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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1989

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Array the Ubyssey
N
S    More on SRC
I       see pg 12
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, Tuesday, September 19,1989
Vol. 72, No. 4
UBC ponders
London campus
by Rick Hiebert
Toronto entrepreneur Sam
Blyth is backing a proposed London, England campus for UBC and
University of Toronto business
students to begin operation in the
fall of 1992.
The British campus would be
shared by the two universities,
who would send third and fourth
year Canadian students to Europe
to study European culture and
commerce on a first hand basis.
"The only way we can effectively expose Canadian business
students to European business
and culture is to start a school for
Canadian students in Europe and
that's what the U of T and UBC are
considering right now," said Peter
Lustzig, dean of UBC's business
faculty.
"We have a decided interest in
post '92 Europe at UBC," he added.
Lustzig and his U of T
counterpart, Peter Wolff of the
faculty of management, will meet
later this week to try to work out
some of the details of how the
proposed campus could work,
Wolff said.
"We'll have to come to an
agreement between UBC and the
U of T as to how we are going to run
the academic program. Then well
have to develop a business plan or
financial plan between the universities for the operating costs," said
Wolff.
"I hope when I come out to talk
to Peter Lustzig, we can get a a
handle on this, so (the universities) can eventually negotiate a
financial agreement with Sam
Blyth," he said."In six to eight
weeks, we'll have a pretty good
sense as to whether the school
proposal will work out."
Both Lustzig and Wolff said
the proposal is still in the planning
stages and must be approved by
the governing boards of UBC and
U of T. Toronto businessman Sam
Blyth, however, is already promising funds for the project.
Blyth, who owns a Toronto
travel company, is noted for his
proposal to buy the Via Rail train
system from the federal government and turn it into an Orient
Express type of luxury train system. He has promised $20 million
worth of support for the school
proposal.
Blyth's company already operates a university at Villefran-
che-sur-mer in southern France
that is affiliated with Laurentian
University of Sudbury. His company plans to buy the land in
London, build the campus, operate
the dormitories and handle the
travel arrangements for North
American students.
"The universities involved
(will) have total autonomy over
the academic portion which means
that it will be a joint venture
where we are effectively the landlord, but the universities can do
what they want with the academics," Blyth said.
"It's important for the country
as a whole to have Canadians who
have been exposed to European
business," he said.
Blyth is also confident that
his company can eventually make
money on the project, though he
said money wasn't his first concern. "In the first two or three
years I don't expect it to return on
our investment, but we think
eventually that there will be value
in the project," he said. "From a ten
to twenty five year perspective,
we're happy with our investment."
Though Peter Lustzig is excited about the idea, he said UBC
students would have to express
interest in the project for the idea
to get off the ground.
"We will be canvassing the
students to see if there's sufficient
interest for us to go ahead or
whether well allow another school
to get in on it," said Lustzig. "The
students (in the European campus) will pay a much heavier tuition and room and board for it to
work."
Lustzig and Wolff said the
British campus could make money
by having programs for European
business executives that could
help pay for libraries, computers
and faculty. "There should be no
risk at all for either university
from a financial point of view,"
said Wolff.
Vandals wreak havoc in SUB
by Mark Nielsen
Police are currently searching
for vandals who nearly killed a
janitor in the Student Union
Building Saturday night.
A couch, estimated to weigh
over 200 pounds, narrowly missed
Manjit Kandola, 32, when a group,
believed to be revellers from a
nearby dance, dropped it down the
south stairwell from the second
floor.
Kandola said the couch
missed him by a few feet just as he
had finished cleaning the second
landing and was heading back
down.
He spotted two suspects up
above, but said he wouldn't be able
to recognize them if they came
around again.
"It was very scary," Kandola
said.
"They were just laughing—
they didn't care."
If he had been hit by the
couch, Kandola, married with one
child and another on the way, said
he would have been seriously injured if not killed.
The group threw another
chair over the edge before taking
off out the north side of the SUB
sometime shortly after midnight.
Campus RCMP and AMS security apprehended two suspects a
few minutes later, but both were
soon let go. Police are asking witnesses of the incident to contact
them.
The chances of catching any of
the culprits is slim SUB proctor
Dennis Ackard-Snow said, but he
wants to make them aware of what
they did.
Snow said it's not so much the
damage that matters but that one
man or others could have been
DAN ANDREWS PHOTO
Young Donald leads "Walk for Environment" on Saturday.
killed. "There were people going
up and down those stairs all
night."
The incident was the most
potentially dangerous of a number
that occurred in and around the
SUB on the same night as two
windows were also smashed.
A screen mesh window on the
second floor of the SUB was
pushed in but not shattered, apparently by someone who either
fell or was pushed into it.
And campus RCMP apprehended a suspect after a bicycle
was driven through a window at
the Aquatic Centre.
As well, another group of students threw beer bottles at security guards after they were ap
proached for drinking in public.
If the vandalism continues at
the current rate, AMS director of
administration Andrew Hicks said
the damage toll will exceed
$50,000 by the end of the year.
"It's too much for students to
pay for, and it's just a waste of
money," he said.
The recent influx of crime has
also forced the AMS to increase the
number of shifts of a full time security staff from three to five nights a
week. As a result, Hicks expects
the budget for security, currently
set at $22,000 a year to jump by
one-third by the end of the year.
"Its an unfortunate use of student funds to protect students in
the SUB from other students."
Students target Shell as boycott heats up on UBC campus
by Ted Ing
Alma Mater Society Student
leaders are demanding that UBC
administration follow Vancouver
City Council's lead to support a
boycott of Shell Oil because ofthe
company's extensive dealings
with South Africa.
Arts Representative Donovan
Kuehn is planning to launch a
campaign calling for the boycott of
Shell Oil and companies involved
with similar South African dealings.
"It's only right, that UBC begin to
stand up and realize that there's a
whole world out there" said
Kuehn.
Royal Dutch Shell, parent
company of Shell Oil Canada, is
one of the few companies defying
the UN's request that no petroleum be sold to South Africa. Royal
Dutch Shell currently has assets
of over $500 million invested in
South Africa.
According to AMS president
Mike Lee, "The AMS will be taking
a stronger roll in lobbying the
administration to stop doing business with any company having
dealings with South Africa." Boycotts of Shell Oil and other such
companies, Lee added, "haven't
been brushed through yet, but will
(be)."
According to Al Lackie, manager of UBC Purchasing Department, the amount of fuel that UBC
actually buys from Shell "isn't that
significant." But he was unable to
produce any definite figures.
But according to Kuehn, we
shouldn't be buying any fuel from
Shell Oil. "Apartheidisbad...(and)
this is something that every student who drives can do about (it),"
he said.
The AMS Student's Council
has already spearheaded a campaign to remove the multi-national's presence from a campus
program.
Over the summer, Labatts
Canada proposed to the AMS a
defensive  driving course  called
"Road Scholar," but it was sponsored by Shell Oil.
The AMS decided it would
support this program only if Shell
Oil was removed as a sponsor.
After several days of meetings
between Shell Oil and Labatts
Canada, Shell removed its sponsorship.
Lee was very appreciative of
both companies' cooperation and
added "this proves that the AMS
and other organizations can have
an effect and make a change." CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.-00
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
70 - SERVICES
11 - FOR SALE
DARK PINE IKEA TABLE and 2 chairs.
$200 obo. Box spring and mattress, $50.
Call 736-3850. Lv. Message.
DUO-FONE ANSW. MACHINE $75.00,
Bundy OBOE $300.00, Artley Flute $100.00
Call Anita 263-1545.
APPLE IIE COMPUTER with 2 drives,
joystick, mouse, monitor & extended 80 column card $1,000 OBO 733-3856
RJ.AT 1750 INTERESTED? Evenings
and/or weekends. Call 324-2923.
1981 TOYOTA CELICA GT 5 spd. Hatchback, cruise, gauges. $4300. Michael ph.
325-8429 after 6 pm
1983 TOYOTA CELICA GT Coup. exc.
condition, loaded, 5 spd asking $7700 obo
224-1239
5 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS. Toronto Conservatory
Gr. I-X, A.R.C.T. or just for fun! 20 years
experience with L.R.S.M., B.Mua., M. Mus.,
R.M.T. Call Mrs. Okimi 228-9161.
AFTER SCHOOL DAYCARE NEEDED.
2 children attending L'Ecole Bilingue.
Grandmother/student. 873-8405.
EXP. BABYSITTER REQ. 1 morning/wk.
Kits. Htb. 9 a.m.-12. Day negotiable. Call
Sue 733-3864
P<T NANNY REQ. for one 3 yr. old, 2 - 3
days/wk. Hours flexible. University Gates.
Ref. req. Call 224-3820.
 35 - LOST	
LOST: 1AVIA RUNNING SHOE with a
fitness group tag. If found please call Dena
at 738-6087.
40 ■ MESSAGES
For Muslim Students
1:30 pm - 2:15 pm
Friday Prayers at the
International House
lower lounge.
UBRARY QUALITY THESIS binding
andgold stamping $25.00. Additional copies
$17.00 time 2 days. 683-2463.
75 - WANTED
VOLUNTEERS. Healthy non-smoking
males (19-25 yrs.) are needed for study of an
antiarrhythmic drug, Mexiletine. Blood,
saliva and urine samples will be collected
over 72 hrs. A $70 honorarium will be paid
on completion ofthe study. For info, call Dr.
McErlane (228-4451) or Mr. Kwok (228-
5838) in the Pharmacy Faculty, UBC.
80   TUTORING
ENGLISH: IMPROVE comprehension,
composition, conversation ability. All levels
welcome. Reasonable rates. Ph. 734-5917.
SPANISH TUTOR AVAILABLE
All levels, reasonable rates. Call 737-1404.
ENGLISH - Do you need help analyzing
and/or writing about poems/plays/novels?
Call 683-4289.	
EXPERIENCING TROUBLE IN RUSSIAN? If so phone Lydia for help. Phone
936-3139 for information. 6-10 pm. Experienced tutor for 1st yr. & beginners. Classes
in reading, writing and Russian conversation.
ACCURATE REPORTS, WORD PROCESSING, WordPerfect, laser printer, dictation. Student rates avail. #16-1490 W.
Broadway at Granville. 732-4426.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Typeityourself... simplified instructions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look top quality. $7/hr. and 15c/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant: 228-5496.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant: 228-5640.
85 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
WAITRESS POSITION New Dunbar
Mexican Rest Part-time Mon-Wed. 5 pm -
11 pm. Five dollars per hr. plus tips and
meals. Phone after 4 p.m. 737-7499.
AN INTERNATIONAL FRATERNITY,
founded in 1850, plans to become re-established at U.B.C. This fraternity is interested
in hearing from a group of undergrad students who wish to participate in the reorganization of this fraternity. Funds and
organizational support are available. Call
Murdo MacKenzie 684-3402.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
TYPING UBC VILLAGE, 24 hr. service.
Tapes transcribed, essays, papers, resumes,
letters, editing/proofing. 224-2310.
TYPING TIGERS. Low, low rates. Computerized. WordPerfect 5. 273-1420. UBC
Area.
WORD-
PROCESSING
$2.50 Double spaced page
APA, MLA, CMS
COMPUTERSMITHS
3726 West Broadway
(at Alma)
224-5242
PUBLIC TRANSIT USERS
428-A 470 Granville
for IBM-PC typing
Call 687-3171
MOT
■ FLASHES
Last week to register for Intramural Soccer Bowl
at BC Place call
Intramurals at
228-6000, Rm. 66
• • •
Film      Society
SUB Films.
