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The Ubyssey Jan 14, 2010

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 2010.01.14
WEATHER
UBC BY NUMBERS 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.01.14
JANUARY 14, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N° XXXII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia. It is published every
Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications
Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey
staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff,
and do not necessarily reflect the views of The
Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of
British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The
Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey Publications
Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork
contained herein cannot be reproduced without the
expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding
principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification
will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion
pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will
be given to letters and perspectives over freestyles
unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces
will not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
submissions for length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published
in the following issue unless there is an urgent time
restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the
Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS will
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
A freak fire wiped out the Masthead for this issue. Here's
the gist of it, though: A fanciful scene was described
involving Ashley Whillans and Joanna Reeder There was
an inside joke about Paul Bucci, with passing references
to Justin McElroy and Gerald Deo. Somehow Sara Chung
and Sam Jung were worked into the next sentence,
because their names sound good together. Fabiola
Carletti, Johnny Wakefield and Nichole Gall were lumped
together in a potentially offensive aside about farm
animals. Adeeb Tawseef and Austin Holm were described
as New York drag gueens from the sixties, and Kasha
Chang showed up in a Velvet Underground reference. Bob
Bobson is fictional, but I'm pretty sure Kristen Harris and
Danielle Zandbergen are real. Trevor Record was accused
of hating Catholics, and somehow Anthony Goertz was
involved. Or wait, maybe it was Virginie Menard. Either
way, one of them was a priest. And Tara Martellaro may
have been an altar boy It really gets blurry here. Katarina
Grgic did something with a blender, and the whole thing
ended with a clumsy hypothetical connection between
Sarah Baldwin and several Hollywood actors. There was
no satisfactory closing statement
FRONT PAGE GRAPHIC RY
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \_AQ
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION* Come help us
create this baby! Learn about layout
and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
KOERNER'S NIGHT* Join us for open
mic night every Monday. Listen
to the different flavours of music,
all while enjoying a nice cold beer
or a competitive game of pool. •
Every Monday, 8:30pm onwards.
Koerner's Pub.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC &
MEAL* Like to play fun music? Just
want to listen? Looking for a sense
of community? This is for all members of the UBC community who
want to have a good meal and
great conversation. All meals are
home-cooked and are vegetarian-
friendly. • Every Monday, 6:30pm-
8:30pm, Chapel of the Epiphany
(6030 Chancellor Blvd), more info
revnathanwright@mac.com.
DRIPPYTOWN: VANCOUVER'S COMIC
ARTISTS ON DISPLAY* Want a different take on Vancity? The collection
features contributions from six local
comic artists whose work provides
a look at life in Vancouver. • Continues until Jan 31, Rare Books and
Special Collections in IKE, more info
at puddingsock livejoumal. com.
UBC FILM SOC PRESENTS: A SERIOUS
MAN • Directed by the Coen Brothers, A Serious Man is a dark comedy
about a man trying to find balance and
direction in the world. • Jan 13-17,
9pm-11pm, Norm Theare, SUB. $4
general admission, $2 for members.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Get healthy and
come run or walk. Hosted by UBC
Rec, the Noon "Fun" Run is about
active participation, wellness and
fun that takes students on a scenic
course ranging from 3 to 5 km. •
Every Thursday starting Jan 14,
Student Rec Centre (6000 Student
Union Blvd).
THURSDAY, JAN. 14
POETRYHAUS* Part of Arts Week, a
chance for students to share poetry in a casual atmosphere. With
special guest appearances from
Slam Vancouver, UBC Slam and
UBC Improv. Coffee and snacks
will be provided. • 5pm-7pm,
MASS, Buchanan D.
BRANCHING OUT • The Foresty
Undergraduate Society (FUS)
and the Students for Forestry
Awareness (SFA) are hosting a
symposium to provide insight into
the implications of current forestry
issues and perspective regarding how students can apply their
education to adapt to and initiate
changes in the sector. Listen to the
panel discussion and get an opportunity to voice your opinions. •
6pm-9pm, Lecture Theatre 1005,
Forest Sciences Centre.
HIP HOP* One of the world's most
popular dances for all levels! Wear
loose baggy clothes and runners.
No jeans/skirts! • 4pm-5pm, SUB
Ballroom, drop in: $8.
IAN FERGUSON • An award-winning
playwright and humourist whose
commentaries have been widely
broadcast on radio and television
speaks on being Canadian. • 2pm,
Lillooet Room (301) IKBLC.
ARTS AND MASS VIOLENCE: NEW FORMS
OF ENGAGEMENT* The Liu Institute's
Transitional Justice Network presents this dialogue about artistic
research and practices relating to
situations of mass atrocity, social
reconstruction and social change. •
Panel discussion at 4pm, reception
at 5:30pm, Liu Institute for Global Issues (6476 NW Marine Drive). Free
registiation online at fluidsurveys.
com/surveys/liuinstitute/register-tjn-
arts-event/.
CONTINUING STUDIES WRITING CENTRE
USED BOOK SALE • The Writing Centre
will be holding its gigantic annual
booksale. There will be a wide variety of used books on a wide variety
of subjects, from cookery books to
classics of fiction, and lots more. All
proceeds go to awards and scholarships in the UBC Writing Centre. •
Jan 14-15, 10am-4pm, UBC Writing
Centre. All books are 50 cents each.
GO GLOBAL ONLINE APPLICATION WORKSHOP • Come to this workshop to go
over the Go Global Online Application
for Exchange & Study Abroad step by
step. Helpful for students who have
decided to apply to study abroad, but
have notyet started the online application. • 11am-12pm, Upper Lounge,
International West House (1783 West
Mall). More info at go.global@ubcca.
FRIDAY, JAN. 15
A CONVERSATION WITH MICHAEL IGNATIEFF AT UBC* Liberal leader Michael
Ignatieff is starting the new year
with a cross-Canada campus tour
to meet young Canadians in the
lead-up to Canada at 150: Rising
to the Challenge—a non-partisan
conference being held in Montreal in
March 2010. • 3pm-4:30pm, Norm
Theatre.
SATURDAY, JAN. 16
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL VS. FRASER
VALLEY CASCADES • UBC Basketball vs. Fraser Valley Cascades
Come out and support your
UBC Thunderbirds as they continue their 2009-10 basketball
season with a match-up against
the conference rival Fraser Valley Cascades. Wear blue and
BRING THE NOISE! • 6pm,
War Memorial Gym Ticket, $10
adult/$5 youth/$2 student.
UBC HOCKEY VS. ALBERTA PANDAS
• Come out and support your
UBC Thunderbirds as they
continue their 2009-10 hockey
season with a match-up against
the conference rival Alberta
Pandas. Wear blue and BRING
THE NOISE! • Thunderbird
Arena, 7:30pm, $10 adult/$5
youth/$2 student.
UBC BASKETBALL VS. FRASERVALLEY
CASCADES* Come out and sup-
portyour UBC Thunderbirds as
they continue their 2009/2010
basketball season with a
match-up against the conference rival Fraser Valley Cascades. Wear blue and BRING
THE NOISE! • 8:00pm, War
Memorial Gym, $10 adult/$5
youth/$2 student.
FILMSATTHENORM»The UBC Film
Society presents: Where the
Wild Things Are (G, 101 mm)
• The Norm Theatre in the
SUB, $4 general admission, $2
for members.
BACKSTORY: NUUCHAANULTH CRE-
MONIAL CURTAINS AND THE WORK
OF KI-KE-IN • Please join us
for the opening reception
Symposium: Talking about
Thliitsapilthim, Nuuchaanulth
Ceremonial Curtains • Marris
and Helen Belkin Art Gallery.
For more information, please
visit belkin.ubc.ca, free.
SUNDAY, JAN. 17
GUTTERBALL BOWLING • It doesn't
matter whether you roll a strike,
spare, split, or gutterball at this
bowling tournament because
you'll have a blast! CoRec
teams of 4 to 6 participants
sign up for a one hour timeslot
Sign up by Wednesday Jan
13. • 6pm-10pm, Varsity Ridge
Bowling Centre, 2120 W. 15th
ave. $48 UBC student team,
$100 UBC staff, more info at
amiu@rec.ubc.ca
MONDAY, JAN. 18
AFRICA AWARENESS WEEK • Participate in the on-campus dialogue
about African issues • Opening
Night, 6pm-7:30 pm, africaconfer-
enceweek.eventbrite.com.
TUESDAY, JAN. 19
AAI CONFERENCE: AFRICAN ART AND
POETRY: OPEN MIC PERFORMANCES •
Africa has been the source of artistic
inspiration for many the geopraphi-
cal nature of Africa is an astounding
piece of art in its own right. Join us
in celebrating the artistic nature of
Mama Africa through art from the
motherland. This is a collaborative
event with the Nyala restaurant
and Caribbean African Association.
• 6pm-12am, Koerner's Pub, Entrance by donation, suggested $5.
FILM SCREENING: THE AGE OF STUPID •
UBC Continuing Studies presents
The Age of Stupid, the docu-drama
everyone is describing as the wakeup call for climate change. After the
film, a brief panel discussion, led
by Brian Nattrass of Sustainability
Partners Ine, will examine potential
forward steps in the fight against climate change. • Doors open at 6pm;
film at 6:30pm, followed by panel
discussion. Woodward Instivctional
Resources Centre, Theatre 2, 2194
Health Sciences Mall. Tickets $10
and are available at the door or call
604-822-1444 to reserve
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20
ROMEO & JULIET • "These violent
delights have violent ends." Expect
a brave and twisted approach to
Shakespeare's iconic story of lovers in a dangerous time from MFA
Directing Candidate Catriona Leger.
Drawing from the traditions of
Bouffon, Clown and Cabaret, this
theatre-in-the-round production will
tickle, thrill and tantalize. Audiences
will experience theatre as it was
meant to be - LIVE. • Telus Studio
Theatre, $15 for students, runs until
Saturday, January 30.
THURSDAY, JAN. 21
HKIN SEMINAR SERIES: OLYMPIC
GAMES INPACT RESEARCH—HISTORICAL, CONCEPTUAL AND METH0D0L0G-
ICALCONSIDERATIONS* This seminar
will be given by Dr Rob Van Wyn-
sberghe, who will be examining
the theorectical and methodogical
underpinnings of the International
Olympic Committee's Olympic
Games Impact research program.
• 12:30pm-2pm, War Memorial
Gymnasium Room 100.
THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE—DISSOLVE
• Being put on for Sexual Assalt
Awareness Month as their second
event, followed by a Q&A with creator and performer Meghan Gardiner. • 7pm, Dorothy Somerset Studio
(6361 University Blvd). $5 deposit to
be returned at performance.
