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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1992

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Array Founded in 1918
Wiictraver^
Vol 75, No 9
VOLUME 75, Number 9
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 6,1992 Announcement board
This week atTHE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUB 241K
SUNDAY
MONDAY
6
The
Ubyssey
conies out.
Staff meeting
at 12:30 pm;
new staffers
welcome!
8
Ubvssev Production
Copy deadline 2*00
pm, Production
meeting starts at
5*00 pm. All night
newspaper
production.
The World9
Famous Ubyssey
Beer Garden
from 4pm to 8pm
at SUB 207/209!!!
Cheap BEvERages,
as always.
10
11
12
Production
begins for the
First Nations
issue of The
Ubyssey; come
one, come all.
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
Advertise
your   group's
on-campus
events in The
Ubyssey
Campus
Calendar.
Submission
forms are
available at
The Ubyssey
office,
SUB 241K.
Submissions
for Tuesday's
paper must be
in by Friday
at  3:30pm,
and
submissions
for Friday's
paper must be
in  by
Wednesday at
3 :30pm.
Sorry,  late
submissions
will not be
accepted.
Note: "Noon" =
12:30 pm.
(ilobal "Development" Centre. 2-
hr workshop on media literacy with
Michael Maser of the Media
Foundation. Noon-2:30, SUB 212.
Women Students' Office.
AsscrtivenessTrain ing-3 sessions.
Noon-2:20. Brock 204D.
t BC Ja//. Folk and Blues Club.
Mtg/infonnal jam (musicians only
lornow). 7-1 lpm. Fireside I-ounge,
(Irad Centre.
7:30nm, SUB 211.
UBC School of Music. Wed. noonl
Women's Centre. Coffee & herbal
teahouse. Bring vour own mug. 3-
7nm, SUB 130. '
(Jlobal "Development" Centre. (Jen.
mtg.. Noon. Sl.B 21 S.
Women Students' Office. Sexual
\busc Survivors support group -
pre-registration required. Noon -
2:20 pm. Brock 203.
Women Student*-' Office. Mature
women students drop-m. Noon -
!:?0pm. Brock 261.
Student Christian Movement. Dinner -5c Program: Bruce MeAndicss-
Davis - update on South Africa.
5:30pm. Lutheran Campus Centre.
Canadian ascent of Ml. McKinlevin
1W2; with Charles Hvu.-is. s pm.,
Wood IRC 2. |
l,BC New Democrat:-.. Cien. mtg:
all welcome.  Noon. SUB 212.
Amnesty Intl (UBC). Regional action network letter writing - China/
West Africa. Noon. SUB 205.
Arab Students'Society: Movie "sub-i
titled", noon at Angus 421.
Forest Resources Commission.
"Future ol" our Forests." Noon -
1:30. MacMillan 166.
Intl. Relations Students' Assn. Informal session concerning application process for the Harvard National
Model UN. Noon, BUCH A2(U.
Chinese Christian Fellowship-
Cantonese, (ien. mtg (bible study).
Noon. Scarfe 20".
UBC SiudenlsolObjectivism. "The
Morality ol Capitalism." Dr. John
Ridpaih (York Univ.) on the moral
Hasis o| a capitalist society. Noon.
SUB Audit.
Univ. Christian Ministry. Thurv
night lellowship.    7pm. Lutheran
UBC School of Music. I BC Sun-
phony Orchestra. Jessie Read.
Conductor. Noon. Old Audit.
UBC Life Drawing Club. Drop in
session, $4.50. 12:20 to 2:20.
Thursdays. UasscrreBidg..Rm2<>4.
ililiel/Jewish Students Assn. Fihics
in the modern world: How uan a
lawver defend a murderer? Sieve
WexIerMBClawprol. Noon. Hillel
House.
Medical-Legal Club. Presentation -
by Penny Washington, of Bull
llousser Tupper, on confidentiality
of medical records and their use in
trials. Noon, bw - Rm 179/1 SI.
WUSC. Slide presentation on "92
WUSC summer seminar in Brazil.
Info, on '93 WUSC' summer seminar in Indonesia available. Noon,
BUCHA202.
about the students of Objectivism!
Noon, SUB 215.
Lutheran, United ■& Anglican
Campus Ministries. Fcumenical
service of prayer and remembrance
on the 500ih anniversary of the
■ arrival of Columbus. Noon.
Lutheran Campus Centre Chapel.
UBC School of Music: UBC
Symphony Orchestra. Jessie Read,
conductor al Spin at the Old An*
Sheila Copps speaks on the referendum: "Questions hoih sides hav*.
to answer" al noon at Law Rm 101
I Lutheran Campus Centre
Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS cardholders ■ 3 lines $3.15, additional lines 63 cents. Commercial ■ 3 lines $5.25, additional lines 80 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more.)
Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 3:30 pm, 2 days before publication. Room 266, SUB. UBC, Vancouver, B.C. V6T2A7. 822-3977.	
5 - UPCOMING EVENTS
The AMS presents...
'COMPUTING FOR RADICAL
ACADEMICS"
Wednesday & Thursday
October 7 & 8
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
SUB Ballroom
Free Admission - Door Prizes!
UBC PLACEMENT SERVICES
presents: opportunities for Arts
students in PhD Business
Programs. With special focus
on Economics and Psychology
students. Presenters from UBC
and UofA. Noon in Brock
Annex 351. October 13.
11-FOR SALE (Private)
78 MAZDA GLC for sale,
hatchback, good condition.
Only $350. Call 228-0027.
FOR SALE 68 BEETLE, black,
new engine. Sony stereo,
amplifier & equalizer!
Excellent condition. $3000.
272-5356.
85 HONDA MOTOR scooter,
150 cc, 13,000 km, $900. 272-
1781.
286 COMPUTER/WORD
processor w. software - 20 m hard
disk, 3.5 - 5.25" HD drives, incl.
Wordperf., Works, Ventura &
more. $599 obo (incl. delivery &
Betup), call Marc 9 731-7711.
20 ■ HOUSING
1FURN. RM FORRENT, quiet family, non-smoking, non-drinking
home. $296 per mth, incl util. 270-
8281.
30 - JOBS
AMAZING OPPORTUNITY for
students to earn part-time income.
Flexible hours.
Call toll free 1-979-0450.
TRAVELLING TO MOSCOW or
Kiev.
Guide/interpreter wanted.
Will pay! 591-8512.
WORK STUDY VACANCIES,
Macintosh experience preferred
but not necessary. Must be able to
work 10 hrs/wk, good writing and
typing skills. Up to $14/hr, please
call Dr. Tan 8822-2737 immediately or leave message at 327-
5863.
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000.00
IN JUST ONE WEEK! PLUS
$1000 FOR THE MEMBER WHO
CALLS! And A FREE HEADPHONE RADIO just for calling 1-
800-932-0528, Ext 65.
EXPOSE'
"SUBJECT CORPORATE
CRIME-
MINERAL RESOURCE
INDUSTRY
Require competent person with
good knowledge, of civil, criminal
corp. law, to assist in computation
for rewrite a transcript is loaded
with interesting, intriguing,
exquisite flavour, fact based and is
highly educational, what every
Canadian should, but doesn't
know.
THE POWERS OF THE
MULTINATIONAL"
Write Box 198
Squamish, B.C. V0H 1H0
70 - SERVICES
YOUR GRADES WILL SUFFER
unless your written English is of
competitive quality. Before you
hand in an important essay or
term paper, bring it to us for
expert editing and correcting
(grammar, coherence, bias, etc.).
WordPLUS: near campus at 4183
W. 14th Ave. Phone or fax 228-
8444.
CLAIRVOYANT AURA readings
by Jocelan Harvie. Remove energy
blocks in your chakras and aura
preventing your spiritual growth
and creation of your desired
reality. 224-0239.
DESKTOP PUBLISHING * laser
printing, creative resumes that get
noticed! Reasonable rates, colour
printing & transparencies too!
(Sorry not a typing service).
Bakjam Graphics 732-4342.
80 ■ TUTORING
FORMER UBC INSTRUCTOR will
tutor students in all aspects of
French lang. & literature.
Reasonable rates. 689-7889.
EXPD ENGLISH TUTOR, MA in
English lit, 5 years teaching
English in Japan. Can speak
Japanese. Ph: 222-0276.
MATH AND PHYSICS tutoring
by PhD, 15 years experience, on-
campus, reasonable rates. Call
254-7058, anytime.
85-TYPING
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years
exp., wd process/typing, APA/
MLA, thesis. Student rates.
Dorothy, 228-8346.
— ON CAMPUS —
Don't Panic!
Stop running around!
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Room 60, SUB
(Across from Tortellini's)
Fall Hours:
Mon. - Thurs. 9 - 6
Friday 9 - 5
Drop in or call 822-5640
TYPING & WP of theses, essays,
letters, manuscripts, resumes,
reports. Bilingual. Clemy 266-
6641.
JUDITH PILTNESS, EXCELLENT typist, will edit Call 263-
0358.
Community
Notices
DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE
WOMEN CENTRE IN
CONTINUAL NEED OF THE
FOLLOWING ITEMS:
• PLASTIC BAGS (FOR
WOMEN TO PUT
CLOTHES IN)
•HAND SOAP
•SHAMPOO &
CONDITIONER
•SANITARY PADS &
TAMPONS
•TOOTHBRUSHES &
TOOTHPASTE
• LAUNDRY SOAP
•TOWELS & BEDDING
• PLANTS (TO MAKE THE
CENTRE MORE WARM
AND FRIENDLY)
• FAX MACHINE
•HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
• CLASS 4 & 5 DRIVERS
• MOVING AND DELIVERY
HELPERS
•WOMEN WHO WANT TO
OFFER THEIR SKILLS
AND KNOWLEDGE
PHONE PAM F1CHTNER
FOR MORE INFORMATION
2/THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1992 N.E W.;S
Anti free-traders join Chiefs union on No side
by Frances Foran
Free Trade Opponents and the
Union of BC Indian Chiefs have
joined forces against the Charlottetown accord and the "unlawful"
process leading to it.
David Orchard, chair of the
Citizens Concerned about Free
Trade said, "Canadians are being
asked to go to a polling booth and
vote on a document that no Canadian has yet seen and will not
see.
"Not only is there no final
legal text, there is no final text at
all. All we have is this unsigned
report and there is no binding
commitment to the written text at
all." The published text does not
meanmuchjOrchardsaid, because
the Charlottetown accord contains
60 items yet to be negotiated by
the first ministers.
Orchard shared the concern*
of other opponents of the accord
that ratifying the Charlottetown
accord will not dispel but rather
confound the "constitutional
wrangling."
"If they get a yes vote then the
premiers and Mulroney can go
back and complete their mangling
ofthe constitution, and there will
never be a chance to vote in the
final text, because there won't bea
second referendum. Nobody has
told us what is wrong with the
current constitution let alone the
necessity of entirely rewriting the
law ofthe land."
The Union ofBC Indian Chiefs
and CCAFT are joined in the *NO'
camp by the Native Women's Association of Canada who argued in
the Supreme Court in August that
the constitutional process was undemocratic. The court ruled that
the constitutional process violated
the Charter Right to freedom of
expression by denying the Native
women's group a seat atthe constitutional talks.
A court injunction lodged by
NWAC to stop the referendum has
been stalled to allow input on the
matter from the four recognized
Native groups.
Barbara Wyss, vice-president
ofthe NWAC affiliated BC Native
Women's Society, said the four
Native groups support the accord
because they helped create it. The
main contention against the accord held by NWAC and other
women's groups is that the accord
substantially weakens the Charter Rights of disadvantaged groups.
UBCIC president Saul Terry
said the accord is a blueprint for
David Orchard speaks out against free trade and the Charlottetown Accord.   ELA|NE Griffith photo
the extinguishing of land rights
and treaty rights.
"What is being put forward is
a termination policy, and inherent
self-government is the vehicle to
sell this termination. We are being
asked to give up our land and live
under the law of Canada and then
negotiate it back in bits and pieces."
"The referendum process is
unlawful and doesn't give full information regarding the proposal.
Even on that basis it must be rejected," Terry said.
Orchard, who worked with
Manitoba MLA. Elijah Harper in
defeating the Meech Lake Accord,
said the new constitutional deal
will broaden the wealth gap among
the provinces. The Charlottetown
accord allows the provinces to opt
out with compensation from federal
programs, leaving each province
to replace them without standards
to regulate the programs across
the country, he said.
"We believe that [the
Charlottetown accord] will lead to
ten balkanized provinces, not a
unified country at all. Combined
with the Free Trade Agreement
this document will weaken the
East-West ties that hold the
country together, and it will lead
to the dissolution of Canada."
Orchard said the no side has a
"David versus Goliath" contest
with government's Yes campaign.
He said the federal government's
$7 million advertising campaign
will be "polluting the airwaves"
and predicts that by mid-October
all television-viewing audiences
will have been exposed to 13 referendum commercials in one week.
Turner predicts
students to vote Yes
by Rick Hiebert
John Turner predicted yesterday that Canadian students will
strongly vote Yes in the constitutional referendum later this month.
"I think they will vote yes,
more than Canadians as a whole
will," the Liberal MP for Vancouver-Quadra (UBC's federal riding)
said after a speech in SUB yesterday. "It will be very close nationally,
but I would guess that there is a
strong Yes majority on campuses.
You'll see a solid Yes there."
Turner, the former head ofthe
national Liberal party and a former
Prime Minister, may be biased,
however. He is one of the more
prominent Yes supporters in BC,
and has travelled with Esquimalt
NDP MP Dave Barrett to speak in
support of the Charlottetown accord.
"I do think that students at
universities will vote Yes, not
necessarily because I am a Yes
supporter, but because that is what
I am picking up from speaking to
them," he said.
"I feel that students are
smarter than people in general,
they are more careful to read and
think and ask good questions. They
are more likely to read the constitutional documents and understand why this is a good deal,
without being swayed," Turner
said.
