UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1965

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127344.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127344.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127344-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127344-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127344-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127344-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127344-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127344-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127344-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127344.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBYSSSY
keeps
the doctor
away
Vol. XLVIII, No. 8
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   TUESDAY,   OCTOBER  5,   1965
CA 4-3916
rf**  v *« ■•" *'    s     '}s«^'  ^^*tf.<'"'WvJ&.V
BLEED,
BABY,
Trustee boosts free fees
'B.C. should follow Joey
BLEED
(THIS WEEK AT ARMORY)
The B.C. School Trustees Association
president said Monday there's no reason
why Canadian provinces can't follow the
educational example set by Newfoundland.
Wilfred Peck told the association's annual
meeting in Vancouver that Canada's poorest
province—which has just opened its first
university—is paying first year university
students' tuition fees.
And, he said, Newfoundland premier Joey
Smallwood has indicated this will soon be
extended to cover second year fees.
"I'm aware that there is a cost involved
here," Peck said, "but if we could afford
free education up to grade 12 20 years ago,
we could easily afford it to first or second
year university level within our dynamic
society today."
He said: "No one with an eye for history
can mistake the trend toward free and
universal education to the highest level required."
"We must seriously consider free university education on a universal basis," Peck
said.
FACULTY MEMBERS were hard pressed to keep their balance during a weekend of discussion with students at Frosh Retreat. Walking planks to their cabins at Camp Elphinstone
are Malcolm  McGregor and Vic College's   dean Alec Wood.
_v ** — |*_«
*V__v.—" v.l.*""JBH  - .     -    __
:-.;__, ■;.. ■=• - -_,___»desMt;M*i**
*'•______!_!';; f*—&"^'L ""* '
Vance hits
councillors
action lag
Alma Mater Society councillors were accused Monday
night of not participating in planning the Education Action
Program.
ACTION SWIRLS down the field during touch football game at Frosh Retreat in the wilds
of   Camp   Elphinstone.   Neither   team   scored in the tight defensive battle.
In an hour-long session of
heated argument over EAP
policy planning, AMS co-ordinator Graeme Vance accused
council of not getting involved
in the work.
"Up to date the majority of
you have been doing precious
little to help the committee.
"You can't expect people off
the street to originate and formulate policy," Vance told
council.
"If anyone is informed it has
got to be you. There must be
council support."
But Bob Cruise, AMS vice-
president and co-chairman of
the EAP committee, disagreed
with Vance's assessment of
council's role to date.
"We've had tremendous participation," he said.
"People from outside council
have come to do work for us,
but we have seven councillors
active in EAP."
GRAEME VANCE
. . . 'precious little'
He invited any interested
councillor to attend EAP committee sessions today and Wednesday.
Foresters dead against EAP
AMS president Byron Hender said he is concerned that
a great deal of EAP legislation had just slid through
council with councillors giving it little thought.
"Even though responsibility
for EAP rests on my shoulders,
it also rests on yours," Hender
said.
"This is the biggest project
we have backed in years ex-,
cept for the union building
project, which is of a different
nature."
EAP co-chairman Peter
Braund told council he wanted
the students to realize the
prime point of the current fee
fight is to prevent any immediate tuition increase.
He said many students
couldn't understand the idea
of tuitionless education but
they could appreciate the fight
against increasing fees.
Cruise said he was distressed because so many students
were worried about what council was doing for the fee fight.
Forestry president Dave Parker said his faculty, at a general meeting had endorsed the
principle of universal accessibility to EAP committee's program as it stands.
He said the foresters "are
definitely against any strike or
boycott, and all points of EAP
—including the Oct. 27 march
on the Vancouver courthouse." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  5,   1965
AS SOLUTION
Bilingualism
is doubtful
A University of Oregon history professor cast doubt
Monday on bilingualism as a solution to problems of national
i unity.
Dr. Val Lorwin told 100 students the relationship between
French and Flemish-speaking
factions in Belgium is "a dialogue of the deaf."
"Hopes for bilingualism as a
national unifying factor failed."
He said the 1932 language
law giving Flemish equality
with French was seldom observed.
But separatism has not prr
ven to be a force in Belgiar
politics. The separatist Flemish
federal party gained only 1
of 265 lower house seats in the
1965 elections and functions
mainly as a pressure group.
"Politically the problem was
not party-forming but party-
destroying," Lorwin said.
He saw a partial solution in
the continued socio-economic
development of the Flemish.
Lorwin was reluctant tr
compare Belgium with Can
ada, but felt parallels could b<-
drawn and expressed a hope
for tolerance in relations be-:
tween French and English Canadians.
He concluded "Belgium is
not condemned but must prove
its right to live."
ABOUT that card game . . .
I apologize.  Signed,   B.  M.
Liberals
want fees
eliminated
The B.C. Young Liberal Association Convention passed a
resolution Friday favoring the
reduction and gradual elimination of university tuition fees.
The resolution put forth by
a combined delegation from
UBC and Simon Fraser Academy Liberal clubs, reads:
Be it resolved that the B.C
Young Liberal Association go
on record as favoring the reduction and gradual elimination of all university tuition
fees."
The resolution was passed
by 73 delegates at the two day
convention held in the Bay-
shore Inn.
The    delegates   also    heard
B.C. Liberal leader Ray Perrault say that the B.C. govern
ment should provide free tuition for first year students.
He said travelling and living grants should be made
available to students from out
of town.
UBC Liberal club president
Alan Gould said 'The resolution will be brought to the attention of the National Younf
Liberal convention and the
B.C. Liberal Association con
vention."
He said that although no immediate action is planned by
the club, it will be taking ar
active a part as possible tr
support the. campaign.
Eat hearty
if you bleed
this week
Approximately 300
people gave blood Monday at the Red Cross
clinic in the armory.
Mrs. Donata Sturtin,
nurse in charge of the
mobile clinic, said that
the drive's goal is 1,500
pints.
"But we could handle
as many as 2,000," she
said.
The clinic, open from
9:30 to 4:30, is staffed by
13 people. Two registered
nurses, eight aides, and
three drivers are on
hand.
"We need 300 each day
to reach our quota, but
we're prepared for 400
donors," Mrs. Sturtin
said.
Students who plan to
give blood should get a
good night's rest and eat
a big breakfast before
coming to the clinic, Mrs.
Sturtin said.
YOUNG MEN
FROM JAPAN
KIM CAMPBELL
. . . retiring
Frosh exec,
nominations
deadline set
Thursday is the deadline for
frosh election nominations.
Frosh executive positions to
be filled are president, vice-
president, men's and women's
sports representatives, secretary, special events chairman,
and public relations officer.
Nomination forms can be obtained from the frosh office
(Brock extension 157) noon
any day this week.
Candidates will speak in
Brock lounge noon Oct. 13.
Voting will take place Oct.
14.
Retiring frosh president Kin-
Campbell said Monday two
persons are already definitely
running for president.
