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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1977

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Array McGeer, Armstrong clash over research
By HEATHER WALKER
B.C.'s three public universities will not
receive an increase in research grants
from the provincial government this year,
Universities Council chairman William
Armstrong said Monday.
Armstrong said he supports a report
recommending increased provincial
government spending for research. But
education minister Pat McGeer has said
the money must come from university
operating grants, and Armstrong said the
grants are already meager.
"It's obvious the council has the power
to hold back money for research if we
wanted to do so," Armstrong said. "But
since the grant to the universities was
small I doubt we'll hold back anything at
all."
Armstrong said if the council does hold
back any money for research funding, it
will probably be a small amount.
The report, tabled in the legislature
Friday, said research at the three
universities is endangered unless it
receives more financial support from the
provincial government. It recommends
the government put $3.27 million into
university research and increase the
amount to $5.45 million during the next five
years.
The report by Roger Gaudry of Montreal
was commissioned by McGeer and
economic development minister Don
Phillips last July. Gaudry is president of
the International Association of Universities and a founder of the Science Council
of Canada.
McGeer said the government had no
more money available this year for
research and any extra money would have
to come from university operating grants,
although this year's grants will be $10
million short of the amount recommended
by the Universities Council.
The council is responsible for dividing up
the grant the government includes in its
budget for the universities between UBC,
Simon Fraser University, and the
University of Victoria.
"With the amount of money they have
this year, the universities will barely be
able to maintain their present standards,"
Armstrong said.
He said the council is in a difficult
position because it has to decide between
cutting the universities' operating grants
even further or not providing enough
money for research.
"It's a hard choice," he said.
Armstrong said research is currently
funded primarily by the federal government, with some money coming from
industry and the provincial government as
well.
"Only about five to six per cent of the
money comes from the provincial
government," he said. "The federal
government gives UBC about $15 million a
year.
"The amount going to the other two
universities is much smaller; UBC gets
about 80 per cent of the total."
"The amount (from the federal
government) has increased a little in
dollars, but it has gone down in purchasing
value," he said.
Armstrong said McGeer has suggested
money could be freed from the universities' operating budgets by decreasing
wage increases to faculty and staff to
levels well below Anti-Inflation Board
guidelines.
"That is one way the operating grants
could be cut, but it's not a popular one,"
Armstrong said.
Acting UBC administration president
Erich Vogt said a cut in operating grants
would not be "healthy" for the university.
Such a cut in the operating budget would
have to be compensated for by cutbacks in
other areas or a great increase in tuition
fees, Vogt said.
. Vogt, vice-president in charge of student
and faculty affairs, is acting president
until Doug Kenny returns from a
"business trip," Vogt said.
UBC research director Richard Spratley
said an increase in research grants to
universities is crucial if the universities
are to become a valuable provincial
resource. But, he said, he does not think it
is possible for research to be funded from
the already small operating grants.
Leaders urge
fee boycott
THE UBYSSEY
VoLUX, No. 46 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1977      €55^4S   228-2301
Student leaders have proposed a
tuition fee boycott — to be held only
if tuition fees are increased by
more than 10 per cent.
At a meeting Monday, undergraduate society presidents
and the two student representatives to the board of governors
agreed to stage a boycott if three
conditions are not met.
The conditions are that fees not
increase more than 10 per cent,
that UBC's board of governors
urge the provincial   education
UQAM strike
settlement
negotiated
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) — The
administration at the University of
Quebec at Montreal has surrendered to faculty union demands to
retain a voice in academic
decision-making, ending a four-
month strike which kept 14,000
students out of classes.
A board of governors meeting
Friday agreed to change the only
clause in the administration's
conciliation proposal that was
voted down the same day by
professors.
The faculty voted 82 per cent not
to return to work until the
university agreed to retain the
union's right to participate in
academic decision-making — a
demand they had won after a strike
in 1973.
"This was the major cause for
the strike, for it took away an
acquired right," said Jean Pierre
Cheneval, president of the
professor's union.
Administration spokesman
Marcel Aime Gagnon said the
union demand was accepted
because the board "considered the
situation of all those 14,000 students
deprived of their studies for 16
weeks due to the conflict."