"Ifound, duringthelastfederal
election, that it was students who
were mostly likely to have studied
the US-Canada free trade agreement. Fm finding that of the students I speak to about the constitution. They have thought about
the issues," he said.
In his speech, Turner called
the deal "a typical historical Canadian compromise," eliciting a
little laughter from the audience.
Although he's not in favour of national referenda (he deems them
contrary to the "British political
tradition"), he says the referendum
will "give the public a chance to
endorse a united Canada."
"I don't think it's a bad deal
and I think BC came out very well,"
Turner said. "Everyone engaged
in give and take, and there were no
winners and losers."
"This country has gone
through a self-flagelation in recent
years with this [constitutional]
debate," he said. "The consequences of a No vote are not going
to be academic, they are going to be
real. I predict that if Canadians
vote No, they'll wake up the next
morning saying What have we
done to ourselves?""
He did not feel comfortable in
predicting what would happen if
Canadians voted down the accord,
he said in an interview conducted
after speech. But during his speech
he sai d he feared that international
investors would pull funds from a
Canada they deemed unstable politically.
He said he thought BC Premier Mike Harcourt, widely derided for.not sticking up for BC's
interests, was a positive force at
the negotiations, and that was also
how the Ottawa, Ontario and
Quebec delegations to the constitutional talks felt.
Turner also suggested that
voters pass judgement on the proposed accord, and not the politicians bringing the deal forward.
"I never thought I would ever
say this, but he is the only Prime
Minister we have," he said. "You
can always get Mulroney or
Harcourt later at the ballot box.
Separate that from this issue."
Native education explored
by Lucho van Isschot
First Nations educators are
calling for a more human, more
spiritual approach to teaching.
The 1992 Mokakit Conference on First Nations education
held at UBC last week, however,
was about much more than education—it was also about ways
of knowing, and about incorporating First Nations' philosophies into academic research.
Akeynote address was made
by UBC alumnus Ethel Gardener, who is going to Harvard
to continue her studies in education at the doctoral level.
She said, "Heart and spirit
are very important, and very
much a part of thiB conference—
in just about every aspect ofthe
conference that I participated in."
Gardener emphasized the
importance of incorporating
spirituality and emotion into scientific research in particular.
"We have talked a lot
about science, and about
spirit and love in science. If
we don't get those things
back into science, weVe
doomed,"      Gardener
warned.
Another    keynote
speaker, Carl Urion, a
Metis instructor from the
University of Calgary,
spoke urgently about the
need for autonomy and integrity in Firet Nations education.
He said, "Despite tremendous advances in research
in Native education in the past
20 years, we are still in a state of
crisis. And our crisis is deepening."
Urion said in order to overcome this crisis it is necessary to
train more First Nations teach
ers. He also said that First Na-
tdons communities be permitted
to run their own schools is imperative.
"Our job, I think, is to research operational and educational programs that emphasize
teaching from the heart," he said.
*We can't deal with [the issues of] autonomyandintegrity in
Bim ply political and social terms,"
he concluded, "because we could
build the greatest political systems and social structures and
still not survive as a people."
Several hundred people from
New Zealand, North and Central
America came to participate in
the three-day conference.
Among the many other
speakers featured at Mokakit
was Oscar Kawagley, who discussed issues of concern to First
Nations educators in Alaska.
Jennie Joe, a Navajo physician, made a presentation on
health and Fi rst Nations peoples
entitled "American Indian Concepts of Wellness and
Unwellness."
There were too many other
excellent speakers and presentations at the conference to mention.
. Gardener described the conference as a "booster shot" to First
Nations people working in education.
October 6,1992
"<n&mssR[&«. THE ALMA MATER
SOCIETY OF UBC
1992/93 BUDGET
AMS
BUDGET
OVERVIEW
■ v,<i,i i<ou ,-• i :s<-j,\ D<scorde
Disab.ea y x;«x'$ Assoxtr ■•■
H Gays ax: Sux-nts Assooox
H Gicuci M.^xx-'v--]' Cf-r.'r..^
L! Oaic,.Jsor.:e
I LJDyssey
! SbTime' ut'VSSG,
I A omens M''X-r
I Speakeasy Student Supm
ces anti '-"ogrun \s Expenditures
.■ Carpoaimg
I Drug ana Alcohol Awareness
I Essentially UBC
j &J External Affairs
Q ' A Perpetual State of Consent'
■ II First Year Mailout
DS Frosh Week (Consolidated)
' B Housing Registry
j B Homecoming
i ■ Inside UBC
B International House BBQ
H Jobiink
lilH Programs Depaitment
—]_Sfuaen! Leadership Conference
If you would like a complete copy of the budget
or have any questions regarding the overview,
please contact the Director of Finance, Bill Dobie
SUB Room 258 or phone 822-3973
sSURPOJS INCOME SOURCES
AMS Fees from Registrar
Building Operations
Investment Income
BUDGET 91/92 ACTUAL 91/92 VARIANCE SUQC&T 92/93
828,750.00 834,896.00 6,146.00 834,896.00
347,356.00 370,520.00 23,164.00 454,728.76
 190,000.00 214,116.00 24,116.00 160,000.00
Total
1,366,106.00
1,419,532.00
53,426.00
1,449,624.76
Art Gallery Restorations
5,000.00
5,000.00
0.00
6,000.00
Art Purchasing Fund
1,500.00
1,500.00
0.00
0.00
Bursary Fund
0.00
15,000.00
15.000 00
000
CPAC Fund
382,500 00
359,614.00
(22.88600)
357,531.00
Emergency Student Loan Fund
10,000.00
3,097 00
(6.903.00)
0.00
Intramurals
114,750.00
114,750.00
0.00
107,259.00
Programs Reserve
0.00
8,899.00
8,899.00
000
Registration Photos
6,000.00
6,000.00
0.00
6.000.00
SUB Management Fund
14,000.00
17,520.00
3.520.00
30,000.00
SUB Repairs/Replacement Fund
53.500.00
53,500.00
0.00
0.00
Whistler Reserve
0.00
16.841.00
16,841.00
0.00
WUSC Retuqee Student Fund
12.750.00
12.750.00
0.00
11,918.00
Total
600,000.00
614,471.00
14,471.00
518,708.00
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY INCOME
EXPENDITURES
Business Office Allocations:
Student Government
Clubs and Constituencies
766,106.00
144,000.00
96,000.00
805,061.00
149,937.00
99,958.00
38,955.00
5,937.00
3,958.00
Total
240,000.00
249,895.00
9,895.00
Service Organizations:
CiTR Radio, Disco & Discorder'
Disabled Students Association
Gays and Students Association
Global Development Centre
Ombudsoffice
Student Environment Centre
Ubyssey
Summer Ubyssey
Women's Centre
Speakeasy Student Support
Volunteer Connections	
77,695.00
1,190.00
1,375.00
1,000.00
2,620.00
3,163.05
14,984 00
11,490.00
2,975.00
6,000.00
2,566.13
77,52861
223.01
597.46
1,098.70
2,030 23
1,683.31
28,003 66
12,134.11
2,633.33
6,680.38
1,726 11
(166.39)
(966.99)
(777.54)
98.70
(589.77)
(1,479.74)
13,019.66
644.11
(341.67)
680.38
(840.02)
Total
125,058.18
134,338.91
9,280 73
Total
170,406.18
176,352.23
5,946.05
Total
163,221.20
164,737,84
1,516.64
CODE REQUIRED CONTINGENCY
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
NET
38,500.00
737.185,56
28,920.44
38,500.00
Z6M2i2S
41,237.02
0.00
26.638.42
12,316.58
930,916.76
171,777.60
114,518.40
286,296.00
71,834.00
1,945.00
1,575.00
4,661.00
4.935.93
2,058.00
23,661.00
20,646.00
3,207.25
7,855.00
7,455.00
149,833.18
AMS Services and Programs:
Art Gallery 7,533.00 3,957.94 (3,575.06) 6,275.00
Carpooling 0.00 0.00 0.00 5,860.00
Colin's Smile 1,000.00 0.00 (1,000.00) 0.00
Copies ol the Code 2,000.00 2,000.00 0.00 0.00
Drug and Alcohol Awareness 1,989.76 784.51 (1,205.25) 6,363.50
Essentially UBC 0.00 0.00 0.00 438 50
External Affairs 9.115.00 9,561.08 446.08 6,850.00
" A Perpetual State of Consent" 0.00 0.00 0.00 7,738.19
First Year Mailout (580.00) (705.00) (125.00) 583.00
Frosh Week (Consolidated) 8,595.06 8,595.06 0.00 17,523.91
Housing Registry 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,845.00
Homecoming 3.815.00 0.00 (3,815.00) 5,934.73
Inside UBC 135.00 6,615.74 6,480.74 6,450.00
Researcher 13.000.00 13,000.00 0.00 0.00
International House BBQ 0.00 0.00 0.00 463.25
Joblink 17,66650 17,41461 (251.89) 19,977.00
New Students Retreat 686.75 686.75 0.00 0.00
Programs Department 67,130 00 67,378.00 248.00 87,800.00
Student Leadership Conference 213.00 1,677.00 1,464.00 1,385.00
Student Union Development Sympos 0.00 1,109.92 1.109 92 0.00
Summer Projects 24,737.11 33.147.96 8,410.85 22,009.20
Sexual Assault Pamphlet 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,100.00
United Way Campaign 0.00 0.00 0.00 450.00
Upper Year Mailout 7,160.00 7,310.00 15000 7,880.00
Walk Home Program 6.21000 3,818.66 (2,39134) 6,198.00
213,124.28
Student Government:
Student Council 91,179.20 102,070 04 10,890.84 116,856.20
Student Administrative Commission 66,932 00 56,989.24 (9,942.76) 71,000.00
Council Composite Restoration 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,000.00
Student Court 1,325.00 829.56 (495.44) 1,205.00
Legal Contigency 0.00 0.00 0.00 15,000.00
Service Organ. Re-Adjustment 0.00 0.00 0.00 13,000.00
Unallocated Discretionary Income 0.00 0 00 0.00 13,260.10
Student Senate Caucus 200.00 200.00 0.00 545.00
Referendum Committee  3,585.00 4,649.00 1,064.00 4,563.00
237,429.30
44,234.00
930,916.76
0.00
.^Ttfe.Wy^Y
pctot}er,^.??2 NEW.S
AIDS: the continuing struggle for rights
by Andrew MacLeod
VICTORIA (CUP) — Bart Wittke
leans back in a white plastic patio
chair. He sits outside the patch of
shade cast by a cafe-style umbrella,
with the sun warming his face.
Potted flowers line this urban
courtyard, three floors up in the
building that houses ADDS Vancouver Island.
"Fve known that I was HIV-
positive since 1989," Wittke says.
The human immuno-deficiency
virus can lead to the failure ofthe
body's immune system. AIDS—
Acquired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome—is a condition where
HIV and other conditions such as
pneumonia and bronchitis are
present.
Wittke was a student at the
University of Victoria when he
tested positive. He no longer attends the university.
"The first two years after I was
infected I spent ignoring the fact.
That sort of denial is quite common.
I kept it to myself for a long time,"
he said.
He didnt tell anyone he was
infected, even while he worked as
an assistant manager at the
university's student union building because he was afraid he
wouldn't be able to keep his job.
"Some of the less informed
sections of the population might
have created trouble," he said.
"There's rednecks up there."
He worked in the food services
department, coordinating the cafeterias within the building, and
filling in for employees that
couldn't come into work.
He said he was afraid that
people might have pressured the
student union building management to keep him from working in
the food services kitchen if they
knew he was HIV-positive.
HIV can not be transmitted
by handling food. It can only be
transmitted by exchanging bodily
fluids, sharing intravenous
needles, or from a pregnant mother
to her child.
Wittke said his experience
working at the university was good,
and that for the people he worked
with, his sexuality was never an
issue.
Andafterhelefthisjob—when
his co-workers knew he was HIV-
positive—he said they were very
supportive of him.
He said he never had any
problems—at least nothing overt.
"I think one of my biggest pet
peeves was people who knew I was
HIV-positive who asked how I was,
and who were not prepared for the
answer," he said. "Tve come to the
conclusion people don't mean
anything when they ask that. Some
of them stopped asking. There are
more and less perceptive people
everywhere."
Last March, Bart left his food
services job mid-shift, without
giving notice. He quit his job to
spend more time with his partner.
"When I left, my partner was
getting down, and I didn't have the
energy to run around. [Working at
the student union building] was a
physical roller coaster as well.
"I certainly was taking more
sick days than I have in any other
working situation. That was only
because I was determined to fix
anything thatmightbe wrong with
me before it got worse.
"The most drastic thing I felt
was fatigue," he says, but it is
impossible to say if it was worsened by being HIV-positive.
"I could very well be healthy for
the next 10 years. Do I want to be
in a work environment that tires
me out? There's far too much out
here to eiyoy."
Wittke said before he quit his
job, he and his co-workers talked
about the rights of employees who
face life-threateningillnesses, and
their health insurance.
There was a guarantee of no
discrimination on the basis of
sexual orientation in his collective
agreement, but he said the insurance carrier didn't agree.
Wittke said he had had plans
to take some time to relax with his
partner after he left his job.
"I wanted to spend last summer kicking back with David," he
said. "The unfortunate thing was
David died at the end of May. That
kind of shot my plans for the summer. Getting to know him was all
wrapped up with saying goodbye
to him."
Instead, Bart spent the summer working at AIDS Vancouver
Island. He's now the acting support coordinator for the organization. He said he sees a lot of people
his age at the organization.
"Generally we are looking at
young men, mostly in their early
30s, who are dying. Men that age
don't usually die. When you are
76, thafs part ofthe social experience."
In the Victoria area, 45 men in
their 20s—the average age of university students—tested HIV-
positive between January 1989
and July 1992.