"Quite a bit a enthusiasm
was shown at frosh retreat,"
she said.
The retreat at Elphinstone
Oct. 1-3 was attended by 90
frosh compared with 45 last
year.
At the retreat frosh heard
faculty members and student
leaders speak about university
life and the many activities
open to students.
Touring
royalty
visits UBC
Three members of Japan's
royal family toured UBC
Saturday.
The visitors were Emperor
Hirohito's brother, Prince Ta-
kahito Mikasa; his wife Princess Mikasa; and their daughter Princess Yasuko.
The visit was part of the
trio's North American tour.
They were shown around the
university by UBC president
John Macdonald and his wife.
They took pictures in UBC's
Japanese N i o t b e Memorial
Gardens.
Purpose of the tour was primarily to enable Prince Mikasa to attend and international religious conference in
California.
The prince received news
Sept. 5 of a blackmail threat
against his daughter.
A report from Tokyo said
a blackmail letter demanded
about $82,000 for negatives of
sneak photographs said to be
taken of Princess Yasuko's
private life.
The prince declined comment to Vancouver reporters,
but spokesmen said he did no'
seem worried.
Ubyssey seeks
creative blood
Does the creative spirit
run high in- your hot little
veins?
Do you have an artistic
bent for writing, taking pictures, practising typography,
staying sober at parties?
No? Good. The Ubyssey is
the place where you can
learn most of these ideals of
the Fourth Estate.
Stumble on down to North
Brock basement and join
Canada's best university
newspaper.
You'll like it.
Buy A New Guitar
19% Cash Discount
Wish Your A_M_3. Card
ASHOUn PAWNSHOP
986 Granville — MU 5-7517
SVEN LETH
Keep Fit Class
Evenings
Gymnastics for
Men & Women
Mornings
Women's Gymnastics
& Swimming
DANISH ATHLETIC  CLUB
1155 W. 11th, Vancouver
733-0378 eves.
BAY
PSYCHO
Anthony Perkins
Janet Leigh
Plus  BEDTIME  STORY
Marlon Brando. David Niven
Shirley Jones
DELTA
Across prascr St. Bridge, Richmond
THE PRIZE
Paul Newman, Elke Sommer
Edward G. Robinson
THE  NEW   INTERNS
Michael Callan   ::   Barbara Eden
(Adult)
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
453S West 10th
Hie Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
* TRADES
* RENTALS
4 TERMS
* REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
May  we  correct
picture mixup?
The Ubyssey wishes to correct a mistake made on page
13 in the Friday, Oct. 1 edition.
The picture labelled
Arthur Fouks, Vancouver
lawyer and member of
UBC's board of governors,
was in fact a photograph of
UBC pharmacologist Dr.
James G. Foulks.
The Ubyssey regrets the
mistaken indentification and
any inconvenience or embarrassment it might have
caused either person.
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition  up to Advanced
Level -  Segovia Teohnlgue
W. PARKER
Redtaliat 682-10M
MAUD: I'm just admiring your
new high-neck sweater with the
Raglan sleeves that are designed
on angle to make your chest look
broader than it really is.
DON: It's a honey. Made by
Byford and designed by Hardy
Amies.
MAUD: Amies! He's world
famous for his styling knowledge.
DON: I like the way it fits.
MAUD: That sweater makes you
look like I want you to look.
Feel that man-size ribbing and
those one, two, three, four, five,
six sexy leather buttons.
DON: I am. I am!
MAUD: Anyone who understands
quality in sweaters, knows
Byford. They're British.
this exclusive, made in England,
Model #M70
at better stores
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES Tuesday,  October  5,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
1926 AUBURN antique rolls up in front of Brock Friday at noon. Inside Brock, president
Macdonald, chancellor Ross, president-emeritus Norman MacKenie and a packed lounge
watched films commemorating UBC's 50th year of classes.
—bert   mackinnon   photo.
NDP leader slams loan fund
—disgraceful substitute
New Democratic Par,ty leader Tommy Douglas blasted
student loans Friday.
Speaking in London, Ontario, he ended his first week
of federal campaigning by calling loans a disgraceful substitute for a free university
education.
Douglas said a student must
pay up to $1,000 in interest
charges if he uses the maximum $5,000 available during
five years of study.
He reiterated that an NDP
government  would  give  first
priority to making all stages
of education free by providing financial support to the
provinces.
Rick Vulliamy, president of
the   UBC   New   Democratic
Club,   said   his   club   was   in
complete   agreement   with
Douglas.
He said loans are "a step
in the right direction.
"But the next step is full 100
per cent rebate of fees," he
said.
"We would like to see this
as soon as possible.
"In fact, we are in favor
of a living allowance for students while going to university," he said.
The   New   Democratic  Club
is   sponsoring   a   speech   by
Douglas in Brock Hall Oct.
22.
Education
gets active
Entrance exams
too easy—Parnall
A national entrance exam would be an unreliable
standard for university admission, said UBC registrar J. E.
A. Parnall Monday.
The entrance exam was proposed by Canadian provincial
ministers of education at a
meeting in Fredericton, New
Brunswick last week.
The exam, patterned after
the American College Entrance
Examination Board tests
would replace the present matriculation exams.
The CEEB exams are objective, intelligence-tests marked
by computers  said  Parnall.
They do not test a student's
ability to think creatively or
synthesize material.
. "The only advantage would
be in making registrator
easier."
The results from the CEEE
exams would be released in
time for the university to accept students before the end of
June.
The university then knows
how many students to expect
"But we can't do things just
because it's easier for us," said
Parnall.
"We have to do what is academically correct."
Poets read
Poetry readings will return to
the campus Thursday noon as
Jamie Reid begins a series of
weekly readings by UBC poets
at International House.
The Education Action Program swings into action this
week with the setting up of
committees to implement the
program.
A general interest meeting
will be held Wednesday
noon in Brock.
This , meeting which is
open to anyone, will outline
to the students the aims of
the   EAP   for   the   coming
months.
Tuesday noon a meeting
of EAP committee heads will
outline the plans for th"
Brock meeting.
THE   UBYSSEY   AND  PIQUE
present
THE  SECOND  ANNUAL
ROAD RUNNER
FILM  FESTIVAL
Noon, Oct..9  -12
Auditorium—50c
H.W. PARKER
design director of the Royal Ontario Museum
Qxvjuc and. fiJudtoJiiaL - Owl y&aA Jjodsh
Being an examination of the world of sight and sound.
It is unique and edifying and not to be missed.
25c
Auditorium
noon
Thursday
Go home, young voters
—with UBC's blessing
UBC students not qualified to vote in Vancouver will
be given time off to vote in their home ridings Nov. 8,
UBC president John Macdonald said Monday.
In a press release, Macdonald said students who
wished to do so could absent themselves from classes
during the days around the election.
But the university will not close said UBC information officer  James  Banham.
"Students who do go are expected to inform their
instructors," he said. "The instructors will make arrangements for them to make up labs later and will see they
get notes from missed lectures.
