departments
— to agree to' lift the strike.
Everyone has to give an opinion,
and keeping an auditorium silent
while almost each one speaks,
without a microphone, is a slow
process.
Students finally voted to lift the
strike Feb. 17, and the machinery of
one of the world's largest schools
slowly began churning again the
next day. "It's excellent," CEU
leader Cuauhtemoc Medina said the
day the strike ended. "It's the first
social movement in this country
that has been victorious."
Certainly an exaggeration, but
the student movement did show the
power of wide-spread social
movements to change government
policy, and exposed the weaknesses
of the system. With presidential
elections coming up in Mexico in
1988, demands are likely to grow
for a "congress' to let all people
speak, similar to that won by
students for their school. The Institutional Revolutionary Party,
whose presidential candidate has
won every election since 1929, has
not been opening up participation
in politics fast enough to satisfy its
young, restless, and increasingly impoverished citizenry.
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HOORAY!
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Now, before you leave school, American Express
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American Express believes you, as a graduating
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