And in Toronto, 460 men between the ages of 20 and 29 tested
HIV-positive between January
and July 1992.
With numbers like that, ifs
important that people learn how
to prevent HIV transmission.
"What is more important is
safer sex—distributing free
condoms. They should be available all over the place, and at a
reasonable price as well. A dollar
a condom is pretty pricey for
someone struggling to buy groceries."
He said universities could consider including condoms in their
health insurance plans—although
he didnt think the insurance company would like the idea.
He said ifs important to educate young people about HIV.
"The only way to getrid of AIDS/
HIV is to raise a generation of kids
who won't catch it.
"For university students, ifs
safer sex or no sex. Those are your
options. Anything else is putting
yourself at risk," he said.
"By saying, 1 trust my partner", you're only deluding yourself.
I can't count the number of people
who have said, 1 didnt think it
would or could happen to me.'
"Assume you're negative, and
everyone else in the world is positive. If you operate under that
self-induced delusion it is a pretty
good incentive to practice safer
sex.
He said there's still an incorrect perception that HIV is a gay
disease.
"The virus doesn't care if you
UPEI accused of rape cover up
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students are
denouncing administrators at the
University of PEI for waiting six
days before calling police in to investigate an alleged rape and
beating at a campus residence.
About 500 faculty, staff and
students attended a rally October
1 to protest the way university
administration handled the incident.
The university only announced
that an allegation had been made
after the alleged victim's mother
went public with the story.
Her mother said the 18-year-
old student was abducted from a
residence party on September 23,
that her wrists were bound and
that she was raped and beaten so
badly she had to be hospitalized.
"People are angry that they
didnt know something happened,"
said Tracey Arsenault, the student
council president. "We're scared
for our own safety."
"We would have liked to have
known what happened, instead of
hearing rumours all over the
place," she said.
Campus security was called
to the residence September 23. Five
days later the victim's mother went
public. A day after that, the uni
versity released a statement.
City police did not take over the
case until September 29, when the
woman filed a formal complaint of
sexual assault, said Constable Richard Collins, community relations
officer for the city police.
But students are saying campus security should have turned
the case over right away, instead
of waiting until a complaint was
filed.
And they're also accusing the
university of trying to cover up the
alleged rape.
The students say that the university could have handled the case
better. They say the campus security should have turned the case
over to city police right away.
"The campus police is in no way
able to deal with a matter this
serious," the student council said
in a press release.
Although city police were called
the night the alleged assault took
place, they arrived after the alleged incident happened, Collins
said. He said campus security remained in charge of investigating
it.
But from now on city police will
deal with incidents on the univer-
are gay, straight or bisexual. It is
risk behaviours we focus on, not
risk groups," he said. "I don't think
it crosses [heterosexuals'] minds
that they have been at ri sk. Anyone
who has had unprotected sex has
been at risk."
His job at AVI focuses on helping people with AIDS, rather than
just educating people. Wittke acts
as an advocate on behalf of people
with AIDS in dealing with the provincial ministry of social services.
"Fve had two people denied
handicapped benefits, both clinically diagnosed with AIDS. Very
early in the disease your body stops
absorbing nutrients. I know people
who are spending $130 to $140 on
vitamins each month."
Part of his job is to help people
with AIDS get through the government bureaucracy to get financial
assistance.
He said AVI tries to minimize
the day-to-day stress in the lives of
people with AIDS.
"Telling families, telling friends
is a big concern for a lot of our
clients. We help them to explore,
and look at the way their family
interacts," he said.
Broaching the subject in a way
that is non-confrontational is important, he said.
"I knew one person who during
Thanksgiving dinner, with all his
extended family there, announced
that he had AIDS, and then could
not understand why the rest ofthe
holiday was so uncomfortable."
Wittke says when he tells
people about his own HIV-positive
status he watches their reactions,
so he can help them deal with it too.
Having HIV is something he's
always aware of. He said that an
acquaintance told him they wished
there was an AIDS "unawareness"
week.
"Having the disease is just another facet of my life. It is part of
what is being Bart. My priorities
have undergone radical revolution.
Tve become very conscious ofliving
each day."
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sity campus right away, he said.
"This will not happen again.
There will be clarifications about
what is to be done in a situation
like this," he said.
Campus security began "investigating the nature ofthe disturbance" right away, said Sonya
Banks, the university's
director of public relations.
"The university knew something had happened—a disturbance at a party in residence,"
said Banks. "But that information
wasn't given to students because
we didn't know exactly what happened."
She would not confirm that
campus security had been investigating an alleged sexual assault.
She said campus security wrote
a report about the incident, but
she said she didnt know when it
was given to university administrators.
Banks said the student was
taken to a Charlottetown hospital
by a university residence staff
person.
The student has not returned
to school.
A public forum for university
and city residents was to be held
October 2.
ns§
fb
i
ctobcvh$t
OCTOBER 6-10 with
Dr. Sfrangelove
Book your fundraiser or Student party at th<
Roxy. Call Chris.
684-7699
932 GRANVILLE
October 6,1992
THE UBYSSEY/5 ON THE BOULEVARD
s2 °° off cuts
s10°° off perms
Esthetician
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for   29'
Panel on the constitution underlines
with presentation of this ad Exp. Nov. 10/92
5784 University Boulevard
Phone 224-1922
224-9116
Vancouver
Art
Gallery
August 19 to
October 18,1992
Montage and Modern Life: 1919d942
Photographic and cinematic works
from Germany, the USSR, and the
United States.
by Jennifer Johnson
The Centre for Continuing
Education sponsored a non-partisan information conference on the
Charlottetown Accord this past
Saturday at the Curtis Law
Building.
The day long event provided
information on issues that have
been oversimplified by the emotional rhetoric that has dominated
the referendum campaign.
In his opening remarks, Political Science professor Alan Cairns
addressed the question as to
"Where we are and how did we get
here?" Quoting the late Northrop
Frye, Cairns said, "We are not lost,
we are here."The difficulty he said
is in determining where here is.
Cairns posed the question as
to whether this situation is "more
serious, more real, or more fundamental than its predecessors?"
Citing the failure of Meech Lake
and the resultant criticism ofthe
"eleven white men meeting in secret" process, Cairns expressed
concern about what he termed the
"'routinization' of crisis."
Guest speaker BC Minister of
Aboriginal Affairs Andrew Petter
further stated the case, saying that
we are in a "crisis of the
"routinization' of crisis." Petter
argued that Western interests
wouldbe well servedifthe proposed
amendments were instituted. He
called the fears of loss of BC representation at the federal level mythology. Petter voiced concern
that the stage for debate was being
monopolized by, "constitutional
pundits and media commentators
who are nitpicking the deal to
death."
Law Professor Joes Bakan
continued in this vein, favourably
interpreting Article 25 of the Accord which has been criticized by
the National Action Committee on
the Status of Women as "threatening the existence of the social
welfare state." Bakan said that
the clause was necessary in order
to address provincial concerns
about the federal government using its spending power to impinge
on provincial powers.
The opting-out clause applies
only to federal-provincial cost
sharing programs, he stressed. If a
province were to opt out of a federal
program it would receive compensation only, as stated in Article 25,
"if that province carries on a program that is compatible with the
national objectives." According to
Bakan, this wording would substantially limit the provinces'
ability to be compensated if they
chose to opt out. As an example,
Bakan stated funds could not be
diverted from a federal daycare
program to a provincial construction project.
Commerce professor Maurice
Levy criticized the Accord for failing to outline a precise way of
dealing with regional input on
national monetary policy. In regards to the social charter, Levy
criticized certain tenets, such as
the provision for full employment,
as poorly defined and unattainable. At the same time he applauded the provision for the free
movement of factors of production
between the provinces describing
it as "absolutely paramount to a
nation."
Two opposing views on aboriginal self-government were
voiced by Ron George, President of
the Native Council of Canada, and
Teressa Nahanee of the Native
Women's Association. George argued that self-government was
necessary "for the Native healing
process to begin." Nahanee argued
passionately against the Accord,
criticizingit because ofthe absence
of Native women at the constitutional table, a criticism that has
been legally upheld by an August
20 ruling ofthe Supreme Court of
Canada.
Ian Waddell, MP from Port
Moody-Coquitlam described the
Accord as an "honourable compro-
mise,"but said he was disappointed
in the Senate reforms as he had
favoured a triple A senate, "Abolish, abolish, abolish." Analysing
the referendum campaign, Waddell
stated, ""No' is winning because
the "Yes' is so elitist and patronizing."
Of particular interest was the
"No" argument presented by Political Science professor Josee
see next page
S
?^»aWtf PRKENTf...
Speaker
Series
Tomson Highway
Native Canddian Playwright
SUB Theatre
Mon. Ocf 19 12:30
to*fc
Roots Roundup &
King Apparatus
SUB Ballroom
Oct 16  doors 8:00
Tix $10 - UBC Students
$12 - Non Students
ALL AGES
TIX AT AMS BOX OFFICE
.0. SONIC
First 100 people get
FREE LUNCH
Oct 7 - J.P. Mass
Oct 14 - Scared Weird Little guys
direct from Australia - a must see -
Oct 21 - Pat Bullard
Oct 28 - Jeff Fink
[DA&S]
I   ROOTBtEB I
Thursdays 9:30 pm
tree to UBC students   tj
Oct 8   State of Mind
Oct 15 TBA
Oct 22 Thomas Trio and the
Red Albino
Oct 29 Rattled Roosters
OCT 5-9 AIDS AWARENESS WEEK AT THE PIT
(Z^     ^^d
ALL THESE EVENTS FREE TO
UBC STUDENTS
FOR MORE INFO CALL AMS PROGRAMS  822-6273
6/THE UBXS§EY
October 6, 1992 , X---X
N E W S
complexity of Charlottetown Accord
Legault from the University of
Quebec. Legaultcriticized Premier
Robert Bourassa for being melodramatic after the failure ofMeech,
stating that this "type of fallout
could have been avoided."
As she said, "the knife on the
throat of English Canada backfired, turning itself on Bourassa's
throat." Legault criticized the distinct society clause as unnecessary,
saying that Quebec "does not need
an interpretive clause thatis vague
and may plunge us into instability." Legault further questioned
the necessity of a 25 per cent floor
for seats in the House of Commons,
saying that Quebec is already over-
represented at the federal level
and "who would want 25 per cent
of Jean Chretien?" Legault said
that what Quebec did need was
more power within their province,
which could be achieved by an increase in asymmetrical federalism.
UBC Political Science professor Philip Resnick echoed this call
for asymmetrical federalism, noting that every increase in power
that Quebec would get at home
would be followed by a decrease in
power at the federal level.
Resnick argued that the failure of the Charlottetown Accord
would be "a step on the road to a
deeper restructuring of the English Canada-Quebec relationship," whereas if the Accord were
implemented we would only "bring
ourselves a short-lived truce."
Arguing that the Accord does
not speak to English Canadians,
Resnick said that we must begin to
think of ourselves as three nations
within one country; Aboriginals,
French Canada, and English
Canada. Resnick said that the
"devolution of powers [to the provinces] in the Charlottetown
Agreement is a recipe for disaster." Advocating asymmetrical
federalism, he argued that a strong
federal presence in English Canada
and a considerably weaker federal
presence in French Canada would
better accommodate Canada's
needs.
The veritable deluge of information lasted for seven hours
through eighteen speakers, leaving the overwhelming impression
that the Accord is very complex. In
Canadian history there have been
only two referendums on the Constitution: Newfoundland's 1949
referendum on whether to join
Confederation and Quebec's 1980
referendum on whether to leave.
We could describe this referendum
as a decision on whether we should
stay together, but that wouldbe an
oversimplification that belies the
complexity of this agreement.
The single "Yes" or "No" referendum question that we face on
the 26th implies a black and white
argument, which clearly this is not.
Cairns reminded us that despite
the complexity, we cannot avoid
the "agony of choice": "the Accord
is a single package and must be
treated as such."
So, for those still trapped in
theirmental quagmire thereisless
than three weeks to be wooed to a
"Yes" or "No" stance; unless, of
course, they add a "Maybe" to the
ballot.
• The conference, entitled "Redefining Canadian Federalism," will
be broadcast on Rogers Cable TV
over the next three Saturdays and
Sundays at 5:00pm and 9:30am
respectively.
^fr*—~*TtrrJ '         -m^"~
*.ite<
i^Kx <H1
^■3
HP
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iau.E*l\    ^K
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BIBBS
BROKEN
COMPUTER?
We repair all Makes and Models.
U.B. C. Network Services
Computer Science Bldg., Rm. 106
822-5516
The Latter-day Saint
Student Association
presents a
Friday Forum
9 October 7:30 pm
Woodward IRC #1
Speakers
President Heber B. Kapp
Sister Ardeth G. Kapp
Canada Vancouver Mission
Topic
Heavenly
Father's Plan
"If you are sick and
tired, of the politically
biased crap put out by
these people, now is the
time to act."
-Jason Saunderson,
UBO YoungSatanists
Join The Ubyssey.
Kvxxyxx*]
WHAT DOES DRINKING
COST YOU?
Come and find out at D.R.A.A.C. week
in the SUB Concourse - Oct 5-9:1030 - 230
THE TOP TEN REASONS
TO GET DRUNK
10 Experience the mother of all hangovers
9   Spend hard earned money
8   Pass out
7   Embarrass and lose your friends
6   Lose your money
5   Wake up with someone you don't
(want to) know
4 Flunk out of school
3 Get to know a stomach pump really well
2 Swap stories with cellmates
1 DIE
EVENTS INCLUDE:
• Debate
• Outreach
• Info, booths and videos,
including the controversial
"Perpetual state of consent"
• Games, prizes and much,
much more!
COME & GET
A T-SHIRT!