While the back to -work
agreement is expected to be signed
soon, the union said a major
stumbling block is salary reimbursement for the 600 maintenance
workers who received only 57 per
cent of their regular wages while
supporting faculty pickets.
The rehiring of 142 professors
whose contracts were not renewed
by the university during the strike
is another unsettled issue.
It might take as long as two
weeks before the university is fully
operational, because of the length
of the strike, which began Oct. 18,
and the large number of people
involved, Cheneval said.
department to increase by 10 per
cent ftmds allotted for student loan
plans, and the board actively seek
non-government sources of funding.
In the provincial budget announced last month, university
education spending was increased
by 11.5 per cent — considerably
less than the universities
requested.
Administration president Doug
Kenny and Howard Petch, administration president at the
University of Victoria, have both
said 25 per cent tuition increases
-wBibetfecessary to ffifoifitain those'
universities' academic standards.
UBC'sboard of governors, which
must make the final decision on
any increases, is expected to
decide the fate of tuition fees at its
March meeting.
the boycott proposal will be
discussed by the Alma Mater
Society external affairs committee
today and by the student
representative assembly.
The proposal adopted by student
leaders on Monday was based on a
six-page proposal drafted by AMS
president Dave Theessen, arts
representative Paul Sandhu and
Moe Sihota and Basil Peters, the
two student representatives to the
board.
The written proposal did not
suggest a boycott be held only if
tuition fees are increased more
than 10 per cent.
"There are few alternatives
remaining to effectively control
tuition increases. A tuition boycott
seems to be our only plausible
course of action," the report says.
"Whether tuition increases are
25 per cent or 40 per cent, these
increases wiU be coupled with
increases in other areas as well.
Residence rates will rise by as
much as 17.8 per cent and campus
residence hikes average 8.3 per
cent.
"Food prices in residence will
also be raised by five per cent and
See page 2: TUITION
— matt king photo
SOAKING UP SUN at bottom of open pit mine near Sedgewick library, student studies for soon-to-
be-upcoming exams, and hopes eastern snow doesn't decide to move west and disrupt balmy
temperatures, springlike sunshine.
Lowrise residents want rent reduced
Gage lowrise residents decided
Monday to ask the board of
governors to reduce a 17.8 per cent
rent increase for the residence to
10.6 per cent.
And the tenants decided to apply
to the rentalsman to have the
residence placed under the Landlord and Tenant Act if the board
turns down the request. The act
limits rent increases to 10.6 per
cent.
The board decided last week to
approve, a housing  committee
report recommending a 17.8 per
cent rent increase for the lowrise
residence effective in September.
If the rentalsman turns down the
tenants' application they will take
the issue to county court, tenants'
spokesmen have said.
The board decided the 17.8 per
cent increase is justified because
maid service and linen changes are
provided in the lowrise residence.
But 30 lowrise residents decided
at Monday's meeting the maid
service is almost nonexistent and
could not be used to justify large
rent increases.
The residents said the maid
service consists of two rolls of
toilet paper being placed in front of
residents' doors each week. And
most tenants don't use the linen
service, they said.
The tenants also agreed the rent
increases would contribute to
severe financial hardship for
residents because they will occur
at the same time as impending
tuition fee and food increases.
Dave Van Blarcom, chairman of
the Alma Mater Society student
housing access committee, said
Vancouver lawyer Stuart Rush has
told the committee the lowrise
residence is covered by the Landlord and Tenant Act.
Van Blarcom said the tenants
should also consider year-round
occupancy of the residence
because they are almost all
married couples and families who
find it difficult to move out at the
end of each term and back in again
the following September. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
Tuition boycott proposed
From page 1
food on campus will go up 12.6 per
cent.
"Furthermore, we have just
recently experienced a 40 per cent
increase in transportation costs.
As well, the price of textbooks is
due to rise at the minimum by 10
per cent and at the same time
students at UBC, like all Van-
couverites, face the highest living
costs in Canada.
"Although students will be faced
with higher educational costs, their
ability to pay these costs has not
and "will not increase substantially," the report says.
