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The Ubyssey Feb 4, 1969

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Array Give Walter
an ear
Vol. L, No. 40
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4,   1969
48
228-2305
— lohn frlzall photo
IT'S ENGINEERING WEEK (rah rah) as witnessed by the above damage to science common room.
AMS brief to the masses
outlines students' concerns
The people of B.C. will finally find out
what student council unrest is all about.
Council has published a brief, To the People
of the Province, in which it outlines* what problems students see in the world today.
According to the brief, major student concerns include: the need for foreign aid, moral
responsibility of science, population, racism,
nationalism, moral responsibility in corporate
and government enterprise, the economic system, urbanization, and the role of education
in society.
The brief suggests that the solution of the
problems in our society "cannot lie in the hands
of experts alone, but must rest upon a broader
base — a base that is both intellectual and
moral, and one in which the voice of the citizens must be heard."
Then the brief recommends "that the following changes be discussed between the students and the rest of the university community."
1) The creation of a sufficient number of
academic and scholarly university seminars
outside the present avenues of format and
specialized education.
2) The further encouragement of experimental programs such as already exist at UBC
(for example, Arts I and Arts. II).
3) The creation of an academic area
similar  to  the  Tussman program,  an  experi
mental approach to the traditional liberal arts
curriculum.
In the connection of the growing burden
of financing higher education, the student
council suggests in their brief:
• the formation of adequate regional college system;
• the creation of a number of satellite
and residential colleges;
• the creation of declared entrance procedures and qualifications, between provincial
higher education institutions; and the creation
of an independent board to allocate grants and
determine academic priorities for B.C.'s universities.
Carey Linde, former Alma Mater Society
vice-president, criticized the student council
for not coming out strong enough.
"They refuse to take a political stand," he
said Monday.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt agreed.
"People are turned off by statements with
the tone of demanding," he said.
The brief has not yet been released to the
public.
"I'd like it to go to the faculty. It's not vital
that it go out right now," said Zirnhelt. "The
brief is designed to reach university graduates
who have an intellectual appreciation of what
goes on at the university."
"We're planning a special edition of The
Ubyssey, which we plan to distribute off campus," he said.
Profclub prez blasts AMS
over refusal to foot bill
Faculty club president D. S. Huberman
has blasted the Alma Mater Society for refusing to pay the bill for the October occupation.
In an interview with The Ubyssey, Huberman said an AMS decision not to pay the
$6,122.62 tab is a "gross lack of responsibility".
Council voted 8-7 Wednesday not to pay
the bill.
Dave Zirnhelt, AMS president, said a decision on whether or not to reconsider the
matter will be made at an executive meeting
Wednesday. *
Zirnhelt said it was the* AMS's political
responsibility as a part of the university community, to pay part of the damages.
"I was part of the pressure to keep the
police off campus," he said, "and I feel responsible."
Whether the AMS is legally responsible is
open  to  question.
Zirnhelt said there has been pressure from
the faculty club membership for legal action.
"Their lawyer thinks they have a case,"
he said, "but the AMS lawyer says they don't."
Huberman, when asked if the club contemplated legal action, said, "We're contemplating everything."
Tobin Robbins, external affairs officer, was
one of those who voted against payment at
Wednesday's meeting.
"There was a feeling by those who voted it
down that the AMS was not morally responsible," he said.
"My own feeling is that the people who
did the damage should own up and pay themselves," he said.
You can't tell
players without
a prof program
YOUNG ARTS DEAN
Former economics professor and department head John
Young was named dean of arts Monday.
Young was chosen by a faculty committee which considered
over 200 applicants and nominees for the position.
English prof M. W. Steinberg, chairman of the committee,
said the committee was unanimous in its final choice of Young.
"The committee felt he possessed the qualities which best
met the needs of the faculty at the present time," Steinberg said.
Young said his major concerns as dean will be with improving conditions for first and second year students and with
the planning for additional building space.
He has been acting dean since the resignation last year of
Dennis Healy, now vice-president of York University in
Toronto.
Young was head of economics from 1960 to 1965, when he
resigned to devote more time to teaching and research.
TWO HEADS QUIT
Two more UBC department heads, one of whom has not
yet arrived on campus, have resigned.
Anthony Scott has resigned as head of economics and John
Waterman, German prof at the University of California at
Barbara, has decided not to accept his recent appointment as
head of the new department of Linguistics.
No administration spokesmen were available Monday for
comment on Waterman's resignation.
Political Science head Stephen Milne and English head
Geoffrey Durrant resigned after Christmas this year.
"I've done four years of heavy work as department head,"
Scott told The Ubyssey Monday. "The job is not compatible
with the teaching and research I want to do."
Scott has been head of economics since 1965, when he
replaced John Young, the new dean of Arts.
Scott said he believes in short tenure for department heads,
pointing out that his predecesor had served only five years in
position.
MORE ON HARGER
By ULF OTTHO
The science undergrad society is forming a committee to
investigate the pending dismissal of Robin Harger, assistant
professor of zoology.
"A committee will be formed,
made up of four members of
the science undergrad society,
which will investigate both
sides of the story," said Peter
Kowalczyk, SUS president.
"The committee will report
to the SUS council in two
weeks. One of the things that
will be reviewed is if Harger's
pending dismissal is justifiable," Kowalczyk said. "From
there, council will make recommendations to the science faculty committee."
Kowalczyk    said   he    could
see where Harger's dismissal
was partly justifiable, as the
faculty of science cannot afford to hold too large a staff.
When told about SUS's plans   s
to investigate his case, Harger
replied, "Its reassuring."
"I'm sure that the science
faculty committee would listen
to the students," he said.
He felt that a student response favoring him would assure him that he was doing his
job competently.
Harger has appealed his case
to the science faculty committee and expects to get their reply today.
GLIB GAGE
RAPS AT LAST
See P. 6, 7 Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4,  1969
""•^.J****
THE SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE, part of the contemporary Arts festival which runs through
Friday.
Legal action initiated by
Regina students' council
REGINA (CUP) — The Regina campus student council has begun legal action to get
$4,000 in student union dues which it says the
University of Saskatchewan administration is
holding.
Council had set a deadline of noon Wednesday (Jan. 29) for the administration to turn
over the funds, collected before the board of
governors announced Dec. 31 it would not collect student union fees this term.
The only response from the administration
came from principal W. C. Riddell, who said
only the board, which meets Feb. 6 in Saskatoon, can deal with the situation.
Council was also seeking an injunction
Thursday (Jan. 30) to stop the administration
from turning the fees directly back to the individual students instead of handing them to
the student union.
Meanwhile a section of the student body
began attempts to reverse a student decision to
restrict the voting franchise in upcoming council elections to those who had paid their fees
on the voluntary basis set up as an interim
measure.
The move led three councillors, including
president Dave Sheard, to resign on grounds
that the union had chosen to represent only
itself.
The petition originally called for reinstatement of Sheard and the other two councillors
and the resignation of left-wing councillors, but
this portion was dropped and the petition began gathering support among many who voted
to restrict the franchise 24 hours earlier.
A pamphlet circulated Thursday described
the position of Wednesday's meeting as hypocrisy which could be expected "only from a
group whose greatest fear is that they should
have to consult the entire student body in an
open election."
BLURBLURBLURBLURBLURB
Bloody poor
A grand total of one dentistry student out of 90 has donated blood in SUB over the
past week.
That statistic is sadly indicative of the general turnout.
Only 176 people gave their
pint Monday to bring the
grand total to about 1500 pints
in six days; far below the projected 4000 pints needed by
this Friday.
The Red Cross clinic is on
the second floor of SUB, southeast corner, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. until Feb. 7 and organizers report that there are no
lineups. A bloody big lineup
could save the day.
Atheists
The atheists are organizing.
Engineering prof Rick Jamieson is setting up an atheists'
club "to show that a very deep
and meaningful faith is possible without actually postulating the existence of God."
Jamieson will speak on "Religious Experience — the force
that moves the world" Monday noon, Feb. 10 in Angus
110.
Nominations
Only   three   candidates   for
the AMS first slate elections
have 'been nominated so far.
All of the candidates are from
the arts faculty. No nomination
has been received for internal
affairs officer.
Those nominated so far are:
Les Horswill, arts 6, for president, backed by the Reform
Union; Ann Jacobs, arts 3, for
secretary, and Hanson Lau,
arts 3 for activities co-ordinator.
Nominations close noon
Thursday.
Speedreed
UBC's reading centre now
offers students a course in
speed reading.
The $35, six-week course includes two 90-minute classes a
week and additional lab periods. A similar course offered
by Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics regularly costs $160.
Interested students should
register at the extension department in East Mall Annex
or call 228-2181.
Eye thank U
UBC students donated 400
pairs of eyes to the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind
eye bank last month. This number is almost half of the 900
pairs donated to the B.C. eye
bank all last year.
The Circle K club says
thanks to all who gave.
Payola?
Bureaucracy pays.
AMS Treasurer Don Aven
and returning officer Brian
Staples are among six winners
of the 1969 Athlone fellowship
awards. They are given to 47
graduating engineers across
Canada to spend one or two
years doing advanced work or
research in Britain.