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS SERIES
• For the Unconditional Defence of
the Chinese Deformed Workers
State! For Workers Political Revolution! • 6:30pm, UBC SUB Room
224
SUNDAY, JAN. 24
AMS ELECTION PRESENTS: HACKFEST
BZZR GARDEN! • Meet the candidates
running to be in your student government, one day prior to the opening
of the polls! Mingle with your opponents and campaign to students
who never go out to debates! Also
available: samosas and $2 beers! •
Jan 24, 7pm-11pm, SUB Partyroom.
MONDAY, JAN. 25
GSS ELECTIONS ON-CAMPUS DEBATE
• The Graduate Student Society
is hosting an on-campus debate
between all nominees for the
GSS elections. Come meet your
future  executives and  enjoy the
free food and beverages. One
free drink ticket will be issued to
all in attendance. • Thea's Lounge,
Giaduate Student Centre (6371
Crescent Rd.), 5pm-8pm. More
info      at      elections@gss.ubcca.
TUESDAY, JAN. 26
ALLIES UNITE! COMMUNITY RALLY AND
MARCH • Being put on for Sexual
Assault Awareness Month as their
third event. Gather for a rally and
march around campus, followed
with refreshments. • 4pm-6pm,
Student Union Building.
GSS ELECTIONS OFF-CAMPUS DEBATE
• The Graduate Student Society
is hosting an off-campus debate
at the BC Cancer Researc Centre
between all nominees for the GSS
elections. Come meet your future
executives and enjoy the free food
and beverages. • Diamond Family Lecture Theatre, BC Cancer
Research Centre (675 West 10th Avenue, by Heather), 12:00pm-2pm.
More info at elections@gss.ubc.ca
THURSDAY, JAN. 28
TOUGH GUYS: SEXUAL VIOLENCE, MEDIA, AND THE CRISIS IN MASCULINITY
• Being put on for Sexual Assault
Awareness Month, a public lecture
by Jackson Katz, PhD. • 6pm, Hebb
Theatre.
FRIDAY, JAN. 29
"TAKING IT PERSONALLY: WHY GENDER
VIOLENCE IS AN ISSUE FOR MEN" •
Workshop for students being put
on for Sexual Assault Awareness
Month. • 70am, Room 100, Neville
Scarfe Building (2125 Main Mall).
SATURDAY, JAN. 30
EXHIBITION INDIA 2010* Presented by
the UBC Bhangra Club, this is one
show that combines the sounds,
sights and vibrancy of India in an
entertainment-filled night of entertainment. All ticket proceeds go to
BC Children's Hospital. • Jan 30,
6pm-9pm, Bell Centre for the Performing Arts (6250-144th St), $15,
For tickets call Harman (778-865-
3216) or Puneet (778-24-4235)
GAZA REMEMBERED* One Year Later
Hear Dr George Bisharat, Dr Mads
Gilbert, Dr Joanne Naiman and Dr
Hani Faris speak. • Alice MacKay
Room, Vancouver Public Library,
350 West Georgia, 7:30pm, Free,
RSVP at MuslimCommunityCenter.
com.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY* AKCSE
UBC presents its first annual AKCSE
Research Competition for Undergraduate Students, sponsored by
StemCell Technologies and TRIUMF
Regardless of experience, any undergraduate science or engineering student can study a topic of their choice
and compete for up to $1000! • The
deadline for application is Jan 25,
2010. For more information, please
visit www.akcseubc.org/research or
email akcse.reseaich@gmail.com for
any inquiries.
CLASSIFIEDS
• Textbooks bought and sold, new &
used, online buybacks. Buy, sell, rent
at cheapbooks.com, or call (260)
399-6111, Espahol (212) 380-1763,
Urdu/Hindi/Punjabi (713) 429-4981
See site for other support lines.
CORRECTIONS
• In the article "Your Ams Elections
2010 Candidates", we wrote that
there are six senate seats when
there are only five. The Ubyssey
regrets this error. 2 010.01.14/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
N
EDITOR
EWS
SAMANTHA JUNG»news@ubvssev.ca
OVERHEARD
"Is the law school part of the...educational mission of the university? Or is it a profit
centre? Now, 1 understand that international students are a profit centre...they always
put in the bullet point that 'oh, this is for cultural interaction' and it's not, it's just because every one of those guys comes in the school with $12,000 attached to them."
-Law Student Society President Ted Murray on the university's proposal to remove the two per cent cap on tuition
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG»schung@ubyssey.ca
Law students fear possible $6000 tuition increase
Dean of Law maintains that consultations are ongoing
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
When it comes to tuition increases,
no news is not necessarily good
news for UBC Law students.
Students in the faculty are becoming increasingly concerned
over "selective relaxing," a proposal
drafted by the UBC administration
which upon approval, would allow
the university to raise tuition in selected professional programs above
the two per cent tuition cap put in
place by the provincial government
in April.
Dia Montgomery, director
of AMS Relations for the Law
Student Society (LSS), brought
the concern to AMS Council last
Wednesday, January 6 in hopes
that the soon-to-be elected new
student government would provide long-term help against this
proposal. She also announced
that she will be in contact with
the BC President of the Canadian
Bar Association, James Bond, for
additional support and advice.
At the Council meeting, Montgomery stated that if the cap is lifted, Law students may be faced with
a $6000 per year tuition increase.
This number is not set in stone,
however, and Montgomery later
clarified that there is no clear answer from UBC about the exact
tuition increase students should
expect to face.
"It has been stated in faculty
meetings and meetings I've attended with the dean, but there is no
[document] that I can point you to
that says that number," said Montgomery in a telephone interview.
We as the student
government at the
law school, are trying to mount an
opposition...but are
muddled knowing
where to go to and
knowing who can
help us.
DIA MONTGOMERY
DIRECTOR 0FAMS RELATIONS FOR LAW
STUDENT SOCIETY
"This is one of our frustrations,"
she added, "we as the student
government at the law school, are
trying to mount an opposition to
such a vast tuition increase, but are
muddled knowing where to go to
and knowing who can help us."
In various phone and e-mail
interviews with The Ubyssey,
both Dean of Law Mary Anne
Bobinski and Communications
Coordinator Penny Elton denied
that the figure of $6000 had
been discussed, adding that
while a plan to raise tuition was
discussed within the faculty, it
was never taken to the Board of
Governors, and therefore has no
"official status."
In a interview with The Ubyssey in early December, Bobinski
disclosed the previous tuition increase plans—plans that were
proposed before the tuition cap-
were "probably about ten per
cent a year over four years."
However, Elton later told The
Ubyssey that this figure should
not be assumed.
"Any discussion of what a plan
might look like, should the cap
be lifted, would be highly speculative and very premature," she
explained.
She also assured students that
a "detailed and thorough consultation process with students and
stakeholders would be part of any
discussions regarding tuition increases in the future."
Due to the fact that the proposal is in its preliminary stages,
UBC administrators were reluctant to talk about their current
plans. If the cap is lifted, many
UBC professional programs such
as Medicine, Dentistry and Law
could face a tuition increase,
which has been especially concerning to Law students, many of
whom, such as LSS President Ted
Murray, feel targeted as a result
of the proposal.
"We are not concerned enough
to the extent of being outraged,"
explained Murray, "but it bothers us that the idea of singling us
out in this way on the basis that
because we are in these professional programs that we are going to have high enough future
incomes and therefore we should
pay more tuition."
Any discussion of
what a plan might
look like, should
the cap be lifted,
would be highly
speculative and
very premature.
PENNY ELTON
FACULTY OF LAW COMMUNICATIONS
COORDINATOR
While all the exact details maybe
unknown, Montgomery is making
sure the students do everything in
their power to fight against any type
of large tuition increase, immediate
or otherwise.
"Finding people who can help us,
who can fight against [this tuition
increase] is our biggest challenge
right now," she saidTvl
TOTEM TO GET
NEW DIGS
UBC Housing and Conferences, along with Campus and Community Planning, held a consultation session for a new seven-
storey in-f ill housing unit at Totem Park residences.
The project, which will cost approximately $45 million and is
scheduled to be completed in August 2011, will add just over
560 new beds to the first- and second-year housing complex.
The proposed dorms will be private bedrooms with a shared
bath, compared to the current dormitories, which consist of
shared quarters and a communal bathroom on each floor.
Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden is the architectural firm hired
for the project. They are striving for REAP Gold standard, UBC's
personal green building assessment system based on the
LEED Gold standard.
—Samantha Jung
Bidding
farewell to
Gallini
To be completed in August 2011, the in-f ill housing at Totem will have sustainability features such as green roofs and rain collectors. GERALD DEO PH0T0S/THE UBYSSEY
JOANNA REEDER
Contributor
The Faculty of Arts will see new leadership as of nextyear, when current Dean
Nancy GaUini's near decadelong appointment draws to a close in late June.
The Ubyssey asked Dean Gallini for her
thoughts on the eightyears she spent as
dean and her take on the issues her successor will have to deal with around the
future of an arts education at UBC.
After 17 years as a professor of
economics at the University of Toronto, Dean Gallini spent five years
heading up the department between
1995 and 2000 before accepting the
top job in the Faculty of Arts at UBC
in 2002. With a characteristic smile,
she said that her departure from the
administration this year is a natural
transition.
"I've been dean for eight years,"
she said. "I think that turnover in
leadership is always healthy in an
academic institution, especially in
one like [the Faculty of Arts] which is
so dynamic and diverse."
The dean of Arts is responsible
for allocating funds to 16 departments, 4 professional schools, 2
museums and numerous interdisciplinary programs, as well as liaising with the president and VP academic on academic issues. Gallini
said that during her term, Arts saw
a faculty turnover of nearly 50 per
cent as well as numerous changes
to its budgetary model. An economist to the core, she explained by
saying, "I don't adhere too well to
a top-down approach," instead espousing a decentralized model with
more grassroots decision-making
styles. This includes student consultation in the interests of departmental autonomy.
Despite the challenge of funding
a massive and extremely diverse
faculty, the dean's excitement with
collaborating with faculty, staff
and students was palpable. She is
proud of the accomplishments and
contributions of faculty, staff and
students, evident as she touted the
student-initiated Humanities 101
program, advances in faculty research, and the recent momentum
among student groups and staff
surrounding sexual assault awareness on campus.
Meet the Dean, an event she began
in the second year of her term, was
an important part of getting student
issues on the agenda. "I see myself
as one of thousands of people in a
team," she beamed. "We're all trying
to work together as a community."