If you'd like to get involved,
contact Bit Dobie at 822-3973
October 6,1992
THEUBYSSEY/7 XSeiriry,   berry
good!!
by Carol Farrell
I couldn't help
being reminded
of a Swedish film
when viewing Salmonberries, starring
Canadian singer k.d.
lang and German
actress Rosel Zech,
directed by Percy
Adlon.
Film Review
Salmonberries
Whether it was the
coldness of the film
site, or the filming
technique, I had
flashbacks of Ingmar
Bergman throughout
the entire screening.
Many ofthe scenes
are shot in sequence,
with blackouts in
between, which serve
to develop the relationship between
Roswitha (Zech) and
Kotz (lang). A technique which I could
remember being used
during the sixties in
Bergman's films.
Salmonberries is
shot against a stark,
cold background with
lots of shadows to
emphasize the dark
brooding character of
Kotz and the deep-
rooted secrets that she
holds inside of her.
Roswitha, also a
dark horse, has her
own set of problems
and has built a wall
around her, much like
the one she escaped
from in East Berlin 30
years earlier.
When Kotz flies
with Roswitha to
Berlin, the walls start
to crumble and their
secrets are brought
into the open. First,
when Roswitha
discovers who was
responsible for her
husband's capture
during their escape
attempt, and second,
when Kotz makes
sexual advances
toward Roswitha.
They move towards one another
and the mysteries are
unravelled, as Kotz
says, "I was in the
dark and now Fm in
the light," (before she
met Roswitha.)
Roswitha replies,
"You opened one door
after another for both
of us and stirred up
secrets locked within."
Apart from the
beauty of its
location, (Kotzebue,
Alaska), what compelled me most about
this film was the
attraction they felt
towards one other,
despite their cultural
and 25 year age
difference.
The sexually
repressed Roswitha is
not entirely convincing when she rejects
Kotz's advances with,
"That's not me." ,
The soulful strains
of k.d. tang's, Td walk
barefoot through the
snow to get to you," is
played throughout
and somehow ties the
whole thing together.
i „        r
X/ -,
L     ._ ES
by Denise Woodley
These tales are a collection
of six short films from across the
prairies. Enough said, here is an
overview of them all.
NEW PRAIRIE TALES
Pacific Cinematheque
October 4 and 7—9:30 p.m.
The Ballad of Don Quinn is
directed by Mark Wihaks and
Kmt*_   J..**- _
\
iv-.
fish
X-'X
\. ;f       - : •--
9
and
takes place in Regina. Don
wants to Celebrate the
anniversary of Sid Vicious'
death and to show Ziggy (a
young female friend/roommate) and today's punkers
what life was REALLY like in
the late seventies. He tries to
get together his old band The
Spontaneous Abortions and
the local young punkers (and
skaters) for a party to end all
parties.
The band members, despite
some protests, decide to join the
reunion and although they have
lost their youthful rebellion {how
their personalities have changed
makes the movie) they play
anyway. Well, the party ends a
bust, and Ziggy and Don decide
to do what any cool punkers
would do—go to Vancouver.
Best part: the soundtrack and
the fact it's shot in black and
white (the parkade scene is
cool too).
The Final Gift is in
complete contrast to The
Ballad. Directed by Brian
Stockton and written and
read by Edyth Stockton (his
mom maybe?) this film is a
short story about a man who
lives in town and his relation
ship with the storyteller. The
shots are of a small town which
could be anywhere, with
Edyth's voice over the scenes,
basically a cute short (five
minutes).
Best part: the last line in the
story.
The third film, Incident At
Pickerel Fillet, is a complete
spoof of a UFO sighting and
how it has affected this small
town of 53 people. The film is
done up like a documentary and
comes complete with a scientist
who analyses martian feces.
Another cute film which left me.
.well, just wondering.
Best part: writer/director K.
George Godwin's interesting
camera angles
With Frogs and Fishes was
my favourite of all the shorts.
Written and directed by
Cynthia Wells, it is a combination of modern dance, images of
water and swimming—a tale of
a lifeguard and her relationship
with a drowning victim.
Best part: the dance.
Steve Cosens directed Endiang,
a stark black and white film of
TiTffli"/*!**' ■tTnarra-.a    Al4-'U....gr-Q
lacking a good script, the images
and cinematography made me
remember trips I took to the
family farm and some ofthe
bleaker moments from my
childhood.
Best part: the wind blowing
through the grass and the
S Wflth©T
DOG STORIES—basically
that explains the movie. Thirteen dog owners from Winnipeg
tell of their love for their pets.
We get to meet some of these
amazing animals as well. Where
director Shereen Jerret found
these people I will never know—
I lived in Winnipeg for 18 years
and missed all the excitement.
Basically, one big laugh.
Worst part: having an
irritating woman's voice in my
head go "dancey, dancey,
dancey" for a hour after the film.
')
Unstoppable
sex at 86st
by Ian Uoyd
My Carter day started like every
other, but it had the added anticipation ofthe evening's events. I
showered as usual, ate breakfast as
usual, and did nothing the rest ofthe
day; as usual.
Carter USM
86 Street Music Hall
Thursday, Oct.l
The time slowly dragged on
until, it was time to rush down to
86ST. All day I had been bombarded
with comments like, "Wow, you're
going to see Carter, I hear they are
the best live band ever!" I had heard
the same thing myself from all the
imported music magazines. Monthly
I heard about, "CARTER USM, BEST
BAND AT READING FESTIVAL" or
"ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND
SING ALONG TO CARTER'S "G.L
BLUES'". My anticipation was
overwhelming.
I had arrived early to get a spot
upfront so I could see the event of my
life; but no one was there. So I sat
down to watch the weird cartoons.
Then the lights went low, it was time
to start.
I wandered up to the front to
suffer through the opening band,
REDD SECKTOR ONE. For the first
thirty seconds I thought that I was at
a Depeche Mode concert, until I
realized that there wasn't enough
people and DM didn't come from
Vancouver. Since I like DM, it was
actually a really enjoyable opening
act.
RSI finished their act and then
it was time for the changing ofthe
band's equipment. Not as exciting as
it could have been, but I was waiting
for Carter.
The lights dimmed and the
opening theme came on, some sort of
opera I think, but I couldn't hear it..
I, like everyone else with vocal cords,
was yelling "YOU FAT BASTARD!"
As if summoned by their fans,
Fruitbat and Jimbob appeared to
give us the show we would never
forget.
What I got was good, but not
worth the hype. It takes more than
patterned lighting, sampling, and
Pink Floyd covers to make me drool.
I mean the crowd almost seemed
sedated, I never got trampled. It
was a great show, but not the
things legends are made of.
The highlights included
covers of Inspiral Carpets,
Pink Floyd, GrandMaster
Flash and even Nirvana. I
kinda felt let down half
way through but, I still
sung along to "GI
Blues". The moral
ofthe story is
don't read music
magazines and
overanticipate.
I AM VORTEX. TOLD I AM VORTEX
I FUNCTION BEST IN MOCHA IN-     .
SPIRED AIRLESS STUPOR. THERE
WAS A TIME I THOUGHT I WAS A
MUPPET BUT THAT WAS BEFORE A
FRIEND TOLD ME HE WAS A REALER
MUPPET THAN I WAS.   IN THOSE
DAYS I USED TO DRINK IMPORTED
BEER AND GO TO A LOTSA PUNK
GIGS. THEY WERE TRYING TO CALL
THEM NEW MUSIC THINGS BECAUSE
NEW WAVE EXPERIENCES WERE
ALREADY OUT OF FASHION. I GUESS
THE KNACK AMD THE CARS JUST
WEREN'T " HARSH ENOUGH MON*'
BUT FOR SOME ABSURD REASON
DAVID BOWIE STILL HAD SOME
STREET CREDIBILITY. IN ANY CASE
ISTUX HAD SOME MUPPET SENSI-
BIUTY-MY ONLY CONCERN WAS
ABOUT THE COMPOSITION OF MY
STUFFING, NOT ABOUT THE HOPELESSNESS OF POST-POST SECONDARY UNEMPLOYMENT AND MY
SOON TO BE REALIZED ELDER-
STATESMAN ' SHIP OF THE SLACKER
GENERATION-YES IT'S TRUE, A JOB
WORKING FOR MYSELF. Y'KNOW
THE QUALITY OF THE BEER AT
THOSE PLACES WASN'T HIGH, THIS
WAS BRTORE THE DAYS OF GOOD
BEER ON TAP AT EVEN THE WORST
BARS. LONG BETORETHE DAYS OF
OBSIDIAN STOUT IN PORTLAND
OREGON (CHECK IT OUT), WHERE I
DISCOVERED THAT HOPS  AND
CANNABIS SATTVA REALLY ARE
RELATED PLANTS. LIKE IT WASN'T
THE FAULT OF THE MODERNETTES,
OR DOA, OR THE SUBHUMANS, OR
THE ENIGMAS, OR FAMILY PLOT OR
EVEN SLOW AND ITS FAMILY TREE
OF TANKHOG AND JIRCLE C- BY
VORTEX
THE WAY CIRCLE C ARE THE MOST
POETICALLY      ANGST-RIDDEN
MANTRA    GROOVE    BAND    IN
VANCOUVER, NOW OR EVER. WE
WENT TO SEE THE BANDS BUT IF
WE WANTED TO DRINK GOOD BEER
WE HAD TO DO IT BEFORE WE GOT
THERE. SITTING IN PARKS ACROSS
THESTREET. AROUND THE CORNER.
IN BACK ALLEYS. GUZZLING OUR
KRONENBURGS OR OUR BECKS OR
OUR   SAN   MIGUELS   OR   OUR
STEINBECKS ( ALWAYS AVOID
BEERS WTTH LITERARY REFERENCES
).THE IS AKM TO SNEAKING GULPS
OF COURVOISIER AT THE OPERA,
TRYING NOT TO SPILL ON YOUR
SILK TOX-OH, I GUESS I DIDN'T
TELL YOU I BORROWED IT BUT I
DTD AND YOU STILL WON*T KNOW
'CAUSE YOU DON'T UVE HERE
10
ANYMORE. IN EGYPT, THE HARVEST
MAY HAVE BEEN WEIGHED WHEN
THE MOON WAS FULL IN LIBRA BUT
IT STILL NEVER HELPED GETTING
GOOD BEER AT GIGS OR AT MAKING MY PASSIONS MORE REASONABLE   IN   A   POST  "JUST SAY
NORIEGA" MORAL CLIMATE. AM I
RANTING?  AM I RAVING? AM I
LACKING EMPATHY? AM I CONFUSED? DO YOU CARE? I DON'T. I
MEAN WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM
ME WHEN MY PRIME MINISTER
ACCUSES ME OF BEING A BAD
" CANADIAN JUST BECAUSE I DON'T
LIKE HIS LITTLE ACCORD. EXCUSE
ME-I GOT BRAJN.IHAVE VOTE. I'M
GONNA USE THEM BOTH, EVEN IF
THEY ONLY CANCEL OUT JOHN
TURNER'S VOTE. HELL, THAT'S
EVEN A GOOD START, MEANWHILE
MULRONEY CAN THINK ABOUT HIS
FRACTURED FUTURE. Y*AIX CAN
THINK ABOUT OUR FRACTURED
COUNTRY.    ME?    I*LL JUST SIT
by E. Griffith
The most hilarious gross-out gore-fest Fve ever seen, Brain Dead transcends
godawful to attain a place of sublime honour up there with Evil Dead and Return
of the Living Dead in the splatter hall of fame.
AROUND AND WONDER WHY IT S
"DRUG  AND  ALCOHOL   ABUSE
WEEK" ON CAMPUS AND "AIDS
AWARENESS WEEK" EVERYWHERE
ELSE, WHILE I COMPOSE LITTLE
DITTIES ABOUT MY FAVORITE
WORDS THAT BEGIN WITH THE
LETTER B.
Film
Brain Dead (Friday Night)
Pacific Cinematheque
•r-l
55
a
by Andrea Palframan
Some kinky movies are just dumb.
"Chain of Desire" is a film about sex in the
*3
•i-i
■3
The film features wonderfully nauseating Dick-and-Jane
main characters that one can't help but love, seemingly
endless bizarre and twisted special effects and a totally
stupid premise: the bite of a demonic monkey turns 	
people into flesh-eating zombies whose victims and       9° s that, while it is not about AIDS, cant seem to avoid
parts thereof turn into more ofthe same. . the ksue. It's like soft porn with a conscience: scenes of gratu-
A lot of fun ensues—for example two horny   itous, cleverly choreographed sex between SOHO sophisticates,
zombies make atruly gross zombie baby; an   sbre%t hustlers, and S&M culties, with scant mention of condoms, "the
embalmingmachinegetslefton.making virus, and distant characters who are "sick."	
undead Mom explode from the green r ~ ;
stuffgettingpumpedintoherveins; Chain of Desire
and a final lawnmower-massa- Vancouver Film Festival
ere showdown takes the clas- Press Screening
sic Gremlins blender stunt       Friday, September 25
to psychotic extremes.
the big He versus Chomsky
V . Graham Cook
around aimlessly, the "world's largest Per,m.anen^0J^X^« W
nerdish looking 64-year-old academic talking about thought control.
For those of us who
call this entertainment,     Brain
Dead     gets
four stars.
A. ^opper-mm»«™d^-*^^
MANUFACTURING CONSENT: NOAM CHOMSKY AND THE MEDIA
Monday, October 12,4:30, Vancouver Centre 2
Vancouver International Film Festival 	
-^^^Timage is that of Noa^s^Uliant scholar and intellectual and the subject of the documentary
"Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the M****^^ .^ ^ ft (> ^ ^.^ ^ philoBophicai WOrk that propels
by NuBya Presaey
Caryl Churchill's
Mad Forest is billed
as "a play from
Romania'' and con-
as a pioneer in tne stuay m iinguu.**.«-.,"». ■..•■=...- r----;-- —-y^  _ ,*r    ^ work Because    earns itself with the
^i^ho^^                                                                                                                                                               . HvesofBucha.ast
these states can no longer openly coerce their citizens ^* ™ ** "™' ^JJSb as an institution, one controlled, not     J—*- J "-
TMsisnohalf-baked conspiracy theo^omsky^
f   -.
by Ian Lloyd
surprisinf-dy.-by the people who own it
Electric.
residents during the
•; December 1989 revolution
in Romania.