The other winners are Robert
Kelsch, Donald King, iNorman
Trusler and John Waterer.
Second 2 one
UBC placed second in the
McGoun Cup debate Friday
in a competition involving Winnipeg, Vancouver and Edmonton.
"Student Protest is Founded
in Canada" was the topic of
the debate held simultaneously in the three cities.
UBC's Ed Hamel-Shey and
Jim Leavy, supporting the
negative, defeated the Edmonton team in Vancouver while
Jennifer Alley and Greg Mason
on the affirmative succumbed
to Winnipeg at the University
of Manitoba.
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—Head blorg E. Jack U. Lation said
today, in a speech to the masses, the world has too much love.
Though he admitted love is a wonderful thing, he added that
he had too much love to bare.
However, his audience will have to wait 'til next Friday
for the conclusion of his speech, which will be presented in
L.A.B. 210.
GRAD  STUDENTS
fflkcuuL JjoIul YbiiL
THE ROUGH  DRAFT OF THE
NEW CONSTITUTION  IS POSTED
Jjoa. fomm&jntA.
in the entrance to the center
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 AT 3:30 P.M.
Edward  English
Black Poet from Sel ma, Alabama
SUB AUDITORIUM
sponsored by Performing Arts as part
of the Contemporary Arts Festival
FILMSOC PRESENTS
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in ELIA KAZAN'S
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FEB. 6, 7, 8
Thurs. & Fri. - 12:30, 6:00, 9:00
Sat. - 8:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
DAZZLING! Once you see it, you'll never again picture
'Romeo & Juliet' quite the way you did before!"      -life
PARAMOUNT PICTURES pn-xni.
A BHt FILM
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Production of
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STRAND
01-2362 Tuesday, February 4, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
f, ,^<J$%&;' v
Murmuring from
the masses
"Should the Alma Mater Society pay for the
faculty club damages?"
Allan Burke, ScL  1
"I think they should have
paid part of it. There were
students involved although it
wasn't AMS sponsored. The
profs pay a lot to belong to the
club, so the AMS should pay a
token at least."
-Jim Dayton, Arts 1
"I think that they should
have paid one-third, because it
was at the university but not
all involved were students. 1
feel that AMS is responsible
for actions of students on campus."
Buzz MacLean. Eng. 2
"I think that they should.
The students were acting for
the good of the university. The
AMS is a student body so they
should have paid for it."
John Randall, Sc. 1
"Yes. Idealistically, the students who did it should be
held responsible, although this
is impossible. The students inconvenienced the profs and
should compensate them for
it."
Brian Miller, Arts 1
"No, I don't think that they
should have paid because a lot
of the people there were non-
students."
Janet Tully. Ed 1
"I don't think that they
should have paid it. Plenty of
students who belong to the
AMS weren't involved so they
shouldn't pay. Those who participated should be held responsible."
Jerry Rawson, Arts 1
"It's better that they didn't.
It wasn't an AMS sponsored
thing. The AMS is a student
body, and I don't think the
students in general supported
the invasion."
Sir Geo. Williams
Is there racism in Canada?
MONTREAL (CUP)—Support spread at Sir
George Williams University Friday for an immediate reconstitution of the contentious hearing committee investigating charges of racism
levelled at biology professor Perry Anderson
by six black students.
Over 800 students voted overwhelmingly at
an open meeting that the administration disband the committee and allow the contending
parties to create a mutually agreeable replacement.
Just an hour earlier, a like number of commerce students and faculty voted the same way.
The school's student council and science
students association have also rejected the present five-man committee.
The defiant students holding the university's
computer centre called on students who support
them to "pressure" the administration into
meeting their five demands.
They include disbandment and reconstitution of the committee, amnesty for three students facing charges, consideration for organizers for academic time lost, and no reprisals or
punitive measures against the occupants of the
computer centre.
A black spokesman called for direct action,
including other occupations, to escalate the conflict. He reiterated the occupants' determination to stay put until their demands are met.
There are some 300 students—black and white
—holding the centre.
Thursday night, the executive council of
the school's teaching association—representing
half the 400-man faculty—announced "full confidence" in the impartiality of the hearing committee and in vice-principal John O'Brien.
The executive of the evening students association has also announced support for the administrative position.
The Friday noon meeting last about two
hours and produced bitter argument over the
occupation. A motion calling on the protestors
to abandon the computer centre as a gesture of
good will was debated at length and taken off
the floor just as it was coming to a vote.
It was clear the occupants and militant
students at the meeting would not accept the
motion, and rather than risk a showdown on
the floor, the movers of the motion withdrew
it.
The occupation, meanwhile, began to draw
more external support. About 200 students
from McGill University marched through downtown Montreal as a gesture of solidarity, ending their parade at the Sir George computer
centre.
Offical support has also come from the
student councils at Laval, McGill and Universite
de Montreal, which sent a 40-student delegation
to visit Thursday evening.
TIP-TOE TO A CRISIS
February
Prof. Perry Anderson is informed by a lab demonstrator
that some black students in
Zoology 431 believe him to be
prejudiced against them.
April 28
A group of black students approach Magnus Flynn, dean of
students, with racial and academic complaints against
Anderson. Flynn terms the
charges "very serious."
April 30
The complaints are presented
to dean of science Samuel Madras. Afterwards Madras calls
in Frank McLeod, biology department chairman. (Madras
writes the charges down.) A
meeting to investigate the
charges is set up between
Flynn, Madras, McLeod, Anderson and the students.
May 4
The meeting convenes for
four hours. Anderson remains
silent while he is defended by
Madras and McLeod. Minutes
of the meeting were later lost
in the university mail system.
Madras promises to communicate decision to students, never
did.
June 14
Madras sends a memo to
Flynn, McLeod, Anderson, acting principal D. B. Clarke.
Memo says Madras is convinced
"there is no substance to the
charges of discrimination and
racism." Memo does not go to
students.
September, October,
November
Prof. Chet Davis of the faculty of education informs Flynn
that the black students are
still dissatisfied. Flynn transmits this information to "var
ious members of the university
community."
Nov. 20 - Dec. 3
Dean Flynn and Davis meet
and agree that an enlarged
meeting of all coerced people
should toe convened to discuss
the situation. The meeting was
never organized.
December 5
Students occupy McLeod's
office, demanding that Anderson be fired. They are willing
to accept a hearing committee
to investigate the matter, but
only if the composition of the
committee    is   acceptable    to
them. The committee is to be
composed of five faculty members. Clarke proposes five
names which Davis brings to
the students. The students accept the formation of the committee but ask to substitute
Parambeth Menon for one of
the faculty members on the
original list.
Clarke, the blacks and Anderson accept the revised membership of the committee to
consist of professors Alan
Adamson    (chairman),   C. W.
Continued Page 8
See: SIR GEORGE
Their statement: fact
or tongue in cheek?
MONTREAL (CUP)—Black students involved in the computer centre occupation at Sir George Williams University Jan.
30 issued the following statement:
"The occupation of the computer centre of Sir George
Williams University, Montreal, Canada, was effected with lightning and clockwork precision on Wednesday, Jan. 29.
"This decisive move was motivated by the university's
totalitarian and arbitrary methods in dealing with charges ol
racial discrimination and incompetence made by six black
Caribbean students against one Professor P. Anderson of the
biology  department  of  the  said   university.
"The black students have consistently and unswervingly
held their ground with a revolutionary integrity and orientation
never before witnessed on any Canadian university campus.
"We vow to prolong this just occupation of this vital nervt
centre of the university until justice is properly meted out tc
us and the whole student community which is also affected b>
the universally known rigidity of all university hierarchies.
"We extend our solidarity to the students of Simon Fraser
University in British Columbia, who are also courageously
combatting the status quo.
"We also militantly extend our fraternal solidarity with
the struggle of black people everywhere for we are historically
linked in the struggle to give birth to the new society that is
making its way out of the womb of the old.
"A fraternal embrace to one and all — Black students in
struggle at Sir George Williams University." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1969
On the motives of AMS politicians
By   CAREY   LINDE
Second term, and with it Spring.
University life is at its best in the
second term. There is the frantic
cramming for exams; the wanderlust
that comes with the approach of
Spring's refreshments; the annual
idiocy of AMS elections with the many
promises of "Heaven
here and now" by
the almighty "Vote
for Me", who ever
that may be; and the
excitement of reading about student uprisings at other universities. (You pretend to be against
that sort of thing,
but you really love
it, like the good fisticuffs that you look LINDE
for in the hockey games you watch.)
Now that you've spent first term
frustrating your time in the pursuits
of   sex,   spending   money   and   emo
tional energy on the oposite sex, second term is a good time to get down
to the real facts at hand and borrow
your buddy's apartment for a weekend.
•       •       •
Second term is the time of year
when the budding civil servants now
serving as clerks on the various superfluous sub-committees of the AMS will
begin to suffer growing pains, like
teething children. They will go out of
their way to walk by the executive
conference room up in the feudal section of SUB, where the ill-fated liquor
cabinet once stood in hiding, and their
bookkeeper eyes will glass up, their
egos swell, and their mother's voice
in the back of their head will say,
"Son, it can all be yours."