When asked about her next steps
in the faculty and beyond, Gallini said
"I want to keep things going, but at
the same time I want to dean up..J'm
looking forward to goingback to more
research and teaching" vU
Students can meet the dean in the
Meekison Arts Student Space BUCH
D140 next Wednesday January 20. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 010.01.14
UBC Campus Map for iPhone
Now Available @ iTuties
Just 00.99 helps yon or others.
Teach English
Abroad
Backstory
Nuuchaanulth Ceremonial Curtains and
the Work of Ki-ke-in
Bringing together contemporary ceremonial curtair._
by Nuuchaanulth artist Ki-ke-in (Ron Hamilton)
and historical curtains from museum and
private collections in Canada and the United States.
January 17 to March 28, 2010
Opening reception: Saturday, January 16, 3 to 5 pm
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
• Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
* Internationally Recognized Certificate
* Teacher Placement Service
* Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800 269 6719
www.oxfoidseminais.ca
Ki-ke-in painting the th iitsapilthim of
Ha'wilth Nuukrniis of the House of
liwaasaht, Opitsat-h, Tla-o-qui-aht,
winter 1988-89, Vancouver, B.C.
Photo: Haayuusinapshiilthl.
This exhibition is generously sponsored by
The Audain Foundation, and is presented with
the 2010 Vancouver Cultural Olympiad,
with support from the British Columbia Arts Council,
the Canada Council for the Arts and the
UBC Museum of Anthropology
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
University of British Col
ine: 604 822 2759 I Fa
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The Winter Games are coming to
Get Smart.  1
Learn something new. From sport and politics to technology
and the body, there's something for every interest in the
UBC Winter Games Event Series.
January 21,12:30pm
HKIN Seminar Series: Olympic Games Impact Research -
Historical, Conceptual and Methodological Considerations
Room 100, War Memorial Gym
January 21, 7pm
Ethics and the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games: Back or
Ban Boosters for the Body and Brain?
UBC Robson Square
January 21, 7pm
Pecha Kucha-Inspired Olympics Forum
Lillooet Room, Chapman Commons, Irving K Barber Learning Centre
January 30, 2010, 8:15pm
The Sanctuary and Games at Nemea
Instructional Resource Centre, Lecture Hall 2, Vancouver Institute
www.ubc.ca/2010
Follow us on Twitter ©UBCWinterGames
UBC
w
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC    2010    OLYMPIC    &
PARALYMPIC   SECRETARIAT
norway
new Zealand
south africa
united states
Canada
-30    -25     -20    -15     -10
% reduction from 1990 levels
-2
0
-10        0         10       20       30       40       50
I
i       i       i       i       i
quebec
-20%
Ontario
-15%
british Columbia
-14%
alberta
+58%
i
■       i       i       i       i
-20      -10        0 10       20       30
% reduction from 1990 levels
40
50
Proposed CO emission reductions from 1990 levels for 2020, per country
(top) and per province (bottom). GERALD DEO GRAPHICS/THE UBYSSEY
Canadians in Copenhagen: a
tough pill to swallow
|       If you are artistically superior to most people, write to production@ubyssey.ca.   ~~|
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
Making an international agreement
on climate action between 193 leaders of states with varying political
stances is challenging, even if everyone is working together. But UBC
master's student Liz Ferris claims
that Canada was the "obstructionist"
at Copenhagen.
"Canada was not only playing
neutral...we were obstructionists,
we were very much lower than
what actually needs to happen in
order to make our greenhouse
gas emissions to a level to avoid
catastrophic climate change," said
Ferris.
December 18 marked the end
of the UN Conference for Climate
Change in Copenhagen, Denmark,
also known as COP 15. After 12
days of deliberation and debates
between over 10,000 politicians
and environment ministers, a non-
binding Copenhagen Accord was
drafted.
The Accord proposes that developed
countries fund $30 billion over the next
three years to developing nations' projects that would alleviate problems of
drought and floods caused by climate
change. It also "set a goal" of raising
$ 100 billion ayear by 2020.
Ferris, along with five other UBC
students, was at the scene ofthe debate
in COP 15.
"We all wanted a FAB agreement—a 'fair, ambitious and legally
binding' agreement,"said Ferris.
But the 2010 Copenhagen Accord, unlike the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which it is set to replace before
Kyoto expires in 2012, is not legally
binding.
Still, many countries set their own
individual targets for climate change,
such as the European Union committing to a 40 per cent reduction of
greenhouse gas emission below the
1990 levels.
Canada, on the other hand, was
only willing to commit to three
per cent reduction below 1990
levels.
Canada also ranked 61 out of
62 countries this year in terms
of how effective countries were
with reaching their reduced emission targets, according to Climate
Action Network a worldwide
network of over 450 non-governmental organizations. The only
country behind Canada was Saudi
Arabia.
"It was actually a tough pill to
swallow to realize that...as a Canadian [we were] sort of a badjoke ofthe
conference, that my government
was actively breaking apart the
talks rather than participating/'said
Ferris.
Megan McKeen, the youngest
UBC representative at the conference and a member of Canadian Youth Delegation, felt "embarrassed" to be Canadian. "I think
my initial reaction...was still heartbreaking. It was very emotional to
see them play lightly with lives on
the line," she said.
However, some positive things
came out ofthe conference. COP 15
gained a wider exposure on climate
change. "It was hugely empowering
to the numbers of people who are
concerned about this issue,"said
Ferris.
"Within 24 hours, 11 million
people around the planet, including 124,000 Canadians, signed
a petition stating that they want
climate change," she said, adding
that people no longer have doubts
over the scientific evidence that
shows that climate change and
global warming is happening and
that the consequences will be and
are "being catastrophic."
Now safely back at home, both
Ferris and McKeen plan to continue advocating and coming up with
sustainable, tangible solutions, tl 2 010.01.14/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
YVR AddFare no
longer applies to
passholders
Yes, UBC students, that means that
you can go to the airport for free
CENTRE FOR STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
OPENS WITH A FLOURISH—BALLOONS!
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
U-Pass holders who wish to travel
to the Vancouver airport (YVR) via
the Canada Line will no longer
have to pay, after a recent change
in TransLink policies.
When the YVR AddFare came
into effect on January 1, it was
$2.50 for a one-way fare, which
had to be purchased while passengers were travelling between Tem-
pleton and Bridgeport stations on
the Canada Line. "Non-cash fare
media," or pass holders, were not
exempted from this fee, to the
dismay of the AMS and the Simon
Fraser Student Society (SFSS), as
this included U-Pass holders.
Whenever you ask for a
public response, you're
only going to hear
from the people who
don't want it....I think
this was more in the
interests of streamlining
a system that was too
complicated.
KEN HARDIE
TRANSLINK MEDIA RELATIONS
The SFSS and the AMS both
sent letters to TransLink in
opposition/The TransLink commissioner solicited input from transit
users over this issue and student
unions from across the Lower Mainland made submissions stating that
U-Pass holders should not pay the
YVR AddFare citing the existing U-
Pass contracts," said Tim Chu, AMS
VP external.
On January 7, TransLink announced they would exempt U-
Passes, monthly FareCards and
FareSaver tickets from the fee.
Additionally, they lumped the two
fees together, so travellers have
to pay one $5 fee for a round-trip
instead of two $2.50 fees.
According to UBC Insiders, the
TransLink report outlined that the
"'vast majority' ofthe 400 responses
to their public consultation were opposed to the AddFare," citing a lack
of alternatives, effects on ridership
and discrimination as reasons.
When asked if the opposition to
the AddFare was the reason the fee
was changed, Ken Hardie of TransLink media relations disagreed. He
said that "it was generally agreed
that we needed to make the process
simpler...and easy to enforce."
"Whenever you ask for a public response," Hardie continued,
"you're only going to hear from the
people who don't want it...I think
this was more in the interests of
streamlining a system that was
too complicated. There had been
a lot of concern...on the impact of
charging the whole AddFare..lor a
one way trip." tl
NEW SPACE
HELPS PEER
PROGRAMS
CONNECT
Miserable rain and early nightfall
couldn't keep students out of
Brock Hall to celebrate the grand
opening of the new Centre for Student Involvement, also known as
CSL Along with booths informing
many visitors about the variety of
volunteer and leadership opportunities at UBC, student assistants
led tours highlighting the blend
of social and work space, which
included meeting rooms and
shared resources for the leadership programs that operate out of
the space.
—GeialdDeo
GERALD DEO PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
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• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
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• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
ROCK THE DAT
Need help
preparing
for the DAT?
Get great tips & tricks
at our next course
Jan23&24.
www.rockthedat.com
Su^Mer Jobs f
Counselors• High Ropes*Lifeguards• Sailors• Kitchen
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Make a difference in the life of a child dealing with cancer
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IN THEATRES EVERYWHERE FRIDAY, JANUARY 15th
COME VOLUNTEER ON OUR PRODUCTION DAYS!
WED. AND SUN. FROM 2PM ONWARDS! 6/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.01.14
28 DAYS UNTIL
THE OLYMPICS
UBC services to DTES affected by Games
FABIOLA CARLETTI
Contributor
The UBC peninsula can feel far removed from the Downtown East-
side, Canada's poorest postal code.
The university is often lauded as
an academic beacon, while the
DTES is discussed as a blemish on
the face of a polished and Olympic-
ready Vancouver.
But through several innovative
projects, many groups within the
UBC community regularly connect
with the much-maligned area.
These projects help alleviate some
of the neighbourhood's problems
and challenge its one-dimensional
reputation as a slum.
"It's not the mandate of the
university, which is academically
focused, to somehow solve poverty," said Mary Holmes, who runs
the Urban Aboriginal Community
Kitchen Garden at the UBC Farm.
"Still, our emphasis is around paving the pathway with kindness."
As thousands of visitors swarm
the city in February, many projects
will feel the impact and be forced to
adapt. The Ubyssey spoke to some
of those planning for the Olympic
rush.
"We will be doing some proactive
planning," said Margo Fryer, founding director of the UBC Learning
Exchange. "Our location is close to
some of the Olympic venues and
we will be in the midst of all of that
activity."
The Learning Exchange has a
storefront location on Main Street,
making it the university's physical presence in the DTES. It offers
various services like language programs, computer training courses
and student-designed initiatives.
Fryer estimates that around 100
residents make use of the centre
every day.
"It's not going to be business as
usual," said Fryer, "but it would be
silly for use to shut down for two
weeks and wait for it all to be over.
That would be irresponsible."
SHUN ENDO FILE PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
Holmes is less sure of how she
will adapt. Every week, a bus picks
up DTES residents and native elders, bringing them to the farm
to garden, cook, eat together and
take food back with them. During
the Games, their regular bus route
may be congested or even blocked
off.