A,
.fter
getting lost I found my way
to the PNE to see the Master of
Moan. T-shirts, posters, programs
and buttons, all with his face on them,
you could see them everywhere. Lilies
were in full bloom and everyone wore black
plaid and Docs.
MUSIC
Morrissey
PNE Forum
Monday Oct. 5
mmmmm=$m
THEATRE
Mad Forest
. Studio 58, Langara Campus
October 1-18
AIDS enters the movie because it has to, lending a depth and credibility to a less than
deserving film.
An exploration of alternative sexual practices runs parallel to the wham-bam-thanks-
now-get-lost sex that predominates. One character uses telephone sex hotlines to get off,
but when one of his partners suggests that they meet to consummate their conversation', he
hangs up. One of the truly original scenes in the film is a mini-classic of voyeurism in
which three people watch each other masturbate, each in his/her separate apartment: the
ultimate in safe sex.
While there is some cynical commentary on the young artsy-hip scene (one character
explains that he's an artist because "it's a good way to make a lot of money"), it is
mainly a non-editorialized trip down a chain of sexual connections.
AIDS then takes one participant and we begin to count back and see how many
people have been infected. The links in the chain present a very scary understanding ofthe disease's domino effect.
AIDS becomes the final, brutal judgement of our generation's
hedonism.
Director Temistocles Lopez has created an interesting series of
vignettes; however, the dialogue is so scrappy that, although _
it has its moments, the film fails to be truly stimulating, sidestepping its potential for new insight
into sex in the 90s as it skirts the issue of
AIDS.
Damned Salvation
The film combines an "anti-celebrity" biographical approach with film of Chomsky^lectures
aid interviews. This is intercut with "propaganda" f-ta^from^anou^sour^s, including
Enough about what the overly-fashion conscious were wearing,
let me tell you about the opening band.
Gallon Drunk made a brief appearance and delivered a harsh, ambient sound
which was highly distorted. Scott said," [They] were really cool for five minutes."
Sandy said, "Kindahard to understand., .and they hurt my ears." The truth was revealed
in these comments, but it was only an opening band.
After doing the polka during intermission, it was time to witness the melancholy maniac. After
. In this Canadian premiere,
Chui-chill has chosen to lay empha-
„. a  sis on an Eastern Bloc issue pres-
"the US and Canadian defense departments, a New YorkTiir.es public relations newsreel.      ently very trendy in the media: that
and the carefully censored news footage ofthe GulfWar. . of the "black" or illegal market.
The filmmakers delight in "re-contextualizing" Chomsky s words, placing his      characters are. shown bribing doctors
image everywhere from the aforementioned video wall to a TV screen in a i»au »      with aie^i fa return for better care,
^vS^^^
ering, andat firstitleavesaviewerwondenngwhatcanbodone. The films
second half, however, saves the viewer from depression. Profiles.of
alternative media outlets around North America suggest that
Chomsky's dissident view is not as isolated as the mainstream
media would have us think.
Chomsky's belief in the power of "ordinary  people to
realize the truth, and to fight against oppressive institutions, provides some hope that we can all follow a course
of "intellectual self-defense". The film leaves us with
° sense that there is much work to be done, but
that by "taking responsibility for the predict
and art school directors are given other
gifts in return for admittance to higher,
education.';.'''.'.
■" Churchill consistently presents this
issue as a source of tension between generations, with the older generation upholding
the chanting was loud enough, he graced the stage with his presence. His presence was awe able consequences of our actions," asChomsky
inspiring, [the crowd even cheered when we stood still.] . puts it, we may yet effect some change.
-   l He began to sing, but you couldn't really feel his haunting voice. Somewhere through the digital {for more about Noam
filters, miles of audio cables and thirty foot high speakers, the essence of Morrissey was lost. His music lost Chomsky, and an interview
its personal appeal, it became an act on a stage. Even though his lyrics hit so close to home, the five show was as        with the dire°tor8 ofJManu-
personal as a TV show. I treat his lyrics as if they were psalms, but I didn't like the dilution a live show gave to his        facturing Consent, stay
songs. tuned for the Ubyssey
I am not a diehard fan, but I hold a lot of respect for the man. His live show was an impersonal, rehearsed feature medio issue,
presentation. Its only spice was his teasing the crowd by tearing his shirt, then turning off the lights. The only encore produced
two more songs, and that same feeling of emptiness.
The only consolation was the fact that I heard his moan louder than I had ever heard it before. It turned the steamy arena into
a shivering wasteland of melancholy tremors. The entire crowd seemed to shiver in unison as his moan turned their spines into jello. There
aren't many people that can do that to me, I guess that is what makes Morrissey what he is.
That haunting voice channeled all that depressed energy into an audio projection. It was a deeply moving experience, but his music is a
personal music experience; listen at home.
November 6th).
the illegal market diver the protests ofthe
young people.
••   The play contains a good deal of sexist
language. One character, Lucia, is loaded with .
negative energy and associated with such faults as
materialism, Americanism and even (oh no) premarital sex. She is constantly reviled by male
Characters, with lines like, "You're a slut, Lucia."
One hesitates to say whether this represents
unprocessed sexism or a mimetic description of sexism.
One wants to give the woman playwright the benefit of
the doubt. However, the production itself highlights the
abuse while refusing to focus on Lucia's resources in the
face of attack and is thus very sexist.
The play is mostly about "normal people," no doubt to
show the effects of male politics on "average citizens" in true
scientifico-journalism fashion. Everyone in this piay has a job
they really care about, everyone is heterosexual, and no one is
alienated from the drug rituals of their culture, ,
Ultimately, hampered by its own gender and class politics, this
political" play doesn't get very far.
by Colin Maycock
Religious
zealots of all
stripes will not
like this film.
Civilized people
will.
VANCOUVER
FILM FESTIVAL
ANGEL OF FIRE (Mexico)
Hollywood theatre
Directed by Dana Rotberg
Ostensibly, Angel of Fire
illustrates the impossibility
of redemption for the
perpetrators of mortal sins.
On this level it depicts a
bleak reality in which the
sinners are punished beyond
the call of justice by the
inexorable progress of events,
overseen (presumably) by a
vengeful God.
The narrative concerns
Alma, a young performer in a
circus/brothel (suggestively
called Fantasy) who is
impregnated by her father
the clown. She leaves (Fab-0
running away from the
circus) and quickly joins a
travelling religious
troupe. Led by a
matriarch and her son,
who she feels is a
prophet, the religious
show moves through the
apocalyptic landscape of
the squatter settlements on the outskirts
of a city, collecting
names and adding them
to the Book ofthe
Righteous (for a price).
The Prophet,
Sacramento, falls in
love/lust with Alma, and
recognizing the impropriety of his desire,
engages in all manner
of suitably auto-
flagellatory rites. Alma
miscarries due to the
brutality ofthe
matriarch's purification
rites and is quickly
returned to the circus
(ah, the return ofthe
prodigal child).
In this way the film
questions the viewers'
notions of sin, and by
extension, right and
wrong. On the one
hand, there are the
representatives ofthe
holy order praying for
and preying upon the
outcasts and the weak—
the ones who truly
deserve to have a heaven to go
to—and on the other, there are
the midgets, the clowns, the
whores and other symbols ofthe
fallen and damned.
Yet, which is worse? The
apparently consensual union of
daughter and father or the
sadistic excesses perpetrated by
the matriarch on and through
her son in the name of righteousness. One could argue that
both the father and mother are
the real sinners and that the
children merely serve as vessels
that suffer the ultimate consequences of their respective
elders' wrongs.
Either way, and with the
finesse of a truly delightful
tragedy, the main protagonists
die: Sacramento slits his wrists
and ends up spread-eagled
across his workbench—what a
superb tableau: Christ crucified
by his own desire—and Alma in
the inferno ofthe burning big
top.
So there you have it. Angel
of Fire is a fine film with a
wicked sense of humour. Yes,
although it does deal with some
major and potentially turgid
themes, it maintains a sense of
proportion via its liberal
application of vicious ironies
that deflate not only the
characters' aspirations but those
ofthe film. WIN A TRIP TO
KHATMANDU. NEPAL
representing the Reiyukai Cultural Centre of Canada at the
Reiyukai International Speech Festival
First Prize: expense paid trip to Khatmandu, Nepal
Second Prize: $500 Scholarship
Third - Fifth Prizes: $100 - $200 Scholarships
Contest is open to all Canadian citizens or landed immigrants 16-25 years old.
Entry Deadline:       November 8,1992
For more information and an official entry form, contact us by mail or fax at:
RCC International Canadian Office
1076 West 49th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Phone 263-1919    Fax 266-3406
SPORTS
T'Bird sports highlights
Live on Stage
Station Z Station
Hockey
T'Birds win Husky Invitational
UBC Thunderbirds defeated Lethbridge Pronghorns
4-3 to win the pre-season University of Saskatchewan's
Husky Invitational Hockey
Tournament. Scorers for the
final game were Dave Bond,
Lance Johnson, Casey
McMillan and Darren
Kwiatkowski. The T'Birds
swept the tournament with
wins over Regina 6-5 and
Calgary 9-6 previously.
UBC is 5-1 in preseason
play, with a pair of win s against
the Red Deer College Kings and
a loss to the Hamilton Canuks.
The TBirds open their 28
game conference scheduled at
home on October 16 & 17 with
a two game series against
Brandon University.
Soccer
T'Birds Sweep at Home
Women
The UBC Thunderbirds remain undefeated at 5-0 with a
win over visiting Calgary and
Lethbridge last weekend.
Kristine Vaughan, Jodie
Biggan, Heidi Slaymaker and
Nancy Ferguson each scored a
goal over the 4-0 shutout ofthe
Dinosaurs. Several players
combined to shutout the
Pronghorns 8-0. Kathy Sutton
recorded both back-to-back
shutouts.
Men
The T'Birds conference
record is now 3-1-1 with a
weekend sweep over visiting
Calgary    Dinosaurs    and
Lethbridge Pronghorns. Doug
Shultz scored the lone goal
against the Dinosaurs and several players helped to trounce
the Pronghorns 5-0. UBC's only
loss this season was against
Victoria, when the Vikings
ended UBC's 48-game winning
streak against Canadian University opponents.
mmmdxmmyd „■
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
Calgary Dinosaur player (left) needed a shoulder to cry on Sunday, as
the UBC Women Soccer Birds down them 4-0. Earlier, on Saturday,
the Birds destroyed U of Lethbridge 84) to extend the UBC record to a
perfect 5-0-0.
Marketing careers at CP Rail System
Team up with a winner
CP Rail System, one of the most successful and innovative transportation
companies in the world, is looking for men and women with talent,
vision and ingenuity.
People with fresh ideas and new approaches.
Team players and problem solvers.
If you have a business degree and want to team up with
our marketing and sales professionals, come meet us
at the D.L.M.R.G. Amphitheatre, between 5:30 and
7:30 p.m. We'll be on campus October 14th.
You might find it rewarding.
For further information, please contact your
on-campus placement office.
CP Rail System
CP Rail System positions are open to all qualified: individuals; women, aboriginal peoples, persons with a disability and
members of visible minorities are specifically encouraged to apply.
10/JHE UBYSSEY.
Octob<Sr6, S PORT S
OPEN THE DOOR
TO YOUR FUTURE
stan paul photo Penny Cooper of the UBC women's field hockey team outruns two Vikettes.
Winning tradition continues
Works Corps is an international organization dedicated
to providing summer opportunities for all students.
Whether you are a first year student or one Hearing graduation. Works Corps can help you to gain the invaluable real
world experience that post graduate employers look for.
• Back to school with no money again    f~-*|
• Working part time to make ends meet     r
• Tired of earning mediocre wages •
Why not get a head start on your career by securing
yourself employment now?
My   experience with Works Corps taught me the time management skills and
work ethic necessary lo increase my marks and reach my scholastic potential.
Mandy Barclay
3rd Year International Relations
For information call Vancouver 244-3924
Western Canada 1-800-655-4992 or send resumes to:
110-12811 Clarke Place, Richmond, B.C. V6V 2H9
INFORMATION SESSION • SUB RM 224
OCTOBER 8 & 13, 1992
11am • 1pm • 2pm • 3pm • 4pm
by Stan Paul
Which team at UBC has won
more National Championships
than any other?
The answer is the varsity
women's field hockey team, with
five CIAU titles. Coach Gail Wilson says, "We have a consistent
record of excellence." The field
hockey team has 11 national
medals in total, including championships in '78, '80, '82, '83, and
'90.
Wilson, who has been with the
team for 15 years adds, "However,
as a 'minor sporf in the eyes of
many, we continue to fight for publicity and recognition."
As defending CIAU silver
medalists, the UBC women's team
played their first of three Canada
West tournaments in Manitoba on
Sept 26 and 27. They tied Calgary,
defeated Alberta and Manitoba,
but lost to their perennial arch
rivals, and defending national
champions, UVic.
Field hockey
Last weekend UBC and Victoria finished as co-winners at the
13th annual Early Bird Tournament at UBC.
Throughout the contest UBCs
scoring was evenly spread among
the team members. However, they
played their conference rivals to a
Vancouver is Proud to Host
OUTRIGHTS/
LES DROITS VISIBLES
Second Pan-Canadian Conference on
Lesbiain & Gay Rights
October 9,10, & 11, 1992
Robson Square Media Centre
Vancouver, B.C.