The reasons why people decide to
join that incestuous club in the first
place are often weird. Not much comes
out of it all for the students. Those
in office get to eat dinner with the
board of governors, sip tea with senators and have evening cocktails down
in the splendor of the president's backyard overlooking the ocean. But can
you think of one thing that the AMS
has done to improve your lot this
year? Not ten or a dozen things, but
just ONE?
•       •       •
There is an oft used expression in
the United Spates that says a liberal
is one who believes anything a black
man will tell him about his own white
racism, because this liberal has long
cherished the idea of taking on his
back an unequal share of guilt and
suffering.
By this standard, I don't think our
UBC small (and large) "1" liberals
cut the ice. I can't think of a single
one who is eager to take more than
his share of the guilt for the dilemma
we have put the Indian in. Most liberals are outright reactionaries in
that they still believe all the lies told
to them in school about the Indian,
and bugger 'em anyway.
These same sort of blank-faced liberal types will soon start appearing,
speaking here and there, fronting
some new and typically useless or-a
ganization, publishing some new white
paper on how to solve the problems
of the university in one easy lesson —
more money. They'll talk of the great
things they have done over the past
twelve months buried in some cubbyhole in SUB, and will ask you to vote
them into AMS office. And so the Mandarin tradition survives.
I'm afraid that this year's AMS
elections will be nothing more than a
very close — even uncanny — repeat of the Nixon Humphrey Humphry contest, such that no matter who
wins nothing will change. Maybe the
engineers will run a George Wallace
candidate, sort of a hodge-podge of
all the great things they stand for,
like law and orde-r.
Carey Linde's political memoirs, a
collection of his essays in The Ubyssey,
will be published in March by Grove Press
under the title 'Dog Daze'.
■■■■■
TMWSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it !j a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 4, 1969
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating    Al   Birnie
News     John  Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Managing     Bruce  Curtis
Associate   Paul Knox
Wire     Irene  Wasllewski
Pag* Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports  _  Jim Maddin
Photo      Fred   Cawsey
Ass't News   John Gibbs
Nate Smith not only worked, but in
addition also Nate Smith slaved viciously for the cause. Other involved bodies
were hardly humble Elaine Tarzwell,
Nader Mirhady on a groovy trip. UM
Ottho who investigated Harger and Jack
Emberly, and Allison Brown who watched Erik Brynjolfsson blorg down in
liberal whoreshlt, he says. Bruce Stout
leaped in to join the groupgrope with
his lens cap off and to cap it off Bruce
Stevenson saved us from John Frizell's
lovely photos. Tony Gallagher slinked
in to push the sports pen for Jacques
Strappe, who was busy having an
affiar with Charity Balls. Dave Ketal-
lack ran copy while Twigg tore his hair
between love-moans for Linsey Doyle.
Jeannie Toll, Fraser Canyon, Ann Teak
and Steve Adour will be starring at
the massive staff meet Tuesday noon.
There'll be T. Furtoo.
**.*"Wv
, r
Meanwhile, the war in Vietnam continues
By NGUYEN KHAC VIEN
(from Vietnam Courier, Hanoi)
With his hackles up, Mr. Harriman threatens:
"Attacks on Saigon may have the most serious consequences."
Indeed, Mr. Harriman does not use the same kind
of logic as a common mortal: The eminent American
diplomat finds it quite natural that 5,000 U.S. planes
and helicopters, 2,000 artillery pieces and hundreds
of war vessels bomb and shell Vietnamese territory
day and night. But should the Vietnamese launch a
few rockets on American airfields and military command posts set up on Vietnamese soil, he would cry
out violation of the most elementary rules of humanity and justice.
Mr. Harriman thinks it quite normal that 550,000
G.I.s coming from California, Texas, Arizona or the
frozen lands of Alaska pitch their tents in Saigon,
Da Nang, etc., and behave as if they were masters
of Vietnamese land. But should the Vietnamese
want to kick those intruders out, he would loudly
complain of agression—and foreign aggression at
that. A native of Mississippi is at home in Viet Nam,
but anyone ill-fated enough to be born one kilometre
north of that abstract line, the 17th parallel, is a
- - - - foreigner, who has no say in the matter.
Defence is a sacred right
Some time or other, Mr. Harriman, certain fundamental truths must be driven home to you. You
should know that whenever a people is attacked,
it has the right—I repeat: the right—to defend itself.
A sacred, inalienable, imprescriptible right. The Vietnamese people will gladly welcome foreigners on
their soil: tourists, men of science and culture, even
businessmen. But when half a million foreigners,
armed to the teeth and accompanied by thousands
of tanks, planes and other engines of death, invade
their lands, the first reaction of any citizen is to
snatch a weapon.
Any citizen—young or old, man or woman, Con-
fucianist or Buddhist, Catholic or Marxist, Thai or
Bahnar, born in Ca Mau or Lang Son, Hue or
Haiphong. Incidentally, Mr. Harriman, do you know
where your man Nguyen Cao Ky was born? Indeed
it would be a great deal easier for the aggressors if
each man said it himself: "The foreigners are attacking only such and such groups (or such and such
provinces, in the east, or in the south), it doesn't
concern our group or our religion."
Any weapon. There was a time when our patriots
had only bamboo spikes and old flintlocks at their
disposal. They attacked and ambushed the enemy
with those weapons. Now that we have Migs, missiles, rockets, why should you forbid us to use them?
Do you have any qualm sending your B-52s against
our villages or razing to the ground populous quarters of Hue and Saigon, killing even your best
valets? I know that you are using a very sophisticated language to talk about things you are perpetrating
in this war. Whenever your planes reduce a village
to ashes and rubble, your bulletins and reports don't
mention "houses" but "V.C. structures"; whenever
your cruisers and destroyers sink fishing boats, they
don't say "junks" but "wiblics" (water-borne logistic
craft). This "semantic" scrupulousness has not prevented our towns and village from getting, over the
past three years, more bombs than the whole ot
Europe during the Second World War.
You're feeling a noble concern about the life
of your compatriots stationed in South Viet Nam.
But what the deuce are they doing there? Shouldn't
they feel a whole lot better staying home with their
wives and children? You'll have to resign yourself,
Mr. Harriman, to seeing them harassed, decimated,
attacked from every side, so long as they remain
encamped on Vietnames territory. We did the same
to Japanese and French troops: why should we favor
the Americans?
Free and independent Vietnam
The same thing has always happened in Viet
Nam and will always happen.
Our Declaration of Independence of September
2, 1945 said: "Viet Nam has the right to be free
and independent, and has in fact become free and
independent. The entire Vietnamese people are determined to mobilize all their strength to safeguard
their right to freedom and independence."
In November  1945, President Ho Chi Minh is
sued this warning: "The French colonialists should
know this: the Vietnamese people do not want any
bloodshed, but 'if it becomes necessary that thousands
of fighters should lay down their lives, that we
should fight for years to safeguard national independence, so that our children shall not live in
servitude, we are resolved to do it. For the Vietnamese people are firmly convinced that their
resistance will be victorious."
The French colonialists did not take those words
seriously: this led them to Dien Bien Phu. Instead
of indulging in threats, just think, Mr. Harriman,
of events over the last twenty years. Could one, with
impunity, deny the Vietnamese people the right to
be free and independent? the right to defend arms
in hand this independence whenever it is threatened?
Perhaps you are not acquainted with Vietnamese
realities. So, to make things clearer to you, let's
carry things over to the United States. I wish no
harm to the American people, but let's simply make
a supposition. Supposing a foreign army were to
land in the United States, occupy New York and the
Atlantic coast. Wouldn't your immediate response
be to snatch a weapon and face the aggressors? And
suppose someone were to say to Mr. Johnson: "You're
from Texas. What's happening in New York is none
of your concern!" What would you say, Mr. Harriman?
Civilized nations respect rules
Mr. Harriman, you are the spokesman of a great
power, with world responsibilities. You certainly
know better than others that international life,
among civilized nations, supposes respect for certain
rules. It may not however be superfluous that I
propose to your meditation the following words:
"Any nation's right to a form of government
and an economic system of its own choosing is inalienable. Any nation's attempt to dictate to other
nations their form of government is indefensible."
"There can be no doubt that if all nations could
refrain from interfering in the self-determination of
others, the peace would be much more assured."
Those two quotations are neither from Marx, nor
from Lenin. The first was from Dwight D. Eisen*
hower, the second from John F. Kennedy. Tuesday, February 4, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
SO  SAYS
NORMAN   DEPOE
111 never be objective
Ubyssey: Is there such a
thing as objective journalism?
Depoe: There is no such
thing because you can't divorce yourself from who you
are. There is such a thing as
fair journalism. I'll never be
objective, but I try to be fair.
My role is to inform the
public. The theory of informing is that you are standing in
proxy for the general public
and you ask the kind of questions they would want to know
the answers to.
You must remember always
that as a respresentative you're
Norman Depoe, a former Ubyssey
staffer, is a CBC reporter, a
writer for Macleans magazine. "I
do a whole mixed bag of jobs."