Holmes wants her participants
to tell her what they want to do.
"I'm going to be elastic," she
said, though her aim is to keep the
service going. "A lot of people depend on the garden 52 weeks ofthe
year, even when we're not growing
anything."
Other projects are closer to high-
traffic areas on campus.
Margo Butler is the Academic
Director of Humanities 101, a
non-credit university-level course
geared toward DTES residents.
Classes are held in the Buchanan
complex.
"There are 60 students a week
from the Downtown Eastside who
are at the campus Tuesday and
Thursday nights," said Butler. She
pointed out that other community
members "might not even know
that they're having supper at the
SUB with these students."
But this service will be on hiatus
during the games, partly because
the atmosphere on campus is
expected to be different as it hosts
Olympic events.
"One of the reasons is that the
security [on campus] is going to be
so high and it's not necessary to
subject our students to it," she said.
One of Butler's former students,
comedian Paul "Decarie" Cloutier,
is taking a humorous approach to
the upcoming event.
"As I say in my routine, I'm in
favour of anything that brings attention to Vancouver, like Expo '86,
the Olympics and feet washing up
on shore," he said.
When Cloutier was a UBC student, he frequented the Burger Bar
in the SUB. Though he enjoyed his
time on campus, he didn't see it
as an escape from his "sometimes
rough" neighbourhood.
"Looking from the outside in,
people place judgment on [the
DTES], but for many of our students
it's a desirable place to live," said
Paul James Woodhouse, program
assistant for Humanities 101 in
UBC, who said many residents have
fresh perspectives and "beautiful
minds."
This upcoming reading week
could be a chance for students to develop their own first-hand opinions.
"Everybody's got preconceived
notions," said Fryer. "The reason why
we see these programs as so powerful is that they do unsettle preconceptions. People get surprised and that's
how learning happens."
Frats to flee campus during Games
Houses to be rented out to security units for month of February
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
While the rest of Vancouver is
either partying on Granville or
getting out of town, expect a somewhat more subdued atmosphere
at the UBC Fraternity Village in
mid-February It was recently announced that the houses on Wesbrook would be rented to a group
providing Olympic security for the
month of February, where the fraternity users would be relocated.
A press release prepared by Glen
Bury, president of the Fraternity
Village Strata Council, outlined the
rental decision. The Strata Council,
which oversees the management of
the fraternity residences, decided
unanimously to rent their houses to
non-members during the Olympics.
The rental idea was proposed during the 2008/2009 academic year,
and was approved before the start
of this year's fall term. The Strata
Council is composed of representatives from each fraternity group.
The fraternities hired Prime
Strategies, a Vancouver-based event
planning agency to find a renter
during the games. They lodge a
group who are providing Olympic
venue security for the duration of
the games, according to the release.
Among Prime's notable former
customers is the Vancouver 2010
Olympic Bid Committee. The firm
provided "travel, event and site
management" for a group of VIPs
attending the 2003 International
Olympic Committee session in
which Vancouver was selected
as the site of the 2010 Olympic
Games. A representative of Prime
said that due to contract issues, he
could not discuss the partnership
with the fraternities.
The demand for event adjacent
housing has provided a "unique
economic opportunity," said Bury.
"We can't disclose, as a condition
of our contract with Prime, how
much money we receive," he said,
but he stressed the benefits of the
income to fraternity members.
"I'm a Deke. In my house, we
gave the guys a discount on their
rent," he added. "All the money we
get goes back into either subsidizing housing for our guys, upgrading
our facilities, or doing something
for the users. Each house will have
control over how it uses its share of
the money."
While the Strata Council's vote
was unanimous, members of Phi
Gamma Delta, a fraternity group,
will not be renting their house.
Maintenance required as part of
the rental arrangement was seen as
"not worth it," said Bury.
The fraternities' decision to
rent such a large percentage of
their beds out during the games is
unique on campus. Andrew Parr,
the managing director of Student
Housing and Hospitality Services,
said renting student residences
was never considered an option.
For market housing on campus, the
rental of housing is up to the owner,
said Jan Fialkowski, the executive
director of the University Neighbourhoods Association.
It is hard to judge the opinions
of members towards the rentals,
which some in the media are referring to as an "eviction," Most
members contacted for this article
declined comment, as they had
been asked not to. One who did
comment, Lawrence Austin of Beta
Theta Pi, felt that the decision was a
smart one because of the monetary
gain. When asked if he felt that
he was being evicted, the answer
was "yes and no", pointing out the
inconvenience of being forced to
totally move out of his room so
close to exam time, but adding the
inconvenience was mitigated by
the fraternity helping him find alternate housing, vl
OLYMPIC BRIEFS
TRANSLINK ANTICIPATES
TWO-HOUR WAITS
TransLink is warning commuters
that they can expect waits of up to
two hours at some transit stations
next month during the Olympic,
reported The Vancouver Sun.
Ken Hardie of TransLink media
relations said that the waits would
likely be only at peak hours, such
as the morning rush, when events
are occurring and after medals
ceremonies.
The transit population is expected
to swell 33 per cent with 250,000
more people using the service
per day. The crunch is expected to
be at all Downtown stations, the
Lougheed station and the stations
with park and rides, such as Scott
Road and King George.
Bicycles will be banned from
the Canada Line and SkyTrain to
accommodate crowds. TransLink is
encouraging transit users to adjust
their schedules and take extra time
in commuting.
CYPRESS CLOSES EARLY TO
PREPARE FOR GAMES
As of January 13, Cypress mountain has closed its alpine runs early
in order to preserve the freestyle
skiing and snowboard courses for
the Olympics.
The early closure of the mountain follows days of warm and wet
weather. VANOC has been running
"an extensive snow salvage project" to save snow and stockpiling it
at higher elevations.
VANOC will now begin construction to prepare for the Olympics,
which includes warming tents,
along with fencing and banners. The
slopes will reopen for the public on
March 9.
ENGINEERS DISCOVER SECRET
TO MAKING ATHLETES FASTER
UBC engineers have discovered
a secret that will hopefully win
Canada more medals at the coming
2010 Winter Games, reported The
Vancouver Sun.
After three years and nearly
$400,000, the engineers have
come up with two new different
surfaces designed for BC's warm
and rainy conditions: one super-slick,
friction-reducing metal surface, and
a plastic surfaces for skates, skis
and snowboards.
One design features speedskate
blades that repel water on the ice,
with a pattern engraved within it
shaped like a lotus leaf. On the new
skis and snowboards, friction has
been reduced by the plastic up to
20 per cent, which means a small
yet crucial advantage for Canadian
athletes in the winter games.
"Canada in the previous Olympic
Games won a lot of fourth places.
It's the kind of thing that I would
imagine would be very bothersome
for these athletes. We thought that
by slightly improving the times we
could push them to the podium positions," said Sawas Hatzikiriakos,
a chemical and biological engineering professor at UBC who led the
endeavour.
"There's not enough time for
anybody to copy us. Maybe in the
next Olympic Games but by then
we should try to discover something
else." tJ 2010.01.14/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/7
Olympic profile: Loo longs for the podium
NICOLE GALL
ngall@ubyssey.ca
For 37-year-old Richmond snow-
boarder and UBC Commerce
alumna Alexa Loo, even an accounting office downtown with
a view of the mountains was not
enough to keep her from leaving
her clients to pursue an Olympic
record.
When Loo graduated from UBC
in 1994, she didn't get into snowboarding until the next year. Then,
in 1998, the same year that she
received her Chartered Accountant
designation, Loo decided to charter
a new life course, which she began
carving out on the mountain as a
member of the Canadian National
Snowboarding Team.
Although Loo missed qualifying
for the Salt Lake City in 2002 by
eleven hundredths of a second, she
persevered, and at the 2006 Turin
Winter Olympics she became the
first Canadian woman to compete
in the Olympic Parallel Giant Slalom (PGS) event, placing 20th.
Since Turin, the time and money
that Loo has invested in training
for PGS—where two snowboarders
race head-to-head down a course
through a series of gates—has paid
off. Loo won a bronze medal in
2006 in Italy, a World Cup bronze
medal in 2009 in the US, and last
Wednesday (January 6), Loo raced
to a career-best second-place finish
in World Cup PGS event in Kreisch-
berg, Austria.
"My second place last week in
Kreischberg was my biggest accomplishment so far," Loo told
The Ubyssey in an e-mail sent from
Switzerland (where she is training
for a World Cup run on the 17th). "It
felt like a huge relief and a lot of fun,
as I had been doubting my abilities
recently after a few bad races."
UBC Commerce alumna Alexa Loo placed 20th in the 2006 Olympics as the first Canadian woman in the Olympic Parallel Giant Slalom. COURTESY OF ALEXA LOO
The weight of a silver medal
around her neck has allowed Loo
to shake off some of the self-doubt
that inevitably affects the athletes
who dedicate years of their life to
a race where every split-second is
significant.
"Every day, I think about what I
am doing and how it will affect my
snowboard career; how to keep my
body healthy and strong whether I
need to make changes to my equipment or my training" said Loo.
In addition to the demands of her
own professional snowboarding career, Loo has dedicated her time to
representing the voice of Canadian
Olympic athletes. After serving as
the Athlete Rep for the International
Ski Federation (FIS), she worked to
reform the FIS election process so
that it was more democratic and
functional. Currently, Loo is serving
as a board member for AthletesCAN
and an Athlete Rep for the Canadian
Olympic Committee (COC).
"I try to be an ambassador for
my sport, sharing it with others
whenever I get the opportunity. I
especially enjoy going to elementary
schools and showing the kids photos
and movies of my sport and telling
them about it," said Loo.
With just over one month
remaining in the Olympic countdown, Loo has set her sights on
reaching her podium potential in
the women's Parallel Giant Slalom
event on February 26. But the ac
countant in her always keeps the
long-term in mind.
"I will probably keep racing until
the 2011 World Championships and
then see what opportunities present
themselves," said Loo of her future
plans, also sharing the news that she
will be marrying the love of her life,
Ari Goosen, after the Games.
"The great ones are the ones
who are truly talented athletes and
can keep focussed and driven long
enough to show their talents." tl
iqt" A\A/a rr\
Students are invited to enter by January 29,2010
• *•
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Winter training no day at the beach
Across the country, varsity teams fly south for the holidays
SANDY CHASE
The Brunswickan
DORADO, Puerto Rico (CUP)-
Quite often, when friends hear
that a team is going away to a training camp, they can be jealous of
those escaping the cold Canadian
winter. Training camps, which usually take place in exotic and sunny
locations, are sometimes perceived
as vacations by the unknowing
outsider, but in reality they are one
of the most exhausting weeks of an
athlete's life.