Banham said more than 2,000 students would be
involved, but he didn't expect all of them would take the
time off.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
jpMAsmhu
ERICK HAWKINS-NOV. 2 - 8:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM
Students $1.50 - $1.75
Non-Students  $2.50 - $2.75
Tomorrow 12:30 - Brock 25c
THE FREDDIE REDD JAZZ QUARTET
— direct from the Jazz Workshop — San Francisco
Philly Joe Jones — drums
Walter Benton — saxophone
Bob Maize — bass
Thursday 12:30 - Brock 25c
THE THREE D's
Exciting new folk trio on Capitol  Records.
"The boys at the National Jamboree loved their performances. They're a fine group of young men."—Marshall
Munroe, Assistant to the Chief Scout, Boy Scouts of
America. Page 4 THE     UBYSSEY Tuesday,   October   5,   1965
THE UBYSSEY cx«_« THAT 0L CONTROL
Published   Tuesday,   Thursdays   and  Fridays   throughout   the  university Ta^~^r^l   -n ,r r>, o^X, -.- #*                                             • I I I
year by the  Alma  Mater  Society,   University  of B.C.   Editorial  opinion. UM       \\>   Y     \Ht3U0.1KJ0r ^._r^f/V%#H          i*^ ■ I I *»           ■»>»_ I _»N "^ _• _»^
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily  those of the AMS ^\           _B    \      , mT,M _jfj|I|r5          l__l I I I _H          ___■ I W^ _^ ^ t?T
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-32*2, \j        •3?           A KImKCTs ** ^^ ■ ■ ■ ^*           T* ■ ■ ■ **          f* ■ ^* *«■ ** ^^
Ioc.  26.   Member Canadian  University Press.   Founding  member,   Pacific |          *       j     euQ_(?0 _Oe\_fi
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mall by Post Office Department, \                 /     wwrusfclWlrw By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. A      ^jj  k       \vlwENT.n.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general /AVV^vK .^S or not to contr°l b^?     .        .    .
excellence and news photography. ^M{S ( th^ „/2?         1S n°       ger f^th "e^!ce. °iflCials sym"
6   * <V^V//§\ the question, pathize with students on this
TUESDAY,  OCT.  5,  1965 ToduN^jfy. The question is whether or issu but are having a difficult
».,     _.•_■_.__              »        ._.       _._.    _. VV" not    unmarried    students time putting their feelings in-
The tigers of wrath are w,ser than the horses should have access to birth to practice
Of instruction.                                             — Wm. Blake. control pills. Acting on a policy no doubt
i^^A"*»X_UK- ^^-^m:&m^mm^mmmmmmmmmm _#-w-x      neccueVucrw UBC's health centre admits influenced by UBC's  admini-
_ CPW_W«5 these   pills   are   available  to stration, the health service is
r> f            f                     f-% f r^Ly^\ cnCWUW Si. married   students.   Therefore refusing   to   give   contracep-
Klrtrlnn        f< If f_Q C XJh     ^     fSK« the   question   of  whether  or tives   to   single   students,
LJ lUUvjl I       DIU"0 X       & \^_VivlwUQ n0t  tt   is  morally  w1-0^  to which   means   girls,   since
•ro^rmwiuro control birth has either been males can easily buy them at
Tomorrow, the report of the Bladen commission on 1     ^ju I wCKtv u" Ww decided   or   ignored   and   the anv drugstore,
higher education in Canada will be made public. AJk ?^!EVItl6 Wt WAS health centre's policy set ac- However   this  is   only   a
This is the report which will surely be considered /jf^Sj&^yjk \ tAM&^Vw        t cordingly. general policy since the health
a watershed in the history of Canadian universities. >\ tE!^y    ■■ Jt is now simply a question centre   admits   it   is   giving
And it could well become the first issue in a so-far xlJjL^Lfl of whether or not single stu- them   to   unmarried   couples
ho-hum election campaign. VTyn dents should have the privi- who   can   convince   officials
Dean Vincent Bladen of Toronto and his colleagues ledge of carrying on a norma] their intentions  are  sincere
are  attempting to  settle the much-disputed fair  share _*•»_ healthy   relationship   with and sensible,
students, provincial governments, and federal authorities ^^^\     WM\|& % ' members of the opposite sex But this is not nearly good
should pay to keep campuses going and growing. W -A  NfcWJT fO)Mtf It is not healthy when thece enough.
And though most political parties have  only hesi- X^^^SA .^ ^oyj). students have to rely on blank People are not infallible, es-
tantly taken up the issue of university financing so far V5>         A X   ^ ^\|£ ^ market sources for contracen- Pecially when they're young,
in the campaign, the issue will probably blow sky-high V        J^ \   Qcrru^c mm tives which may be sold with- going steady and living under
after tomorrow.                ,,,,.„               , |         *        WwEOf out   the   proper   information the strain of a highly compe-
And, if not this week, then the fun will start when I      ^   I    *"   "'   v on   how   to   use   them    Nor titive system,
the Association of Universities. and Colleges of Canada \.         >4>.   »ww>»» when  they have to  lie  and There are couples who are
prepares   its   brief   to   the  federal   government  at   its /\\^jW\ scheme to deceive health ser- Prevented    by    financial    o-
October 26 to 29 meeting here. ^   cMtyJ*)   ' \ vice officials in order to ob- other circumstances from mar-
No one really can tell what Bladen will say. The \ (L__&^a__i-   \ tain birth control pills. riage   even  after   a   girl  be-
Ubyssey is assured by its Toronto colleagues that Dean >hw  ^^ n «e k_,ni,- *„„ . '     • _ comes pregnant.