It said recent surveys by UBC
student services show that only 20
per cent of male students and
seven per cent of female students
could be expected to fully finance
UBC prof
refuses job
Noel Hall, professor of commerce and business administration, said Monday he has
turned down the chairmanship of
the Workers Compensation Board
because he wants to stay and teach
at UBC.
Hall sent he went to Victoria
Wednesday to tell labor minister
Alan Williams of his decision.
"You're always torn on one of
these things," Hall said. "It's an
important board to the people who
are injured and on (compensation)
pensions."
The board has been without a
chairman since Williams fired
Terry Ison in January, 1976.
Williams said he is having trouble
finding a new chairman.
II
their school year from summer
savings.
"The employment prospects for
the coming summer do not promise
major improvements," the
proposal adds.
"It is our impression, that with
all of these increases in students'
educational costs, coupled with a
bleak summer employment picture, that education will become
less and less accessible, especially
for those from an economically
deprived background. It is also our
belief .... that education must
remain accessible to all."
The proposal also suggests that
the university eliminate some of its
expenditures by:
o cutting back faculty and staff,
such as secretaries and office
personnel in administrative offices
and faculty employed by UBC
solely for research purposes;
• cutting back physical plant's
inefficient and unnecessary services because "in times of fiscal
restraint, services such as
beautifying the campus are unnecessary and only money consuming";
o eliminating traffic patrol —
"do we really need quasi cops who
spend endless hours driving
around in blue vans for no apparent reason?";
• reducing maintenance costs
and
WE HAVE
THE CAR
STEREO   FOR  YOU
294-3513
3720 E. HASTINGS
• investigating alternative
sources of funding, such as industry.
The proposal concludes by
urging student leaders to consider
a tuition boycott in September and
suggests that the AMS spend an
additional $6,725 organize such a
boycott.
According to the proposal, the
largest part of the money would be
wages to hire one person to work
for the AMS to organize the boycott
during the summer. The proposal
suggests that the other two persons
hired each summer by the AMS,
also co-ordinate the boycott.
Other expenses would be advertising, posters, leaflets and
supplies.
The proposal also suggests that
AMS representatives speak in
classrooms at UBC and to
graduating high school classes to
urge students to support a boycott.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Who Is This Man
and
What Does He Want?
"(There) is only one law that is
necessary for the governments to
make .... and that law would be
gain the knowledge of Science of
Creative Intelligence and practice
Transcendental Meditation twice a
day. With this one law, the purpose
of all the laws will be fulfilled."
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 1974
Wednesday, February 9th at 12:30 in SUB Ballroom
BROOKS ALEXANDER and
DAVID FETCHO
of the Spiritual Counterfeits Project of Berkeley,
California, will be speaking on what TM really is—
a science or religion? Admission is free.
Sponsored by Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
TOTEM PARK AND PLACE VANIER
REQUIRE RESIDENCE FELLOWS FOR
1977-1978
A Residence Fellow, as the name implies, is a fellow residence
student who interacts with House members on a daily basis. In
this role, the Residence Fellow acts as a friend and peer
counsellor in helping students develop as individuals and
community members.
The position provides an opportunity to develop basic human
relations skills that will enable the Residence Fellow to make a
positive contribution to residence life. As a part of the total
residence team, the Residence Fellow contributes to the overall
quality of residence life and provides support and assistance to
the House Advisor.
Applications forms are available at the Student Housing Office in
the Ponderosa Building and at the front desk of each residence
area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage.
Applications will close on Friday, February 18, 1977.
letltfat
t&at (fact
teatity cane . . .
CLOSING DATE FOR SPECIAL
VALENTINE'S CLASSIFIED MESSAGES
IS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10 - 11:00 a.m.
peNTICTQA/
i
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
REQUIRE HOUSE ADVISORS FOR
1977-1978
As a mature senior student living and working within the
residence, the House Advisor provides basic paraprofessional
advisory services to residence students.
As a student leader and a part of a residence area team, a House
Advisor is important in developing a sense df community within
the residence area and in contributing to the overall quality of
residence life.
This position involves diversified tasks and calls for a
commitment of purpose and flexibility in responding to varied
situations. Candidates will possess a basic knowledge of human
relations skills and a willingness to further develop in areas such
as communication, leadership and counselling.