He was interviewed by Jack Em-
berly and Peter Ladner while in
Vancouver for the official opening of SUB "This is the only
paper in the world I would do
this for . . ." he said. Here are
some   excerpts   from   the   inter-
not in the governing process;
you're informing the public
about it. You should never put
yourself in front of the story
because then you've stopped
being a representative and
started being something else
which I don't like.
Ubyssey: Earlier this week
CBS covered the student revolt at San Francisco State
College and it seems the only
people they chose to interview were tough, rowdy students. This is a common practice of the media. Why?
Depoe: If you are going to
interview you can't ask the
guy who says *duh'! You have
to ask the guy who will give
you the answers. You don't
want the straight square. You
.- need the guy who will give you
the answers even if they are
controversial — which you
hope they will be.
Ubyssey:   In   view   of   this
*     what then is the role of  the
news media as a public organ?
Depoe: To entertain, to inform, to sell ads and keep the
paper going. If you have a
good editor who really believes in society you really
have something.
Ubyssey: You've seen student newspapers and once
worked on The Ubyssey. Are
they as mature as outside papers, and how do they compare?
Depoe: Well, the writing
quality is not as good as the
professional press, but they
have got a freshness you don't
find in the big dailies. I subscribe to The Ubyssey, the
Varsity (Univ. of Toronto) and
the Le Quartier Latin (from
Univ. of Montreal). The university press is completely
free — it doesn't have to make
shabby compromises with reality, but the writing just isn't
as good as it should be. It's
sloppy. The art of writing is
to use words with precision.
Ubyssey: What's the best
newspaper in Canada?
Depoe: Most Canadian newspapers are very bad. I think
the Globe (Toronto Globe and
Mail) is incomparably the best
in Canada, with the (Toronto)
Star or Telly (Toronto Telegram) next.
Ubyssey: What do you think
of The Sun?
Depoe: The Sun is changing — I think for the better
because of Stu Keate and
Bruce Hutchinson, but I'd have
to wait a while before I say
anything more than that about
it.
Ubyssey: When you say that
the three best papers in the
country are the three in Toronto ,* doesn't ithiis reveal a!
Torontonian's bias?
Depoe: I'll admit even the
Globe never attempts to do
really full coverage of areas
outside Toronto and Ottawa
... in fact, recent surveys
show that the public is not as
interested in politics as most
newspapermen think they are.
This of course brings up an
ethical question: Do you
change the format of your
paper when you find out something like this. I guess the answer is that you don't really
overcover anything. You'd
have to estimate what over-
covering would be by looking
at the feedback from circulation figures, surveys, or other
ways like that.
Ubyssey: Should papers
lead or follow?
Depoe: One of the best
things papers do is leading,
by investigative reporting or
muck-raking, as some call it.
This isn't the most important
thing; they must also provide
background — the why's and
how's of the TV and radio
news stories.
Ubyssey: What makes a good
paper?
Depoe:  I  know  this  sounds
trite but it's the best way of
saying it. A good paper should
be honest, fair, and fearless.
A newspaper that doesn't always have two or three reporters out investigating something isn't doing the job a modern paper must do.
Ubyssey: Do you think
newspapermen overestimate
their importance in creating
opinion?
Depoe: Newspapers only
create opinion among a small
percentage of the population,
but it's still not significant.
264 M.P.'s read the lead editorial in the Globe every morning to find out how the Globe
wants them to think that day.
They really create a climate of
opinion on two levels. For the
concerned people there's the
editorial page. Then there's
the more subtle creation of
opinion in tho way they pick
stories and play them on the
pages. I don't think newsmen
are really conscious of this.
Ubyssey: Then you're really
saying that the whole paper is
a big editorial, only in different degrees.
Depoe: No, I never said that.
Ubyssey: But then doesn't it
follow from what you said
that the choice, slant, and play
of the news amounts to editorial comment?
Choice of news seems to be
the critical issue. Who decides
what is news and how do they
decide?
Depoe: It's the people who
work on papers who define
what is news — you just know
this by the seat of your -pants.
The best definition of news
I've heard is that news is whatever makes a woman look up
from her paper and say "Well,
for heaven's sake." A lot of
news is just high level gossip.
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Order of Elections
SLATE I — Nominations open Jan. 29; nominations
close at 12 noon Feb. 6; election is Wednesday, Feb. 12.
1. President — who shall have sucessfully completed
his second year or its equivalent, and who has attended
the University of British Columbia for at least two years.
2. Internal Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
3. Secretary — who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
4. Co-ordinator of Activities — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
SLATE II — Nominations open Feb. 5; nominations
close at noon Feb. 13; election will be Wednesday, Feb.
19.
1. Vice President — who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least
two years.
2. Treasurer — who shall have successfully completed
his second year or its equivalent.
3. External Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
4. Ombudsman—who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Nomination and eligibility forms and election rules and
procedures can be obtained from the AMS offices in
SUB and are to be returned lo the Secretary's Office,
Room 248, SUB, before 12 noon on days of closing of
nominations.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4,  1969
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Administration president Ken Hare has resigned.
That means UBC student, faculty and administrations are now
scratching their minds to find one man who can—and will—head this
agglomeration of concrete, books and general frustration that purports
to be a university.
There's been a lot of talk about who this man should be. In fact,
there's been a lot of talk about whether one man is capable of performing the job we now call the presidency in a seething academic
community of 20,000.
Significantly, the last two permanent presidents—who served
the snortest terms in UBC history—were brought in from outside the
university. And both, by their own subsequent admission, were "temperamentally" inadequate for the job.
Now, a committee is being formed to elect the next administration
head. Its composition has not been announced although it is expected
students and faculty will be represented—not in parity proportions.
The committee cannot afford to lose sight of this fact—especially
since the first three UBC presidents were all hometown boys—who
served admirably stable tenures.
Thus emerges a strong possibility, then, that the people who
pick this man will stay close to home — at least for an interim
president.
One solution to at least the immediacy of the problem is already
being bandied about among administration people, faculty deans and
department heads, who will doubtless influence the committee's choice.
It concerns a man who's been at UBC since 1921. He's a great
teacher, according to his students. He's well-known—and liked—around
the  campus.
Not only that, but he has in effect held the position of administration president for three years. He became deputy president after John
Macdonald announced his resignation in October, 1966, and was acting
president from June, 1967 to June, 1968, when Hare took over. He
served as acting president during Hare's lengthy illness last fall, and
continues to hold that position.
Most important, he has only two years left before he retires.
This is the essence of the plan.
The man is Walter Gage, math professor, dean of inter-faculty
and student affairs, and dean of men in addition to his presidential
duties.
The plan is manifestly simple: give the presidency to the 63-
year-old Gage for the two years until his retirement from administration. This gives the selection committee, or whoever, time to settle
down and pick a really solid man who can give 15 or 20 years of his
life to this institution.
So who is this man, who's likely to approach you out of the
blue, shake your hand and ask you who you are, and to whom
generations of students give their undying thanks for getting them
through Math 120?
Certainly a fine traditional teacher, but the sort of man we want
to be our president?
In the past, and especially as acting president, Gage has been
reticent to talk to reporters, apparently afraid that he would commit
some political faux pas and spoil things for everyone else.
When he talks, he talks glibly, taking minutes and long sentences
to say what could be said in seconds and words.
But in the light of his presidential star, currently peeping above
the horizon, what he has to say becomes relevant.
I talked with him for an hour last week, and I asked him it he
wanted to be president.
"I haven't wanted to be," he said, "and I've had no ambitions.
I've never submitted my name. If it means that it gives them
more time to pick out a good man to be president — and it does
take a bit of time — then I would do it for a period of time that
wasn't too long. But I would merely do it because I'm interested
enough to see that when I retire the university is in good hands.
BIGgest MAN
ACTING   PRESIDENT
There may be people far better than I for the interim job."
Ubyssey: You think then that you could do it?
Gage: I think so, I've spent a year now as acting president,
or more than that time. I couldn't do the things that a younger
person coming in could plan for but I would hope that we
wouldn't stand still.
Ubyssey: Do you think there are people who could do the
job for a long period of time?
Gage: Well, if two or three people who I won't name that if
they were asked would do a very fine job.
Ubyssey: Then you think the concept of just one man being
at the top of everything is possible?
Gage: Yes, but only if he's a man that is willing to delegate
certain things.
Right. So lefs find out some more about him.
Ubyssey: How would you describe yourself? As a liberal?
Gage: I think I'm liberal, with a small 1. I'm not politically
minded. I don't think I'm conservative. When I came here, the
student council used to operate with a faculty committee which
had to pass their minutes. I was chairman of the committee that
eliminated that. Now, you can say, 'well, that was some years
ago, and I've got older now', and of course it is hard to judge.
Ubyssey: Would you say that education) is a liberal process?
Gage: Well, I think it should be. I think a professor can be
conservative, or cautious, about certain things. But in general,
education has to be liberal in its attitudes.
Ubyssey: Do you think it's liberal enough now?
Gage: Well, we all stick to some formal practices that we've
had. I imagine that we could make it much more liberal and still
get the results we want.