Sept 21-24
7:30 each night -
The Naked Gun
9:30 - Dangerous
Liasons,
SUB  Auditorium,
call 228-4405
Between
'Note: "Noon" = 12:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
UBC Lesbian Discussion Group
meets alternating Tuesdays and
Thursdays at noon in SUB 130
(Women's Centre).
WEDNESDAY
UBC Marxist-Leninist Study
Group. Discussion - "The main
thing in the 60's", 7:00 p.m.,
Buchanan D352.
THURSDAY
Forestry Lecture - "Management
& Organization of Forest Industries in the USSR", Dr. Anatoly P.
Petrov, speaker. Noon, MacMillan Bldg., Room 166.
UBC Scottish Country Dance
Club is holding a dance practice,
7:30 - 9 p.m., SUB 212. New
members very welcome.
SATURDAY       TUESDAY
FRIDAY
CATALYST HOUSE WALK-A-
THON, Saturday, September 23
at Brockton Oval - Stanley Park.
Catalyst House Society is opening
a home for teenage girls who have
been neglected, abused or who are
without a supportive family environment. We ask for your support
in raising funds for this worthwhile and urgently needed project.
The Walk-A-Thon begins with
registration at Brockton Oval between 8 - 9 a.m. on Saturday,
September 23, rain or shine. It
completes at the 2nd Beach fire-
engine. Catalyst House is a nonprofit society and all donations are
tax deductible. The minimum
suggested registration fee is $10 or
$1 per kilometre. We invite you,
your friends, spouses and children
to participate in a morning of fun,
exercise and lively conversation
while we walk the seawall together. For more information, call
253-8047.
SUNDAY
Community Worship, 9 a.m., 11
a.m., & 7 p.m. at St. Mark's College.
MONDAY
Graduate Student Society Bzzr
Garden, 4:30 - 7:30, Graduate
Student Centre Garden Room.
Graduate Student Society. Walter Zuber Armstrong - Chinese
Wooden Flute & the Japanese
Shakuhachi Flute. 5 p.m. - 7
p.m., Graduate Student Centre
Fireside Lounge.
Ballroom Dance Lessons, 7:30,
Graduate Student Centre Ballroom.
Free lecture series: "Multiculturalism in Canada: Meeting the
Challenge". Monday, Sept. 25 and
Tuesdays, Oct. 24 and Nov. 14,7 -
9 p.m. Theatre, Robson Square
Media Centre, 800 Robson. Inquiries: 228-5339 or 222-5238.
This free series provides an opportunity for public discussion and
education about ethnic relations
in Canada, now and tomorrow.
Law Students' Legal Advice Program, evepy Tusday, from 12:30
p.m. to 2:00 p.m., SUB Room 213.
General Meeting, UBC Sports
Car Club. 7:30 p.m., SUB 211.
General Meeting, International
Association for Students of Economics and Commerce (AIESEC). 12:30, Henry Angus,
Room 425.
Hillel House
by Julie Roberts
Hillel House, a Jewish Resource Centre located next to the
parkade behind the Student Union Building, offers a rich and
varied program of cultural, educational, spiritual, and social events
for all UBC students.
Tuesday is well known for its
hot vegetarian lunch which is
served for $3.00.
Hillel provides Hebrew lessons for the beginner, intermediate and advanced; and Jewish
discussion groups on the Torah, in
particular its applications to modern lifestyles.
Executive Director Dr. Mordehai Wosk, an excellence source
of Jewish history, is available to
students for counselling on both
personal and academic problems.
Students can drop by between 9
p.m. and 5 p.m., Monday to Friday
for more information.
APPLICATIONS ARE STILL
OPEN FOR ARTS
OMBUDSPERSON
The Ombudsperson will be required to
deal with student complaints and
should have scheduled office hours. The
Ombusdperson will also have to work with
the A.U.S. Academic Coordinator.
Applications are available
from Buch A 107,
and must be submitted
by 4:00 pm, Friday September 22, 1989
SEE LONG
ISLAND FOR
0199 OH
THUR6P/.Y6
4397 W.IOth Ave.
222-1342
Applications
now being
accepted
For Three (3)
Student-At-Large Positions
on the
Ubyssey Publications
Committee
Application Forms
Available
In SUB Rm 238
Applications shall be
received until 4pm on
Friday, September 22,1989
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989 NEWS
CFS plans
walk-outs in
tuition protest
by Deanne Fisher
Ottawa(CUP) — British Columbia's student federation
thinks the provincial government
can afford to freeze tuition fees at
their current level.
The Canadian Federation of
Students' Pacific Region is gearing
up for a campaign against escalating tuition fees that will see one-
day walk-outs at two universities
in January.
CFS-Pacific chair Pam Frache thinks freezing tuition fees at
their present level is a reasonable
goal and, once successful, plans a
lobby effort aimed at having tuition fees rolled back.
Frache hopes the effort will
co-incide with a provincial election.
"We think well be successful,"
Frache says about the upcoming
campaign. "I was surprised to find
out how cheap it is (for the government to impose a freeze)."
Walk-Outs are planned for
the University of Victoria and
Simon Fraser University. Frache
says their success depends greatly
upon whether support staff unions
decide to respect the students'
picket lines.
The walk-outs are part of a
four part plan to win a freeze. An
education program on the effects
of tuition fee increases on the
general public is the first stage,
followed by walk-outs, civil disobedience and lobbying sessions with
politicians.
An official in the Social Credit
government's ministry of advanced education would not
speculate about the likelihood of a
freeze and said the ministry has no
control over tuition fees.
"Institutions are responsible
for setting their own fees," he said.
Freezing tuition fees is policy
for the province's New Democrats.
The party's post-secondary education critic, Barry Jones says that
because the government controls
operation grants for institutions,
it could "very clearly apply the
necessary pressure" to halt fee
hikes.
Shelter for homeless
students proposed
JOHN KASSAM PHOTO-
by Christina Park
Because of the chronic shortage of affordable housing near
UBC, Board of Governors representative Kurt Preinsperg and
Ombudsperson Jessica Mathers
have proposed an overnight emergency shelter on campus for homeless students.
The proposal was originally
presented in the Recreation Facility Referendum held last November.
The idea was to have hostel
style accomodation included in the
layout for the Recreation Facility.
It would have provided an overnight place for students studying
late for exams, or those who should
not attempt to drive home after a
night at the Pit, or for those especially who simply don't have anywhere else to go.
However, in the reduced plan
of the RecFac (SRC) the proposal
for a shelter was not included.
Because no new residences
are planned for the next five years,
Preinsperg and Mathers have res-
surected this idea on the suggestion of K.D. Srivastava, Vice President of Student Services.
"The disregard ofthe current
administration is disappointing
and discouraging," said Preinsperg, "The need is clear. I had a
student come to me panicking
because he simply could not afford
to live near UBC."
The student is still homeless.
The new proposal suggests
the shelter be set-up in already
existing residences: Vanier, Totem, and Gage. Preinsperg admits
there is potential for problems,
particularly from those living in
residence. However, the new proposal has included certain terms
to accomodate those in residence.
Another suggestion was to
convert the AMS owned Old Barn
near B-lot, presently being used
for storage by adding showers,
blankets, towels, and perhaps
some beds.
The exact cost for this type of
hostel has not been projected.
The proposal goes to vote next
Wednesday.
AMS prez Mike Lee takes a dunking from first year engineers Thursday.
Mike Lee did not wear his Calvins for the occasions, but he managed
to utter a few political statements on behalf of their absence.
B-lot
suffers
crowding
by Paul Dayson
Students lucky enough not to
have 8:30 morning classes may be
getting an extra 40 winks, but they
are facing a parking nightmare in
B-lot.
Students arriving after
8:30am are becoming angry when
they are stopped by flashing "full"
signs and can still see empty
spaces in these lots.
Most end up bending back the
barrier and driving past.
"It sucks," said two 3rd year
biology students last Wednesday.
They arrived for their 9:30 class to
find all tHe lots full except for the
far gravel lot which had a 15 minute line up. They parked in a parkade, at 75 cents an hour. That's too
much for all day," said one.'
A graduate student in Oceanography also found himself
trapped in the parking lines after
drivingfrom Victoria. He ended up
missing his first class.
The parking barrier system,
instituted two years ago, is still
causing students problems.
Student response has been to
either limit cars using a sticker
policy, or encourage more students to carpool.
"Not everyone needs their
car," said one student.
And the administration is
also unprepared to consider alternatives.
Ted Leather, Parking and
Security parkingmanager, saidhe
is "hoping people will form car-
pools."
Leather said no new parking
is planned, but said there is room
available on some roadways
around campus including South
West Marine and Wesbrook.
Alternative restaurant
opens on campus
by Pat Nakamura
Ifyou are tired of fast food on
campus, you can finally pass on
the grease and awaken your tas-
tebuds to a healthier lunch.
UBC's first vegetarian oriented restaurant, Grains and
Greens, opened Monday last week
at the Grad Centre to the general
public. The 100 seat restaurant is
also licensed for beer, wine and
coolers.
Most of the dishes are
meatless although chicken and
fish are occasionally served.
"Red meat isn't on the menu
because it's served everywhere
else on campus," explained Supervisor, Kathy Lees.
Trained at the Pierre
DuBrulle Culinary School in Vancouver, Lees has been cooking for
eight years.
"I want to keep up the quality
ofthe food—so we (the restaurant)
can't get too big," she said. "If
people want to send in their favorite vegetarian recipes, they are
most welcome."
The idea of Grains and Greens
originated from UBC Food Services Director, Christine Sampson.
"I wanted to do something
different to satisfy the needs of
some customers that aren't serviced as well as they probably could
be, Sampson said. "There are
people who want to limit the meat
and fat in their diet and get their
complete protein and amino acids
by eating a combination of
cheeses, grains and beans."
AMS products threaten environment
by Joanne Neilson
At a time when environmental destruction dominates the headlines, UBC
food services continues to
churn out food served on
paper plates, in foam cups
and plastic containers.
Blue Chip Cookies alone
hands out an average of 500
foam coffee cups a day estimated a Blue Chip employee.
Linda McGillivary, the
AMS food and beverage manager, said such disposables
are their only choice due to the
high costs of china, the need for
more space to wash dishes, and
additional staff needed as dishwashers.
Such large scale use of
paper and plastic products is a
concern of the recently established Student Environment
Center. They believe a solution
lies in increased student
awareness.
There are many consequences associated with the
use of disposable containers
says one SEC member. Every
cup and plate has been
bleached, which emitts dangerous dioxins into our environment, she adds. Also, the
accumulation of these products as garbage only adds to
the growing landfill problem.
Neither Canada Cup nor
Lily Cups, who supply the
-VMS, use the controversial
Chlorofluorocarbons that destroy the ozone layer.
As of yet, recycling is not
available for paper products
used for food. The paper companies claim they are working
on technology which will enable them to decontaminate
and recycle cups and plates in
thefuture.
Meanwhile, the SEC hopes
to educate students and urges
them to conserve the amount of
disposable products they use.
The AMS also offers an incentive program for students to
bring their own cup to one of
their food outlets (Blue Chip,
The Gallery, The Pit Pub,
Snack Attack, or Tortellini's)
and receive five cents off a cup
of coffee.
McGillivary also said the
Blue Chip reusable coffee
cups, given away to students
at the beginning of the year,
were very successful and the
.AMS is thinking of running a
similar promotion again.
When asked if they
would bring their own cups to
reuse, many students agreed
it was "a good idea" however
some were reluctant to commit themselves because as
student Tom Lebbetter said,
"I wouldn't want to carry a
cup around all day."
September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/3 REC COURSES START THIS WEEK
CfiMPUS RECREATION UBC
d PLf.CE TO BELONG THIS YEfiR 1989-90
FOR SERIOUS FUN REGISTER NOW
Quality Instructional Courses in Leisure Pursuits, Campus Fitness, Number One Health Club,
Rec Clubs, Saturday Seminar Series, Certification Courses, Outdoor Equipment Rentals.