Application   forms   are   available   at   the   front   desk   of   each
residence area. Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage, and
at the Student Housing Office in the Ponderosa Building.
Applications will close on Friday, February 18, 1977.
IhT
.when fun breaks the ice wide open!!
Make your great escape to Penticton for nine
days of fun and good times during this major
winter festival (Feb. 12-20)  Over 40 Events...
•Molstar Ski Challenge. 4x4 races etc	
Stage Shows	
"Jim Staffonl'7"Stan Kenton'V'Rock Concert"
tfci .->&m*-^*&*M Tuesday, February 8, 1977
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
'African riots tightly organized'
By CHRIS GAINOR
The recent riots in the black
townships of South Africa are the
result of years of organizing by
student and community groups,
Oxfam's program development
officer for Southern Africa said
Friday.
Judith Marshall, who recently
visited African nations bordering
South Africa, said in an interview
the uprisings are "not nearly as
spontaneous as the press was
trying to suggest."
"It linked into a decade of work
by some organizations," she said.
The South African Student
Organization and other community
groups have raised the consciousness of Africans by projects
such as community centres in the
black townships,   Marshall   said.
The groups were attempting to
help the Africans regain their
dignity while not stirring up anti-
white feeling, she said.
Visitors to the townships said a
common greeting in the townships
after Angolan forces expelled the
South African army from Angola
was a handshake and "Angola,
Angola."
The impact of the Angolan
victory had an "electrifying"
impact on the townships, she said.
"It is really possible to end the
blatant injustice of the South
African system," said Marshall,
because the younger generation of
Africans rejects apartheid.
Marshall spent five months
visiting Angola, Mozambique,
Tanzania and Zambia last summer.
The people of Mozambique are
working against staggering
problems the country had when it
gained its independence from
Portugal, she said, including 98 per
cent illiteracy and lack of trained
medical personnel.
"If there was one impression, it
was of energy being released at the
community level," she said.
"They're working on drawing out
community health workers from
the village."
The government trains these
workers for six months in basic
health needs instead of spending
money on hospital doctors, which
would be of limited use, Marshall
said.
"This kind of solution from the
bottom up is part of the national
reconstruction program."
She said daycare centres are
being set up gradually in
Mozambique to free women to
work on national reconstruction.
"The stress was, again, on self-
reliance. Some of the most
dramatic things are happening in
education."
Marshall said most people
thought the new government would
be as heavy-handed in education as
were the Portuguese, but teachers
were allowed a great deal of input
into the curriculum.   The  policy
began in the liberated zones held
by FRELIMO before Portugal left
Mozambique.
"People are looking at the institutions that grew up in the
liberated zones as embryos of the
new Mozambique. The changes
had to go farther than substituting
Mozambique for Portugal."
She said creation of entirely new
curricula and breaking down of
distinctions between work and
study are important goals of
educators. The main goal of the
FRELIMO government is
economic self-sufficiency,
especially in agriculture, she said.
"African resources which were
once used for plunder are now
beinggiven to the African people."
Mozambique is also aiding
guerillas fighting for the liberation
of Zimbabwe, she said. Refugee
camps hold 30,000 refugees from
Zimbabwe.
Marshall said Mozambique and
Tanzania are providing bases and
— matt king photo
OBLIVIOUS TO SIGNS cyclists ride east on University Boulevard    administration erected signs, painted curb in foreground to make
near intersection of Toronto Road. University Endowment Lands    cyclists  follow winding back-streets route to campus.
Women won't pay fines, fear attacks
By KATHY FORD
Forty women from UBC
sororities are refusing to pay
parking fines incurred Jan. 26.
The women, nine of whom appeared in provincial court Monday,
say there is no safe parking
available near Pan-Hellenic house
where they attend meetings
Wednesday evenings so they park
illegally on Marine Drive.
Gail Chernen, spokeswoman for
the group, told provincial court
judge Jack McGivern sorority
women are reluctant to-park in a
nearby parking lot because they
have to walk along a trail through
what she described as bush.
McGivern told the women to talk
to the University Endowment
Lands administration and to return
to court March 14.
In an interview later, Chernen
said the group plans to collect
signatures for a letter of concern
they will present to the administration this week.