Ubyssey: Which are these?
Gage: Well, we think there should be some course evaluations.
But I'm not sure that you have to do these in the stereotyped
pattern that we tend to now. There are a number of people who
have decided that the only way of examining is to have thie
three-hour final examination. I think you might get results by
thinking of other ways, although I wouldn't like to suggest what
they are.
Thafs this thing that grabbed me most — this reticence to
suggest anything that hasn't been suggested before.
Ubyssey: What's the one thing you'd like to see happen most*
at UBC in the next couple of years?
Gage: I hope we, can get an administration, faculty and student body that feel we're making progress, that we can work
together amicably for the primary purpose for which we exist*,
which is the pursuit of learning and the pursuit of excellence.
Also, I would hope that for once in its life the ordinary things
around campus could be housed properly.
So ifs unquestionable that Gage feels an undying loyalty to UBC.
If this university is anything worth being loyal about, thafs one point,
in his favor.
He was a student here from 1921 to 1926 and returned from a
stay at Victoria College to join the UBC faculty in 1933 as assistant
math prof. By 1943 he was a full professor and senator and was made
dean of administrative and inter-faculty affairs in 1948.
Ubyssey: Have you in the past been offered positions Th
. other universities? If so, why did you choose to stay here?
Gage: Well, I have been. I haven't made a point of seeking
other positions. I don't want to give any impression that I've
been offered a lot of different positions, but I have had some
over a period of years. I've usually turned offers down right
away, because I like the philosophy at UBC and have no desire
to move.
Ubyssey: What do you find that most satisfies you at UBC?
Gage: I think, actually, that it's getting to know a 'lot of
students, getting to know where they come from, the homes they
come from, what their plans are, and seeing them achieve these',
or in some cases completely change their minds and get into
something else.
Dean Wally s just
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Behind the foreboding title of acting
administration president of UBC sits a
man who essentially wants to teach.
Walter Gage has wanted to teach ever
since he was in Grade 6, but at that time,
university life never crossed his mind.
"When I was in elementary school,
I was sure I wanted to teach there, but
as I went through high school, I thought
high school teaching would be more interesting," he said.
"Actually, even when I got to university I was still intending to teach in high
school."
His math students consider themselves lucky that circumstances turned
out differently.
A second  year  science   student who
wished   to   remaii
Gage "a truly iftspi
"He  seems to
which tells him jus
a special explanatu
when they need a
understand.
"Many people v
wise have failed 1
math, but actually
120 and even enjoy
he   said.
One constant s
Gage's ability to ex
and his patience.
As Mary Jan Ch
explains everythinf
eral times to you
stand."
Many students
in individual stadc Tuesday, February 4, 1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
ON CAMPUS
TALKS - AT   LAST
Ubyssey: You like to walk around campus and talk to people?
Gage: That's right.
Ubyssey: Does it really give you a feeling of pride to be able
t® go up to someone and be recognized?
Gage: Yes, I think it does. I think I like to feel that I've
gotten to know, a number of people who may know me for one
reason or another. You have a feeling that some of them are
rather thankful in a way that somebody recognizes them. They're
- not quite sure whether they're really known for themselves or
whether you're doing it as a matter of course, but it helps them
a little bit, especially someone who's a bit homesick, or the
younger ones.
Ubyssey: A lot of people seem to think that this is treating
students with a sort of patronizing manner. Do "you think this
was ever true, and is the situation changing?
Gage: I suppose, to be honest, there are alwayse some that
are a bit patronizing. There may be some that seem to be patronizing but actually aren't. But I would say in the majority
they're not. As long as I can remember at UBC, and even when
I was a student here myself, I think the faculty have always had
a very great respect for the students.
By PAUL KNOX
And the students have always taken such a responsible part
over the years, in the building of the university, that there
shouldn't be any question of them being patronized. They're
recognized because they are good.
Ubyssey: Many people have said there is a possibility that
the administration has been running scared of the student movement this past fall, taking into account the faculty club incident,
etc. Do you think this is true?
Gage: Not at all. The administration and faculty have been
concerned about the problems, but I don't think they've been
frightened by the problems, I think they've done it in a very
sensible way, and I think most of the public feels that taking
them coolly and taking the lines of communication open is the
best way of dealing with it. I think the longer one can do that,
the better. Every kind of solution has been tried at one place or
another. You have to play it by ear. In the main, our students
have been very responsible individuals. I think they were ill-
advised on the faculty club incident, and I think most of them
felt that afterwards.
Ubyssey: Do you think students will be on the selection
committee to pick UBC's next president? Should they?
Gage: Yes, I'm quite certain that although I won't have anything ta| do with the selection of the committee or the choice of
J-he president, it's my opinion that students ought to be part of
the selection commitee; and I also hink from what I have heard
the chairman of the board say, that they will form a part of) the
committee.
Ubyssey: What about students on the senate? A lot of people
say that having four students on an 82-member senate is tokenism
and doesn't really mean very much.
Gage: I don't think a number on a committee means that
you're going to get a greater contribution. A president of an,
Alma Mater Society, I refer here to Peter Braund, he was able
to make a significant contribution, no matter how many people
there were on the campus, he was able to make a significant
contribution.
Ubyssey: What about the proportion of teaching and research
. that should go on in a university?
Gage: I don't think the university exists solely for teaching,
or* solely for research. It has several functions, and several different kinds of teaching. Similarly, there is research that I think
is very important. If you really want fundamental research without political  implications,  perhaps the best place for it to  be
f teacher at heart
r
*&•
unidentified called
g prfbf."
re a special sense
hen the class needs
of a difficult point,
ke, and when they
would have other-
e not only passed
lone well in Math
it because of him,"
rce of praise was
in difficult concepts
CAgr. 1) puts it, "He
j simply, even sev-
you don't under-
led* Gage's interest
"Gage knows so many students by
name, and even more than that can remember their marks," said David Pag-
ham,   arts   2.
When asked how he did it, Gage said
he usually chose some students in the
class with personal characteristics, and
then related others to these few reference points.
Gage has always taught at least one
freshman class every year. "I find these
by far the most interesting for they are
at a new institution and are still very
enthusiastic," he said.
In fact, Gage is such a popular and
effective teacher, he has received the
Master Teacher award early in January.
But that was when President Ken was
doing the dirty work.
* . ■   W*\ t**
m M'\*v/t?*v%.
■ j■ I-*,   -   .■» ■
carried on is at the university. I would say that I don't think
universities should toe limited to one or the other function. I
would hope that every teacher would be able to do or to have
done some research. Not necessarily at a high-level, but at least
so that he knows what research means.
But if he is an exceptionally fine teacher, I don't think that
anybody should say he must do research. He'll always do some,
although it might be of the tye of investigation, rather than research. It might be research in his own mind rather than written
research. There's a difference between research for publication
and research for its own sake. Teaching and research can be related, but I don't think a person should be limited, if he does his
best contribution in teaching or in research. I would hope the
good researcher who was a poor teacher wouldn't have to do
much teaching.
Ubyssey: Research is one place where a university could be
almost too dependent on the outside society. Do you think this is
happening here?
Gage: Well, I think you have to depend on the honesty of
the man. The interesting thing I've noticed about faculty members
here, I'm glad to say, is that no matter where the grant comes
from they've been honest in the conclusions that they've drawn,
without regard to that. We've always made it the point at the
university that we make sure we don't accept anything where a
person indicates the kind of result he wants to get.
Ubyssey: How much do you think the provincial government has to do with the funds crisis, and what has to be done?
Gage: Well, I wouM say that the provincial government
doesn't realize the importance of the* universities, and partly
because the general taxpayer also doesn't realize how important
the universities are to the development of the province and Canada.
We have a lot to do to make certain that the general public of
B.C. does realize our importance. That's one reason why we have
to be very responsible in what we do. This is the contribution that
we can all make, and particularly the students can best make,
is to show thai! the sudents are responsible, that they have some
concern for the welfare of others, and that when they go to university, what they get is very worthwhile.
Ubyssey: How do we do this? Do we go out and put on a
big public relations campaign?
Gage: No, I think public relations campaigns have a very
limited value. I think one gains much more by the day-to-day
attitude of people in their community.
Ubyssey: You mean we should just try and be as good as
we can all the time?
Gage: Your best effort. Now, occasionally, being truthful
will mean that you aren't going to be popular with the public, but
if you're that way and you're responsible at the same time, then
I think in the long run it comes out all right.
Ubyssey: Can one man handle the job of president?
Gage: There has to be some man to direct the thing, around
which the problems and the organization become centred. There
has to be a president. Now, if he attempts to do everything himself, it's unwise, because he needs to consult others even for the
morale value to those working with him, and apart from that, the
problems are too complex for one man to have all the answers
for. A good president has to pick out those people that can do a
good job, and to make the most use of those that can do a good
job in each area.
Ubyssey: Do you thing these people are around?
Gage: Yes, there are a number of them around. Bill Armstrong of engineering I find most valuable. Dr. John Young, acting dean of arts knows something about economics, other people
have had much experience in dealing with students, this is the
type of thing I see as useful.