A conference for gay and lesbian activists, lawyers,
teachers, organizers, professors, researchers, students—all
those interested in the social/legal Issues that confront lesbian
and gay communities to exchange ideas, evaluate our work,
strengthen our alliances and focus our energies for the work
that lies ahead.
Partial list of workshops/panels
AIDS/HTV Issues • Censorship • Coalition Building • Human Rights
• Are We Family? • Immigration • Refugees • Spousal Equivalency
Benefits • Out Law Practices/Out Law Students • Lesbian and Gay
Youth • Violence in Relationships • Violence Against Lesbians and
Gays • Custody and Access • Sexuality and the Education System
• Gay & Lesbian Rights and Labour Unions... and much more
Sliding Scale Registration ($25 - $250)
Cultural & Social Events / Childcare
6-
For more information and registration package contact:
OutRights/Les Droits Visibles
321 - 1525 Robson St., Vancouver, B.C. V6G 1C3
Phone (604) 689 - 1525
Sponsorship /Endorsements:
Vancouver Gay and Lesbian Centre; B.C. Federation of Labour;
Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia; Faculty of Law,
University of Victoria; Vancouver Lesbian Centre; Feminist Institute
for Studies on Law and Society, Simon Fraser University
0-0 draw in the final game.
Although the TBirds will win
an automatic birth as the host team
to the CIAU Championships on
Nov 6, 7, and 8, they are firm on
seeking the Canada. West Conference title. "In a big way," says
coach Wilson, who added, "we
basically have to win every
game."
With a record of 2-1-1 at the
first CWUAA tournament, the
women's field hockey team are
looking forward to the return of
starters Leslie Richardson and
Susan Franks The ad
dition of rookie Mamie McComb
should strengthen their line-up as
they head toward the second
Canada West
Tournament in Calgary on Oct 10
and 11.
LSAT
MCAT
GMAT
GRE
Classes are starting soon
call 734 - 8378
KAPLAN
Tfte answer to the test question.
UIBC AWARDS
SILKSCREENINC
(QUICK TURNAROUND)
•EMBROIDERY
•CRESTS & CHENNILLE
•CUSTOM-MADE JACKETS
call the OYE SPORTSWEAR
HOTLINE: 875-1245
"TKOtfrTVLU'V-E'KfOT QOOVS'
OPEN EVENINGS & WEEKENDS
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR STUDENTS
INTERESTED IN WORK STUDY
The LAST Work Study Drop-In Session will be held on
Wednesday, October 14.
Work Study Drop-In Sessions are held every
Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 and
Wednesday morning at 9:30
from
September 22nd through to October 14th.
Work Study is open to students from all provinces,
provided they have applied for student loans through
their home province.
In order to attend a drop-in session you must have:
• applied for a student loan
• and received your Notice of Recommended Award
Work Study applications will be accepted in the Awards Office
until Monday, October 19th.
Octggr^l^.,.
THEUBYSSEtm^ Forum On Education
A Series of Discussions Aboi
Post-Secondary Edi
Tuesd
pm
uditorium
ons Aboitf
"Meeting the Needs
of a Changing
Student Population"
Speakers:
Dr. Dave Strangway, UBC President
Dr. Jim Griffiths, UVIC Dir. of Student Services
Dr. Bill Stewart, SFU Dir. of Student Services
Brief speeches will be followed by a
question and answer period.
Canadian    northB|
Canada's Ski Airline FACEIH
CARTEL
MAKING TODAY BETTER FOB YOU
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18 - 5:00/8:00 P.M.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 19 - 8:00 P.M.
Tickets available at all TICKETMASTER locations, Sport Mart, Eatons,
Woodward's stores, and INFOCENTRES in major malls.
HRoucHr.,, «ou bv        Charge by Phone: 280-4444 ff^^fp^
aoiww
IDISCOUNT     SUPERSTORES
BEAT YOUR HUNGER
WITH A CLUB.
When your hunger just won't quit, beat it with a
Subway Club. It's loaded with ham, turkey, roast beef
and free fixin's. Look out wimpy burgers. Subway's
Club is the serious weapon against big appetites.
ANY
FOOTIONG
SUBOR
SALAD
$1.00 OFF
AMY
FOOTLONG
SUBOR
SALAD
(500 off six-inch)
5736
UNIVERSITY BLVD.
222-0884 ^m*ikadma4imuitJMtiAWr wed/Fri/sat:
ON THE VILLAGE)   Offer Expires: Od. 1IV92 Valid at this location only 10 am-2 am
\mJLJLmJkMtJkmJKr
Hours:
Mon/Tue/Thu/Sun:
10 am-Midnite
H 0 ROS CO P E
Crazy cosmic comets and fantasmagoric futures
By Laaha Seniuk
October 7-9,1992
Aries (March 21-April 20)
Image: "A sudden downpour of fat
raindrops."
Message: a gush of meaningful words.
Well now, Aries—there's much in the
way of verbal excitement milling
around at present (for some Aries' this
is likely to continue over the next few
weeks). After Wednesday expect an
increase in compelling, if not abrupt,
communications from friends, colleagues and family members. Generally, Aries, it's as if those around you
have decided to no longer "mince
words"-
relation!
and fii ri
stay alei
Friday,
stern-
thority ft
the worl i\
Leo (July 23-August 22)
Image: "An emerald green kite in a
clear blue sky."
Message: A flutter of strong ideas.
Home matters, family dynamics and
emotional "rules and regulations" are
likely to be the topics of conversation
over the next few weeks, Leo. Beginning Wednesday, and lasting until the
end of October, expect to experience an
increase in emotional intensity on the
home front or in relationships. Everyone is more expressive just now, Leo,
and you are likely to be smack dab in
the middle of it all. Stay centered and
enjoy the view—there's much to be
learned just now from observing the
emotions of others. Friday, on the other
hand, avoid disagreements and mild
confrontations with the narrow-
minded, pushy types: ho good can come
of it until next week.
Sagitarius (November 23-
December 21)
Image: "In the mountains, a small
stream of fresh, clear water."
Message: Inner movement.
Before the end ofthe week, Sage, past
relationships, old emotional depths,
"yesterday's dreams" and emotional
patterns may be on your mind—indulge yourself a little bit here, Sage,
but don't get too carried away. Aspects
indicate that now is a particularly auspicious time for you to clarify, ponder
and release nostalgic emotions and
thoughts. To a lesser degree, issues of
home, property, investments, traditional roles and family maybe affected.
After the weekend, Sage, you enter into
a 14-month period of "re w social beginnings" and a relationship "luck"—many
Sages may now begin to change their
social status or look for a new circle of
friends, co-workers.
Taun
Image:
Messag
Over thi
may
ings in
emotion:
orexpec
usual.
eryone
ally coi
sive:   ai
rus—sU
Thursdt
in a rat
keyrelat
sign)
great di
questio:
ier 22-
h blueber-
sure, mo-
and last-
lur weeks,
d to ex-
iends, ex-
and open
nters/alli-
be speak-
in a much
publicly
attract a
and keep
that you
tangeable,
ay/Satur-
id misun-
ibers.
Gemiip
Image:
glasses.'
Messag
Overth<
ideas an
popping
ning thi
weeks, n
flashes r.
Much o:
express*: 11
\21-Feb-
ils and a
Aquarius,
to speak,
"down to
that you
period of
o chance"
tt across.
say what
you say,
may also
financial
ions. Al-
set of cir-
energy is
"shadow
d all day
financial
Cancer (June 22-July 22)
Image: "High in the mountains, an
untouched watershed."
Message: Clarity of intent.
Beginning Wednesday, Cancer, and
continuing on in bits and spurts over
the next three weeks, expect to be romantically receptive, nostalgic and
expressive. Emotions will be deeply
felt and easily verbalized before the
end ofthe month, Cancer—not only for
you, but for your nearest and dearest.
Enjoy yourself here, Cancer, but if it
gets to be a bit much make sure you
create room for a little quiet time and
restful solitude. Thursday/Friday, on a
different note, could be somewhat
stressful in the area of career, employment relationships and "reputation" or
public image—don't conform to a role
or persona forced on you by others.
Scorpio (October 24-No-
vember 22)
Image: "After a bonfire, a cluster of
glowing embers."
Message: Feelings that endure.
Time to start chattering, socializing
and expressing your wit, wisdom and
humour, Scorp—beginning Wednesday, and lasting until the end of October, you are likely to experience a sharp
increase in mental energy, curiosity,
social zest and romantic interest. Some
Scorpios may also experience the sudden emergence of a past relationship
or emotional pattern in a relationship.
Interesting, perhaps challenging to
your ego, but interesting. Enjoy yourself, Scorp—you may need to release
some penned up energy just now. Friday, on the other hand, is NOT a good
time to challenge authority in the work
place or to ask for financial favours.
Pisces (February 20-March
20)
Image: "A bright blue fish at the bottom ofthe ocean."
Message: Vibrant dreams.
This week, Pisces, everything gets wise,
hidden and intense—beginning
Wednesday, and lasting over the next
few weeks, you are likely to feel strongly
compelled to discuss philosophy, fascinating emotional issues, learning experiences and inner wisdoms. How enchanting, Pisces—make sure you also
tap into any surges of creativity that
present themselves. Friday/Saturday,
on the other hand, are much more practical and financially demanding—budgets, schedules, home repairs, property
and/or investments are likely to need
added attention. After Saturday financial opportunities look much more
promising.
La$ha Seniuk, whose column can be found
regularly in the Vancouver Courier, it now a
Mtudent at UBC. For private consultation,
hatha can be reached at 739-8871.
ia/THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1992 ImE tters
75 years of sexist
memories
The insensitive writers of facetious letters about women's fight
for equality in B.C., and in Canada,
should view the situation at from
the University of British Columbia, a training ground for the
country's business leaders.
There are 14 men and ONE
woman appointed to the Boards of
Governors at UBC this year, on a
campus that has no high-level
women administrators. The current edition of the Alumni
Chronicle, mailed to the University
graduates all over the world, has a
front page picture of two dozen
ageing men on a stairwell, with
the message below reading "75
years of Memories".
Women at the University have
no chance of winning equality of
opportunity. At least they have a
fighting chance in the larger community of B.C. of claiming a minimal justice in a face of ages-long
disenfranchisement.
Nancy C. Horsman
Forestry
Awareness #1:
mayonnaise
Opinion: a considered view,
judgement, belief; estimate; point
of view. Drivel: Daniel P.K.
Mosquin's October 2nd article entitled, "Forest-Killer's forum." His
unbelievably inaccurate reportage
was neither a well considered point
of view nor an example of
thoughtful judgement. Anyone who
was present at the Students for
Forestry Awareness Thursday
lunch time speaker series would
say unequivocally that Danny Boy
must have covered his ears in
mayonnaise while trying to decide
how he would distort what the MLA
from Prince George, Paul Ramsey,
said. I value the opportunity to
express opinion, However, opinion
that twists fact into drivel is dangerous.
Ramsey said, "interest groups
are seeking more education," in
reference to the need for information in order to participate in decision making processes regarding
forest use. Danny figures Ramsey
implied that "interest groups" are
a threat to foresters. Hereinis proof
ofthe mayonnaise theory. Ramsey
was simply reiterating what interest goups have been advocating
for years, thatinformation is power
and power should be shared.
Mr. Ramsey also said that the
forest industry needs to create more
value added product from the raw
resource. This he said would take
pressure off the forest land base
because more people Could be employed per cubic meter of wood.
The result may be a reduced harvest. Danny twisted this tidbit of
information into a statement implying that the rational for value
added products is greater profits
for industry. Did the mayonnaise
seep into the cerebrum?
I don't believe what Paul
Ramsey said is the word of God.
But I, unlike Danny, am willing to
come with open ears and mind to
hear the opinions of speakers invited to our series, and in turn,
become a better citizen and forester. I can only hope that others
keep their ears out of the mayonnaise jar and "listen" to the multitude of perspectives on forestry.
Jim Gates
president,
The UBC Students for
Forestry Awareness
Forestry
Awareness #2:
cutting mustard?
I was surprised at Daniel
Mosquin's reaction to Paul
Ramsey's speech of Sept. 24.1, like
many others present, found the
speaker to be frank and insightful.
Indeed, the speaker discussed
three major issues facing the forest industry: land use planning,
land management and product diversification. Mr. Mosquin is correct on the first two counts: Mr.
Ramsey does foresee an important
step toward "rational and consul
tative" planning, as well as a need
for "better forest management
guidelines". On the third topic the
reporter is quite off base. Mr
Ramsey called for a diversification
of products which will create more
jobs using the same amount of
wood, or, conversely, the same
amount of jobs using less wood. A
move to value added products will
also be instrumental in fostering
community stability. These are
vitally important topics facing forests and foresters, regarding which
Mr. Ramsey's speech showed great
foresight.
I do not believe that the
speaker was referring to better
ways of deluding the public when
he advocated better education.
This is yet another example of Mr.
Mosquin's selective reality in light
of his pre-conceived notions.
Mr. Mosquin did not ask any
questions or make any comments
about Mr. Ramsey's apparent ecosystem killing promotion. If he
truly believed these allegations,
the writer should not have been
afraid to confront the speaker and
defend his beliefs. Students for
Forestry Awareness strives to provide an open forum for learning
and discussion. I invite Mr.
Mosquin, and anyone else interested in forestry topics, to attend
our Thursday lunch hour speaker
series, but I urge him to remember: an open mind is a pre-requi-
site to understanding.
Tara DeCourcy
secretary, Students
for Forestry Awareness
Be All You
Can Be.
Join The
Ubyssey.
SUB 241K
lESQUUBeBlsliBARY INDIVIDUAL ADVOCAGYt&aQUPSWORKSHOPS FEMINISTCOUNSELLING
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from the Women Students' Office
Drop in to Brock 203, Monday through Friday
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FAIX TERM GROUPS
Come join us for support, discussion and information.
xn
SO
c:
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CO
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October 5 - November 2
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Going Home for Thanksgiving!