The RECREATION UBC OFFICE is located in Room 203, WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
CALL 228-3996 for FURTHER INFORMATION
The One-Shot-Deal $25.00
SATURDAY SEMINAR SERIES
Preregistration at the RECREATION OFFICE (203 War Memorial Gym) is a MUST for all seminars. Register at least one week
before seminar date. All classes held in 211 War Memorial Gymnasium. (After lecture some classes proceed to different locations.)
1st TERM 2nd TERM
STRENGTH TRAINING-A
COMPONENT OF FITNESS:
•SATURDAY Sept.23rd 10 am -
Strategies to complement
your overall fitness program.
1 pm
TRIATHLON I * (see below)
SATURDAY Jan. 23rd 11 am - 1 pm
Physical Techniques and race
tactical pointers to produce the
competitive edge.
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENCE:
SATURDAY SepL30th 1 - 4 pm
Manoeuvers to overcome
unwelcome physical
difficulties
YOGA FOR STRESS MANAGEMENT
SATURDAY Oct.21 st 10 am - 1 pm
Asanas 'yoke' and balance
energies increasing
ability to concentrate
and relax.
REFLEXOLOGY
SATURDAY Oct. 28th 10 am- 1 pm
Body rejuvenation through
pressure manipulation of
the feet.
TRIATHLON II ♦ (see below)
SATURDAY Jan.23rd 2 - 4 pm
Mental toughness and
preparation is imperative
to triathlon competition.
Points on how to mentally power
through physical barriers.
BASIC BIRDWATCHING
2 SESSIONS - 1 PRICE
SATURDAY March 24 and 31, 9am -
Winter Birding;
Waterfowl identification, early
migrants and season birding hot spots.
lpm
* TRIATHLON I and n are held in conjunction with the UBC TRIATHLON,
March 17th. Triathletes who have
registered for this UBC Intramural
Sports special event pay only
$10.00 for both sessions.
CODE
500
501
502
503
504
505
COURSE & LEVEL
Ballroom I
Ballroom II
Ballet I
Jazz I
Jazz II
Modern I
DANCE - $45.00
DAY(S)
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
TIME
7:30-9:00 pm
9:00- 10:30 pm
4:30 - 6:00 pm
12:30 -2:00 pm
12:30 -2:00 pm
6:00 - 7:30 pm
PLACE
Task Force
Task Force
Task Force
Task Force
Task Force
Task Force
CERTIFICATION COURSES
ALL certification course fees are well below off campus fees for same courses.
CODE
700
701
702»
COURSE & LEVEL
DAY(S)
703*
Red Cross Standard Tues
First Aid (includes CPR)
Fitness Instructor Tues
Coastal Navigation Thur
for boating
Basic Sailing Theory Mon
TIME
6:30 - 9:30 pm
PLACE
COST
$50.00
7:00 - 10:00 pm        Gym E $95.00
6.00-9.00 pm 203B/Osb      $70.00
6:00 - 9:00 pm 203A/Osb      $50.00
SKATING - $45.00
CODE
400
COURSE & LEVEL
Beginning Skating
DAY(S)
Fri
TIME
12:30- 1:30 pm
PLACE
TWSC
ACTIVITIES
CODE
600
601*
602*
603*
604*
605*
COURSE & LEVEL
Yoga
Massage
Squash 1 (Sep 18-Oct 11)
Squash I (Oct 23 - Nov 15)
Kayaking
DAY(S)
Mon/Wed
Mon
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
TBA
TIME
4:30 - 6:00 pm
7:30-9:00 pm
4:15-5:45
4:15-5:45
TBA
12:30-2:00
Golf (Sept 19-Oct 31) Term I ONLY Tues
*Above, denotes truncated courses (approx. 6 weeks).
PLACE
Arm.203
TASK FORCE
TWSC
TWSC
Pool
Gym E
COST
$45.00
$50.00
$50.00
$50.00
$45.00
$35.00
CAMPUS FITNESS with REC UBC
Participatory Classes and Instructional Courses for all levels of fitness
100 AEROBICS - $45.00 (W, B and NJ - see schedule below)
MONDAY
12:30-1:30 W
4:40-5:30 W
TUESDAY
12:30-1:30 NJ
4:40-5:30 W
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
4:40-5:30 W
LOCATION
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
OSBORNE CENTRE
OSBORNE CENTRE
OSBORNE CENTRE
W — WORKOUT class emphasizes cardiovascular conditioning with a strength and stretch component.
B — BODY class is an overall workout with an emphasis on body toning, muscular endurance, co-ordination and posture.
NJ— NO JUMP is a moderate no jump aerobic workout minimizing stress on leg and foot joints.
101 NO JUMP ONLY - $30.00 (see NJ above)
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
LOCATION
OSBORNE CENTRE
701 FITNESS INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATION - $99.00 LOWEST RATES IN TOWN
TUESDAY
7:00- [0:00 p.m.
OSBORNE CENTRE GYM E
WEIGHTROOM COURSES - $35.00 You should consider weightroom membership lo complement your program.
102 BODYBUILDING Monday 5:00-6:00 (A term long development program)
103 STRENGTH TRAINING Tuesday 5:00-6:00 (A term long beginners program)
MARTIAL ARTS - $45.00
HUGE PROGRAM WITH SOME WORLD CLASS INSTRUCTION
RECREATION UBC is pleased to announce Its recent acquisition - NEW COMBATIVE MATS
for the sole use of the RECREATION MARTIAL ARTS.
CODE
COURSE & LEVEL
DAY(S)
TIME
PLACE
200
Judo I
Mon/Wed
8:00 - 9:30 pm
Gym E
201
Judo II & III
Mon/Wed
8:30- 10:00 pm
Gym E
202
Karate I
Mon/Wed
6:00 - 7:30 pm
Gym E
203
Karate 11 & III
Mon/Wed
6:30 - 8:00 pm
Gym E
204
Aikido
Tue/Thur
6:00 - 7:30 pm
Gym E
205
Wushu (Adult)
Thursday
7:30-9:30 pm
Gym E
206
Wushu (Children)
Saturday
8:30- 10:00 am
Gym E
207
Tai Chi (all levels)
Wednesday
7:30-9:30 pm
Task Force
208
Tae Kwon Do
Tue/Thurs
4:30 - 6:00 pm
Task Force
209
Shorinji Kempo
Tue/Thurs
6:00 - 7:30 pm
Task Force
210
Shadow Boxing - Tayson
Saturday
10:00-1:00pm
Task Force
211
Kendo
Mon/Wed
6:00 - 7:30 pm
Arm.203
FREE
TRIAL CLASS IN KARATE
20th Sept. only
Mon. or Wed. 6:00-7:30 Osborne Gym
Present this cut-out coupon to
the instructor to gain access to class
■V-
4/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989 Prisoner writes back
by Yukie Kurahashi
He's finally written back to
them.
Basile Legba isn't just another pen-pal—he's a political
prisoner being held without
charge or trial in a military prison
camp in Benin, Africa.
Since being informed of his
case 14 months ago in July, 1988,
members of UBC Amnesty International have written numerous
letters to the government of Benin
demanding to know the reason
behind Legba's arrest. They have
also been demanding assurance of
no torture and a fair and prompt
trial for their adopted prisoner.
After receiving permission
from the commandant of the
prison camp, one AI member at
UBC who wishes not to be identified has been writing to Legba as a
"friend" several times a month
since the beginning of this year.
Although AI is privately
funded and is not politically
aligned in any way, reception of
support from AI may possibly
arouse further suspicion against
Legba.
Consequently, all reference of
affiliation to AI has been avoided
in this member's letters to him.
The member finally received a
letter from him late last June,
then again in early July.
Chris Simon, another AI
member, coordinates the prisoner's dossier and edits the members' letters to the Benin government for formality. Because they
must be written in French, Simon
also finds himself helping members with the actual writing ofthe
numerous letters.
After months of this letter
writing campaign, Simon says
there still has been no reply.
UBC AI chairperson Isobel
Simpson says it is quite common
for "friends" to write to prisoners
for several years before receiving
any kind of reply.
"We had no idea what to expect, so we're really thrilled (about
receiving Legba's letters)," she
said.
In his letters, Legba says he
was a medical student three
months away from his thesis before he was arrested 19 months
ago on February 16,1988. He has
written that he is worried about
his doctorate, and is frustrated
because he fears he has forgotten
most of the studies he had previously undertaken.
.Above all, he says he would
like to see his family again.
Okanagan paper returns
KELOWNA (CUP) — Students at B.C.'s Okanagan College
will once again have a student
newspaper this year.
It has been three years since
The Golliard's funding was pulled
out from under them resulting in
the demise ofthe paper.
But now a group of students,
with the help of Student Society
funding, are starting a new paper.
The paper doesn't have a
name yet, but it hopes to be biweekly with a circulation 2,000.
Eventually they hope to become
weekly.
Okanagan College is a community college with satellite campuses in Kelowna, Penticton and
Vernon, B.C.
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
FREE WORKSHOP ON
TIME MANAGEMENT
Thursday Sept. 28, 1989
12:30 - 2:20 pm
Women Students' Lounge
Brock 223
Pre-register at Office for Women Students,
Brock 203. Telephone: 228-2415
7 Days    E    _
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
a week pss^s low low prices
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UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARK'VAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224-6225
E6PRE660
YOURSELF AT
THE CACTUS
CLUB CAFE!
4397 W.IOth Ave.
222-1342
CAF_
Make Your First
Step,
The Right
Step
Touche Ross Chartered Accountants/Management Consultants is a firm that offers a stable balance for
students ready to turn a degree into a profession. Just
look at what we have to offer:
• Comprehensive training program.
A wide variety of experience on clients ranging from
small local enterprises to the largest multinationals.
• Opportunities for short and long term tranfers to
Touche ROSS offices located throughout the world.
• A flexible performance review and promotion
System which recognizes an individual's abilities
and allows the best and the brightest to "Fast
Track" to the top.
• An open and friendly office environment.
So when you are ready for that first step, let
Touche Ross lead the way.
Touche Ross on-campus interviews will be held
Tuesday, October 17th, Wednesday, October 18th and
Thursday, October 19th.
Submit your application, with recent transcript, to
your Campus Employment Centre by Wednesday
September 27th.
ii Touche Ross
GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS DAY
Wednesday, September 27,1989
The Ballroom
Graduate Student Centre
Thea Koerner House
A Graduate Scholarships Day is being sponsored by the Graduate Student Society and the office of the Dean of Graduate
Studies. Representatives ofthe major Federal and Provincial Granting Agencies as well as ofthe Office ofthe Dean will be
present to provide information and answer questions on relevant Scholarship and Fellowship programs. This is designed
as an information session for Graduate and prospective Graduate students who are interested in applying for Graduate or
Postdoctoral Fellowships. An opportunity will be given for students to raise questions and to meet witn the representatives
of the various agencies.
SCHEDULE
SESSION 1 NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL (NSERC)	
9:00-9:10
9:10-9:40
9:40- 10:00
10:00- 10:20
10:20 - 10:50
10:50 - 11:30
SESSION 2	
Welcome and opening remarks
Dean of Graduate Studies and President, Graduate Student Society.
Ms. Teresa Brychcy - NSERC Scholarships Programs.
Mr. Rick Warner - The Science Council of British Columbia (Great and Stars Awards).
Tips on applying for Scholarships
Professor Martha Salcudean, Head, Mechanical Engineering Department
(member ofthe NSERC Scholarships Adjudication Committee)
University Graduate Fellowships - Dr. James Russell, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies
Open forum - questions and discussion.
MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL	
1:15-1:25
1:25 - 1:50
1:50-2:20
2:20 - 2:30
SESSION 3_
2:30 - 2:40
2:40 -3:10
3:10-3:30
3:30 - 4:00
4:00 - 4:30
Welcome and opening remarks
Dean of Graduate Studies and President, graduate Student Society.
Ms. Pat Evans - Medical Research Council (MRC) Awards Program.
Questions and discussion.
Break
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL (SSHRC).
Welcome and opening remarks
Dean of Graduate Studies and President, Graduate Student Society.
Ms. Carole Ann Murphy - SSHRC Fellowships Programs.
Tips on Applications for Scholarships
Professor Mark W. Zacher, Director, International Relations Institute
(member of the SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships Adjudication Committee).
University Graduate Fellowships - Dr. James Russell, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.
Open forum - questions and discussion.
September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/5 GMAT • LSAT • GRE
Weekend Test Preparation
at UBC
Next Seminar:
GMAT & GRE
LSAT & GRE
Oct. 6, 7, 8
Nov. 18,19
222-8272
CALL:
(Sexton     Educational Centers
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We Abo Sell Cellular Phones
Campus Computers Limited
2162 Western Parkway, Vancouver, BC V6T 1V6
Tel: 228-8080     Fax: 228-8338
*XT is a registered trademark of IBM Corp.
UBC   BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSE BOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the original
receipt) for full refund any time up to the following session deadlines:
Fall session September 29,1989
Winter session January 26,1990
Spring session May 18,1990
Summer session July 13,1990
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition. After
the respective deadlines all course books will be non-returnable.
NON-COURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to 10 days from date of purchase,
when accompanied by sales receipt.
No returns or exchanges on sale items, special orders, electronic and
computer goods, protective eyewear, lined shorts, bathing suits and
swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT • NO REFUND • NO EXCHANGE • NO EXCEPTIONS
Refunds for purchases by cheque will be made
after 10 business days from the date of purchase.
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
CATHERINE LU PHOTO
George Egerton recognizes the importance of historical memoires
UBC prof makes history
By Catherine Lu
A group of Canadian and international scholars will attend a
conference on campus concerning
the memoirs of famous and infamous world leaders this weekend.
UBC history professor George
Egerton who conceived ofthe idea
feels "the politics of memory" need
to be studied. "It's a problematic
but powerful genre," he says, citing the popularity of political
memoirs among the reading
masses, and its virtual obscurity
from scholarly criticism.
Memoirs have been written
since the rule of pharaohs, and
reflect a lasting, human desire "to
record one's deeds, to live beyond
one's own life...to have one's name
remembered on the lips of those
who come after," says Egerton.
However, besides satisfying
this human aspiration, "the historical and political impact is that
this genre of literature acts as a
very effective carrier of historical
and political messages," he says. "I
think modern political parties
know this now, and they are anxious to cultivate this genre."
Egerton notes that rising
Third World leaders, like Benazir
Bhutto, now publish autobiogra
phies as a means to project a political agenda.
Fascination with the secrecy
of power have made memoirs
popular, but it has created a reason for challenging and gauging
the validity of memoirs in terms of
historical accuracy.
The conference concept occurred two years ago, while Egerton was working on a book about
the creation of the League of Nations.
"I had to wrestle with the fascination of the personal stories on
the one hand—how they seduce
you into telling their version of
events—and, on the other hand, as
a historian, testing out their stories against other types of documentation," Egerton says.
His growing interests with
the genre of memoir culminated in
the organization of the upcoming
conference, which will critically
examine this distinct genre that
fuses literary, historical, and political elements.
Participating scholars include two other UBC professors
from the History department,
Janos Bak and Leonidas Hill, as
well as renowned Eisenhower and
Nixon biographer Stephen Ambrose.
AGORA
F     0
Li^n_______________L__________Ll
FOOD FOR PEOPLE NOT FOR PROFIT
OPEN HOUSE
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 23rd
10am - 6pm
3420 West Broadway
(at Waterloo)
• Live Entertainment
• In-store tastings & samplings
• Face-painting fun for kids
• In-store specials
EVERYONE WELCOME
5% Discount for working members,
Annual Discount for all members.
6/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989 NEWS
Conference will boost
Woman's Studies at UBC
by Carla Maftechuk
A lack of concern for Women's
Studies has caused UBC to fall
behind almost every Canadian
university.
Much has changed since the
early '70s, when UBC led the way
by creating several Women's Studies electives in the Anthropology
and Psychology departments. In
addition, several departments offered courses listed as "of related
interest."
At present, UBC has the same
status as it did 15 years ago. While
the program here has completely
stagnated, other universities have
moved rapidly ahead, creating
minors, majors, research centres,
and graduate programmes in
Women's Studies.
Continuing progress at UBC
was halted for several reasons.
The high energy level and commitment dropped when several ofthe
most actively involved people left
the university.
As well as the ever-present
financial problems, UBC also had
staff trouble. No one was being
hired, and quite a few women left
during the period of cutbacks and
restraint. Today, women remain
underrepresented in UBC's faculty and administration.
Attempts are being made to
update UBC's current status.
A report by the Faculty of Arts
Women's Studies Committee was
recently submitted to UBC President Strangway. It outlines the
need for such resources as a
Women's Studies Research and
Resource Centre and gives recommendations for the creation of a
future programme.
Their study has revealed that
a budget specifically marked for
Women's Studies must be created
in order for a strong programme to
be established. Simon Fraser University received the federally
funded Chair due to the initiatives
they took with their own Women
Studies programme.
Another positive step taken
by the committee is the organization ofthe first major interdisciplinary Women's Studies Conference
to be held at UBC. It takes place in
Woodward IRC during the weekend of September 22-24.
The theme, "Gender and the
Construction of Culture and
Knowledge" covers many areas:
Theology, Science, Psychology,
Law, Education, Fine Arts, Literature, Asian Studies, and more.
Topics range form a slide lecture entitled "Feminist Analysis of
West Edmonton Mall" to the controversial position that past medical procedures used in the treatment of depression in women have
been wrong.
The conference provides a
forum not only for local speakers
but others from across Canada
and several from the United
States.
Lack of funding had previously prevented the staging of
such an event at UBC. This year,
money for the conference was provided by the Koerner Foundation
and Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada,
and was matched by the University.
Valerie Raoul, member ofthe
Conference Planning Committee,
feels that such a conference is
valuable in several ways. The wide
variety of subjects can raise
awareness, provide a ground
where networking connections
may be made, and inspire research
into some ofthe fields.
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Hewlett-Packard Day
Wednesday, September 27th
10:00 am - 3:00 pm
20% off
IIP calculators
■ during Sept.
Drop by and see the line of quality
Hewlett-Packard calculators at
the Electronics department.
enter our draw
to win a
HP 42S Calculator!
Hewlett-Packard Calculators-
Built for your success.
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BOOKSTORE
ANNIVERSARY
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking for a career
in the business world, come see us. We're Chartered Accountants
from firms downtown and in the Lower Mainland and we'll be on
campus September 20 to talk about career possibilities in one of
the most stable professions - chartered accountancy.
There are jobs available in chatered accountancy for non-
Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered Accountants come
from all backgrounds, bringing new skills and diversity to this
growing, dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for accounting and
auditing in Canada and, because of their education and training,
are in demand by business around the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal basis and
explore opportunities. You may be an ideal candidate for Canada's
fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to:
Wine, Beer, Cheese Event
UBC Faculty Club
Salon A, B & C
Wednesday, September 20
5:00-7:00 p.m.
For more information call The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia at 681-3264.
W
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia.
September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/7 "THE WRITING'S
ON THE WALL."
Granada is offering low monthly rates
on all TV, VCR and Audio Systems.
Every student rental is backed by the
Granadacover service warranty, with
free loaners if it should require service.
And rental payments can be taken
directly from your bank account.
Just bring in your student card to
the nearest Granada store and take
advantage of the low monthly rental
rates available for students.
And get straight "A's" on TV 101.
ELECTROHOME 20" REMOTE CONTROL
COLOUR TV (48CGU)
PREFERRED
STUDENT RENTAL
_C "tm MONTH
ELECTROHOME REMOTE CONTROL 2 HEAD,
14 DAY, 8 EVENT VCR (HVRG90)
PREFERRED
STUDENT RENTAL
$1Q95*
ITn MONTH
PANASONIC REMOTE CONTROL AUDIO SYSTEM
WITH TOWER SPEAKERS AND STAND (SC3037)
PREFERRED
STUDENT RENTAL
$0095*
Jk.%9 rat MONTH
•BASED ON A MINIMUM 3 MONTH RENTAL
(i:
TVs ■ Audio • VCRs • Camcorders
Dealing with #1 has its advantages
| 669-1221
1009 Kingsway
I (Kingswiy- Windsor)
I Guildford Town Centre
Pacific Centre
4800 No. 3 Road
Richmond (Pirkside Phz_)
■ Call Granada Today
1191 Robson Street
(Robson-Bute)
Capilano Mall
Eaton Centre
(Burniby)
Coquitlam
Centre
386-8826
1661 Douglas SL
Victoria
These students are smiling because they gained a summer of valuable experience working with
some of our prestigious clients—clients like B.C. Hydro, Mitsubishi and First City Trust. They're
also smiling because they had fun while they worked with us: just ask them.
NOT YOUR
AVERAGE
BIG EIGHT
GA
We're not your average "Big Eight"
accounting firm: we've relaxed some of the
traditional C.A. firm formality for a more
personal — but no less professional working
atmosphere. Our staff claim this informality
keeps them confident, comfortable, creative;
and it helps them pass their exams.
If you are a student or grad looking for
opportunities in Toronto, Calgary or
Vancouver, consider talking to us. We'll be
on campus October 16th and 17th to answer
your questions and tell you why Deloitte
Haskins & Sells should be your number one
choice when selecting a career in chartered
accounting.
For further information, contact Sandra
Throness at 669-4466.
Deloitte
Haskins Sells
CHARTERED  ACCOUNTANTS
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
United with
Samson Belair through Deloitte/SatTISOn
DAN ANDREWS PHOTOS
People pound pavement for the environment. While the costumes and
banners were varied, some chose inappropriate methods, resulting in
four arrests under Sec. 31 and possibly a fifth case of embarassment.
THEOLOGICAL
DISCUSSIONS
with
Lutheran Chaplain
RAY SCHULTZ
Registration meeting
Thursday, Sept. 28
12-30 noon
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE
University Blvd 6c
Wesbrook
224-1614
Look for us on Clubs' Day.
1
1
W\   I   "Unless that which is
l^^(      above you controls
that which is within you, then
that which is around you will."
APPLICATIONS
for Volunteer Positions at
Speakeasy
UBC's Student run
Peer-counselling and Information
Centre
Are available at the
Speakeasy office
SUB 100B
Deadline for applications is:
Wednesday, September 20th, 1989
8/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989 NEWS
People pound pavement
by Tara Shioya and
Franka Cordua-von Specht
They danced and clapped and
bobbed their umbrellas to the
drum beat of Batucada BC and the
rattling maracas and beating of
tin cans.
They carried posters with slogans such as "Either help save the
rainforest or learn how to stop
breathing" and "Stop polluting
outdoors, smoke indoors."
Despite the poor weather,
more than 7,000 people gathered
at Kitsilano Beach Saturday for
Walk for the Environment, the
first of it's kind in Canada.
"People are finally aware that
our environment is under siege,"
said Ken Lay, walk coordinator
from the Western Wilderness
Committee. "Now we need behavior and attitudes to change on a
personal and institutional level
like never before."
Walkers assembled at Kitsi-
lanoat noon, following with a walk
along the shoreline of False Creek
to Cambie Street and eventually
gathering at Queen Elizabeth
Park for the post-walk reception.