r>i j      v.     ■    __.         _    j        _ j       _.      j-    i ^ " 1S healthy for unmarried .   , „
Bladen has in the past advocated such radical moves as couples to experience a com d   here are alwavs Peo"
allowing students to take tiheir summers off to think, lplete )relation;hi     ,a(JcordiT,; Pie who believe in having a
relax and read what they ve missed in the annual eight- ^**\   j^g. ^ to their beliefs, and feelings good time and to hel1 with tne
month haul. !»_.    —\   riftWCMcv "* >                     » consauences  It i<! not onnush
But, on the other hand, first reports from a pre- Jfe4©, ^ f\W&   k ^ . p/e:marita ,+sex- And to say '^them find out tS
release iook at the document by eastern administration W^\l MOT WW^ "?»»* ^g «^lty of vio- hardyw    „
types indicate it will most likely be less progressive than H5       g   Uc-N&^ tto^wn^^l^h          Ve"" ^   an  unwed   mother
the times demand. \    -T       fl&SK\W(N , ?       Ci.W™d have a cou- who's    gone    through    nine
We're predicting the Bladen report will advocate a 7        J   *L Pie's   relationship   controlled ^^ of Ll (no" to mZ
sliding scale of fees for students-in other words, a fee 1    ^(L to   Ifther^L T       fZZ ti™  ^ cSStoSLS Xr
raise every year or so as the universities grow. AmM'JX contraeentiver         wlthnold the baby's birth) how much
Since UBC administration figures show now that the '   % Yf«W^S   ' \ TT                  ' she  appreciated learning the
average student can't make enough to attend UBC with- ^43M>- T   current   conditions hard way
out aid of some sort, we naturally would oppose such a Vt^T couples unable to obtain con- tjbc president  John  Mac-
finding of the Bladen commission. traceptives must either strive donald has said a university
It has been The Ubyssey's constant contention that to suppress their natural feel- <.by its very nature it will al-
too-high fees mean some able students in B.C. do not f^\ ingS toward one another  or ways create a  strained rela-
attend university, turned back by the psychological block f      A gamble. tionship   between   itself   and
caused by having to commit themselves to four years of ^>3_JO         „„.»,„ If they lose-  li means tht the society of which it  is a
debt-       .                                              ,  ^ wPT\     "Mi WLLS m°ther;t0-be, and   often   thfi part. A university offers not
We do not find mortgaging one's future in the tradi- \ '    ^L \ prospective father must leave what  is   accepted,  but  what
tion of dynamic independence for which our province is I               I university  before   graduating wiU become accepted "
famed. I in order to earn enough mon- Let's   be   progressive   and
One  administration  official  of  a  Lower Mainland V     ^ A^ ey needed to support a family, realistic
university told us if the Bladen report is progressive, /1f^w7 f\ The ease with which The Let's ' make   contraceptives
u «      /ut ^a<*?/ university system on the road to kvwSK Ubyssey's   reporter   obtained available to all university stu-
better days. And if it is a failure, m terms of    either W%#   : \  avYilD a  two  year Prescription  for dents capable of using them
administrations or students, its detrimental effect will W^             <W birth  control  pills   (see  Fri- without adverse physical ef-
be incalculable. .            \fjfl                     «Ir day,.   Ubyssey)   indicates fects.
Fee fight good for you, says Tommy Wu
By TOMMY WU                    "I've     always     wondered "Well,  buddy,  listen good, lightly   over  immediate  pro- lately'"
"Look     Tommy,     exactly    why they wrote briefs." The   report   issued   by   the blems    in    favor   of    great «twc   -„™_.*i,«„„  t
what is going on in this fee         "Yeah-   well,    the    discus- placement  office—an   admin- aims." „_, £,        '       ,,^gJ   C?f *
fight business?"                              sions this summer panned out istration report, remember— "What do you think, Tom- T'H   l,L    If' «L    *Z-
"What do you mean what's     a ""I6' ™. ?*y^\"""^ *?r summer earnings' shows my?" Maclona.d  sayHhe  feS
eoine on'"                                    to get a brief to the board of the    average   male    student "I think we ought to fight ^acaonam  says  «e  federal
wn          -                   „.      governors, and to do a lot of makes $1,028  and the  aver- like^ heU to^ge?fs muc^^ as government  anf the provin-
'Well,   you're  supposed   to     real thinking on the . . .» age girl makes $497 " we  can   Yo,f knnl *Z\w Clal g°vernment are at fault.
be in with those in guys, ex-        <<Just a minute> what hap. g<<0gkay - ^ ^t means ^J0^ ^ the ™ Okay, the feds are 3,000 miles
tf byel?nE"»        ySUPP            Pen€d   t0   the   bfief   t0   th€ that   any  gUy from   out   of exLtfySlfwha7heaskstory aWay " "   '
aomg.                                    board of g0vernors?» town and just about any girl Jf w& £.ght uke hgll fo «And   who   can   fight   go_
"It's  really pretty   simple,         "Nothing,    really.    They can't afford to come here on no    fees     maybe    the   most cial Credit in B.C.?"
ol'   buddy.   What   happened     asked the board of governors their own." we'U ever get out of Presi- "It's like tackling mother-
was that when the last fee    to give a clear, concise state- -Being  idealistic   and   all, dent  Macdonald will be   no hood    I   Less   Sopte   fSl
increase   was   announced   in     ment   as   to   what   they   are the AMS has gone full bore increase next year, but that'll that since the guyfwho ought
the   summer    a   number   of     going to do about fees next in advocating no fees at all. save  students  about   $1   mil- to   be  fightof ?or^a  beS
Sded JT               uh y           yea^  BUt„ th! ,b°ar^ ♦*  US "* W°Uldn,t bC ^ edUCa" lion- break  JJ   Z SL  of  B C
.   uL *     y'  •  I..'.         '  '  *    wisd°m'  declded not to sav tion, mind you. Not for the "That sounds maybe like it are the board of governors
•rabbit ^roppmgs-'"                     anything   until   the   Bladen guys from out of town, any- „ WOrth it. But you brought and since the Z*£TSZZ2.
„c "          <h          m     „,         report   on  the   financing   ot way, who will still have to Up Macdonald. How come he sentative of the board is John
"So over the summer they     higher     education     came dig up about $1,000 to come is getting such  a hard time B. \^        „    DOara     JOlm
thmgs  they  could do  about        "So that's  why we  didn't "But it would be a help." EDITOR: Tom Wayman short   list   of   working   types
the  fee  rise.   Some of them     pay   second   term   fees   and "It  sure   would.  But  any-    A-Zoliati'"'" Geora"r'Re_m°tn_Jttom Monday    were;    Angus    Ricker.
were   the   usual   things   the     had  the   rally   on the   mall, way,   some  guys around are clt*  --•--•—•"'•'•   Richard Blair Howie   whlte.   Terry   Brooks,
sleepy   ol'   AMS   has   been     and went and heard Smilin' worrying  that  by  having   a SX 3=__I___J_!_LMKiKK *££ vTva^S^rtn Mc"
doing for years, like adding     Mac. I get that. But I'm really stomping fee fight now won't A-'» N'r^bbTw7^JaneDtarVathUe"on i-utfuin.   BreTt 'c™mC Pat
to    the    provincial    govern-    not clear as to why the hell be like a bulldozer—pushing Aaa't City  '.  ai Donald Knrushowy, Gillian Poster, Doug
ment's toilet paper reserve by     we're   fighting   fees   at   all, any possible fee raise out of M*,Onea0Tn'adai_  NormKB-t2 Ha,verson-   Denis   Gans>   Pow««
submitting  another brief on    Tommy. I made enough this the question—but rather will ?••*»•*•   Mlk« B»'t0" !!argra!'e' .,c°lin   ^Leet'   ^
*K_   _..T.i-_.  4.-.  _i      -I.!-  _»                                     _                ,. .      ...                      .                  ......              cup      Don  Hul Hume, Fred Ogden and Don.Kydd.
the subject to the cabinet."       summer and ..." be like a grasshopper, flitting Tuesday, October 5,   1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
By MIKE BOLTON
First-year Law student
Bolton explores the philosophy used by the British
Robbins Report to justify increased government expenditures for higher education.
The report was published in
1963 and many of its principles were readily adopted by
the British government.