This year, the UBC Thunderbird
basketball teams travelled south for
the holidays: the men to Hawaii,
where they have trained the last
three winters, and the women to
Cuba. Both coaches felt the trip was
beneficial.
"We got to face off against some
great club teams from the island,"
said women's coach Deb Huband.
"Playing against teams that are
extremely quick, extremely athletic,
teams that play a style we won't
normally see up here, it only makes
us better."
Men's coach Kevin Hanson
echoed the sentiments.
"It's a great environment to be
in, because you can wear shorts
and t-shirts, but the reality is we're
training and playing nearly every
game," he said. "The guys don't get
to relax."
This year, the University of New
Brunswick Varsity Reds swim team
traveled to Puerto Rico over the holiday break, and although the planes
didn't touch down until Dec. 28,
the training camp actually started
nearly a month before.
Throughout the month of December, the team increased the
amount they swam, averaging
around six kilometres swum per
practice, to get the team used to the
higher training volume. Although
the intensity remained moderate,
the team was mentally preparing
for the tough sets to come.
Training camps are often misunderstood by the outside observer.
New Brunswick swimmer Anthony Hickey swam over 80 kilometres while in Puerto Rico. COURTESYOFTHE BRUNSWICKAN
People will wonder why a team has
to travel south to do the same work
and training that could be done at
home.
More than just being able to focus better on the training at hand,
there's another big psychological
advantage to heading south for a
week of training. Being able to relax
between sessions is a key factor in
being able to succeed at camp.
"Driving down to a morning
practice, doing dryland, team
breakfast together and then coming
back at night and to start again, it's
mentally tiring," said Brian Beau-
dette, who is in charge of recruitment and is a former men's team
captain.
"Coming here, you get to watch
the sun rise over your lane, which
is really amazing. You get to spend
the day in the sun and the heat together which is a reward in itself,"
Beaduette added, noting that even
with the rain, the 2 5 degree Celsius
weather is still awesome.
"Doing a night practice and not
seeing the darkness and not being
in the cold at five o'clock at night,
it just does so much more for you."
The final advantage of going
away for training camp is that the
training times are more flexible. Often with long course pools closer to
the equator, many teams will come
to the same spot to train.
Over the course of the UNB
camp, six other swim teams from
Canada and the US were staying at
the same resort, including the Laval Rouge et Or. With an eight-lane
pool, all the teams had access to the
necessary pool time.
The Brunswick swim team completed over 80,000 metres in their
week in Puerto Rico, with runs, circuit training and dryland exercises
on top of their time in the pool.
Eighty kilometres over eight days
may not seem like a long distance
in other sports, but it a significant
amount for swimmers.
"If you want to put it in perspective, a marathon race in swimming
is five kilometres, so when we
swim ten kilometres in a day, that's
a marathon in the morning and
a marathon in the evening," said
UNB swimming coach Dan Monid
"But that's the conditioning it
takes to build up to do this; none
of us could run two marathons in
a day, but that's because we're not
runners. Nobody can do what we do
...just talk to the (athletes) who are
training."
Although training was the dominant focus of the camp, there was
plenty of time for the team to relax
and explore Puerto Rico, including
a chance to explore old San Juan
and a visit to the rainforest.
"We got to go up a mountain,
which was such a good opportunity,
but of course we made it into training. We ran up and it killed the legs,
but the view at the top was worth it,"
said second-year swimmer Natalie
Doucette.
'You can't really put a value on
what we gained from this trip....You
can't pay for these experiences. You
can pay to get down here but what
we do down here is invaluable," she
added.
One feeling that was unanimous
throughout the group of students
was that they all felt closer because
ofthe training camp. Doucette said
homesickness doesn't happen with
the players, because the swim team
acts like a second family, a feeling
that is shared with many of her
teammates.
Tiffany Cook, a first-year swimmer at UNB, said that the team's
coaches were responsible for the
success of the trip, and that they
are "amazing. Training camps back
home were good, and going away is
good, but the sets are all perfectly
planned. Dan and [coach Aaron
Lee] did so much work on this."
Monid, a former UNB swimmer,
said that one of the great things
about the camp is the memories.
'You work your ass off, you push
yourself to the limit, fail, then get
back up and do it again. And between that you're in the sun, you're
sleeping, you're with great friends
and you're seeing new places.
You couldn't ask for a better set of
memories." vl
—With files from Justin McElroy
WEEKEND PREVIEW
BIRDS BOUNCE BACK?
HOCKEY | After a tough two losses
to the Regina Rams last weekend,
the T-Birds Women's hockey team
has another tough test this weekend, as they face off against the
Alberta Pandas in a two-games
series at Father Baeur Arena.
"Again we thought we played well
enough to win but we just couldn't
finish. That has been the story for
us so far this year and although we
are disappointed with the loss, we
can take some good things away
from this game," said T-Birds head
coach Nancy Wilson after the two
games that UBC lost by scores of
2-1 and 3-2.
The two losses pushed UBC's
record to 5-8-1 and to fifth place
in the Canada West conference.
Only four teams make the playoffs, and with ten games left in the
season, every series is now crucial
for the team. Alberta may not be
the ideal opponent for the T-Birds
however, as they are a perfect
16-0 on the season, and ranked
No. 2 in the country.
T-BIRD COACH RECOGNIZED
BASEBALL | UBC head coach Terry
McKaig has been named one of
the top 100 Canadians in Baseball for the third straight year,
ranking No. 62 on SunMedia's
annual list. McKaig has been
head coach of UBC since 1997,
and has seen 11 of his players
drafted in the MLB Amateur
Draft—the most famous being
Colorado Rockies pitcher Jeff
Francis.
McKaig was cited by Bob Elliott,
who compiled the list, as successfully leading Canada's only
four-year university baseball program, and managing his mostly
Canadian team deep into the
2009 NAIA playoffs. \3
ii'SX
After a disappointing weekend, can UBC recover this weekend at home? MICHAELTHIBAULTPH0T0/THE UBYSSEY 12/UBYSSEY.CA/R ANT/2 010.01.14
ACTUAL
HELLO, LOYAL READERSHIP!
Today, we are running the coveted Actual         Rant meant "Literary Supplement," so to         It should be mentioned that all of these
Rant issue. This is a silly issue, where               differentiate, we called the issue where            opinions have only been edited for style,
we let everyone's silly opinions get into            we let people actually rant "Actual Rant."          which means that this is 100 per cent
print, and print a few silly opinions of our           Our inane idiosyncrasies aside, we've              raw UBC student opinion foryour reading
own. That's why we have a silly name,             decided to make this silly idea of ranting a         pleasure. Have fun, and don't forget to
like Actual Rant. This comes from a time          regular thing. So e-mail us your rants ALL         send us yourrants.
when the editors were much sillier, and            YEAR LONG at rant@ubyssey.ca.                                                           —Paul Bucci
i
iff!
N
1
r
THIS BLOWS!
LANA MAD0R
How many people does it take to
move a leaf? UBC's answer: For an
operation like that we'd need at least
ten machines.
Last time I counted, that's how
many workers were packin' leaf
blowers on one campus block. TEN!
It cannot possibly be necessary to
have that kind of crew combing the
campus in search of every single
loose leaf that has been so rude as
to fall onto the precious sidewalks.
You might have mistaken them
for the ghostbusters storming the
campus with the blaring noise and
awkward bulk of their machines,
but really the only threats these
teams combat are tiny withered
leaves.
As much as we all love walking
through clouds of blower smog on
the way to class, or trying to study
with the screeching of ancient motors as background music, it just
doesn't seem very sustainable to
me.
Are UBC sidewalks truly so
dangerously allergic to leaves that
maintenance crews have no choice
but to pull out the big guns? Or is
someone simply so hateful of the
environment and student comfort
that they are intentionally trying to
destroy both?
Legend has it that once upon a
time humans invented a nifty little
thing called a "rake." This simple
contraption could be used quite
effectively to move, pile and repile
leaves, all without the blaring noise,
chronic air pollution and colossal
waste of energy involved in using
hordes of leaf blowers. Aaaah those
were the days... *vU
ROCKING AROUND
THE CLOCK
SHAR SMITH
My rant has to do with clocks around
UBC Why are they not set to the
right time? Why shut them off? Does
time stop when classes are over?
Time is infinite, so why do clocks at
UBC have to be stopped? Start the
clocks now and never again shut
them down! Not everyone has the
time! There are still human beings
in the building after all the classes
are over. Keep the time going! *vU
WHEN WE
USED TO STAND
FOR SOMETHING
PIERCE NETTLING
This editorial ran in The Ubyssey on
July 23,1992:
MEDIA DISTORTS, BUT THE
STRUGGLE CONTINUES
On the night of Wednesday
April 29, a political uprising occurred in Los Angeles. No, this
was not simply a '"riot" and those
who participated in the uprising
were not merely "looters." Three
days ago, young Black people in
Montreal rose up. Forty people
were arrested, twenty-seven of
whom were minors, in a skirmish that broke out between
members of Montreal's Haitian
community and the police. An
article, which appeared in The
Globe and Mail two days ago,
portrayed the participants in the
events in Montreal as "vandals."
The focus ofthe Globe article was
on loss of property, and shopkeepers were portrayed as the
"innocent victims" of young
Black "vandals." Whether or not
the uprising, which took place in
Montreal, was explicitly political
is debatable, but the article in
the Globe and Mail certainly has
political implications. By repeatedly using such words as "riot,"
'looters," and "vandals" over
and over again, the media has
portrayed the actions of Black
people in Montreal, Los Angeles
and other cities as criminal.
Indeed, these words suggest
that the Black community, as a
whole, is a criminal element. By
not representing the social and
economic contexts in which the
Montreal and Los Angeles uprisings occurred and thus implying
the outbreak was spontaneous
and anomalous, the media has
upheld racist stereotypes.
If we were to be informed
solely through the mainstream
media, we would be led to believe dominant, white values are
neutral and benevolent.
And we would be led to
believe any actions which challenge  the  white   supremacist
ruling class are criminal. What is
hidden behind this facade is that
institutions, such as the media
and the police, exist primarily
to "serve and protect the interests of a racist power structure.
Meanwhile,   Black  community
leaders have been shut out of the
discourse. In the Globe article
(and many others like it) there
are no Black people quoted; no
Black voices are being hear d. The
mainstream media has chosen
to ignore the anger of the Black
community. They have chosen,
moreover, to ignore the political
struggles being carried out by
Black and other visible minority
communities in North America.