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to meet
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The Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.75
Ifs Really Good I
Full course meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets and
Catering Services Available
SHOP
Across from
the   Bowling   Alley
224-1911
150 New Jackets
—Regular U.B.C.
-New All Melton
cloth ones
—Blacklight posters
—Contemporary cards
—New U.B.C. mugs
Open: Mon. - Fri.
10:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Sat. 12*00 - 5:00
Sun. 1:00 - 5:00 Page 8
T»K    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1969
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS - CRISIS IN COLOR
From Page 3
Bayne,   Davis,   Michael  Marsden and Menon.
Adamson and Marsden are
white, Bayne and Davis black.
Menon is an Indian.
Clarke    accepts   Anderson's
request to be temporarily relieved of his teaching duties.
December 9
Members of the hearing committee write a letter to Clarke
requesting his assurance that
the committee has authority
and the confidence of the administration.
December 10
Vice - principal Clarke replies   by   letter   assuring   the
committee of his backing and
confidence.
December 12
An emergency meeting of the
science faculty is called with
only white students invited.
Madras reads a two-page summary of the lost minutes of
the May inquiry. The meeting
is adjourned abruptly because
of disruption from blacks who
are incensed over its process.
December 12
Principal R. C. Rae resigns,
vice-principal  Clarke  becomes
acting principal.
January 6
Vice-principal John O'Brien
learns that Anderson proposes
to  resume  teaching   in  even
ing classes unless he is formally relieved of his teaching
duties.
O'Brien sends him following
letter:
"This will confirm that you
are a member of the teaching
staff ... in full standing and
as such you are entitled to
teach your classes . .. However,
you are aware of the potential
difficulties that may arise, including the risk of violence,
and which latter situation we
all wish to avoid. We would
suggest that you consider very
seriously, in view of this possibility, that your lectures are
temporarily suspended. Be it
clearly understood that this
decision is entirely up to you
APOLLO 8 SCIENTIST
speaks on
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
Walter Koch, noted space scientist
from Santa Barbara, lectures on
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION, a simple,
easy, technique to expand consciousness
and improve effectiveness in life.
TUES., FEB. 4TH
8:00 P.M.
ANGUS 110
The   Faculty  of  Graduate   Studies
DALHOUSIE   UNIVERSITY
invites applications for
THE IZAAK WALTON KHIAM
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS
VALUE $3500 TO $5500
These scholarships are open to outstanding students
wishing to pursue studies towards the Master's or
Doctoral Degree in any field of graduate research at
Dalhousie. Approximately forty awards will t>e available for the year 1969-70'. These range in value from
$3500 to $5500 with an additional travel allowance.
For application forms for admission to The Faculty of Graduate
Studies and further information on these and other awards available at Dalhousie, please write to
THE DEPUTY REGISTRAR
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
and, should you decide to suspend your lectures, this decision will in no way affect your
academic position."
Anderson decides not to
teach.
January 10
Prof. Marsden, a member of
the hearing committee, resigns,
calling for a replacement to be
made along the agreed principles acceptable to both sides.
He resigns because he is head
of the school's faculty association and feels he would like to
remain free to review the
whole affair.
Six black students present
Clarke with a formal written
charge.
January 16
The black students present
the following conditions to
Adamson, chairman of the hearing committee:
(1) The hearing is to be held
Jan. - 26 and completed that
day.
(2) Len Bertley (a black) is
to replace Marsden.
(3) The hearings must be
open.
Adamson agrees with the
students to arrange a meeting
with Clarke, the committee and
the black to discuss the conditions.
Adamson writes Clarke that
the committee has agreed to
replace Marsden with Prof.
Fred Knelman and asks Clarke
to contact both parties and obtain their consent.
Hearing committee meets
and (a) rejects black demands
as "non-negotiable", Ob) advises
Clarke and O'Brien to assume
ultimate authority in the case
particularly with reference to
replacing Marsden, <c) decides
to arrange a meeting between
all parties.
January 20
Adamson calls a meeting for
all parties, blacks refuse to at-
Leotards, Tights
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tend. Blacks charge Adamson,
Bayne and Davis are all incapable of judging the issues
impartially. They suggest replacements. Marsden is relieved of his faculty association
duties and is reinstated to the
committee despite student pro-"
tes.
January 22
Davis and Bayne resign, saying the committee is ineffective.
Adamson stays on as committee head.
O'Brien   announces   resignations, says Clarke will appoint
new  members  to  ensure  due-
process.
Black students are concerned
about O'Brien's letter to Anderson Jan. 6. They say the letter
is a distortion and threat to
them. They go to O'Brien's
office. O'Brien at first denies
the phrase "risk of violence"
but, when forced to produce
the letter, finds it contains the
phrase. O'Brien signs a public
apology to the students. (The
following week, he initiates
civil proceedings against Erroll
Thomas and accuses him of'
"pressuring and attempting to
exhort a ■ signed statement,
forcibly obtaining a signed
document, and forcible detention". His original statement
had said he did not sign under
duress, but he recanted the
next day.)
January 23
Black students refuse to
recognize the committee's authority because they were not
consulted on filling the vacancies.
January 24
•Clarke writes Adamson saying "in the event of an appeal
from the decision of the hearing committee, the acting principal is willing to establish an
appeal committee composed of
well-known persons from outside the university, and of
proven integrity."
January   25
A   letter   from    Clarke   to
Adamson    formally    appoints
Knelman and John Macdonald
to the hearing committee.
January 26 *
The    hearing    begins.    The
blacks withdraw.
January 27
The university closes for the.
day to allow students and faculty to discuss the issues and
make presentations to the university community.
January 28
The Georgian, student paper
at the university, is prepared
and circulated by black students.
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities ii may be necessary to
restrict the number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry. Tuesday, February 4, 1969
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 9
Last weekend The Ubyssey
sent photographer Bruce
Stout on his first rally. Some
of his photographic impressions of the 1969 Thunderbird Rally are seen here.
The final rally results as
well as some of Mr. Stout's
written impressions will
appear in a later edition of
The Ubyssey.
How to hike in a Datsun.
"■SS*
^.^S0
224 ways to better
your traction.
Artificial eyepower on a horse.
Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are enjoying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST.
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates.
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BARRIE.   ONTARIO Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4,  1969
c
L
O
B
B
E
R
T
H
E
C
L
A
N
S
M
E
N
Buchanan Trophy Classic
Basket bailers prepare for games
against tough SFU opposition
By TONY GALLAGHER
Ubyssey Basketball Reporter
The UBC Thunderbirds lost two more
basketball games this weekend but nobody knows why.
Speculation would have it that they
are letting down as a team, or as individuals; or that it is just the continuing
story of the ludicrous luck that has
plagued them  all season.
Whatever, a survey of the latest
damages shows two losses at the hands of
the St. Martin's college Saints, 73-70 on
Friday and 76-65 on Saturday.
Friday night was a heartbreaker for
the Birds as they were leadings 70-69 and
had possession of the ball with 35 seconds
remaining.
When they put the ball into play Bill
Ruby passed in to Ron Thorsen who, in
eluding his man, accidentally stepped over
the mid-court line with the ball and St.
Martin's  took  possession.
With only 6 seconds remaining, Bill
Weber hit a 10 foot jump shot to put the
Saints ahead and the Birds never regained consciousness.
Thorsen was high man for the Birds
with 15 points, Bob Molinski had 13 and
Bob Barazzuol added 12. The Saints' big
guns were Barry Eidsvold with 19 points
and colorful George Parker finished with
16.
Saturday night was George Parker
night in Olympia as he nabbed  16 re
bounds, shot 64% from the floor and finished with 29  points.
The real problem for the Birds was
their disastrous start which netted them
only 7 points in the first 12 minutes of
the game and a total of 65, far below
their season's average of 82.
Bob "Duke" Molinski had a good
night, popping in 18 points and Ron
Thorsen had 12 for the outgunned Birds.
Said coach Peter Mullins after Saturday's loss, "St. Martin's played very well
and we just couldn't get on track, the
whole team is just so frustrated at the
problems we've had this year."
The  problems Mullins  was referring
S^WS*»'%'<•* •*.
•*■"♦'?* .•>v«-Jrrs"wv
BIG BLOCK MEETING
All members are asked to be
present at this meeting as the annual banquet is to be held next
month.
President Miles Desharnais said
that ticket distribution to grads
and active members would be
finalized and that all sports must
send at least one representative to
get all the information.
As usual the meeting will be
held in the upper foyer of the gym,    (
starting at 12:30.
to were typified on Friday night when
the team bus got stock on the main street
outside the hotel, and while attempting
to get out it was hit by a car.
The bus  eventually  got to  the  gym
half an hour late and not before drench--"     "
ing the players with flying slush.
The frustration stems from the fact
that UBC has lost nine games this year;
for reasons quite unknown.
They've had an epidemic of injuries but
for a team with talented players like
Thorsen, Williscroft, Barazzuol and Molinski, an 8-9 record is bordering on the
absurd.
The club seems to have reached a
point where their frustration at this in-
congruency is feeding on itself, causing
perpetuation of their misfortune.