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Take the
_ Greyhound!
Greyhound offers frequent, convenient schedules to desinations throughout B.C. and Canada. Intercity Express trips between major centres feature
shorter travel times, extra legroom, onboard movies & snacks!
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BONUS:
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Is there a
secret
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Absolutely. Ihe LSAT Is proven to be a highly coachable test. Rnd
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2-DAY  SEMINAR:      U.B.C.
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and Friday, October 9
(9:00 am - 3:30 pm)
AMS Council Chamber, 2nd Floor SUB
FEES (GST included)
Seminar (tax deductible):      Student $160; Non-student $185
Study Kit only (by courier):   $75 (with advance money order)
_ INFO ON THIS AND OTHER SEMINARS ACROSS CANADA:
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Tel (613) 567-9229   Fax (613) 567-9098
The University of British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
T
by William Congreve
a play about adultery,
greed, love and intrique
(in that order)
Directed by Peter Eliot Weiss
OCTOBER 6-10 & 14-17
2for 1 Preview-Tues. Oct.6th Curtain: 8pm
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
Res. 822-2678
.October 6,1992
THE UBYSSEY/13 ]§^-l~T!®--R IA L
_       «.0 S X   ^     ■*•        +       M   .v. .^i>^   .
Why do we get high?
It is Drug and Alcohol Awareness Week at UBC.
Substance abuse is a problem at UBC. But we have to ask
ourselves, why? Is it a simple matter of choice, of just saying "No* to
drugs and alcohol?
We are constantly encouraged to take drugs to relieve what
pains us. Are you seasick? Here's a couple of gravol. Got a headache?
Here's some aspirin. Got the sniffles? Here's some decongestant. Life
got you down? Here are some anti-depressants. Feeling a little out
of control? Take some lithium.
We are never encouraged look for the causes of our pain —only
to treat the symptoms. We are taught to rely on medical doctors, and
to tie ourselves up in pharmaceutical straight-jackets. It can become
rather confusing when the same doctors who tell us not to smoke pot
or drink beer are peddling even more potent narcotics.
With a culture that tells us that it is better to medicate for
instant relief rather than be anti-social—whether due to illness, or
the blues—ifs no wonder that drug and alcohol abuse is a major
social problem.
But the "just say NO to drugs* campaign, and others like it, are
trite and condescending. Instructing people to "just say No" helps us
avoid investigating the social forces that cause people to turn to
drugs. The message to "just say NO* uses the illusions of self-
determination and "free will* to make us believe that individuals
who use drugs are weak—even though this is a culture that glorifies
the quick fix solution. It is, therefore, mistaken to blame individuals
for internalizing the lesson of a drug-promoting culture.
The message is everywhere; that pain and troubles should be
dispelled before they interfere with one's daily duties. And the truth
is most people in Canada, and most students, cannot afford to take
time out to get well, or to sort through personal problem s. Most of our
teachers, our employers and, even, our friends probably wouldn't be
very understandingif we chose take time out to heal ourselves. So we
find ourselves forced to carry on, to suppress the pain.
And if you consider what kind of drugs are illegal and stigmatized, and which are considered acceptable, you realize that what is
really "illegal" is to be in a state of consciousness that maybe beyond
mechanisms of social control. Hallucinogens are taboo because the
user abandons consensus reality. Nicotine, caffeine and alcohol are,
on the other hand, acceptable because they do not interfere with the
individual's participation in "reality* In other words, you can be an
alcoholic and a smoker, and still appear to be a "responsible* citizen.
It is not enough to be aware ofthe effects of drugs and alcohol—
we must also be aware of what pains us, as individuals and as a
society.
theUbyssey
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those ofthe university administration,
or ofthe sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K ofthe Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
I>n>p time. &17 inn. Or is it &17 am? What does it matter? Ma-^
heads at him. Steve Chow wu too busy toning out on the Mac to notice anything. But Sam Green tried to ealm Martina nervee, Lucho van Inelut was the first to feel the effects, and had
to he down for a minute or two, Francea and Paula Wellings wouldnt admit it, but they were beginning to feel it too. Ian Lloyd felt etrai«e, bubbling, giggling feeli-*** well up in hia throat
and, ooon thereafttf. he lost control of himself altogether. Steven Chan couldnt be bothered to join in, and decided, instead, to go for a walk with Cart* Farrel and Stephen Garv-sy. Back in
the office, Graham Cook was trying, in vain, to do some homework. 1 dont get it," he said. This stuff usually makes me so lucid and insightful. "Cool," observed Colin Maycock. "Yeah, way
cool," agreed Rick Hiebert Denise Woodley then said, "You think that's coei you shoijdd check out this red panel's
tiying to figure out which were the stars, which were the planes, and which w«^ the ftmnyhttleHghUthat were floating around in her heaiPh^
LaahathataH of tha tights were spaeeaMp**-, hut wh-mliiatdidntwtyk.th-^
waant laughing. "Hey, the 60s are over," she mused. In a huehed tone, Stan Paul aaked, "Hey, ia it just me, or has it been 8:17 for a long, lot* timer Ela3ne Griffith snickered, informing
Stw that twelve hours had passed sinn Stan had kraked at ta
Bob-art Fleck para rkaiW-we were an h<>ur and eeve^
asleep for several hours, woke up and asked, "What's the matter with you people? Are you on dn*a or somettringT We just grinned guilty grins.
Paula Waitings • Lucho van Isschot •
Editors
Yukio Kurahashi
• Sam Orson • Francos Foran
No censors
I am writing both to
express my outrage at the
recent AMS Council edict
banning the distribution of
certain publications in the
SUB and to remind The
Ubyssey editors ofthe message emblazoned on their
door - "NO CENSORS".
On Sept. 16, the AMS
Council voted to ban the distribution in SUB of all publications except, in part,
those that; "..(P)rovide a
service to AMS members;
cover issues that are of direct concern to AMS members (i.e. campus issues,
post secondary education,
etc.); use proper containment for distribution in
SUB; be UBC operated and/
or UBC student operated;
be specifically directed at
and oriented towards AMS
members.*. One ofthe publications affected by the ban
is the Campus Times.
Having regard to the
Coundl's above criteria for
distribution, a comparison
ofthe Sept. 22 issues of The
Ubyssey and the Campus
Times was revealing. Of
The Ubyssey's 20 articles,
only 6 were such that they
could reasonably be construed as relating to "issues
of direct concern to AMS
members..." as required by
the AMS edict. By contrast,
of the Campus Times' 24
articles, 21 of these had
The Ubyssey welccmes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist
or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or gramnatical
mistakes.    Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k.    Letters must include name,  faculty, and signature.
(conservatively defined) direct relevance to the UBC
student community. I invite
all students to do the same
comparison if you question
my informal test.
No matter what proportion is found in a given issue,
I find it difficult to conceive
of a construction ofthe AMS
ban which would hold The
Ubyssey as more relevant or
representative of students
than the Campus Times. It
is also worthy to note that
the Campus Times publishes
without the $45,565.79 direct AMS subsidy The
Ubyssey received last year,
or the more than $45,000.00
of our student fees it has
requested for this year.
Rather than protecting
its huge investment in the
"not for profit" Ubyssey
through veiled censorship,
the AMS should be re-evaluating the merits of putting
all of its student newspaper
dollars in The Ubyssey's
basket.
I do not know by what
and thus publications ought
not to be banned for political
or business reasons.
Peter Epp
Law 3
Don't cry wolf,
chicken little
When Chicken
Little ran around claiming
that "the sky [was] falling",
he must have taken lessons
from our Prime Minister.
The Prime Minister is labelling people.who oppose the
deal as "enemies of Canada",
and warning of disastrous
consequences if Quebec were
to separate. I agree with
Mr .Mulroney that if Quebec
were to separate the
reprercussions would be
devastating. However, the
Prime Minister is not dealing with the actual intent of
the plebiscite. The question
is not "Do you agree that
Quebec should stay in
Canada?" or "Do you. agree
that Canada should remain
united?" The question refers directly to the "agreement" reached on August 28,
1992. I would suggest to
Canadians that they look at
the deal that they will be
voting on, rather than the
far fetched, scare tactics of
the "yes" side. In 1990, when
Meech Lake was close to collapsing, the very same Prime
Minister warned that the
country of Canada would
crumble if Meech Lake was
not ratified. To everybody's
surprise, the country is still
intact!
Perhaps Mr.Mulroney
has confused his children's
stories. To my knowledge it
wasn't Chicken Little that
cried wolf.
Ryan Jaye
Second Year Arts
Invade The
Ubysseyl
The UBC Young Conservatives' frustration with
the bias of the Ubyssey is
understandable, but their
method of attack seems
needlessly destructive and
inefficient. They could
change the newspaper in a
more productive manner by
contributing to it, rather
than by petitioning for aref-
erendum to stop the AMS
funding.
As a former copy editor
of Excalibur, York
University's main newspaper, I've seen that publication and others at York
drastically change their
content and policies in less
than a year, simply because
a small group of volunteers
took control. Instead of trying to disband the few channels of communication open
to the UBC community, the
Young Conservatives should
infiltrate the staff of the
Ubyssey and ensure that
their views are more adequately represented.
If the Ubyssey is as desperate for volunteers as most
campus newspapers, anyone
who plans to sign the petition for a referendum should
consider instead this more
insidious tactic, which —
unlike a referendum —
guarantees results.
T. Roberts
Graduate Studies
Question time
now
As one of the two
students elected to sit on the
UBC Board of Governors, I
should really apologize for
not making sure that the
faculty housing project near
Acadia ["Development UBC
style: build first, ask questions later" (Ubyssey Oct. 2,
1992, p.3)] was given sufficient public consultation was
filled to capacity within a
month. New faculty at UBC
often find it difficult to afford houXig in Pt. Grey -
one of Canada's most expensive residential
neighbourhoods. The housing will cost the University
(and thus the students) no
money in the long run.
Finally, I should
take the opportunity to tell
you that new student housing is planned for construction on the northernmost two
B-lots in the near future.
Planning is underway, and
now is the time to get involved in the process.
I can be reached in
my office: SUB room 230B,
phoned at 822-6868, or sent
electronic mail at
dkmiller@unixg.ubc.ca.
Derek K. Miller
Student Member
Board of Governors
Scientific fraud
With a new pharmaceutical reseach facility
being considered by UBC
and Merck-Frosst, UBC
continues its grand tradition of vivisection. As species differ so in their reactions to drugs, animal research is simply scientific
fraud. And a lot of it happens here at UBC. Research
on cats of human eye diseases, is still be done here
for the past 20 years. These
diseases do not occur in cats.
Drugs tested on
animals often cause dangerous side effects in humans, including birth defects, degenerative conditions and death. It is in our
best interests to be informed
and practice preventative
and natural medicine rather
than depending solely on
highly refined and often
dangerous drugs.
The pharmaceutical industry is a multi-billion
dollar one. It is not interested in preventative medicine, how would it make its
billions?
Lisa Penny
1st year Arts
We want you to
come to our BZZR
GARD'N Sub207
4-8pm Friday
With love.
the Ubyssey
14/THE UBYSSEY
October 6,19$2 What's wrong with Canadian interest groups?
by Stephen Garvey
"Bullshit propaganda*,
"cycle pigs", "we don't bother
with permits or shit like that*,
"we shouldn't have to asks
anyone's permission, to walk
the streets for this and we
dont....", ^Get your racist, get
your sexist, get your
homophobic laws off my body."
Reading these emotional
phrases, and sentences, one
may feel like I do, that there
are a lot angry people in
Canada. And actually, people
have a lot of reasons to feel
indignant, especially over
ubiquitous discriminations,
sexual and mental abuses,
rapes, repugnant pornography, and government coercion.
These vile, and utterly repulsive occurences in Canadian
society, I dont dispute. And
not surprisingly, I believe they
need to be put to a stop immediately. However, what I have
a problem with i s the way these
issues are addressed!
A common theme in these
quotes mentioned above is extreme language- "Bullshit",
"Pigs" - and total self-interest
thinking- "We don't", "We
shouldn't?, "Get your...". Canadian society was originally
based on John Locke's philosophical writings front the 18th
century promulgating that society should be founded on a
fair, and equal playing field
for all. Shockingly, society today has become a selfish jungle
in which interest groups claw,
spit, punch to get their issues
heard, addressed ,and to get apiece
ofthe government's purse, thereby
circumventing normal democratic
routes. Submerged in astronomical
debt and deficeits, and functioning
in a inefficient, corpulent state,
government is slowly giving into
interest group pressure to solidify
and maintain it's own waning
power. It's a deplorable
development which will
ultimately lead to a fragmented, suppressed society, in which tljp real losers will be the working
core of Canada, as usual.
Fundamentally, I
support the role of interest groups;
people getting together and making an issue pertinent to society,
aware toall.Thislaudable activity
is highly valuable to any society
because it keeps people honest,
and encourages progress. Nevertheless, interest groups in Canada
have become compeletly self-oriented to the point of forgetting
one's own values. This narrow-
minded attitude is dangerous because instead of advancing civil
rights or correcting disturbing realties, society digresses, in most
cases. If these issues were handled
more skillfully, I believe tremendous progress could be made to
rectifying them; however, as soon
as a person or group fights a violation on a similar level as the
aggressor, their dignity and self-
worth, and therefore all progress,
are swept away like dry sand on a
windy beach.
I am not advocating that
community awareness activities
such as the women's "Take Back
the Night March* are wrong, quite
the contrary. I believe it's the interest group's role and purpose to
helppeoplebecomeawareofabuses
and atrocities. But name calling,
"cycle pigs*; discriminating against
others with reverse discriminations is not the way to go because
the public ignores such petty, and
Freestyle
severe words and actions.