She said three-quarters of about
160 sorority members own cars.
During the women's court appearance, crown prosecutor Hugh
McCallum said they were lucky
they were not charged with obstructing traffic on Marine.
But Chernen says this must be an
old ruling.
"They recently widened the road
around that area," she said. "And
if we parked our cars in a place,
that obstructed traffic, we'd be in
danger   of   getting   our   cars
sideswiped."
Lindsay Johnson, an Alpha Phi
sorority member, said there is no
convenient parking spot near Pan-
Hellenic House.
"We could use the parking lot at
the new anthropology museum,"
she said. But that would mean we'd
have to pay over $1 for three hours
parking. And the parking lot is
usually full.
"Traffic patrol has been letting
us use one of two faculty and staff
lots near the new Asian studies
building on Wednesday nights. But
there are more people that need
parking than there are spaces.
"There are about 20 cars that
can't find parking places."
She said the only other available
parking is near Place Vanier.
"We only have to pay 50 cents to
park there, but to get from that lot
to the house (Pan-Hellenic) we
have to walk down a dark pathway," Johnson said.
Sorority member Joannie Sinclair was attacked near Pan-
Hellenic house in February, 1975.A
knife was held to her throat.
After this attack sorority women
approached dean of women
Margaret Fulton to ask for better
lighting and parking areas nearer
Pan-Hellenic house.
Fulton then approached Erich
Vogt, vice-president in charge of
faculty and student affairs, to ask
for safety improvements.
After considerable pressure
from campus groups, Vogt agreed
to look into the situation and the
administration improved lighting
in several areas on campus.
Cops to fine naughty cyclists
RCMP officers will impose fines
of as much as $35 on cyclists who
ride on University Boulevard
between Acadia and Wesbrook,
Cpl. Dave Patterson said Monday.
Patterson said cyclists must now
follow a cycle path from Acadia
Road and University to Agronomy
Road instead of leaving the
established cycle path at Acadia
and continuing along University to
campus.
The RCMP will start Monday
issuing warnings to cyclists who
disobey traffic signs, use out-of-
bounds sidewalks and cycle on
University, he said. They will start
levying fines Feb. 21.
The Mo.tpr .Vehicle  Act  states
"No person who is operating a
bicycle shall ride it upon a roadway if there is a useable path intended for the use of bicycles
adjacent to the roadway."
Patterson said police have
decided to enforce the act to
prevent accidents, adding that
many motorists have complained
of the "hazardous manners of
cyclists" on University.
But he said University Endowment Lands manager Bob
Murdoch and cycle groups
recommended the RCMP reroute
the cyclists.
"Every consideration was given
the cyclists with the new plan.
Cyclists were asked, where they
wanted the new path and a survey
was even done of the area to study
the best route possible."
The new route follows the
original cycling path west from
Blanca but ends at Acadia where
the new route jogs south through
several sidestreets.
Patterson said the new route
leads the cyclist to the center of
campus, "not really out of the way
at all."
Patterson said a person riding
illegally along a sidewalk will be
fined $15 and disobeying traffic
signs will carry a $35 penalty.
According to the Motor Vehicle
Act the RCMP can confiscate the
cyclist's bicycle.
training camps for guerrillas
operating in Zimbabwe, and
Mozambique workers are contributing to "solidarity banks"
which finance the guerrillas.
The refugees have escaped being
put in isolated protective villages
far from their homes, she said.
Angola, which Marshall visited
in May, still faces some problems
caused by guerrillas operating in
several parts of the country.
During her visit, there were
three buses running in Luanda,
Angola's capital city of a half
million inhabitants, and no taxis.
"There was a tolerance for the
problems and a spirit to overcome
them as soon as possible," she
said. One man told her: "You don't
line up if there's nothing at the end
of the line."
The Angolan government is
working on restoring transportation links and building
community centres and cooperatives in urban shantytowns.
Marshall said Cuba is helping
Angola using its post-revolutionary
experience.
"The impression I had was that
the Cubans were invited there and
hadn't overstayed their welcome."
Cuba is helping Angola rebuild
its coffee industry based on Cuba's
efforts in raising the sizes of sugar
harvest, she said.