Ubyssey   Features   Editor
tion—are the commissioners
views of the future needs of
higher education and of the
reciprocal contributions it can
make to the needs of the
whole society.
One of the central anachronistic conceptions the commissioners aborgated was that
the number of persons capable of benefiting from higher
education is limited to by a
so-called pool of ability.
On Feb. 8, 1961, the British
government accepted a Treasury Minutes proposing this
appointment of a committee
to review the pattern of full-
time higher education in
Great Britain, and in the light
of national needs and resources, to advise Her Majesty's
Government on what principals its long-term development should be based.
A committee of 12 was established under Prof. Lord Rob-
bins and immediately set to
a full investigation of the
present future state of higher
education in Great Britain.
Two years and over £128,-
000 later the committee submitted a 350 page report,
five large statistical appendices and several volumes or
sampling evidence.
The Robbins Report is a
landmark in progressive
thinking about higher education.
It was a landmark because
the commissioners unveiled
several truths that together
formed a complete refutation
of conventional thought on
higher education.
Large sections of the report
were adopted by the former
Conservative administration
and by the present Wilson
Cabinet.
Perhaps the most stirring
part of the report—especially
in the light of the present
fight being waged against governments here over the financial needs of higher educa-
Britain buys brain capital
MIKE   BOLTON
The commissioners labelled
absurd any arguments suggesting biological factors limited the potential number of
university entrants.
•   •   •
"We believe it is highly
mis-leading to suppose that
one can determine an upper
limit to the number of people who could benefit from
higher education, given favourable circumstances", they
said.
The commissioners joined
with modern psychology in
rejecting the use of performance on general intelligence
test as a criterion for determining natural ability.
"It is now known that in
fact it is dependent on previous experience to a degree
sufficiently large to be of
great relevance," the report
stated.
They found impressive evidence that large numbers of
DANCE TO
THE SONICS   fJl.1 From SectH.
and the
VANCOUVER PLAYBOYS
*       *       *
at the Frosh Reception
DANCE
This Saturday - Oct. 9 - Armouries
Semi-formal $3.50 per couple
9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. Tickets at  AMS
—AMS Cards to be presented at the door.
See the Crowning of the Frosh Queen
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME
able young people do not at
present enter higher education.
Increased entry, contrary to
the feeling of the more conservative elements in government and university circles,
does not mean decreased
quality.
Futher, they found increased desire for higher education has permitted class lines.
Then keeping down the
numbers does not keep up
quality. There Is no reason
for lack of opportunity for
the increasing numbers who
can benefit from higher education and who desire to do
so.
The commissioners also
considered the problems the
most adequate means for solving the problems of higher
education permanently.
"The problems of the next
ten years will not be symto-
matic of a passing crisis to be
met by temporary expedients
they will rather mark the
dawn of a new era in British
higher education.
• *   •
What are the implications
of the needs of higher education for a modern industrial
society?
"We wish to state unequivocally that .... there is a
broad connection between the
size of the stock of trained
manpower in a community
and its level of productivity
per head. And in modern societies the skills and versatili-
tilities required are increasingly those conferred by higher education.
Surely, then, a rapidly developing society such as Canada literally cannot afford to
neglect its universities.
The commissioners doubted
any possibility of a country
being overburdened with
well-educated persons.
* •    •
The Robbins report dealt
with the problem of cost in
full perspective.
"To devote resources to the
training of young people may
be as much entitled to be considered a process of investment as devoting resources to
directly productive c a p it a 1
goods.
"Judged solely by the test
of future productivity, a community that neglects education is as imprudent as a community that neglect material
accumulation."
To coin a phrase from the
classical economists, investment in higher education produces human capital.
"And provided we always
remember that the goal is not
productivity as such but the
good life that productivity
makes possible, this mode of
approach is very helpful."
And the essence of the fee
fight the AMS is undertaking'
and the pleas of university administrators for increased aid,
are efforts to persuade governments to adopt the human capital philosophy as the
basis of their education poi-
ci'ps. The arguments are irrefutable.
xne commissioners went on
to suggest that over-investment in higher education is
wholly unforseeable.
The better consideration is
whether we even have a
choice. More college degrees
are necessary if the society's
manpower needs were already
to cope effectively with the
problems of the 1960s.
The Robbins report threw
a challenge to the governments of liberal democratic
states-
Talks with educators in the
Soviet Union had left the
commissioners convinced education was getting full governmental support in that country. Ambitious plans correlating   education    growth   and
being effected.
The commissioners did not
suggest a planned economy.
But they did suggest Anglo-
American countries make better use of their natural resources.
"We do not believe that the
Soviet Union is the only country that can make full use
of the brains of its people."
And can Canada afford any
wastage?
^^^^F^^ShkSfe :-.-.■:
You don't have to wear spectacles I
CONTACT LENSES-give  better vision
MU 3-1816        LAWRENCE CALVERT      705 Biria Bldg.
...ask about
mmmmmmm
THE CANADA STUDENT LOANS PLAN
at CANADA'S FIRST BANK
To be eligible, you must be enrolled—or intend to enroll—in a university or other educational institution above high school level,
authorized by your province of residence.
Under the Canada Student Loans Plan, you
don't need any security. And you can attend
school free from financial worry because the
Plan enables you to graduate before repayment begins—repayment in planned, easy,
monthly installments.
To find out how you can
borrow up to $1,000 a year to
pay for college, see your nearest B of M manager today.
to j mum (moms
nip
Bank of Montreal
UNIVERSITY CAMPUS BRANCH
George F. Peirson, Manager
WORKING WITH CANADIANS IN EVERY WALK OF  LIFE SINCE  1817 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October  5,   1965
HOT
Khoury
By JACK KHOURY
How would you like to
be arrested and fined for
strolling down the main
street in your favorite Bermuda shorts ?
No, hein ?
Well, Quebec City's new
law banning overexposure
will certainly be a great
disappointment to you and
all believers in basic human
liberties.
Enforced with unusual
zest by the city's police chief,
Gerard Girard, the law
states: "If your thigh offends,
cover it up or run the risk
of a top fine of one hundred
dollars or three months in
jail."
• •   •
Incredibly,   Gerard    does
not approve of short shorts
or teeny weeny bikinis.
Shockingly, he thinks he
can force his opinion on
freedom - loving Quebecers
and get away with it.
Ironically, he is enforcing
this law in the Canadian
province which is the most
concerned with autonomy
and independence.
• •    •
Well, I'm not going to just
stand here while those poor
"belles p'tites meres" suffer
from overexposure of thigh.
I'm going to do something
about it.
After all, if we Canadians
are ever going to come to a
mutual understanding,' we
should share our problems
as well as our joys.
And there's no time like
the present.
• •   •
In response to this drastic
situation, I'm all for firing
Girard and electing a more
reasonable man, say Maurice
Chevalier, for chef de police.
Let's not forget that once
they take away Quebecers'
right to dress as they please,
we may be next to lose this
right.