What people and interest
groups have to realize is that we're
all in this life together; and therefore, working together as opposed
to against is the most logical, and
practical approach to do. Also,
people should not judge in terms of
sex , colour of skin, racial origin,
income level but how a person acts
and thinks. So vociferous cries like
"cycle pigs" is totally fatuous because obviously not all police people
are cruel people at heart. Lefs
remember that we're all human
beings trying to make the best of
this dynamic thing called life, although it may seem the contrary.
If interest groups stood by
their values: compassion generosity, kindness,...they would undoubtedly make dramatic
progress in improving decadence
in society. People listen to virtuous,
honest, sincere people not angry,
hot tempered, overly emotional
people. By lowering yourself to
somebody else's amoral actions,
your integrity is thrown out the
window. In contrast, standing by
your values, people will listen to
you andperhaps respect you. That's
the first step to change; you cant
Bhove opinions down people's
throat, and expect slavish obedience.
So for, you've been readingmy
ideas; but now, let's consider some historical leaders that have made a prodigious impact on society, and
the world.
GANDHI, KING, DALAI
LAMA,MOTHER
THERESA
What do these people have in
common? Why were/are they able
to unite millions of people to causes
for the betterment of the world,
and make substantial progress for
humanity?
These magnanimous people
have all stood inexorably by their
convictions ofhonesty, compassion
and love, thereby winning the
hearts, and respect of people everywhere. They all had\have tremendous visionary and selfless
minds allowing them to think in
terms ofthe world or society as a
whol e, while not getting stifled with
self-interested concerns. And most
importantly, they cared about all
people not just their loyal followers or supporters.
Finally, these leaders
have\had faced horrific circumstances no different from people
today. Look at how Gandhi and the
people of India through non-violence overcame the British impe
rial rule, and events such as the
massacre at Amritsar in 1919.
where over a thousand Indians
were maliciously slaughtered
by the British. Martin Luther
King, and the Black people of
America faced violent racist
attacks, widespread discriminations in all facets of American
society. King was successful
because he believed in human
value, interrelatedness of all
life; he was sincerely concerned
not only for his own people's
interest but all of America. Look
at the Dalai Lama, and the
couragous people of Tibet, who
were satanicly purged from
their homeland yet stood inexorably by their beleifs in compassion, tolerance... winningthe
respect and admiration of the
world. Mother Theresa, day
after day, tends to the impoverished and sick in the gruesome
streets of Calcutta while ad-
mini steringsimilar relief efforts
all over the world, not caring
who the people are, but simply
because "all life is sacred*
Canada is by no means a
paradise as patriarchy, discriminations, abuse, and selfishness make for a distasteful,
repugnant society. However,
widespread problems do not in
most circumstances call for
someone to foresake their values and beliefe. As these truly
beautiful people - Gandhi,
King.Dalia Lama, Mother
Theresa- have most graciously
demonstrated that love, virtue,
and compassion can conquer all
else if you give them a chance.
A letter from your President
October 6,1992
The AMS has recently been informed by the University administration that it is now philosophically opposed to the Alma Mater Society undertaking capital projects and having an equal role
in managing facilities built by students. This means that the AMS would not be able to expand
SUB as was approved in a referendum last fall. It means that even though students initiated and
paid for a large share of the Aquatic Centre, the University wants sole control of the management of the Centre. The AMS would be relegated to an advisory role, as opposed to our role as
an equal partner in the Centre's management for the last 14 years. In general, the University
administration does not want the AMS (ie. the students) involved in managing facilities and
services that we have initiated and paid for.
To be fair, I should point out that the University would be happy to have students act in an
advisory capacity and would be happy to accept donations from the AMS (ie. students), as long
as the University is in charge of the project and can dictate how the money is spent. This is a
radical departure from tradition: the students have always played an integral and equal role to
the University administration in serving students and in the governance of the University.
To completely understand why the administration's position is demeaning to the student body,
one needs to look at the history of the University and at the history of the relationship between
the AMS and the University. Throughout UBC's history, the students have contributed
significantly to the growth and development of the campus.
In fact, the students were instrumental in creating UBC and in making the Point Grey location
its home. In 1922, the students, with support from faculty and alumni, marched in the Great
Trek from the old Fairview campus, near Vancouver General Hospital, to Point Grey to demand
a proper home for UBC. A petition circulated throughout the province collected 56,000
signatures and was presented to the government The Great Trek and the petition resulted in the
government contributing $1.5 million to build the Point Grey campus and the University
officially moved in 1925.
In 1963, the government ignored the University's request for additional funding and more
universities. The AMS then collected 232,000 signatures province-wide in support of higher
education. As a result, the University of Victoria and Simon Fraser University were created and
funding for UBC increased.
Additionally, the students have initiated and financed, in whole or in part, almost all the athletic
facilities at UBC. The War Memorial Gym, the Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, and the
Aquatic Centre were all constructed on the initiative of the AMS. In fact, our contributions to
capital projects remain     matched by anyone other than the taxpayers of British Columbia
In 1968, the Student Uu^u Building, constructed with student money, was opened and the AMS
has grown to be the largest student society in Canada, if not in North America, in large part
because of our lease on SUB. We are able to offer a wide range of services to students (for
example, Speakeasy Student Support, AMS Programs, the Walk Home Program, the
Ombudsoffice, and Joblink), employ nearly 400 part-time students (paying them a total of over
$1.3 million in wages in 1991/92), and still have one the lowest student society fees in Canada at
$39.50 per student All of this would not have been possible without a lease on SUB. If SUB
were built today (with student funding), the University's philosophy would dictate that the AMS
could not obtain a lease.
The University administration is now effectively telling the students "Thanks for your time and
money, but we'll run things without you from now on."
We would appreciate receiving your comments on this situation. You may phone me, write me a
note, or drop by my office. Also, we are holding information sessions on these issues and the
upcoming AMS referenda on Thursday, October 8 at 12:30pm and 1:30pm in SUB Room 212.
Please attend if you want to know more or want to ask questions.
Sincerely,
sCtt-is^   C.XX
Martin Ertl, AMS President
Tel: 822-3972 Office: SUB Room 256
"No university in the world I know of owes as much to its students as does the University of British Columbia. That applies not only to buildings... but to participation in the actual operation ofthe University at a variety of levels. This, I believe, is good for the university and good for you, for it is in exercise of that kind that you gain experience and maturity
and become, in a real sense, actively interested in and supporters ofthe University."
UBC President N.A. MacKenzie, 1954
October 6,1992
THE UBYSSEY/15 FEATURE
Palestinian prisoners abused, Amnesty report says
This article was run Friday incorrectly as a freestyle; with our apologies to the writer, it is being reprinted as a feature.
by Nadine Araji
"When you die, knock on the
cupboard," the guard told Amin as
he walked him back to his prison
cell.
In Hebron, a prison established by Israel in 1968, Amin
Amin, a Palestinian university
student at Beir Zeit, was being
kept after his arrest on February
2,1992. He was kept in a cell that
was 1.8m by 2m with two other
detainees, and was released February 22,1992.
In Khiam, a prison in occupied
southern Lebanon established in
1985, a 50-year-old woman is tortured in the hope that her screams
will pressure her son into confessing.
In Ansar 3, Assa'd Alshawa,
19, is killed in prison by Israeli
soldiers after he protested harassment.
Hebron, Khiam, and Ansar 3
are among the more than thrity
prisons, detention centers and police stations established by the
Israeli government since 1950.
Prisons such as Ashmoret, Neveh,
Ashkelon, and Nablus were established since 1967. Carmel, Ansar
3, Megiddo and Dvir were established in the late 1980s.
The centers serve as prisons,
as juvenile detention centres and
as a place where detainees can
await their trial. Although the
majority of prisoners are Palestinian, there are Lebanese prisoners as well.
The prisons—eighteen in total—are run by the Israeli Police
Services Authority. Twelve are located in Israel, and six in the Occupied Territories.
Military detentions centres
are run by the army. There are
two centres in Israel and three in
the Occupied Territories.
Five major police lock-ups
hold Palestinian political detainees. Four of these are in Israel
and one is in the Occupied
Territories.
According to a database
project on Palestinian Human
Rights published in 1988, Palestinians are arrested randomly in
their homes, workplace, checkpoints, mosques, and churches.
Arrest orders are rarely presented, and evidence is usually
kept "secret."
When in prison, the detainees may stay up to 14 days without the visit of a family member
or the Red Cross, and up to 30
days without the visitof alawyer.
In a 1992 report that the Palestine Human Rights Information Centre (PHRIC) published,
it is documented that during the
first 30 days of awaiting trial,
Palestinian detainees may be
subjected tobrutal interrogation.
This initial 30 day period is when
the worst physical and psychological abuses occur.
The interrogatiors are usually army members. Methods of
interrogation may include torture
and deprivation to bring the prisoner to confess. The prisoners at
times cannot bear the abuse and
some of them are forced into a
fabricated confession.
In December 1991, PHRIC
published a report which documents eight cases in which electric shock was used on young boys.
Electricity was applied to their
legs, arms, face, and genitals. The
report was later confirmed in
February 1992 by the journalist
Doron Me'iri in the Israeli news
paper Hadashot.
The use of torture is prohibited
by International law, including articles 32 and 147 ofthe 4th Geneva
Convention, and the Israeli Penal
Code section 277.
"The judges are part of the
army," Hanna Kawas, president of
Canada Palestine Association said,
"and they are aware of the torture
and ill treatment that the Palestinians must suffer through while
awaiting trial." But, he said, many
judges maintain the 1987 Landau
Commission states that "moderate
physical pressure" can be used
against detainees.
In a hearing in November 1991,
where prisoner Nidal Assab complained of electrical shock treatment
in Hebron prison, judge maj.
Yonatan Livneh responded that it
was " moderate physical pressure"
and it could not kill a person.
In May 1992, a 44 page report
released by Amnesty International
documented routine torture in
Khiam prison. Detainees, the report said, were being beaten and
doused in water while hung from an
electrical pole. The more than 200
detainees in Khiam were being held
until four Israeli soliders and eight
South Lebanese Army soldiers held
in Lebanon were returned.
Amnesty International stated
that "if these detainees are held
exclusively in order to compel others to release detainees... they are
regarded as hostages and should be
released immediately."
In addition, Amnesty has expressed concern to Israeli authorities about the whereabouts of 36
detainees taken from Lebanon into
Israel without charge or trial.
Both women and men are arrested. As Hanna Kawas said, "as
the Palestinian movement against
occupation, Intifada, evolves, more
women are becoming involved in
the protest and as a result are
arrested." As a result, a section for
women has been built in some of
the prisons such as Hasharon in
Tel Aviv and Neveh in Ramie,
Kawas said.
According to 1992 statistics
released by the PHRIC, often the
detainees die before they reach the
prison, as in the cases of 12 year
old Badr Karadi who was thrown
from a speeding jeep in 1989, and
19 year old Khader Tarazi who
was arrested at home by four soldiers, put on hood of jeep and beaten
with clubs and rifle butts.
Due to the prisons' poor conditions and medical negilgence, some
detainees die before their trials.
Some prisons are very old, as in
the case of Nablus, established in
1967 in a 400-year-old building.
The prisons are also overcrowded.
In the case of Nitsan prison in
Ramie and Ramallah prison in the
Occupied Territories, three ormore
detainees are placed in a cell as
small as 2m by 1.8m.
Detention centres often keep
their detainees in tents under hot
summer temperatures and in cold
winter weather.
Doctors are often denied access
to ill or disabled prisoners, such as
in the case of Raeq Solman, 26,
who diedin 1990followingepileptic
seizure, and Mustapha Akawi who
died in 1992 in Hebron prison from
heartattack. According to PHRIC's
report "From the Field," prisoners
may ask for a doctor, but are usually denied a visit until after their
release or sentencing.
Human Rights organizations
such as the United Nations and
the Red Cross are urging Israel to
hold an investigation onitshuman
rights policies.
Haiti IV 111
Nazaretti IBI
Tol Aviv {5. Ill J
' 4   I J«nin{13. DI
• afc Tulkarm (El ]
/ •Nlblua (14. 151
R»mtel6. 7:8ie        (       a»Ram.lUh(l6l
Ashkelon {10. V)/#
Gaza 118. fl/i.
Khan Yums IGI
Israel
Prison*: [l.Damoun][2.Kishon][3. Shatta]
[4j«ashmorret][5.KfarYouna][6Ayf»lon][7.Neveh
Tirza] [g.Nitsan] [g.South Regional' BirSaba1)]
[10. Ashkelon(Askalan)Hll. Carmel(Atlit)] [12.
NafhaCNaqab)] [13. Jenin] [14. Judea-Samaria
CentralCJnaid)] [IS. Nablus] [16.RamaUah]
[17.Hebran] [18.Gaza] Military Detention Centers: [A.Ketziot (Ansar 3)] [B.Megiddo]
[C.DvirfDhahriyya)] [D.Paral tD.Tulkarai] [P.
Katibeh(Ansar2)][G.KhanYunis
MilitaryHeadq's (Ansar4)] Police Stations:
n.RussianCompoundCMoecobiyya)] [H-AbuKbir]
[III.PetahTikva] [IV.Kishon] [V.Ashgalon
(Askalan)]
VOTING'S
A BREEZE
If you're a Canadian citizen and
18 years of age or older by October
26, you can vote in the federal
referendum.
But to exercise your right to vote,
your name must first be on the
Voters' List. If you haven't been enumerated at your present address or
back home, you have until October 19
to add your name to the list.
You'll find the answers to any questions you might have in: "The
Student Voter's Guide", now available at your Student Association,
Registrar's Office or campus
bookstore.
Pick one up today and you'll see:
Voting's a breeze!
jaT^WtlSr
ELECTIONS
CANADA
The non-partisan agency responsible
for the conduct of the federal referendum
16/THE UBYSSEY
October 6.1992

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