Racism pervades North American culture and society—it exists
everywhere and, as such, it cannot be ignored.
Looking back, I wonder, where did
we go wrong? We have as a generation slowly lost our passion and soul
for the "more just society of tomorrow." Or maybe we just never had it.
You can turn your iPod back on now
there's nothing really to see here. VI
OBAMA TRAUMA
MIMI YU
You know what really pissed me off
towards the end of 2009?
Obama.
Well, not really Obama but the
Norwegian Nobel Committee. You
guys have really screwed up and
not for the first time (more on that
later).
For those of you unfamiliar with
the history ofthe Nobel Prizes, here
it is in short: there once was a man
named Alfred Nobel. He invented
dynamite, and other armaments.
And then he felt bad about inventing devices that would lead to the
deaths of millions of innocent
people so he designed the award
with his will to recognize positive
human advances (such as peace
and medicine). This is all good for
Alfred—who can die with a feather-
light conscience—but he never had
to decide who was worthy of such
a title! Obama is our latest Nobel
Peace Prize winner and I just have
to say: shame on the Norwegian
Nobel Committee for electing a
man who basically said, "War is
necessary for peace!" Yeah, that'll
definitely make me sleep better at
night.
Now, I understand the effect that
Barack Obama had on the world.
He was the symbol of America's
victory over racism (although, this
is highly debatable, as right-wing
support rose immensely after he
was elected). He is also a symbol
of hope to international communities. Obama was different than
any other American president but
more frankly, Obama wasn't Bush.
Except when he announced that
30,000 more troops would be sent
to Afghanistan (now their faces blur
together just a little)! Huh. I wonder
how the committee sleeps at night
knowing that Mahatma Gandhi was
snubbed five times by the Nobel
Committee for his non-violent approach to peace but Obama walks
away with the award for his militarily armed and physically offensive
approach to peace.
I'm no hater. I
once believed
that in the future
Obama could Ve
won a DESERVED
Nobel Peace Prize.
But nothing has
changed in the last
year!
I'm no hater. I once believed that
in the future (NOT during his first
year of presidency) Obama could've
won a DESERVED Nobel Peace
Prize. But nothing has changed
in the last year! America is still in
the war. We're still in the war. The
world is still fighting with each
other and what to do with this war.
Obamania was great while it lasted,
but let's be honest here: he is still
a young, inexperienced president
who is guided by a very republican
senate. And the Norwegian Nobel
Committee just proved themselves
to be nothing but groupies caught
up in the hype. *vH
CYCLES
ANDREA BREDEN
Cycles: we all experience them in
our lives. Women go through them
every month, and males...well,
males can recycle.
The most important form of the
cycle occurs everyday, wreaking
havoc upon innocent pedestrians.
Sometimes they are silent and
stealth as they creep up behind you.
Other times they make sounds to
portray speed, bragging about the
amount of time it takes them to
get to their destination. Either way,
these cycles alter peaceful strolls
into tense treks. I am, of course,
referring to the many bicycles and
their owners running amok on the
roads of UBC.
You can spot them anywhere and
anytime. They are loved by Mother
Nature and those who race across
campus, running late because of
their "broken" alarm clocks. From
the early stages of childhood, we
have been filled with wonder for
the delightful invention whose sole
purpose was to move us from one
location to the next. Little did we
know that the machine had an ulterior motive.
The shiny metal carefully entices each unsuspecting rider into
assisting the bike in its goal: to
score as many points as possible
in the game of near misses. Each
wheeler—whether it be a uni, a bi,
or a tri—wishes to give you a little
surprise whenever they cross the
street, appearing out of nowhere
and nearly knocking you to the
ground. Five points for cutting
across someone's path. Eight
points for creeping up behind
someone and edging them forward faster, and a whopping ten
points for propelling stick straight
to someone, turning the handlebars at the very last second and
narrowly missing the innocent
walker. Naturally, this risk-filled
game leaves all pedestrians in terror, causing them to look before
they cross the street!
You would think that if this act of
being cautious continues, cyclists
would give up their joyful amusements. Well, you would be wrong.
Bonus points would be given if there
were multiple cyclists and only one
succeeded in the terror factor. And,
just for fun, props would be given
to the cyclist with the best machine:
penny-farthings. Therefore, the question of what to do when faced with
the metal monsters arises. My only
suggestion is to wear protective head
gear and look up every now and then
for signs of spinning spokes. *vU
BRING ME
MY BAGELS
SAMANTHAJUNG
You know what's a healthy breakfast
item? Bagels. They're packed with
carbs and grains to give you energy,
come in many variations, and are
more filling than just toast. Not to
mention bagels are quick and easy
snacks on the go.
Now, where can you get bagels in
the SUB? Starbucks bagels are dry
and grainy. The Pendulum has only
one kind (white). Bernoulli's Bagels,
however, offers over 15 different
kinds of bagels and a multitude
of flavoured cream cheese, bagel
sandwiches, pizza pretzels and bagel melts. Delicious.
Bernoulli's Bagels,
however, offers
over 15 different
kinds of bagels
and a multitude of
flavoured cream
cheese, bagel
sandwiches, pizza
pretzels and bagel
melts. Delicious.
Bernoulli's has one problem:
they only take cash.
Being one of those students who
doesn't usually carry cash with them,
this is a huge problem. "Carry cash"
you say? Between courses and a full-
time job, I rarely have time to do my
laundry, let alone wait in line at an ATM
to take out cash in order to buy a bagel.
Bernoulli's is the only food outlet in the SUB that only takes cash.
And it's one of the busiest in the
morning. Does that make sense
to anyone? It also serves food to
students enjoying an after-class
drink in The Gallery. If I'm at a bar,
I usually bring cash. However, if I
run out, I have a debit card and a
credit card to whet my whistle and
enjoy nachos. My plastic isn't any
good there.
Blue Chip Cookies recently
started to accept debit. Our SUB
may be 50 years old, and we'll be
getting a new one in (hopefully) four
years' time, but please, Bernoulli's.
It's 2010.
I just want a fucking bagel. *vU
KAI VS. SAAM
KAI GREEN
Screw you, Sexual Assault Awareness
Month, for being a fear-mongering
pile—a well-intentioned but ill-advised
waste of goodwill and time and
money Your flyers are ugly your
programming is, for the most part
weak (gag me with a live performance
spoon) and, let's face it, you're not going to get the people whose minds
you need to change to pay attention
to this, ifyou're following my syntax
here. Screwyou, especially for furthering the stereotype ofthe humourless
feminist by being little more than a
giant overreaction to an Underground
article that I, quite frankly, thought
was a little bit funny. And no, that's
not because I've been brainwashed
by A Campus-wide Culture of Rape, or
because I'm a bad feminist, or because
I'm unaware of the serious consequences of the serious business that
is sexual assault—it's because, based
on what was an admittedly offhand
reading, I thought it was a pretty goddamn good ironic indictment of the
way this campus maybe doesn't take
sexual assault seriously, you tits. And
even if it was, really and truly, just an
epically bad joke, an apology—let alone
temporarily shutting down the publication—should have sufficed. Because,
sunshine, here is a news flash foryou:
overreactions like that and 'discussion panels' like these don't do squat
besides massage some egos.
Look, I hate to break it to you, but
you're not "dialoguing" or "raising
awareness" or "changing hearts
and minds" or whatever buzzword
it is this year, you're just preaching
to the goddamn choir. Your public
presence is gawdawful. I mean,
seriously, I had to practically hack
the shit out of Google just to get
basic information. And would it
kill you all, really, if for once you
didn't assume that sexual assault
remains a problem because people
are unaware of it? I mean, ferchris-
sakes, statistics aside, I don't think
there's a person on this campus
who hasn't seen the giant, similarly
useless, flashing blue light thin-
gjes that are supposed to protect us
from stranger (and acquaintance)
danger. Why not spend your efforts,
say, updating the existing websites
and resource groups? The Women's
Centre, should they ever decide on
which vowels they're using, could
use a major overhaul, considering it's still on summer hiatus. I
mean fuck, compared to this latest
ridiculousness, I'm for the endless
parade of vagjna-fhemed whatever
that this campus becomes in winter. In short: weak-ass reactionary
shit ain't helpful—it just makes
the whole cause look like a bag of
dicks. Or, rather, for equity's sake:
abunchoftwats.
(P.S. Totally looking forward to
Tough Guys on Jan 28, I've heard
good thingsI) *vH 2010.01.14/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/13
NATIONAL
EDITOR PAUL BUCCI»coordinating@ubyssey.ca
CASUAL STUDENT EMPLOYEES
FORM UNION AT MCGILL
ERIN HALE
McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) - After a year and a
half of effort, casual workers at McGill
University- 65 per cent of whom are students - are now officially unionized.
The Association of McGill Undergraduate Student Employees, or AMUSE, was
certified as an official union last month.
The union was approved by Quebec's
labour standards committee as a local of
the Alliance de la Fonction publique du
Canada-Quebec (AFCP-Quebec).
From September 2008 to April 2009,
volunteers collected signatures from
casual workers indicating interest in unionizing. While the exact number is not public,
volunteers signed an estimated 35 to 50 per
cent of workers. In a representation vote
this autumn, organized by the province's
labour standards committee (Commission
des normes du travail due Quebec), 85 per
cent of workers supported the union.
There are so many people who are
not unionized at McGill. I hope this is
going to change soon on campus," said
Veronique Allard, a lead organizer with
AFCP-Quebec. "Casual workers are usually the most vulnerable, and the fact that
there was so much support for this drive
shows there's still work to do to support
these people." *vH
Canadians take to the streets online
MICHAEL BRAMADAT-WILLCOCK
The Concordian
MONTREAL (CUP)-Canadians have
been anything but quiet since Prime
Minister Stephen Harper once
again requested that Parliament be
suspended.
Some voices have defended the
Conservative leader's actions, arguing it is the right ofthe county's leader
to prorogue Parliament, a right that
has been exercised by many former
prime ministers.
Harper is forsaking
his responsibility to
be accountable to
his employers, us
Canadians citizens.
Mission- "Canadians Against
Proroguing Parliament" Facebook
Group
But since December 30, when
Harper asked the Governor General—for the second time in a little over
ayear—to suspend Parliament, there
has also been a tidal wave of public
backlash.
A contingent of anti-prorogation
Canadians has convened through a
Facebook group called "Canadians
Against Proroguing Parliament,"
which, as ofthe afternoon of January
12, had a membership of close to
172,000.