Racism hits
Dal housing
HALIFAX (CUP) — An
existing accommodations
shortage here is being aggravated by racial discrimination on the part of landlords
says Robbie Shaw, Dalhousie
student union president.
Shaw this week reported
an "alarming" increase this
year in the number of homeowners that refuse to rent
to foreign students.
He estimated the number
of landlords that refuse to
sign a student-housing form,
agreeing to accept students
regardless of race or creed,
had jumped from nine to 17
per cent.
He said there are still 50
students looking for housing
and that a majority of these
are foreign.
Don Blenkhorn and Jim
Ferguson, students at Nova
Scotia Technical College,
stayed in a tent for one night
to draw attention to the
plight of students attending
school here.
WHERE?
Food survey
cruises on
Something may finally get
beefs.
"I'm concerned about the
food in the residences, because
I don't like it," AMS first
vice-president Bob Cruise said
Monday.
"I've had almost 30 meals
in residences and only one that
I thought was passable."
Cruise became chairman of
a committee to study food services Sept. 25.
He said that his working
material was part of the first
comprehensive survey done of
campus residences. It was conducted last spring.
IBM cards were used to
tabulate residence opinion of
university accommodations.
Cruise has received these
IBM cards and is now waiting
for a person to act as a survey
co-ordinator.
"We had a lot of ad hoc re
done about student residents'
sidence committees before, but
this IBM card survey covers
everything: study conditions,
linen supply, heating, washrooms, and food services," he
said.
"We're not going to approach anyone until we're informed. With this survey we're
getting the details, we're getting the facts straight for the
first time."
UBC isn't alone
UBC isn't the only university
with expansion problems.
President T. H. B. Symons of
Trent University in Peterborough, Ont., said recently that
Trent's enrolment this, year is
higher than planned.
A total 287 students registered, seven more students than
expected.
book-Ion protects
YOUR books from*
anything!
(including you)
Daily use, dust, water spillage,
rain ... new books stay
fresher, old books revitalize
with book-Ion. And think of
next year's re-sale value.
Easy to apply, inexpensive. Crystal
clear self-adhesive plastic in
40" x 13" rolls do 3 to 5 books,
only $1.00,40" x9%" for
smaller jobs,
only 750
Also in rolls 400" long,
widths up to 40".
book-Ion
at department, stationery and bookstores.
FLASH ONE-TWO-THREE-FOUR BEFORE CHANGING
What new development will make indoor
photography four times as much fun for
the nation's millions of camera fans? The
new Blue Dot Flashcube, developed by
GT&E's Sylvania subsidiary for use with
the new Kodak Instamatic cameras.
Pop one on and you're ready to take
four flash pictures without changing
bulbs!
The Sylvania Blue Dot Flashcube revolves
after each shot, bringing a fresh Blue
Dot flashbulb into position, with its own
built-in reflector.
With this latest of many important innovations from GT&E, millions of home
photographers will get the great shots
that used to get away while they were
changing bulbs.
The Sylvania Blue Dot Flashcube is another example of how GT&E keeps growing through constant research and swift
response to the changing needs of the
public.
If you're looking for a young, aggressive company with no limit to its growth,
you may wish to view GT&E irt the light
of your own future.
GEE
GENERAL TELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS
730 THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK 10017 • GT&E SUBSIDIARIES: General Telephone Opening Compares m 33 states • General Telephone & Electronics Uaoratories • General Telephone & Electronics International • General Telephone Dneciorv Co. ■ Auiomaiic Electric • LeoJurt Electric • Sytwua Electnc Tuesday, October 5,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
5-2  VICTORY
« —photo rein ende, the silhouette
UBC's   DEREK  McGILLIVRAY (in  white)   smacks  into McMaster  University end  John  Rod-
way after  Rodway snared a   pass  in   8-8  tie Saturday at  Hamilton.
Thunderbirds fettered,
tie with McMaster 8-8
The McMaster University
Marauders held the UBC Thunderbirds to an 8-8 tie in Canadian college football action
Saturday in Hamilton.
"Our passing game wasn't
working well at all," said
Frank Gnup, Thunderbird head
coach.
"We didn't have time to set
up and look for receivers down-
field. Our blocking needs a lot
of improvement."
A crowd of more than 5,000
watched the Birds and Marauders', battle through a scoreless
first half.
Early in the third period,
halfback Ben Stapelton looped
a pass to end Lance Fletcher,
who scampered 59 yards for
UBC's  first touchdown.
Glen Brandt booted the extra
point, and the Birds led 7-0.
A short UBC punt and a no-
yards penalty assessed against
SPORTS AT UBC
Girls learn tricks
FIGURE SKATING
Practice  Thurs.,   6:15   p.m.,
Winter Sports Centre, all interested please atend.
FOOTBALL "
If you would like to associate with the 'Birds football
team, but lack the playing ability, get in touch with Frank
Gnup in the Memorial Gym or
Bob McGinn at AM 1-1878
with regards to being a manager. You enjoy the same privileges as the players. No experience necessary. We will
train you.
GIRLS' TENNIS TEAM
Saskatoon team finalists
meet Wed., 5:30 p.m., field
house. Official team practices
start Oct. 13, 5:30 p.m. Important for all concerned.
FIELD HOCKEY
Vancouver   1st   division —
Varsity   3,   Brittania   Cubs  3.
2nd   division—UBC  5,   North
Van. 11.
BOWLING
Monday   to   Friday,    12:30-
4:30, War Memorial Gym.
WRESTLING
Workouts,   Mon.-Wed.,   4:30-
6  p.m.,  Thurs.   and   Sat.,   1-3
p.m.,   north  end   Varsity   Stadium.
CURLING
UBC Women's, Wed., 8:15
p.m., Thunderbird arena, contact Dolores Doidge 733-4698,
all interested please attend.
Students psyched in
by director s offer
QUEBEC (CUP) — The 72
psychology students at Laval
university have temporarily
suspended the strike which
they began Sept. 23.
Claiming that the vice-
rector Lorenzo Roy had offered to institute temporary
measures to benefit their department, they said that they
welcomed the open spirit
which    the    authorities    had
shown towards them.
The students had demanded
autonomy for their department, now part of the faculty
of education.
They warned the administration, however, that they
would resume the strike if the
commission now studying their
problem did not bring in suitable solutions after a "reasonable delay."
the Thunderbirds opened the
door for a McMaster comeback
in the fourth quarter.
The Marauders took over at
the UBC 21, and quarterback
Mark Timpany promptly connected with end Dick Pottruff
at the Bird four.
The Birds held twice, but on
third down Marauder fullback
Steve Ostapchuk slammed over
from the one to put McMaster
on the scoreboard.
Bill Stankovic converted to
tie the score at 7-7.
The Birds tried to retaliate,
but had to settle for a 42-yard
single by Doug Stavely. John
Oldham nailed Maurauder punt
return man George Adams in
his end zone for the punt.