The perplexed Birds now face two
tough games against the much improved
SFU clansmen whose 12-8 record includes two victories against St. Martin's,
one against tough Western Washington
and one against previously unbeaten
Puget Sound.
The Birds will have to return to early
season form physically, and in particular
mentally, if they hope to stop the Clan
once  again.
The Jayvees also lost twice to St.
Martin's on the weekend, 67-56 on Friday and 63-60 on Saturday. Gary Best
-was the outstanding performer -with 27
points in two games.
Women gymnast's action soon
SANDI HARTLEY
On February 8th, the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Women's Gymnastic Championship will be held at the
University of Alberta in Edmonton.
Four Universities will compete in
this meet, the highlight of the Western
women's gymnastic season.
For the past two years the UBC
team has won both the Team Trophy
and the all round event for the top
individual gymnast.
In defending their title this year,
the gymnastic team's toughest contender
will be the University of Alberta.
Last year Alberta placed first in the
National Invitational Intercollegiate
Gymnastic Championships.
But a determining factor was UBC's
lack of participation at this meet due
to a lack of funds.
UBC's top gymnast is Sandi Hartley —* she holds the title of Canadian
National Gymnastic Champion, and is
also a member of Canada's Olympic
team.
But she is not the only member of
the team -who has gained international
recognition.
Leslie Bird was a Canadian representative at the World Gymnastic
Championship in  1966.
Kathy Lane, who placed third as an
all-round gymnast last year in the Western Collegiate, Terry Cotton, Elaine
Bryson and Nicky Laing are all expected to make a strong showing.
MUSSOC
CAN
CAN - CAN
cam * caur
Opens Thursday
OLD AUDITORIUM
Student Perf.
75c
Feb. 6, 12-8:30 |
Feb. 13—Noon
SEMINAR ON
AID AND DEVELOPMENT
FEBRUARY 7 & 8
Fri.,   7-10   p.m.   (Speaker,   Chester   Ronning)
Sat.,   9-12   a.m.   (Speaker,  Otto   Lang)
Sat., 1:30-4:30 p.m. (India Development Special)
PLACE:
BUCHANAN   Rm.   104-106
ALSO   —   panel   discussions
—   question   periods
a   Touch   of  the exotic
SPONSORS:   CUSO and  India  Club
SPEAKERS:    CHESTER  RONNiNG
—  roving  Ambassador  to  Canada
OTTO   LANG
— minister without portfolio
in Trade & Commerce Tuesday, February 4, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
UBC, SFU basketball game
Ice Birds
INTREPID UBYSSEY photographer Bruce Stout joins the unfortunate competitors as he digs an
official rally vehicle out of trouble on the Talameen section of last weekend's Thunderbird
rally. Scenes such as this were common over the 1200 mile course.
Thunderette to watch
In her second year with the women's gymnastic team, Sandi
Hartley is a girl worth watching. This slim blonde is the Canadian National Gymnastic Champion and a member of the 1968
Olympic Team.
Born in Vancouver, she competed throughout here Delbrook
school career. Now in her third years in P.E., Sandi also holds
the titles of B.C. Provincial gymnastic champion and Pacific
North West champion.
She was a member of the Canadian team in the Pan American
Games in 1967 at Winnipeg, placing ninth, and second for
Canada. Last year at the North American Gymnastic Championships, which were held in Vancouver, she placed fifth, and first
for Canada.
This weekend Sandi is expected to lead the UBC team to
victory at the Western Intercollegiate Championship in Edmonton
and also capture the Ail-Round Individual Trophy.
Weekend Action Star
Tom Howard is  a short, slight young
nan who can move in a big hurry for a
long way when he wants to.
At five feet ten inches and one hundred
and fifty pounds, the twenty year old Howard is UBC's top cross-country runner.
This weekend he came third in the British Columbia Open Crosscountry Championships, where he placed tenth, and more
recently he garnered a first place in the
Fraser Valley Crosscountry Championships.
Through the track season he will run
the one, three and five mile events for the
track team, and from his performances in
crosscountry this year, he will improve on
his best times easily.
Future plans for Tom include definitely
the Achilles Track Meet, Feb. 15 and hopefully the World Crosscountry Championships to be held in Glasgow in March.
blow two
Last year the University of
Alberta "Golden Bears" were
the top collegiate hockey team
in Canada and all indications
show that they have a much
stronger team this ytar.
The Golden Bears made this
fairly clear as they beat the
Thunderbirds in a pair of weekend games in Edmonton by
convincing scores of 10-3 and
7-1.
Coach Bob Hindmarch summed up Fridays game when he
said: "They thumped us." Edmonton came out very strong
to take a 5-1 first period lead.
In the second frame the Birds
worked hard to get back in the
game but it just wasn't their
weekend to play hockey. Even
though they matched Edmonton for a pair of goals the Birds
lost the services of captain
Mickey McDowell, due to a
game misconduct; and Tom
Koretchuk, due to a knee injury and Jack Moores, due to
a shoulder separation.
Moores and Koretchuk will
be sidelined for the rest of the
season taking some of the hitting punch out of the club.
In the final frame Edmonton
pumped in three unanswered
goals to finalize the scoring.
Jim Fowler opened the scoring in the second game but the
lead was short-lived as Falken-
burg tied it up for Edmonton.
In the second period the
Birds stayed in the game until
plagued by penalties they were
forced to play seven minutes
shorthanded, during which time
Edmonton scored three goals.
Being down by three goals
the Birds continued to press
hard as shown by the fact they
outshot (Edmonton in both of
the last two periods but while
they played hard, Edmonton
managed to get the breaks
Hindmarch stated "We played a hell of a hockey game despite the fact that Tommy and
Jack were sidelined. We were
good even in the first period
but you get those games when
nothing goes your way.
Avertable at
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5754 University Blvd.
In Th* VOag* - %Vk Model
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CBC
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UBC CLINIC
2nd FLOOR
SUB
Today-Friday
9:30 - 4:30 Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4,  1969
MAMOOKS
Batik classes start Feb.  13, SUB 249,
$10.
COMPUTER   CLUB
Films on information retrieval today
noon. Chem. 250.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Those   going   on   Thursday   trip   to
Oakalla will be contacted.
PHI GAMMA DELTA
Father  McGuigan   speaks   on  student
revolt Wednesday 9-12 midnight, 2130
Wesbrook.
EDUCATION GRAD CLASS
General meet today noon, Ed. 1006.
ARCHAEOLOGY  CLUB
Meet   Wednesday   8  p.m..   SUB   **P".
SKI   CLUB
Final organizational meet for Sun Valley trip SUB 224, 5:30 p.m. today.
SUS
Crystal B; .'1 tickets on sale daily
Math Annex 1119, deadline for ticket
sales Feb. 7, $11 per couple.
T-BIRD  MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meet Wednesday noon, SUB 105-A.
SQUASH  CLUB
UBC Open Squash tournament, Saturday, Feb. 8, Marc Club, sign up, law
common room.
The Royal Pardon
by John Arden
An M.A. Thesis Production — Directed by Jace Vanderveen
FEBRUARY 5-8-8:30 p.m.
Reservations: Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
SOMERSET STUDIO - UBC
NIGHT SKI ON GROUSE
Every Wednesday Starting Feb. 72
with 6 lessons from ORNULF JOHNSEN'S Top Instructors,
plus all lifts for $28.50. Contact ERIC at WA 2-6871 or
VOC clubroom in SUB during lunch hours (this week only)
did Sou
theWal?
"EDw^rir-WHATDIDYDU DO IN THE WAR, DADDY?"
1 COLOR by deluxH PANAVISION" ""'K UNITED ARTISTS
TODAY & WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m. 12:30, 7:00, 9:00
SUB THEATRE
Admission — 50c
X>ur last check
from home
just bounced?
Think it over, over coffee.
TheThink Drink. **fe.
For your own Think Drink Mut?, send 75C and your name and address to
Think Drink Mug, Dept. N, P.O. Box 1000, WMIowdale. Ontario. The Internat.onal Coff.e Organ.zat,on.
CUSO
This weekend. Development symposium, guest speakers, panel discussions.
GERMAN   CLUB
Meeting to discuss ski trip, and see
a film, IH, noon today.
UBC   LIBERALS
Elect    CULF    convention    delegates,
Thursday noon, Bu. 100, bring membership card.
CIRCLE   K
General   meeting,   Friday  noon,  SUB
211.
CIASP
Important meeting tonight, SUB 105-A
to discuss Tepotrtan.
HISTORY   UNION
WW II allied propaganda films "Nazi
Strike",   Tuesday,   "Divide   and   Conquer",   Wednesday,   Ang.   110,   noon,
25 cents.
'tween classes
FLYING   CLUB
Meeting and movie today noon, SUB
101.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
Meeting tomorrow noon,  SUB   115-C.
Discussion: "What do you love?"
SPECIAL EVENTS, PERFORMING ARTS
Poet Edward English appears in SUB
Aud. Wednesday 3:30 p.m.
CIASP
Meeting Wednesday noon, SUB 105-B.
CIASP
Meeting noon today, SUB 105-B para
hablar espanol.