In contrast, the "I Support the Prorogation of Parliament and the Prime
Minister of Canada" Facebook group
had about 800 members.
The anti-prorogation group's mission states that Harper is "forsaking
his responsibility to be accountable to
his employers, us Canadian citizens."
Prorogation—or suspension—of
Parliament has its roots in the
British system, said Bobby Ansari,
a former graduate co-ordinator for
the department of history at McGill
University. And the public didn't
take it any better back then.
"When King Charles I of England
dissolved Parliament in 162 8, people
took to the street in protest," she said.
Riding the wave of prorogation
dissenters, Liberal leader Michael
Ignatieff has asked his party's
members of Parliament to return to
Ottawa on January 25, the day the
House of Commons was originally
set to reconvene.
"Because of the huge response
to the Facebook group, the Liberal
Party has jumped on it as a way to
promote their campaign," Ansari
said. "They have been putting radio
and print ads up, using the Face-
book group as a platform for their
campaign."
Ansari said she takes issue with the
fact that throughout the duration of
the prorogation, Canadians will lose
their representation in Parliament.
"For example, there will be no
one in Parliament to stand up for the
protesters at the Olympics in Vancouver," she said. "If you're a protester
and get arrested in Vancouver during
the Olympics, you won't be able to
contact your MP until after Parliament resumes."
Some members of the Facebook
group have described Harper's
request to prorogue as an insult to
Canadians.
When King Charles I
of England dissolved
Parliament in 1628,
people took to the
street in protest.
BOBBY ANSARI
In a post on a discussion board,
Richard Wierzbicki wrote, "This prorogue of the house is the PM's way of
saying he has no respect for Canada
or its institutions."
Another group member, Nona
MacDermid, speculated on how Canadians might react if Harper ever
fails to be re-elected as Prime Minister. "[Look at] the global euphoria
when Obama took office—there were
celebrations in places around the
world. I think we are going to have
some pretty happy people partying
in the streets when Mr Harper gets
his permanent prorogation from
politics."
Apathy has also found its way
to Facebook—the "Canadians Who
Don't Really Care the Parliament
has been Prorogued" group had 240
members on January 12. vl
Ottawa student allowed
back on campus
LAURA CLEMENTSON
The Fulcrum
OTTAWA (CUP)-A physics graduate student who was given a no-
trespassing notice at the University
of Ottawa in December has been allowed to return back to campus,
though he still faces charges.
As of January 11, Joseph Hickey
is allowed back onto University of
Ottawa property, according to a letter from Claude Giroux, director of
the school's security department,
Protection Services.
The no-trespassing notice was
originally given to Hickey after
he was accused of painting on the
walls of the school's Morisset Hall
building on December 7. After receiving the notice, Hickey went to
university president Allan Rock's office on December 11 in an attempt
to make an appointment to have
the restriction revoked. Hickey was
then handcuffed and escorted out
of Rock's office.
"As a registered full-time graduate student with course, research,
and teaching assistant obligations,
I have the right to be on campus
every day, without discrimination
or interference," said Hickey earlier
in January when he was still not allowed on campus.
Hickey had his first appearance
in court on January 12 and faces
charges of mischief under $5000.
His second appearance will be
later in January. Hickey said he will
plead not guilty to the charges.
He also has a court date set for
March 1, when the trial for the trespass ticket that he received while
trying to make an appointment
with Rock will commence. The cost
of the trespass ticket is $65. He
noted that he will be calling Rock as
a witness.
"I spoke to (President Rock) at
that time when I was arrested and
handcuffed and waiting for the Ottawa police to arrive, kind of held
a little bit by Protection Services,"
Hickey said this week.
In the January 11 letter to
Hickey, Giroux wrote that "the university expects you to refrain from
engaging in any criminal activity.
Should this fail to occur, the university would likely, among other
things, issue a notice of trespass
against you once again. You can
expect, however, that the effective
period of that notice will be much
longer."
"This letter also implies that I'm
guilty. It affirms the university's position to use trespass as a political
tool," said Hickey.
Hickey, who is employed by the
university as a teaching assistant
and did not receive information
about his winter contract during his
forced absence, resumed work on
January 13. tl
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Do you hate Valentines
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Write for the Anti-Valentines Day Issue e-mail
Kate at culture@ubyssey.ca. 14/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.01.14
1
D
EAS
YOU SAID IT
In response to the editorial Your move, elections committee:
The Ubyssey is claiming it wants to do what Blake and Tim did, and trample over the electoral process sanctioned by this year's AMS
Council. It is unreasonable to attack the elections administrator (the 'EA). In the last three elections, EAs were under constant attack.
Irregularities always come out to bite candidates. Things have changed a lot since Menzies' time in Council in the 70s, and we ended
up with the current policy. The Ubyssey has already played a role in the past in making sure some candidates got a bad rapport or were
ignored. This sounds like the same sort of deal. By posting candidate opinions before the allowed period, The Ubyssey m\\ jeopardize
candidates, trample the electoral process approved by the AMS, and privilege particular candidates who gave them interviews, and not
others. It seems too late to complain now, and bringing candidates down with your rage does not seem fair.
—Jasper Freakstone
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE USA LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
HANNAH LORENA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
IF YOU ONLY VOTE ONCE, VOTE AGAINST THE ENGAGEMENT LEVY
One of the referendums in this year's AMS election ballot will be the implementation of a new "engagement levy." If passed, all students will be charged
$ 5 at the start of the year, which will be refunded to them months later—provided they vote in the AMS elections. This will have two effects: it will motivate
students to get involved in the AMS, or at least the elections, and it will give the
AMS a new source of income.
Although the $ 5 fee is minimal and will be refunded if you vote, The Ubyssey has a number of problems with the engagement levy.
It punishes students for not voting. Democracy is a right that we exercise
because we want to, and students who couldn't care less about the AMS have
every right to not exercise this right. If the levy passes, it will force many of
these students to put in a vote just so they get their $5back.Most will simply
make a number of arbitrary selections or leave their ballots blank and be
done with it; their engagement will hardly be raised.
An even greater number of students will remain oblivious to the AMS
and the fee. It is unclear how these unrefunded fees will be utilized. The
leftover fees will be put in a slush fund, to be used at the Council's discretion
to increase engagement. Examples we've heard of how they would do this
are vague, but included "promoting blogs" and "throwing great parties." We
know that the AMS does a lot of work to benefit students. But that doesn't
make it right to take money on the sly, specifically from the students who
don't care about the AMS or what it does.
The Ubyssey will be voting, so we won't be losing out next year if the
engagement levy passes. Everyone who hits "delete" when they receive
an e-mail from the AMS will be. Since that's most UBC students, likely
including you, we'd suggest you log on and take a look at the ballot for
the elections, if only to vote "no" to the engagement levy. The AMS can
learn to engage with students without taking money away from them in
an underhanded fashion, vl
INFLATION MAKES INCREASES IN STUDENT FEES NECESSARY
In my day, steak cost a dollar or two. Penny candy really once was penny
candy. Neil Diamond sure knows how to write songs that get the kids hopping!
These were things that people said decades ago, and they were (regrettably, in the case of Mr Diamond) true. Anyone who has taken Gateman's
economics course knows that the price of goods rises slightly every year due
to a variety of factors, and we call this silly quirk "inflation."
Obviously, this makes long-term planning and budgeting a bit tricky. It's
dealt with in a variety of ways we take for granted though—taxes are based
on percentage of income, employment contracts with unions have built-in
raises each year.
We mention this because the AMS is different. There's mandatory fees for
Operating Expenses, Capital Projects, Resource Groups, and a variety of different
student services. Those fees have stayed the same for manyyears, but their relative value decreases over time. The costs of all these things goes up every year,
but the amount of money the AMS gets only rises if enrolment goes up.
As a result, the AMS has gotten more and more squeezed for cash each
year. Today, the AMS has a structural deficit, and there's one reason for it-
low student fees. Generally, your student government budgets well and has
(relatively) modest salaries. Still, the only reason we aren't running a deficit
is because Pie R Squared, AMS Catering and other food services are well run,
raking in the cash.
Passing the referendum to tie these fees to inflation makes sense. The
increase doesn't apply to the most expensive programs (U-Pass, Health &
Dental Insurance, Athletic Fees), and it'll keep programs that students depend on solvent. In addition, in applies to the SUB Renewal Fee, and passing
this will raise an extra $ 10 million to fund the project, which has been a sticking point in negotiations with UBC. It's money the AMS needs, and unlike the
engagement levy it's an honest way to raise it. *vH
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG & AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Fickle readership,
This pluvial, effluvial morning finds
one half of the Too Sexy team sequestered in bed...and not in a pleasant
way. Struck down by foreign plagues
and too jet-lagged to know her own
name, she is reduced to listening to
sad indie folk, reading Google ads
for "Positive Self-Talk," and watching reruns of daytime television
programs. But all is not lost. Surely
undertaking the labour of love that
is Too Sexy will cheer her weary
spirit. And yet, when she ventures
into the ether in search of your missives, your sweet somethings, what
is she to find but an inbox sparse in
such comforts! What happened to
us, dear readership? Where has the
love gone?
That, indeed, is the subject of
this issue's letter.
Dear Too Sexy,
A few months ago I met a really nice
guy. We got along very well and were
talking almost every night for the
first few weeks, and we were also
meeting a lot, although we haven't
been alone because we were always
meeting with some friends. He
agreed every time I asked him to
join me and my friends for dinner
or concerts and we had a great time.
But suddenly he stopped talking to
me and every time I tried talking
to him he had some excuse why he
couldn't talk right now.
But from time to time he is nice
and seems to like me and he is the
one who starts the conversation,
but the next day he acts like I am
annoying him. I asked him why he
is behaving like that and why he
didn't want to talk to me as often
as in the beginning; his answer is
always that he has a lot of school-
work or he's busy with some 'other
stuff but most ofthe time it sounds
like an excuse. I am so confused
because we had a lot of fun together
and he still agrees to meet with me
and my friends. And he wanted
to kiss me the night we met, but I
didn't let him. I have feelings for
him and he knows about that.
Right now I don't know what to
think about this strange behaviour
and what to do. Every time I ask
him to meet me or just try to talk to
him on the internet, I am afraid that
he gets annoyed and that he wants
me to stop talking to him, but then
suddenly he is asking me if I would
like to join him and his friends for
dinner. I liked talking to him every
night because we share the same
interests and I miss this, but I don't
want to act like a 16-year-old and
chase after him. What should I do?
Why is he acting like that?
Sincerely
Heartbroken Girl.