More than 140 grou;
senting labour, business and environmental concerns joined together to sponsor the event. They
included the Northwest Wildlife
Preservation Society, the Burns
Bog Conservation Society, Share
our Forests and Greenpeace.
At Queen Elizabeth, there
were booths set up, offering information on a range of ecological
issues ranging from the Breathers' Dining Guide to smoke-free
dining, to a cosmo-like list of "70
Ways to Save the Environment."
Musqueam spokesperson
Dick Lewis opened the speeches.
"The Musqueam once walked and
hunted on this land before there
were sidewalks and tall buildings," he said.
"My Grandfather told me you
could almost walk across the rivers once—the salmon were so
thick. But now there are chemicals, tin cans and pollution. Where
the tall trees are, there are mills,
air pollution and waste," he said.
"It is great to see so many
people interested to clean up the
environment."
Other speakers and perform-
included   Justice   Thomas
Berger, Bonaparte Indian leader
Terry Morgan, environmentalist
Elizabeth May, Greenpeace co-
founder Bob Hunter, Holly
Arntzen, Bill Henderson and the
Raging Grannies, a choir of senior
citizens.
Bonaparte Indian chief Terry
Morgan made a strong plea to stop
the dumping of waste at the
"mega-dump" of Cache Creek,
while Andrea Miller of West Vancouver urged individuals to focus
on the household environment.
"You've got to break your
addiction to putting stuff in the
garbage. It only becomes garbage
when you mix the smelly and the
non-smelly, the dirty and the non-
dirty, and you shake it around,"
she said.
"It's no longer tacky to be
thrifty," said Morgan, who carries
a mug dangling from her belt to
avoid using disposable styrofoam
cups.
'"This can is my can, this can is
your can/it should not be trash-
canned, it should be
recanned...this can was made
for you and me."—The Raging
Grannie
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September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/9 __ SPf"
Lutherans
HEAD THE HUE
BIBLE STUDY
with
Lutheran Chaplain
RAY SCHULTZ
Registration meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 27
1230 noon
LUTHERAN campus
CENTRE
University Blvd & Wesbrook
224-1614
Look for us on Clubs' Day.
Luther said of scripture, "it is the manger in which the
Christ child lies."
The Word tells the story of Cod's love and our salvation.
The Bible is the story of the Word made flesh. It is the sole
rule and norm for all doctrine.
Yet, it is not an idol. The Bible is a beacon, pointing the
way to the One Lord.
Its scope is universal-
Its depth is eternal.
Its message is Christ.
The Bible is the map. And Christ is the treasure,
The Lutheran Church Welcomes You.
ft..
;c-\,>*W'--JS'«W
DO YOU
LIKE TO
PARTY?
THEN YOU'LL LOVE THE ROXY
VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST PARTY SPOT
LIVE CLASSIC ROCK MUSIC BY
DAWN PATROL
WEDNESDAY NIGHT IS UBC NIGHT
FREE ADMISSION WITH YOUR AMS CARD
1% _#^ WW 932 GRANVILLE
III   III 684-7699
ROXY
Make money anti have fun. If you want fo
raise money for your dub, charity or team,
the Roxy has a great idea.
CaU Blaine at 684-7699
FOR CLASS
NOTES!
(1>
>
*fc«£
FOR AS
LITTLE AS
$31.50
YOU CAN SEE
5 CONCERTS
s a student, you can
enjoy the Magic of the
Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra...
At 1/2 the REGULAR PRICE
As a student, you're entitled to up to
50% OFF regular adult prices, when
you subscribe to the Series of your choice.
For more information, tickets, or our
season brochure, call 876-3434.
Peter McCoppin
Principal Guest Conductor
SYMPHONY^
am&rf*m,
MEE
' -**BJ^       Kazuyoshi Akiyama
Conductor Laureate
Mump and smoot
by Harald Gravelsins
The best show in the Fringe
Festival is back for two
encore performances.
The highly-acclaimed Mump
and Smoot in Something... with
Wog returns to Vancouver East
Cultural Centre tonight and
Thursday in a double bill with
another Fringe heavyweight,
Christie in Love.
Tickets for last Saturday's
performance sold out in eight
minutes. Word on the streets in
Mount Pleasant had been
spread—this was the show to
see.
The artistic device underly
ing the show strokes brilliance.
Mump and Smoot speak for the
most part in an incomprehensible gibberish, but we recognize
their actions and gestures, the
dynamics of their relationship,
and the occasional phrase.
To piece the puzzle, we have
to put ourselves in their shoes
and imagine the emotions they
experience. We have to communicate with the performers
through the universal language
of feelings.
We reach into the adult
mind and find the child who
flourishes therein.
Mump and Smoot proceed
through three classic vignettes of
universal childhood experience,
deconstructing adult conventions
in each step.
Ever present in each of these
scenarios is the unknown and
the unpredictable, the wellspring
of childhood terror and humiliation, but simultaneously, the
fountain of adventure and
personal victory.
Mump and Smoot remind us
how far along we have travelled
past the seemingly insurmountable obstacles we face as children, bringing into light how
strong the imagination is of the
'child' as compared to that ofthe
adult.
Fringe Festival
B.C. plays still hot beyond Fringe
by Harald Gravelsins
Theatre-goers want to see
themselves and their
concerns played out on stage.
They also want to be entertained. This expectation is
especially justified with a local
theatre festival such as the
Fringe.
Theatre
Vancouver East Cultural
Centre's
"Beyond the Fringe"
September 20,23
Three productions in the recent Vancouver Fringe Festival
use as their starting point
themes particularly relevant to
British Columbia. Each uses a
different format, and the results
vary accordingly.
Kindling, by the SPARX
Collective, probes the attitudes
of those recently drawn into environmental activism. The show
bills itself as a collectively
written and produced drama
with dance. A further element to
the production is a native
storyteller who adds narrative at
key moments.
The storyline has thr< ••
people wandering into the i< rest,
away from a blockade against
logging. With night falling, they
are forced to spend the next few
hours together in a clearing.
Personality conflicts ensue,
causing differing environmental
viewpoints to surface.
Has organization building
undermined individual initiative?
Do First Nations peoples deserve
a privileged role in environmental activism? Is direct action
or raising general awareness the
more useful strategy? To what
extent has the environmental
movement simply become the
latest refuge for the politically
fashionable and the socially
disaffected?
Dancers in the show are cast
as spirits ofthe forest. Their
movements lend a subtle,
captivating aesthetic quality
much needed by the otherwise
stark script and flat acting.
Separate billing was deservedly
given to Kate Hoover, the mime
who enacted the fire that constituted the central visual element
in the show.
The Occupation of
Heather Rose presents us with
a triumphant solo performance of
Tamsin Kelsey.
Heather Rose is a nursing
graduate who has taken a post as
the only medical practitioner in a
remote northern reserve. The
script brings the audience into
Heather's psyche where we experience the collision of hostile cultures within the confines of
Heather's personality and emotions. This strategy provides
remarkably sharp insights into
the ideology of cultural domi
nance.
Over the course of the sixty-
minute show we watch a cheery
do-gooder become a bitchy
alcoholic. It is testimony to both
playwright (Wendy Lili) and
actor that this transfiguration is
accomplished smoothly and
convincingly.
The character of Heather
Rose trashes her (our) romanticized view of the North and her
(our) paternalism toward First
Nations peoples. In the process,
however, she undermines the
foundations of her desire to
alleviate the plight of oppressed
peoples. The message is dark but
the drama is unsurpassed.
Goldcoasters, a musical
created by Rhodea Lyncaster,
takes a mainstream approach to
current B.C. concerns. The
backdrop for most of the show
was Whistler, the epitome ofthe
province's real-estate driven
economic boom.
The principal conflict set up
in the storyline involves a man's
choice between career advancement, including relocation to
Toronto, versus marriage to a
modern high-achiever running
for election in Whistler's town
council. The resolution is arrived
at all too easily by having the
man open a national computer
franchise in Whistler.
In post-recession B.C., both
money and love are possible.
Where else would anyone rather
be?
SKI TO WORK T1IIS WINTER!
Cypress Bowl/Hollybum Ridge
downhill and cross country ski
areas are seeking dependable,
energetic people for a variety
of F/T and P/T positions in all
departments.
* Food  _; Beverage *  Rental Shop
* Lift Operation* * Ski School
* Ticket Sales • Ski Patrol
* Maintenance
• Cashier*
* Equipment Operators * Clerical
(with dass 3 licence)
On the job training is provided
for most positions.    Apply to
Box 91252 West Vancouver, B.C.
V7V 3N9, before September 30
or call 926-5612 for more
.   information. A
AN INFORMAL GATHERING
FOR WORSHIP AND
DISCUSSION
SUNDAY EVENINGS 7:30 PM
beginning September 24
Lutheran Campus Centre
(Corner of Wesbrook and University)
Sponsored by
United Church Campus Ministry
at UBC
St. Anselm's Anglican Church
information:
Brad 224-3722
Michael 224-8861
EVERYONE WELCOME
WELCOME
BACK B.B.Q.
FRIDAY, SEPT 22
4:00 PM
sponsored by:
Lutheran Student Movement
United Church Campus Ministry
University Hill United Church
LOCATION
Lutheran Campus Centre
(comer of University and Wesbrook)
ALL WELCOME
Information Call Brad 224-3722
10/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989 ENTERTAINMENT
Videotape Lies, and Sex
by Michael Gazetas
Director Steve Sonder-
bergh's Cannes Film
Festival winner Sex, Lies, and
Videotape breaks dry ground in
its questioning of our perceptions
of who we think we are and what
we want in life. Three underlying
principles are examined, beginning an exploration into the
complex fabric of North American society.
MOVIE
Sex, Lies, and Videotape
Granville
Playing now
Sonderbergh examines that
humans need love and the
feeling of being part of a winning
team in order to be happy; that
humans would rather deceive
themselves about the truth of
what's really happening in their
lives than admit there is a
problem; and that people will use
any method in order to maintain
the integrity of self-deception.
Sonderbergh tests these
three premises by creating four
characters in need of love and
understanding who are actively
deluding themselves about the
reality of their situation by using
videotape, having or not having
sex, and telling lies.
The first character we meet
is Ann (Andie MacDowell). She is
involved in therapy, unable to
face the fact that she is married
to a creep. She settles for not
sleeping with him, but not
realising why.
Her husband John (Peter
Gallagher), lies to her about his
affair with her sister Cynthia.
Cynthia seems to be more interested in the sexual experience
she receives from John than
falling in love with him. Her
conscience is not troubled by the
thought of sleeping with her
sister's husband.
The stage is set for the entrance of Graham (James
Spader), John's mysterious
friend from college days. He
becomes a catalyst helping
characters realize they live in a
fantasy world in which they have
been denying themselves
happiness.
Graham is unable to be
physically aroused when in the
direct presence of women.
At first he appears extremely strange with his habit of
interviewing women about sex,
reviewing the videotapes later in
order to get off. But Graham is
the only character who realizes
the truth of his situation and
takes action to remedy his
impot-nce around women—
though! it is only a treatment, not
a cure. The other three characters, however, seem unable to
even realize their problems, let
alone change them.
Graham's use of videotape to
manipulate reality for later consumption is a brilliant comment
on consumer society.
The style of the film fits this
investigation of the human psy
che. Simple sets and bright lighting allow an illumination of the
characters without distraction.
We sympathise with these
people, especially Ann and
Graham. There is something
moving about the way people can
be so close to solving their
problems yet still miss piecing
the puzzle together.
The film cannot help but be
engrossing: the script hides the
development of the characters
until the last moment, creating
intense suspense. We crave
the outcome ofthe situations our
friends have found themselves
in, like a big screen soap opera.