With time running out, McMaster drove from their own
25 to the UBC 31. Stankovic
tried a field goal from there,
but the ball went wide.
Bird halfback Larry Barrett,
attempting to run the btall out,
was trapped by Paul St. George
for the tying punt.
This week, the Birds are preparing for Saturday's home
opener with powerful Humboldt State College.
NOW PLAYING!
ALL STAR JAZZ
from
San Francisco's
Jazz Workshop
Freddie  Redd  —  Piano
Philly Joe  Jones — Drums
Walter Benton — Sax
Bob Maize — Bass
OPEN   9   P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. $2.00 - [ri.-Sot. $2.50
BLUE HORN
3625 WBROADWff   731-6722
Birds top Scots
in UBC opener
Coach Joe Johnson's soccer Birds staged a brilliant
offensive show atop the Pacific Coast League in their home
opener Saturday.
UBC struck for five first-
half goals and went on to defeat St. Andrews 5-2 at Varsity
Stadium.
The Birds, who finished a
dismal last in the PCL last
season, have won both of their
starts this season.
Bob Beckow led the Birds
with two goals within sixty
seconds. Dick Mosher, Harry
Lendvoy and Ash Valdai added
singles.
Ted Budai and playing coach
Barry Mansell scored for the
Scots in the first half.
Compared to last season, the
Birds have now achieved half
their win total and one-third of
their goal production. Last season, UBC won four, lost 18 and
tied two while scoring 25 goals.
The next test for the scoring
Birds is a three-game exhibition
swing through California this
week.
Stanford, San Jose and the
University of California will
provide the opposition.
SPORTS
'or:   Ed   Clark
Lawyers get
their justice
out  of  court
The editorial staff of the
UBC Law Review — all third-
year law students—throttled a
first-year law team 25-18 in
the annual challenge football
game last week.
It was no contest. The Law
Review dressed only 12 men,
threw up an impregnable defence, and sliced through the
first-year team at will.
Notwithstanding the help of
a large partisan crowd and
statisticians, who later admitted to juggling the books
in favor of the loser, and
lirst-year team was hopelessly bogged down, shouting case
names for signals and even
thorwing old volumes of the
Dominion Law Reports at the
feet of Review linemen.
Professors English and Mclntyre of tho Law Faculty act-
| cd as referees and suffered
only minor injuries. They are
expected to resume teaching
in late November.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Help Wanted
4 members needed for the Accident Benefit Fund
Committee — medical students or nurses preferred,
but representative sample of UBC students needed.
Apply in writing to the Secretary, AMS, Mailbox 54,
Brock Hall.
Grad Class
Membership: all students in the winter session who
are registered in the final year of a course leading
to a Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members
of the Grad Class.
— the constitution requires election of executive
within one month of the start of classes.
— positions open are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convenor, Public Relations
Officer.
— a meeting of the Grad class (all graduating students for the first time on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER
6, at 12:30 in the AUDITORIUM.
 nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS,
postbox 54.
Homecoming Decorations Chairman
Needed to supervise the set up of Homecoming Dance
decorations in the Armouries and Field House; male
or female. Submit applications to Brock Hall, mailbox 81.
College Shop Committee
Applications now being accepted for positions on the
'       College Shp  Committee.  No previous experience is
required but applicants should have an interest  in
marketing and retail policy making. Apply in writing,
University Debating Team Tryouts
Apply in writing to Debating Union, Box 31, Brock
Hall. State telephone number. All students are
eligible.    Deadline 4:30 p.m. Oct.  15. Hii?
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   October   5,   1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Clubs   Day over again  as  clubs hold first meetings
VOC
First meeting for new members in Hebb theatre at noon
today.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Your   Creative   Power   Expressed, a talk by David Osha-
nek iii Bu. 221 at noon Wednesday.
CIRCLE K
Slides  from  the  convention
at   Klamath   Falls   at  general
meeting   noon   Wednesday   in
Bu. 2205.
AQUA SOC
Organizational    meeting    in
Bu.   212,   Wed.   at  noon.   All
new members urged to come.
LIBERALS
General meeting at noon in
Bu. 205. All new liberals
urged to attend.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Firect from San Francisco,
the Freddie Redd Quartet,
noon. Wednesday, in Brock
Hall, 25 cents.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
First general meeting of
Chinese Varsity Club today at
noon, in Bu. 203.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
POUND—MONEY. DID YOU LOSE
some on Sept. 30 at noon? Phone
Barb WA 2-6378.
WOULD PERSON WHO Exchanged "London Fog" raincoat
for mine in "Riddington Room"
Sept. 30 please phone Alan 224-
9900 evenings.
FOUND—LADIES' WATCH—FRED-
die Wood Theatre Monday Sept.
27th.
FOUND— A BLACK SCARF WAS
found near the Buchanan Building.
Owner please claim at the Ubyssey Publication Room in Brock
Hall.
FOUND—FROM AN UNAUTHORIZ-
ed locker in Buchanan approx. two
weeks ago, Frosh books and some
clothing. See Bu. 182.
LOST — PAIR BLACK - RIMMED
glasses; gold case. Phone Colleen,
FA  1-0386.
FOUND—3 SLEEPING BAGS AND
1 pillow at Frosh Retreat. Claim
at Frosh   office   Brock   Ext.   157.
LOST — RED KEY CASE  THURS-
day.   Urgent!   261-7841.
LOST    —    BLACK SKI    JACKET
Thursday.      Buch. 3202.      Finder
please   phone   AM 6-2101   after   6
p.m.
LOST — BXTTANE LIGHTER IN
Brock Lounge. Initials P. A. H.
Phone   AM   6-8566   after   6:00   p.m.
Special Notices
13
ARE YOU A RENAISSANCE MAN
or a Technological Man? Find out
Thursday in the Auditorium.
FORESTRY   WEEK  —  OCT.   11 - 15
Watch  For  Special   Even t s.
FORESTER'S HARD TIME "UN-
dercut" Dance Oct. 15 PNE Show-
mart Bldg. 8:00 p.m. Buses from
Residences.   All   students   invited.
APPEARING THIS SATURDAY,
Oct. 9 in the Armories The Sonics
(the Witch) from Seattle and The
Vancouver Playboys at Frosh Reception Dance 9:00 p.m. to 1:00
a.m.      	
SWING TO THE NIGHTRAINS AT
Campus A Go-Go! They're the
biggest (11 pieces) and best soul
band in B.C. today! And this band
is only the first of six great
reasons for you to be at Campus
A Go-Go!	
ONLY SEVEN MONTH TO GBADU-
atlon. Next Tear's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now.from AMS Business Office.
INTERESTED in Figure Skating &
dancing on ice? UBC Thunderbird
Arena Tuesdays 7:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Special rates. For full information
call Pt. Grey Winter Club. 224-
7628.
Transportation
14
CAR POOL MEMBERS NEEDED
in 56th & Ontario area. Phone
Pete FA 5-6435.