DearHG,
Thanks foryour letter. Although we
sympathize with your confusion, we
also thinkyou might be blowing this
whole thing a little out of proportion.
You say he has suddenly stopped
talking to you, but also concede that
sometimes he starts conversations
with you online or invites you to
dinner with him and his friends.
That doesn't sound to us like he's giving you the complete brush-off, so
you probably have nothing to worry
about. His "excuses" (having school-
work to do and being busy) may in
fact be real reasons he simply can't
talk every night. Long involved
chats are lovely, HG, but they're also
time-consuming. We don't think
you should assume his lack of interest just because he doesn't want to
have one every day.
You fear annoying
him by continuing
to initiate conversations when he's
busy. We think
that's wise.
That said, let's look at some
of the other issues raised in your
letter. You fear annoying him by
continuing to initiate conversations
when he's busy. We think that's
wise. Even assuming his claims
of business are a front, everyone
needs some time alone once in a
while. Again, it's not that he doesn't
want to talk to you specifically. It
could be that he's tired and just
doesn't feel like talking to anyone.
Space is important in any kind of
relationship, and it's up to you to respect that need for space while still
maintaining contact and expressing your interest.
It's also possible that he feels like
he was too obvious in his interest
when you first met, and now he's
trying to cover his tracks by being a
little less available. Especially since,
as you say, he wanted to kiss you
and you refused. He could be engaging in defensive measures to try
to avoid getting hurt. Although you
say you know he's aware of your
feelings for him, he may have interpreted the lack of smooch as an expression of disinterest on your part.
That might explain why he seems to
be blowing hot and cold—he likes
you, but doesn't want to be too clear
about that attraction in case you're
not equally interested.
So what should you do? Give
him a bit more space, but stay
in contact and continue to make
it clear you'd like to see him and
converse. Chatting every day is
a bit excessive, so maybe two to
three times a week would be more
reasonable. As a rule of thumb,
figure out how many times per
week he initiates conversation
with you, and try to do so with the
same frequency.
Also, don't sweat the small
stuff. Focus on having a good time
together when you do see him,
since positive shared experiences
are a good way to build relationships. Don't get worked up if he
doesn't want to talk sometimes—
he probably is just busy. Finally,
try to make plans to see each
other one-on-one. That will clarify
to him that you're interested in
dating, and may allay any fears he
has about being rejected.
That's all for this week, gang.
Stay strong, be safe, watch for the
signs and remember to send us
your love (or otherwise) at toosexy®
ubyssey.ca. *vH
STREETERS
IF YOU HAD THE CHANCE TO
ASK IGNATIEFF A QUESTION,
WHAT WOULD IT BE?
Marhis Adonnica
Law 3
What would he do differently from
the Conservatives? I don't like that
he came back to Canada and two
years later he became the Liberal
party almost overnight.
Caroline Duran
Arts 3
I think that he is a fantastic individual that Canada can use. What
would he do to advance Canada as a
global leader? [How would he tackle]
the global warming crisis?
JulienValois
Education
What would he do to pay off the
deficit? I hear him harp on Harper
for getting the deficit up and I'm just
wondering what solution he has.
Jackie Wall
Artsl
What does he have to say about all
the screw ups that the Liberals have
done over the last couple years?
Eva Angelopoulos
Human Kinetics 1
I wouldn't have anything to ask
him. I'd probably go to listen to what
other people have to say. *vU
Coordinated by Tara Martellaro 2010.01.14/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/15
The International University
of British Columbia? Hardly
s.
ADEEB TAWSEEF
Contributor
I still remember when I first read
about UBC. I had received a large
package of brochures, handbooks,
information on application procedures and so forth for prospective
international students. And who
could forget the beautiful images of
BC and the Point Grey campus that
the material was filled with. I was
captured, my rapidly palpitating
heart yearning badly to attend UBC.
I imagined UBC's
students, alumni
and faculty were
world citizens,
well aware ofthe
world in which
they live.
It was not the beautiful landscape nor the great city of Vancouver that made me decide to
attend UBC. It was the fact that
UBC proudly portrayed itself as
an "international" university,
where outstanding students from
all over the world came to learn,
exchange and promote individual
ideas for the benefit of mankind
and human endeavor. I imagined
UBC's students, alumni and faculty were world citizens, well aware
of the world in which they live. I
hoped for a community where I
would learn about Africa, Latin
America, Asia and South America
and about what the civilizations
from across the globe had to offer
for the betterment of the human
race.
Today, I write this article expressing my disappointment for UBC's
lack of international perspective
in the classroom. Early on I had an
impression, which I am now starting to question, that UBC was not
merely a Canadian university like
any other, but a world-renowned
university where scholars taught
and shared ideas from all over the
world. It now seems to me that
UBC is simply interested in recruiting students from other countries,
nothing more.
UBC should rethink its strategy on internationalism. I believe,
and I am confident that many
would agree with me, that internationalism will not prosper merely
by hosting students from over a
hundred different nations. UBC
should start aggressively promoting an international perspective
in the classroom.
Is it only me, or do others
also wonder why academics in
classes tend to stick to Canadian
or Western issues? When I took
Economics 101,1 was taught how
and why wheat prices in Canada
fluctuated. But what about the
world around us? Why don't we
ask questions which will help us
answer the problems associated
with the world or the challenges
we face?
I often feel that the problems of
the developing world are ignored in
the classroom. But it's worse when
we are taught about these problems. I get a sense that we are being
instructed that problems associated
with other parts ofthe world are the
result of those regions not following
the Canadian or Western model
of development. Are the people of
the "less developed" countries really that incompetent? The western
world also faces challenges. Do the
people of Asia, Africa and Latin
America (which are often portrayed
as backwards) not have something
meaningful to contribute to the
classrooms of UBC? I think my
friends from these regions will
agree with me that UBC and Canada
have a lot to learn from the world
around them.
UBC should rethink its strategy on
internationalism.
I believe that the UBC community, especially the international
students at UBC, would appreciate and benefit greatly if we were
exposed to lessons and ideas
from all over the world. And
when we learn about others, we
should aim to understand their
lifestyles and ways of learning—
to walk a mile in their shoes.
In order to become true global
citizens, we must incorporate
our learning from across the
globe-regardless of region, race
or ethnicity.
The purpose of this article is
not to undermine the credibility of scholars at UBC. UBC was
founded to serve the people of
BC, Canada and the World. There
is no doubt that researchers, professors and students at UBC are
highly qualified and talented in
their respective fields. Asking our
students to serve the people ofthe
nation and the world beyond is a
strong, unique vision. In a world
of rapid globalization and ever-
changing human demographics,
we simply cannot stay within the
comfortable territory in which
UBC generally operates. *vU
LETTERS
I am writing to you in response to
your editorial in Monday's issue. I
would like to note a few things.
Although I am happy to see our
campus media having the conviction to question my policies, I disagree with the protocol of The Ubyssey surrounding this weekend's
situation (January 8 to 9).
I clarified to The Ubyssey (well
before the All-Candidates Meeting)
that candidates are permitted to
answer the following questions for
publication prior to the beginning
of the campaign period: those pertaining to their past experience in
UBC politics and those pertaining
to what their campaigning plans
were (as in, what media would they
use, and where they would poster,
for example.) I also explained that
candidates could not speak publicly
as to why they were running, what
their platform was and what made
them stand out above other candidates (except in the case ofthe Elections Supplement put out by The
Ubyssey), per code. All these points
were also made clear to all candidates. Needless to say, I have no
control over what they say beyond
campaigning.
Subsequently on Saturday 10,
I heard that a reporter from The
Ubyssey had specifically asked a
candidate why he was running,
and insisted to the candidate that
I had "okayed it." This, I most certainly did not. I truly believed that
the candidate had been misled into
premature campaigning, likely
from a misunderstanding about
what candidates would be penalized for speaking publicly about,
and thus I asked The Ubyssey to halt
publication of the comment they
had gathered from the candidate
under inaccurate pretences. It was
not a matter of censoring a media
outlet. I have no power to do so, nor
do I have any will,
As for the "stupid" long gap
between the close of nominations
and the opening of campaigning, I
publicized the dates for this at the
nominations information meeting
on November 23, and many members of campus media were present
(including The Ubyssey). I set those
dates quite soon after being hired,
on the recommendation of experienced AMS staff who had dealt with
AMS elections previously. The gap
seemed just, having not followed
the nominations period last year,
and had I known that so many
people would have an issue with it,
I would have certainly considered
reducing it. I intend to include a
recommendation to shorten this
gap in my transition report upon
completion of elections.
Candidates who are concerned
about being punished for what
they do are free to contact me
whenever they wish. Many have,
in fact, and I have happily clarified elections policies for them. I
very much encourage candidates
to talk to the media, as it is one
of the best ways for them to promote themselves. I look forward
to reading and watching these
interviews. Nonetheless, I have
emphasized that only candidates
alone are responsible for any
infractions of code regarding
campaigning, including quotes in
stories published by the media.
And, I maintain this position now.
Finally, I would like to clarify
that the AMS communications
policy does not influence any of my
communications with the media
or candidates regarding campaigning regulations and campaigning
length. At no point have any "media
requests or outbound communication" been intentionally brought to
the attention of the AMS communications manager or any member of
the executive.
Thank-you for your concern, and
I look forward to collaborating with
The Ubyssey and all VFM outlets to
ensure this is a well-run, well-promoted, and well-attended election,
Sincerely,
—Isabel Ferreras,
Elections Administrator
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
X CAM'-r   T£cc
That CM
O'SATHCYAfMlC!.
SUDOKU
SOLUTION FOR JAN. 11 CROSSWORD
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WRITE US LETTERS!
PRAISE! COMPLAIN!
SEND US FOOD (WE'RE
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SPORT, ETHICS AND TECHNOLOGY
Is High Performance Sport inconsistent with Ideals and Ethics?
SPORT, PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT
How Can Sport Contribute to Positive Social Change?
Presented by Merck and Right to Play
•Pfy
RICHARD POUND
DR. JIM RUPERT
BECKY SCOTT
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SPORT AND INCLUSION
Are Major Sporting Events Inclusive of First Nations and Other Groups?
JOHANN OLAV KOSS
STEPHEN LEWIS
WILFRIED LEMKE
PROFESSOR STEPHEN TOOPE
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SPORT AND CHALLENGE   Is Anything Possible
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SPORT, LEGACY AND SUSTAINABILITY
Is it Worth It?
ABILITY       A
RICK HANSEN
DR. BRUCE MCMANUS
March 10 afternoon academic session
PEAK PERFORMANCE
The Path to Exceptional Athletic Achievement
DR. BRUCE KIDD
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