Sex, Lies and Videotape provides an answer to what happens
when you over-manipulate reality. The pain of facing the truth
is the best reason not to. The
happy ending is that three ofthe
characters manage to find
enough bravery to face the truth
about themselves and their
relations with people they care
for. Their reward becomes
contentment with who they are.
Sonderbergh's first feature
succeeds in showing us the pain
of self-delusion and the freedom
of knowing the truth.
ST. ANSELM'S ANGLICAN CHURCH
(Universrty Boulevard across Irom golf course)
WELCOMES...
the Students and the student families of the University of British Columbia
Sunday Services:      8:00 am       Holy Eucharist
11:00 am      Holy Eucharist (2nd Sunday-Morning Prayer)
Sunday School-ages 5-12
Nursery care provided
Consktering the fact that Jesus had his doubts, why cam you?
If you believe in God, but still have doubts and questions, there's plenty of room for you in the faith and
fellowship of the Anglican Church of Canada.
Welcome to St. Anselm's.
Rector: Rev. Bud Raymond • For more information: 224-1410, or 224-2568
FORERUNNERS WELCOMES
UBC WITH ITS
Stinky Sneaker
Sale
Don't chuck 'em - swap 'em! clean out your
closet and chisel the mud off those old dirty
runners. They're as good as cash when you
bring them in to FORERUNNERS during our STINKY
SNEAKER SALE. Trade in your old runners for
great discounts on any pair of our new runners.
Also, be sure to catch the super savings on
clothing and other selected merchandise
throughout the store.
The STINKY SNEAKER SALE - smells good?
You betchal
o*1
SALE ON THRU SEPTEMBER 1 ITH
i < ■ __* _ ■
in »i    i
m a
m ak *»i '«
m
3504 West 4th Ave., Vancouver • 732-4535
UBC Sportswear and Sportshoe Headquarters
Student Representatives
FACULTY OF ARTS
Nominations are invited for
Student Representatives to the
Faculty of Arts:
a) One, representative from the combined major, honours,
graduate, and diploma students in each of the
Departments and Schools of the Faculty of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of the First and
Second year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings of the
Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices,
the Dean of Art's Office, The Faculty Adviser's Office, and the Arts
Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar of the
University not later than 4:00pm FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,1989.
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations have been received by the
deadline, there will be no representation.
AMS OPEN MEETING
12:30- 1:30 pm
Wed. Sept. 20, 1989
SUB Auditorium
ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION:
1. Student Recreation Centre Referendum
(Sept 25-29)
2. Prospective Membership In The Canadian
Federation of Students (CFS)
3. AMS Task Forces On Tuition, Student Aid.
And Housing.
COME AND VOICE YOUR CONCERNS
Call Mike Lee, AMS President 228-3972
If you have any questions
Back By Popular demand
GSS BALLROOM
DANCE LESSONS
First class
Monday September 25
7:30 pm
8 Ballroom Dance Lessons
Students
$25*00
Non-Students
$35*00
Phone 228-3203
now to register and save $5.00
Everyone Welcome
September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/11 FORESTRY
CINDERGRfiDCJfiTE SOCIETY
presents
UNDERCUT /89
Saturday September 23rd
firmouries at 8pm
Featuring
Dawn Patrol
See Omar for Tickets $7.00
eiMinK-exim-ninHnaHiK   >*<__•■ •*_>__■,«    r\
Starts Friday, September 22
at a Famous Players Theatre
Near You.
Mature
• Some Violence
• Occasional Course Language
by Steve Conrad
Pour committees have registered to lobby against the proposed Student Recreation Facility
in next week's referendum.
Students for the Negation of
Outrageous Taxation, is a group
headed by Arts Representative
Joanna Harrington, who explains
the name of her group by claiming
the need to maintain a sense of
humour in this debate.
Students Against the Proposed Recreation Centre is led by
Helen Willoughby-Price who explains her group's name by saying
that her first choice of a name was
disallowed by the SAC elections
Commissioner Angela Pontikis.
Warren Against the Recreation Facility is a one man committee consisting of Warren Whyte, a
general officer in the Arts Undergraduate Society and editor of The
Underground.
The Graduate Students Society also registered a campaign
commission even though the GSS
executive decided to remain neutral in this year's debate. GSS
president Chris Homes said the
society currently has no plans to
campaign actively but registered a
campaign committee only in order
to keep their options open.
While no campaigners say the
$30 SRC levy will affect any students' decisions to attend school,
most question whether the pro
posal before the vote represents
good value for the money.
SNOT representative Joanna
Harrington said she was
prompted to enter the fray because
she has serious doubts that the
current SRC proposal accurately
reflects students' priorities in such
a facility since many of the items
most frequently chosen on last
year's ballot were left out of the
new SRC.
"Now we've got the final deal,"
said Harrington "students have to
say, ~Is this what I want for the
money?"
In her SAPRC posters,
Willoughby-Price cited a concert
hall, a weight room, daycare,
squash and raquetball courts, and
adequate parking as among the
main requests made last year by
students, but not included in the
SRC this year.
"If they said you're going to
pay $30 a year for a gym, I think
that would be more fair," said Harrington.
Homes shares much of Harrington's dissatisfaction with the
SRC- especially the omission of
daycare. "If you're a graduate student and you have a family and
kids then this is not going to be as
successful to you as it could have
been."
Many committee representatives voiced serious concerns that
students might not have an adequate say in the future ofthe SRC
in return for their $3.75 million
contribution.
The SRC is to be administered
by an advisory committee to the
president with six votingmembers
to be selected as follows: three are
to be recommended by the Vice
President of Student and Academic Services at least one of
whom must be an alumnus; three
are to be recommended by the
AMS and must include the Director of Administration ofthe AMS,
one student and one alumnus.
The committee also voiced
other concerns after the five year
commitment, barring a referendum deciding otherwise, the $30
annual levy will remain in place
indefinitely in the event of a "yes"
vote in next week's referendum.
Deciding what to do with this
money, will be a difficult issue to
decide.
Harrington is worried that
"on really big key issues the administration will take over."
"The money is being taken
from the bottom and run by the
top," stated Whyte.
SRC Intercourse: Yeah or Nay
by Otto Lim
The "yes" campaigners for the
Student Recreation Centre referendum includes Board of Governors representative, Tim Bird,
UBC Intramural Sports, and
"Students for UBC" . They believe
a university education should include more than just academics.
Tim Bird, Board of Governors
representative, believes "a portion
of a student's education is in the
classroom, but another part is
involvement in sports and clubs."
He said first-and second-year students should support the campaign before "the situation gets
worse."
He added "people will get carried away in details about the recreation centre such as who turns
out the lights, etc." The main issue
he contends is the stifling of student activity.
Currently, Bird hopes to appeal to different groups on campus
to support the "yes" campaign.
Another strong supporter of
the "yes" campaign is UBC Intramural Sports. The Director of
Intramurals, Nestor Korchinsky,
cited limited team sports registration, such as in volleyball and ball-
hockey, to a lack of available
gymnasium space.
"An expanding student population and limited recreational
facilities denies many students
the opportunity for drop-in and
group recreational activities," he
said.
OPTICAL CLUB
Current student involvement
in Intramural Sports programs is
between 25-31 per cent. By the
year 2000, the participation rate is
expected to be 50 per cent. As a
result, Intramural league teams
have been capped at 161 volleyball
teams, 126 ball hockey teams, 88
basketball teams, and 110 soccer
teams.
Korchinsky emphasized that
Intramural indoor sports activities have never been heavily promoted because of their popularity.
"More facilities are needed to keep
ahead ofthe growth in Intramural
Sports programs," he said.
However, he added, "the proposed recreation facility would not
address all our problems and anticipate needs ofthe future."
He believes the SRC would
provide for students "excitement
and opportunity to integrate socially and athletically into the university."
If the referendum is passed,
Korchinsky promises "students
will get their money's worth." The
more facilities will mean better
programs and greater diversity in
recreational opportunities he said.
But if the referendum is not
passed, he believes it will "take the
edge of the program" which will
result in turning away of participants in Intramural programs.
"There is a possibility of Intramural Sports expanding off-campus if the referendum is turned
down," Korchinsky said.
"If there are no opportunities
to expand on campus, we will pursue every avenue to expand outside campus although that would
mean the cost to the participant
would go up."
"Students for UBC," a coalition group of students headed by
Chris Bendl, will vote yes for
RecFac because they believe that
"students have to contribute to the
university."
Bendl added, "Like the motto
of UBC "Tu em est,'it's up to you to
make the campus a better place."
"Students for UBC" plan to
campaign for SRC by speaking to
classes in lecture halls and putting
up posters.
Director of Athletic Services,
Dr. Robert Hindmarch says the
SRC will not be dominated by
varsity teams.
"The recreation centre has
little to do with varsity sports and
more to do with Intramural
Sports," he said.
Also, according to the proposed SRC plan, there is a written
agreement between the AMS and
the UBC Administration on bookings policy to give priority of recreation space to Intramural
Sports, UBC students, and UBC
community (in that order).
xxses
1439 Kingsway
Vancouver 874-4573
NOTE: CORRECTION ON
• TEST PREPARATION •
SEMINAR DATES
GMAT • LSAT • GRE
Weekend Test Preparation
at UBC
Next Seminar: GMAT & GRE - Oct. 6, 7,8
LSAT & GRE - Nov. 18, 19
CALL: 222-8272
•SCXtOfl     Educational Centers
12/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1 1                                            LETTERS
Walter Zuber
Armstrong
AMS hacks blast SRC
Not for StllC-GlltS?                Yes,   it's   happening   again.            Club office space was one of
We're going back to the polls to    last year's big selling points. With
A typical student may be ask-    decide whether we want to pay $30    over 200 clubs, more offices are
ing themselves right now, assum-    every year to the building of a    desperately needed to solve the
ing they have tuned in to the Rec-    Recreation Facility (Rec Fac). But    current problem of limited space
Fac issue, if they will be getting a    this time, there's no flashy post-    and doubling up.   Rec Fac offers
good deal for their annual $30 fee.    ers, no but-                                                                               just   fifteen
Students  have   been   presented    tons,       no                 A df___l for $30?                  small     of-
with a glossy proposal.   But cut    obnoxious                         Cd            ^°                        fices    and
through the slickly packaged pres-    "Vote   Yes"                                                                           those   will
entation and the flaws    can be    bus ads, no models, no videos, and   be for sports-related clubs,
found.  Rec-Fac is a bad deal for    no AMS-written newspapers. The           Rec Fac's first priority is to
students.                                               AMS wasted an incredible $25,000    Intramural Sports. (And yes, they
If one is in a club at UBC, the    of students'money on last year's    did get office space.) But an open
worsening problems of unavail-    referendum. This year's "informa-    facility for all students is of secon-
able office space is probably all too    tion only campaign" has only a    dary concern. The AMS promises
familiar. If a club is lucky enough    mere $7000 budget.                           that there will be 25 hours per
tohave any office space, itis proba-            So what facilities are in this    week (Monday to Sunday, 7am to
bly shared with one or more other    proposed building? Well there is a    8pm) for students' general use.
clubs.     Rec-Fac  would make a    gym...but if you voted yes in last    That'sjust 3.6 hours each day for a
completely inadequate provision    year's referendum because  you    campus   with  over   25,000   stu-
of 15 new club offices (halved from    wanted:                                              dents.
an original plan of 30). This won't           a concert hall - it isn't there;            This Rec Fac proposal fails to
even begin to alleviate the prob-            a weight room - it isn't there;    meet the needs of UBC students,
lem. Thus, clubs will be stuck in           daycare - it isn't there;              What many students wanted is
their shared cubby holes and clos-            squash courts - they aren't    not included in the present deal.
ets for a long time to come.                there;                                                     Our response is to VOTE NO.