WANTED — 1 OR 2 CAR - POOL
drivers. New Westminster area.
Call  Rich  LA  1-8705  after 6  p.m.
RIDE WANTED FROM CRAN-
brook area to Vancouver Thanksgiving Monday. Call Jerry HE 3-
3615.
DRIVER NEEDED FOR BRITISH
Properties carpool. Phone WA 2-
6893.  Leave   Message after  5  p.m.
RIDE NEEDED FROM CAUL-
field area, West Van. Phone 926-
2471.
GIRLS NEED RIDE TO CALGARY
Thanksgiving. Will share gas.
731-2756.
NORTH BURNABY — RIDE wanted
Mon. Wed. Thurs. Fri., 8.30's.
Phone Gina, CY 8-8519.
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE  & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61  MOD.   SPRITE,  NEW   BRAKES,
tires,   paint,   Also  snow   tires,   ski
rack.  Mowich  253-8876.
METROPOLITAN HDTP. 1957 YEL-
low and white. Top cond't. Low
miles.  526-7669.
'53 FORD. EVERYTHING NEW—
after 5 p.m. RE 6-5171. 3643 W. 1st.
ATTENTION RALLY FANS! 160
Skoda   Sports   Convert.,   spotless,
new tires, brakes, clutch, etc. 1100
cc. Twin Carb. $500 or offer. BR
7-2012.
$900 OR BEST OFFER: 1959 Simca
Conv. Sports, pullmanized seats,
Michelin "X" tires. All trans,
radio. Cheap on gas. Phone 265-
4283 Mon.-Fri. after 7 p.m. All day
Sat.  & Sun.
I CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting Wed. noon
in Bu. 214. All new members
attend.
GUEST SPEAKERS
Sir John Crawford, Research School of Pacific Affairs, Australian National University. Noon today in Bu. 104.
Topic: Population Crisis in
Asia.
Prof. P. I. Lee, head of Dept.
of National Philosophy, Glasgow University, at 3:30 p.m.
today in Hebb. Topic: The
Atomic Nucleus.
TOTEM
Staff meeting  of Totem   in
Brock    Extension    168    today
noon.
FENCING CLUB
First meeting ofFencing Club
Wed., Oct. 6, in Women's Gym
at 7:30. All welcome.
UN CLUB
General meeting noon Wed-
1959 M.G. REC. MOTOR JOB. Good
tires, trans., radio, heater, $875.
228-8296.
1962 VALIANT SIGNET — 2 door
hardtop-automatic. Fully equipped.
In excellent condition. $1700.00 or
best offer. Phone 738-2988 after
5:00 p.m.    	
1957 SUNBEAM RAPIER. Sale or
trade for sports car. Stick, tach.,
good   cond.   AM   6-0162 Grant
Automobiles — Wanted 25
327 CHEV COMPLETE OR SHORT
block. 300 hp or F.I. heads preferred. Drop note in locker 315A
Engineering building.	
Motorcycles
27
HONDA 90. NEAR NEW, 3900 M.
Need money to pay fees. Cheap.
922-6731. 	
1962 HONDA 55cc. MUST SELL
within 3 days. $100 or best offer.
Please contact Linda at 261-0115
after   5:30  p.m. __
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters 8t Repairs 42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RK-
views, and cases typed by qualified typists. From 40c per sheet
including paper, one carbon copy,
and binder. See us for mimeographing, dittos, stencil cutting,
and Multilith master preparation.
We also offer complete editing
and rewrite service — Ardale
Griffiths Limited at 70th and
Granville.   Phone  263-4530.       	
TYPING     (HOME).     ALL     KINDS.
Mrs. Wood- Phone 985-5086.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FREE RENT FOR MARRIED
couple caretaker for 6-suite W.End
apt,  block.  Phone MU 1-0602.
MALE ADVERTISING ASSISTANT
required by Publications Offce,
Brock Hall. Applicant should have
an interest in printing or advertising. Work involves proofreading of
Ubyssey, ads. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday. About 1-1% hours
between 6 & 8:30 p.m. at College
Printers Ltd. Must have transportation.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
HONOURS MATH & PHYSICS 3rd
Year. Complete set of Math 320,
321, 322 Notes, Problems & Exams.
Call 263-6178 after 6  p.m.	
TUTORS WANTED FOR ZOOLOGY
422 Ethology and Psychology 100.
Please phone 224-9776 in the even-
in g aiidaskforJudyJRoom_2141
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
IT SHRUNK WHEN I WASHED
it. One (now) medium sized
Judogi.   Phone   AM   1-2796.	
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.	
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 15-45 lbs. From $7.50.
FA  1-17T6  and AM  6-2869.
HIGH DENSITY & FLUORESCENT
Desk Lamps, $6.95 and $9.95. Cal-
vert-Craft Hardware & Gifts, 3209
West Broadway. Phone 738-2311.
(Opposite Liquor Store, Peter's
Ice Cream, and Super Valu).	
FOR SALE — SET OF DRUMS.
Bass, Large and Small Tom-Toms,
Ludwig Super Classic Snare $250,
Cash. Call Joe, HE 1-0889, after 6.
Rooms
81
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
large basement suite with same
near University. All Found $35.
Phone   733-3602.
nesday in Bu. 203.
RADSOC
General meeting  of Radsoc
today at noon in Bu. 216. All
attend please.
MUSSOC
General meeting in Bu. 202
for all Mussoc members, Wed.,
at noon.
CHORALSOC
First meeting   of  Choralsoc
Oct. 6 in Bu. 104 at 6 p.m. All
attend.
DEBATING UNION
General meeting of the debating union  at  noon,   Wed.,
in Bu. 102.
CUBAN FRIENDSHIP
First meeting today of Cuban   Friendship  Club   in   Bu.
202 at noon. All welcome.
STUDENT RELIGIOUS
Hear Rev. A. Phillip Hew-
let speak on "Religion for a
Revolutionary Age," Wed.
noon in Mildred Brock.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
CLUB
General meeting Wed. noon
in Bu. 221. All welcome.
UBC PIPE BAND
All interested in forming a
pipe band come to Bu. 220 at
noon today.
CHEERLEADERS
All interested in trying out
please come to Hut L-6 in strip
today. No experience needed.
BIG BLOCK
Meeting   of   Big   Block   on
Wed. at noon in Bu. 225. All
welcome.
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
First concert to feature Arthur Poison, violin, and Harold   Brown,   piano.   Bu.   106,
Wednesday.
PRE-MED
Organizational meeting of
Pre-Med society, Wed. noon, in
Wes. 100.
Frederic Wood Theatre
Dept of Theatre
Revival of Hit Musical Revue
IN THE ROUGH
Student Performance - Wed., Oct. 6, 8:30 p.m.
ALL TICKETS $1.00
Your only chance to see this widely acclaimed performance starring Roma Hearn, D. M. Hughes, James
Johnston and others.
BOX OFFICE ROOM 207, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127344/manifest

Comment

Related Items