CDN.   INTERNATIONALISTS
Foundations     of     Mao-Tse      Tung's
Thought seminars continue to Friday
in SUB 111-A, noon hours.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meet today noon, SUB 105-B.
VARSITY  DeMOLAY
Regular meeting Thursday 7:30 p.m.,-
SUB 224. **<
PRE-DENTAL  SOC
Meet Thursday noon, SUB 117.
PSYCHOLOGY  SYMPOSIUM
Registration extended 'til Wednesday
1:30 p.m., across from SUB info booth.
$2.50 includes dinner.
KARATE CLUB
Meeting  7  p.m..  Armoury.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Tour of cataloguing division Wednesday noon, meet at card catalogues.
LSM
The   Case   for   Chastity,   with   Bev.
Luetkehoelter Wednesday noon, SUB-
209 (M).
VISITING LECTURER
Dr. J. D. Chapman on Urban Roles in
China:  Tradition  and   Contemporary,
Thursday noon, G. & G. bldg.j room
100.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ATTENTION ED.-P.E. STUDENTS:
Tickets for formal Feb. 14 on sale
in  Ed.   Building.   $4.50  couple.
SCIENCE "CRYSTAL BALL," DIN-
ner, dance and boat cruise. Sat.,
Feb. 8. 9 p.m. - 2 a.m. Dress: semi-
formal. Tickets A.M.S. or Math
Annex 1119. $11.00 per couple. Ad-
vance  Sales  Only.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE FRE-
sents the International Ball, Vancouver Hotel Feb. 14. Dinner and
Dance.  $5  a person,  tickets at I.H.
NEW STYLE U.B.C. JACKETS —
Melton cloth. Thunderbird Shop.
Open  10:00-9:00 p.m.
WIGGY SYMPHONY FRIDAY NIGHT
in SUB Ballroom. Come and compose   yourself.
Greetings
12
Lost   &   Found
13
DID    I    LEAVE    MY    CAMERA    IN
your  car?   Phone  Ian  Wallace   731
1023.
BROWN SPORTS BAG LEFT IN
Salmon Egg Research Girl's Datsun
by hitchkiker.  Dave  Pugh,   879-9561.
FOUND: LADIES' WRIST WATCH
about Jan. 17 between Math Bldg.
& Civil Engineering Bldg. Owner
contact  Dr.   Steida at  224-3221.
LOST: OR POSSIBLY MISTAKENLY
picked up at Mardi Gras Bazaar,
transistor tape recorder. Any infor-
mation please phone   731-7586.
LOST: CHINESE TEXT IN LIGHT
brown U.B.C. binding in vie. of
Buchanan. Reward. Call Roger —
224-7858.
Rides  &   Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
FREE WIG OR HAIRPIECE FOR
having a Wig Party. Trish 266-7923
evenings.
10%  Discount
to UBC Students & Staff
Top Stylist from Toronto
Colonial Lady Beauty Salon
3743  W.  10th
Phone  224-7844
LEGEND READING CENTRE —
Speed reading experts — new
classes. Feb. 17 & 18 — Phone Mike
Kvenich,   254-4557   (eves.)
OPENS THURSDAY — CAN-CAN.
Old Auditorium. Feb. 6, 12 (8:30),
and 13th  (noon). 75c.
TODAY AND WED. WHAT DID YOU
Do In The War Daddy? Color Pan-
avision.   Admission   50c.
SET UP YOUR OWN LABORATORY.
Chemicals and lab. equipment cheap.
Phone 224-6585.
MALE MODELS FOR HAIRSTYLING
course. Phone Mr. Skeates at* 874-
7473 after  6:30  p.m.	
EDWARD ENGLISH—NOTED POET
— SUB Auditorium, Wednesday,
Feb. 5, 3:30 p.m. No admission
charge. Contemporary Arts Festival.
ROOM TO SPARE? CHILDREN'S
Aid Society needs short-term accommodation in Vancouver for
transient-teenagers, mainly boys,
arriving in the city without adequate plans. For further information, please call Homefinder, C.A.S.,
Mon.-Fri., 9-5, 733-8111 or evenings,
weekends 683-2474.
WANTED: USED FOLK GUITAR,
six or 12 string (nylon or steel).
Good condition. Phone George *—
224-9137.
FRIDAY, FEB. 7th IN THE SUB
Ballroom, Hear, Listen and Dance
to  the Wiggy Symphony.
Travel  Opportunities 16
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR    SALE   —   1962 Corvair. Good
shape.   New   clutch. 224-9017, Room
412.      New     paint. Winter tires.
$500.00.
'59 VAUXHALL, SNOW TIRES, NEW
battery, good condition. 224-9957,
Rm. 3,  Frank, evenings.  ($250).
'67 CAMARO, 3-SPEED STICK, 327
h.p. V-8. 17,000 miles, radio, tach.
$2,600.   Ph.   434-8223  eves.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
WANTED: WILLING COUPLES TO
join Roman-type orgy: alias "The
Crystal Ball". Bread wine and song.
Tickets A.M.S. or Math Annex
1119. Dress: Semi - formal. Boat
Cruise,   Sat.,   Feb.   8.
CAN-CAN IS SCANDALOUS. DON'T
miss it! Thursday night, Old Aud.
75c.
TODAY FIND OUT WHAT YOUR
Daddy Did In The War. 12:30, 50c.
Tomorrow too.
FRIDAY NIGHT: FRIDAY NIGHT:
Wiggy Symphony — Wiggy Symphony in the depths of SUB Ballroom.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM    SELECTRIC    TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR   4-9253
TYPING — PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00.   After 6:00  —  266-6662.
EXP. TYPING, REAS. RATES,
quick service, from legible drafts.
Phone 738-6829 after 10:00 a.m. to
10:00 p.m.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES
Overseas  and  North  American
Needed: —Registered Nurses
—Agriculturists
—Sec. &E1. Ed. Teachers
—Community Development
Workers
—Social Workers  (MSW)
—Other Skills  & Training
A Mennonite Central Committee
rep. will Interview interested persons of any denomination on Wednesday, Feb. 5. Make appointments
now at Student Placement  Office.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
first and second year. By Science
and Engineering graduates. Phone
731-3491   or   732-8058.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR   SALE
71
BIRDCALLS
75c
Publications
Office
241—SUB
LOVELIFE: TRENCHANT CRITI-
que of respectable criminalities and
affirmation of integral living.
Not recommended for minors. Cloth-
bound, 113 pp. $3 from R. MacLeod,
Box 1180,  Creston. B.C.
MISC. FOR SALE (Contd.)     71
WOMEN'S AUSTRIAN DOUBLE
lace ski boot size 9-10, phone 922-
0949,   $35.00.
•FRAMUS RANGER" FOLK GUITAR
with case and all accessories. $90
or offers!   Phone  732-8306.
G88   METAL   SKIS,    185CM.    PHONE
731-7543 after 6.
BOOKS OF INTEREST FOR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, 'Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"M o n t h 1 y Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Van-^
guard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville.
RENTALS  &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
IN PRIVATE HOUSE, ARBUTUS &
West 14th, for single man. Ref. req.
$40  mo.   Call   738-5824   evenings.
ROOM "ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M)
Parking, T.V., kit. priv. 224-9662.
2250   Wesbrook.	
FURNISHED   ROOM   FOR   FEMALE
only. Use of kitchen,  laundry facilities     lots     of     hot     water    $45.    a,
month,   2391  W.   10th.
ACCOMMODATION FOR MATURE
student. Private bath and entrance. No cooking. Phone 263-9545
after 6 p.m.
ROOM FOR RENT NEAR U.B.C. FE-
male only. Have cooking priv. 4183
W. 11th Ave. Phone 224-7645. Reduced  rent for baby-sitting.
PRIVATE ROOM FOR UNIV. STU-
dent. Use of kitchen for breakfast
and lunch. $50 mo. 3680 W. 13th.
Call CA  8-8000.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE ALPHA--
Delta   Phi   fraternity   house.   Good
food    and    congenial    surroundings.
Phone   224-9866   or   224-4221.
ROOM AND BOARD $85 A MONTH
at Fraternity House. Phone 224-9769.
Ask for Gary Goodman between 5-7.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS—
$85 a month, at Delta Upsilon Fraternity House: good food, short
walk to classes, quiet hours, phone
228-9389   or   224-9841.
LIVE ON CAMPUS. ENFORCED
quiet hours. Good food and congenial
atmosphere. All available by calling
Jim at 224-9986 or stopping in at
2280  Wesbrook  Cres.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
WANTED IMMEDIATELY: TWO
girls to share large three bdrm.
suite.  $33 each.  733-3827.	
WANTED ONE GIRL TO SHARE
nice two bedroom apartment, leri-
cho-Pt.  Grey area.  Phone 736-5397.
MALE GRAD OR OLDER STUDENT,
share with same West-End Hi-Rise
soundproof Apt. from March. $63.50.
Phone   685-3187.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
2 BEDRM., FULL BSMT., NEAR
Acadia Camp. Avail. March 1, $165.
Phone Mr. Eng aft. 6 p.m., 228-3427.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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