In the current proposal there           a facility with parking - no,                       Joanna Harrington
are no provisions for any playcare/    not there either.                                           AMS Arts Representative
Chinese Wooden Flute
and
the Japanese
Shakuhachi Flute
in the
Fireside Lounge
Graduate Student Centre
5pm
Friday, September 22. 1989
EVERYONE WELCOME
daycare. Such facilities are considered a possible future phase,
but the university administration
has been firmly against including
any real commitment to playcare/
daycare in the current plans. This
smacks of sexism. Students
(mostly women students) with
children to take care of, who already have a rough time of it,
would not have fair access to RecFac.
These concerns are on top of a
$30 student annual fee, which
students would continue to pay
indefinitely after construction
would be complete, as the money is
for maintenance costs. There has
been an obvious trend against
provincial government support for
their university. Students are
picking up the bills, like the $30
annual fee. Even if one is willing to
vote yes in the upcoming referendum and pay $30 a year (and see
all students pay that money from
now on into the future), shouldn't
one get a good deal for their
money? Students should make
sure they want what they may pay
for. Rec-Fac is not a good buy for
students. Don't buy it.
Mark Keister
AMS Arts Rep.
HOT FLASH	
Women's Study Conference at Woodward IRC from September 22 to
24. Registration is $5 for students and unemployed, $30 for employed. Advance reservations through Valerie Raoul, Women's
Studies Coordinator - Buchanan Tower Rm. 724, (228-4033)
LOOKING FOR A CLUB?
SEPT. 20 - 22, 1989
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LINES
NEED A HAIRCUT?
Bring a friend and pay for only one.
ANNIVERSARY SALE
Offer valid SUNDAY SEPT. 24
2529 Alma St. (Alma & Tenth)
PHONE: 224-2332
PERSONAL
COMPUTING
PRODUCTION
CENTRE
Room 209F, Computer Sciences Building
4  .
_!___.
SELF-SERVE
PRINTING
UNIVERSITY
COMPUTING
SERVICES
forJJ-
>^i^G
t«is
t*ft\3
&&&
^^fisST
\\
)tVZ£S
Use an Apple Macintosh
or an IBM PC-compatible
and print to a LaserWriter
open Monday to Friday, 8:30 — 4:30
pay by cash, cheque, or departmental
requisition
SB phone 228-3050
PRICES
$6 per hour
(minimum charge $1.50)
plus 25c per page
UBC faculty, staffand students only — identification required
The University of British Columbia
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1989 FALL LECTURES
STEPHEN AMBROSE
An eminent historian, well known for his biography of Eisenhower and newly
acclaimed for. the recent volumes on former President Nixon, Professor
Stephen Ambrose ofthe University of New Orleans has studied the character
of soldiers and the place ofthe military in American politics. His 1970 Rise
to Globalism: American Foreign Policy Since 1938 has been repeatedly
revised &reissued and is widely used as a university text. Author of severalTV
documentaries on World War II and the Cold War, Dr. Ambrose is an exciting
lecturer on contemporary international history.
NIXON, KISSINGER AND THE ENDING OF THE WAR IN VIETNAM
Tuesday, September 19       In Buchanan A-104, at 12:30 pm
NIXON, KISSINGER AND THE OPENING TO CHINA
Wednesday, September 20       In Buchanan A-104, at 12:30 pm
THE MAKING OF FOREIGN POLICY IN THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION:
The Case of China (Seminar)
Wednesday, September 20       In Buchanan A-203, at 3:30 pm
EISENHOWER, NIXON AND THE MODERN AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
Saturday, September 23       In Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, at 8:15 pm
(Vancouver Institute)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/13 Be nice to
Mother Nature
For those of us who participated in Walk for
the Environment, our guilty consciences aware
of how each of us produces two kilos of garbage
a day was eased—momentarily.
Nowhere else in the world does anyone
produce as much trash per capita.
Although walking is a step in the right
direction, it is quite another concept to commit
to a change in lifestyle.
Noble intentions all too easily slip away into
dark recesses when it means actions such as
taking public transit rather than the car, hanging the clothes to dry instead of loading them
into the dryer or to stop eating fries and burgers
at McDonald's packaged in styrofoam containers which prove to be hazardous to the environment with its CFC's.
Give mother earth a break. And consider the
following:
1) Turn the water off while brushing your teeth.
(After the lead clears out of the pipes)
2) Keep a compost pile. (The vegetable drawer
in the fridge doesn't count)
3) Choose house plants, such as the spider
plant, which absorb airborne toxins. (Call
Environmental Canada on how to dispose of
toxic spider plants)
4) Don't use plastic straws
5) Don't buy over-packaged foods.
6) Don't use disposable dishes and utensils.
Don't use napkins, use cloth.
7) Use both sides of writing paper (and don't
forget the edges).
8) Patronize only those fast food outlets that use
paper, recyclable containers. (Assuming you
can afford fast-food)
9) Take paper or plastic bags to the supermarket for your groceries. (B.y.o.b.=bring your own
bag)
10) Use cosmetics with natural ingredients.
Save water. Never shower alone.
Share your body heat. Never sleep alone.
<he. REFERENDUM is com,h&
ANO YOU SHOULP VOTE   BECAUSE, t.
theUbyssey
September 19, 1989
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year bythe Alma Mater Society
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301;  advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
Deanne Fisher blew her nose sadly into her fortieth Kleenex
of the hour as a tear rolled down her left cheek. She was lonely.
Lonelier than the Maytag repairman. Ever since she had become
Her Royal Highness, the President of CUP, she had been torn from
the loving bosoms of her friends at The Ubyssey. Then she had a
great idea. She would write her friends at the paper.
"Dear Joe, Franka and Chung," she began, "How are you? I am
wonderful. How are Ted Aussem and Ernest Stelzer, Esq.? If I know
them, they've probably snuck out for pizza, instead of working,
right* She had read about Michael Booth being appointed Canadian Ambassador to Guam, so she didn't ask about him. "How are
Dan "Call Me Hans* Andrews, Martin Chester, Luis Piedmont and
Victor Chew Wong? It's nice to hear they're helping with the paper
again. Youll have to write me all the dirt about Nadene Rehnby,
Steve Conrad, Mark Nielsen, Yukie Kurahashi and Julie Roberts so
I can become friends with them too and laugh at their exploits. I like
the layouts Lorraine Schober and Wendi Shin did. Nice work.
Harald Gravelsins and David Lo are doing good work too. Way to go
guys. Hao Li seems to be learning his job too. Finally."
She paused as Dale Lund, Jenney Cherchas, Tara Shioya, Ted
Ing and Rebecca Bishop rocketed down Besserer Street, attempting
to break the Guiness record for most people on a skateboard going
over 150 MPH, and plowed into Otto Lim's '59 Edsel, causing
Ottawa Sun reporter Paul "My God is Peter Worthington" Dayson
to jump with glee. Suddenly there was a knock at the CUPOTT door.
There, at the door, was a messenger carrying a giant red paper-
mache heart which said on it:
WE LOVE YOU DEANNE.
DONT BE SAD. BE HAPPY. OR ELSE.
love, the Vilest Rag...
Happier, Deanne returned to work. Later in the day, however,
she decided to do the polite thing and write the staffer who couldn't
be correctly included in the former letter.
"Dear Rick," she began, "How are you. You scumbag..."
Joo Altwaasar
EDITORS
• Franka Cordua - von Spocht
Chung Wong
^W/fefe
Ol
Pyj^UlYEASHlT
Bui ycAj^c. s\ck of \\m
/OUWANT IT YOU DON'T        ___.,.  .....
ABOUT IT/ I
iuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiHHimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiinninm_l
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
Letters
5,836 with a
bullet
Dear Dr. Strangway,
Re: Inhumane and Scientifically Fraudulent Sight
Deprivation Experiments
on Animals...
We are enclosing 405
more postcards from people
who oppose the blinding of
animals in UBC/VGH experiments. The total
amount of cards which
Lifeforce has delivered is
5,836. Hundreds more have
been mailed directly to you
from concerned individuals.
Will you respond to
everyone's concerns?
Peter Hamilton
Director, Lifeforce
Money for
education,
please
As it comes time to vote
on the issue of the new
recreation facility, I have a
few thoughts I would like to
share with all of you who are
planning on voting. As will
become clear, I am opposed
to the idea ofthe facility, but
not because I do not want
access to what I am sure will
be a top notch complex.
Rather I question and would
ask you to question whether
we can afford such a facility
and whether this is the
place for one.
UBC is certainly a top
notch university and when a
new facility is built, it is
usually very well done.
However, the price is usually high too and I believe
the money could be better
spent elsewhere. As a student, I would much rather
contribute towards a new
library than a new sports
complex. I would also rather
see university cost lowered
than increased, since I believe (and I think UBC enrollment statistics would
support me) that UBC is
becoming very much a
single class institution. It
distresses me that the provincial government would
be willing to donate funds to
a new building capital project, but not to a continuing
intellectual capital project.
It also distresses me that
UBC is leasing its real estate in order to generate
needed income. First point:
the primary function of university should be the trans
mission of knowledge to all
those who meet the intellectual entrance standards.
This is where we should be
concentrating our resources, especially when
government funding for
post-secondary education is
not likely to increase substantially.
Of course I believe in
balanced mental and physical development and I support intramurals and varsity sports but at the same
time, I feel that Mclnnes
field makes for fine recreation as it is. Furthermore, I
feel that the intramural
program is characterized by
the same, "get the best and
pay for it" attitude that is
evident in Rec Fac. Don't get
me wrong: the programs are
wonderful, but doesn't 60
dollars or so for an Arts 20
team seem a little high?
Why not organise low cost
Intramural leagues that
utilise existing facilities
(such as Mclnnes field and
the School of Theology field
which in my experience are
underutilised)? Second
point: a university needs
sports facilities, but not a
world class complex. To
build such a complex, to say
"its only another $30" will be
encouraging the trend towards a user-pays education that can be paid for and
hence used only by the elite.
Neither should we forget that a new facility
means more administration
and regulation. The 'user-
pays' philosophy that pervades the university will
certainly take hold of Rec
Fac and we will be charged
for using what was once
free. Third point: we need
unregulated spaces where
we can just play and enjoy
the sun and our freedom.
Ultimately, this is our
decision and our money, and
it is unfortunate that we
have to choose between
doing something for ourselves and not doing something for ourselves. I would
love to play on the new
squash courts and use the
new club space, but I think
that it is more important
that I take a stand for what
I believe in. I belive that
accessible education in important, and I believe that it
is a pivotal issue in this
campaign. I am voting no.
Don Mathewson
BEd Secondary
Residence life
stein of beer
I am writing in response to the Sept. 15 letter
"Residence life not his cup of
tea." For functional purposes, as the letter is anonymous, I will refer to the letter writer as "Dweeb".
First, I would like to
address Dweeb being
"afraid for (his) future
grades." Instead of driving
or busing two or three hours
each day, residents are free
to spend this time studying.
He then claims that "the
environment I live in now is
totally incompatible with
studying..." Obviously he
has not been to the study
room in the basement of his
house or the Shrum Lounge
or the ballroom or anywhere
else in residence where you
can hear a pin drop nearly
24 hours a day. We won't
even discuss the Math Library and Computing Science building which are a
gruelling three minute walk
from Place Vanier. The most
impressive academic aspect
of residence life, however, is
that there is nearly an unlimited supply of senior students (some of which are
even TA's) who are more
than willing to help frosh
out with courses. Unfortunately for Dweeb, you need
to miss a little study time
and go to some of these evil
social functions and meet
these people.
More generally, statements such as "I'm battling
for higher education in a
cesspool" and "Otherwise
piss off are more than
grounds for the title of
Dweeb. Nearly 1000 of us in
Place Vanier love it here in
this "cesspool" and thousands more in other residences feel the same.
Though I find you insulting,
I deeply and truly feel sorry
for you. There are people
here in residence that you
can talk to about your difficulties. You have some obvious social and psychological
problems and you should
see someone about them. As
a scholarship student who is
(I assure you) more concerned for his grades than
you, I will give you some
cheap advice. If you don't
blow off a little steam once in
a while, you will do far worse
than ifyou study 24 hours a
day.
Ken Clark
Computer Science 2
Place Vanier
That was fast!
Dear Dr. Strangway...
Re: Inhumane, Scientifically Fraudulent Sight
Deprivation Experiments
on Animals:
We are enclosing 302
more postcards from people
who oppose the blinding of
animals in UBC/VGH experiments. The total number of cards which Lifeforce
has delivered is 6,138. Hundreds more have been
mailed to you directly from
concerned individuals.
Will you respond to
everyone's concerns?
Peter Hamiton
Director, Lifeforce
Paying too much
Starving and otherwise
reluctant-to-spend students,
Did you realize that the
easiest way to save money at
the bookstore is to avoid the
shelves which contain
course books and look elsewhere in the store. If for
instance, you need a book on
mathematical physics, look
in the physics or math general reading sections of the
bookstore. You will likely
find books on the same subject at 1/3 the price. The
classic example of this is the
book "Methods of Mathematical Physics" by Courant
& Hibert. In the course
books shelves it is $122
whereas the soft cover version in the physics general
reading section is $41.
I'm sure that many students already realize this
but people are still paying
up to $80 too much.
Mike Pitcher
EnPhys 5
T'aint true
Your article of September 15, 1989 entitled "UBC
forestry breaking ground"
suggests that it is illegal to
fertilize forest seedling
plantations. This is simply
not true. It is expensive to
apply fertilizers to plantations but certainly not illegal.
Dr. Chris P. Chanway
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Forest Sciences, UBC
14/THE UBYSSEY
September 19 1989 OND
Ghana May Not Be Paradise But It, Most Certainly, Is Not Hell
(ffb&L
Hai V. Le would like to have
us believe that all that there is
about Ghana is naivety, ignorance, bad roads, dirty water, disease, corruption, poverty and hostility. What Le exposes is his own
ignorance which sadly enough, is
the hallmark of North American
impressions of the outside world.
First, Le until recently, had no
idea where Ghana was on the map
of the globe. Next, he does not
have the common sense to appreciate the differences in manners of
speech from culture to culture the
world over and the intellectual
maturity it takes to relate lifestyle
to a peoples' historical, cultural
and economic circumstances. His
liberal use of retrogressive language that has long become unfashionable and despised by mainstream North America must not go
unscathed. Le displays complete
ignorance of African history (past
and contemporary) in his shoddy
attempt to explain the dilemmas
that Africa faces now. He loses
sight, perhaps deliberately, of the
role the developed world continues
to playin the underdevelopment of
Africa through economic strangleholds and the spread of false attitudes in which Le himself is a part,
and to which he has made a tremendous contribution by writing
his derogatory article. The atrocities and thefts committed by some
unscrupulous African leaders is
really deplorable and absolutely
indefensible. However, one must
realize the forces that install such
monsters in seats of power and
prop them for the continued plundering of the natural resources of
Africa. This is mostly a criminal
conspiracy between some western
governments and illegal African
regimes. The greed of political
dictators is not a phenomenon that
is unique to Agric. Who does not
know of Ferdinand Marcos, Reza
Pahlavi, Andreas Papandreau?
Do Canadians condone being
photographed by unfamiliar
people? By foreigners? Africans?
A foreigner in a sea of "black
faces"? Yes indeed, but I would
think "Ghanaian faces" would be
more appropriate. Perhaps East
Asian students and Canadians of
far eastern origin might eiyoy it if
I wrote about an African in Beijing; a foreign face in a sea of "yellow faces" (my apologies). We
should not slump to such low
depths. There ought to be some
humility in contemporary human
communication.
Le's article raises the curiosity ofthe readers, but in a negative
sense and leaves an African more
an object of curiosity. He talks of
Ghanaian stew being..."a mixture
of palm hearts, oil, water served
with meat or any wild creature"
and in the same breath goes to
discount the absurd fear that
"Africans do not lop off heads of
strangers for souvenirs or stew
their bodies for soup". What in the
article other than this lukewarm,
half-hearted and misplaced "compliment" was calculated to correct
previous erroneous impressions of
African such as the one cited
above? Le actually heads off the
reader into believing the contrary
in most of the article.
Not   surprisingly,   the   only
attraction in Ghana, in Le's opinion, is the Elmina Castle, once a
salve-trading post in unpleasant
historical times. This is most
conspicuous and summarizes Le's
attitude.
Finally, Le arrives back in
Canada to the question "Glad to be
back to civilization"? This is cheap
fiction, calculated andintentional;
an own conclusion, not a question
by a "friend". He had had the
option not to write the line but he
absolutely enjoys slanting Africa.
No wonder his most memorable
observations are those that fit the
age old prejudiced impressions of
that continent. Articles like these
achieve nothing but suspicion and
breed ethnic mistrust and eventually racism. Let us elevate ourselves out of the doldrums fo eth-
nocentricism and see things in an
enlightened perspective.
The African Students' Association of the AMS holds regular
video shows in which we seek to
inform students from all corners of
the globe of various aspects of social, economic, cultural and political development in Africa. The
shows are usually followed by
open discussions in which views
are exchanged. Let us put the
record straight; Ghana has its
share of problems facing any developing nation but Africa must no
longer be perceived as the mysterious "dare continent" that colonialists ofthe yesteryears named it.
David Kojwang
Social Secretary
African Student's Association
ofAMS
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Complete Hair Service, Suntanning,
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Phone   224-1922
224-9116
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September 19,1989
THE UBYSSEY/15 **•_
UBC waterpolo team joins league
by Michael Booth
In a bid to gain recognition as
a varsity sport, the UBC men's and
women's waterpolo teams will
participate in a new league comprising Canadian and US schools.
The BC Waterpolo Association (which both UBC clubs belong
to), is sponsoring a new university
circuit that will feature men's
teams from UBC, SFU, Vancouver
Juniors, and North Pacific
(Norpac) schools (Oregon, Oregon
State, Washington, and Washington State).
"The view is to go to the national championships in Ontario
in December," said UBC men's
team spokesman Andrew Mayes.
The league is not sanctioned
by the Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union (CIAU) but will
employ their rules to determine
player eligibility.
Mayes added the league and
the national championship tournament is intended as "a demonstration to show the CIAU the
level of play and interest there is
across the country."
Much ofthe sport's popularity
is centred in Ontario where some
schools have been playing for decades. Although the UBC group is
still in the club stage and not considered a varsity sport, the teams
are currently lobbying the UBC
Athletic Committee for inclusion
among the elite teams on campus
that are given varsity status.
Both   men's   and   women's
teams have submitted proposals
concerning funding to the committee, but the squads realize they are
competing with several other
groups for the committees affections.
Waterpolo Canada, the
sport's governing body, supports
the efforts being made on the university scene as they are seeking
to develop quality players.
The UBC men's squad promises to be very competitive in the
new league as it boasts 10 experienced players including three who
played for Canada in the recently
completed World University
Games.
Mayes said, "the Norpac
schools are strong but not as dominant overall as Ontario," although
he intimated that Ontario schools
are already talking about the potential challenge coming from
UBC's team.
Currently the UBC team is
paying its own expenses, including pool and travel costs. There are
around 70 students in the club,
most playing recreationally
rather than attempting the rigors
ofthe competitive team. A waterpolo team needs 13 players for
competition.
Women's team manager John
McMaster said his squad is not as
active in the US as the men, instead opting for smaller four team
league. The UBC women will play
teams from SFU, UVIC and either
one US school or an alumni team
composed of former SFU and UBC
players.
McMaster said the team is in
the process of upgrading from recreational to competitive play,
something that is needed for the
team's varsity bid.
The team must demonstrate
the sport's viablility to the committee and whatever answer they
get, they still must meet conditions either to reach varsity status
or to keep it.
The team had 25 members
last year but needs to recruit four
or five new players. Since there
was no competitive program at
UBC before this year, many ofthe
top women players opted to play
for the provincial elite program.
"A couple of students at UBC
have been recognized nationally
and we are hoping they will come
out for the team," McMaster
added.
The women's team uses a
system that has the more experienced players helping the newcomers and teaching them the
game in the process.
"It's a good system" said
McMaster, who indicated that if
all went well, the team would be
participating in the national
championships in December.
The men's season got off to a
great start last weekend as they
crushed their crosstown rivals
from SFU 14-7. Next action for the
team comes this weekend as they
host their UBC open tournament.
AT COMMUNITY SPORTS
Students Slide In For 6uper Savings
m OFF REGULAR PRICES
OF EVERY ITE/A IN THE STORE WITH AA16 CARP OR COPY OF THI6 AD
(pius dozens of sale items up to 90% off re6ular prices j
Hours:
/I.ON.-Wed. 9:30-6:00
3355 W. Broadway Vancouver. BC. Thurs. - Fri. 9:30 - 9:00
T53-1612 Cat. $ Sun 9:30-6:00
U.B.C. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
it
228-6121
228-6125
"THE KITCHEN"
THUNDER BAR LOUNGE
At The Winter Sports Centre
...A New Chef, A New Menu
New Specials At The Old Prices!!
Try Us For Lunch Snd A Change Of Scenery
Wttdh All Your Favorite Sports
On Our Sports Satellite T.V. System
Bar And Kitchen Open Daily At 11:00 A.M.
Squash - Racquetball Contracts
• We will be offering four month contracts for September 25 '89 through to Dec. 15 '89.
• These will be a one court a week contract with no reduced fee's.
■ Courts will be Issued strictly on a first come first serve basis with payment required in full.
• Special rates available only on presentation of valid student AMS card or faculty/staff card.
Contracts Can Be Booked On September 22, Starting At
7:30 am, At the Sports Shop.
S>
n$
T-Birds squeak by Bisons
by Michael Booth
UBC defensive back Dean Heffring blocked a 37-yard field goal
attempt with 55 seconds remaining in the game as the Thunderbird
football team came from behind to defeat the University of Manitoba
Bisons 11-9 in Winnipeg.
In the game the much vaunted UBC offense was held to only 271
yards, including 77 through the air.
TBird quarterback Lance McDonald finally got things going in
the fourth quarter when he drove the team 70 yards culminating in
a 16 yard toss to Rob Neid for the game winning touchdown.
As usual, most ofthe UBC offense came along the ground as Jim
Stewart carried the ball 27 times for 126 yards.
Stewart currently leads the Canada West rushing derby with
470 yards in three games (660 yards counting the Shrum Bowl).
Place kicker Roger Hennig rounded out the UBC scoring as he
chipped in five points on a field goal, a convert and a single.
Head coach Frank Smith, who was surprisingly upbeat following the game, said that despite the cliff hanger ending, "we got it
done when we had to."
nym.&
RL3tAUItf_Nt
HtHIPflAN   ClMSINt
VANCOUVERS'   1ST
ETHIOPIAN   RESTAURANT
SPECIAL LUNCH MENU:
Vegetarian & non-Vegetarian
featuring • curry chicken & curry goat with rice
FULLY LICENSED
2930 West 4th. Avenue TEL: 731-7899
LUNCH HOURS 11:30 - 2:30
DINNER 5:00 -10:00
WEEKENDS UNTIL 2 AM.
16/THE UBYSSEY
September 19,1989

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