Le Jour
reappears
in Quebec
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL — Le Jour, this
time in the form of a weekly
newsmagazine, reappeared on
Quebec newsstands Friday.
The once daily Montreal
newspaper, shut down operations
last August after two-and-one-half
years, as a result of internal labor
conflicts and financial difficulties.
Francois Dagenais, director of
Le Jour Hebdomadaire National,
stated the priorities and objectives
of the newsmagazine in his
editorial column of the first issue.
Dagenais        claimed the
publication was devoted to the
defence of independent ideas and
social democracy, and that Le Jour
itself desired independence from
all political parties.
The newsmagazine aims at
exploring the innumerable
possibilities of Quebec's political
status ranging from the confines of
dominion frontiers to independence with the aid of arms,
Dagenais said.
Elaborating Le Jour's position
on social democracy and independence, Dagenais said many
people had been awaiting an organ
of independentist information,
qualifying independence to signify
Quebec's powers of a sovereign
state.
. Dagenais rejected the viewpoint
of a new Canadian constitution,
claiming that this does not
correspond with the aspirations of
the Quebec people who really wish
to obtain sovereign power!
Speaking for the staff of Le Jour,
Dagenais added that social
democracy means political,
economic, social and cultural
power would belong to the people
and that all political decisions
should involve the participation of
the people.
He insisted however, that the
legitimate aspirations of the people
have yet to be found.
Amond the staff of Lo 'our are
Evelyn Dumas, editor-,,, , .lief and
formerly a journalist with Le
Devoir, the Montreal Star and Le
Jour, Roche Cote, former Soleil
reporter and Paris correspondent
and Alain Duhamel who used to
work for Le Droit, Tele-Metropolp
and     Le     Jour. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
Tuition boycott pointless
Some student leaders are recommending a "boycott" of tuition fee
increases of more than 10 per cent. The
plan is puzzling and perplexing for a
number of reasons.
It seems to be the action of people
who are not really against tuition fee
increases at all, but somehow feel
obliged to object to them. They are not
opposed to tuition fees per se; they are
not even against tuition fee increases.
The student leaders are opposed to
"excessive" tuition fee increases.
But as The Ubyssey has pointed out
on a number of occasions (faithful
readers may be getting quite bored by
now) there is little difference between
fee increases of 10 per cent and 25 or
40 per cent. Once you have accepted
tuition fees and the pay-as-you-go
mentality that is responsible for tuition
fees, what the increase is is really
academic if the administration can
show a need for increased  revenue.
The university currently is a service
for the upper and middle classes, and
in fact helps maintain the rigid and
discriminatory class structure of our
society.
Tuition fees are not the only reason
for this but they certainly contribute to
the situation by making it all the more
difficult for people from the working
class to come to UBC. Because tuition
fees of any kind limit accessibility to
university, The Ubyssey is opposed to
them.
Our student leaders think UBC is
fine; they don't see any reason to
change the university's nature. And
they are not opposed to tuition fees.
Therefore their objection to 25 or 40
per cent increases as opposed to 10
per cent increases is really a quibble,
since the people that can easiest afford
the increases are the ones who are
here now anyway.
Sure, some students are going to be
seriously hurt by the increases. Some
may not even be able to return
because of them. But see how much
enrolment drops next year. Dollars to
donuts it will actually increase.
Alma Mater Society president Dave
Theessen and cohorts Moe Sihota, Paul
Sandhu and Basil Peters, council
heavies all, suggested a slightly harder
line.
They suggested that students refuse
to pay any increase at all. The fact that
6,000 UBC students earlier this school
year wrote letters to education
minister Pat McGeer opposing tuition
fee increases indicates that they had a
mandate for carrying out a total increase boycott. After all, if 6,000
people actually went out and did
something because of their beliefs, can
you imagine how many other students
probably support the position?
Whatever the motives, asking
students to withhold tuition fee increases no matter what size is a pretty
weak tactic. Even if a lot of people go
along with the boycott, so what. The
university might have to limp along for
the first year as many of its students
take big discounts (it's doubtful they
would expel boycotting students if a
large number of students aren't paying
the increases) but a year from now who
is going to remember the boycott?
Come September 1978, every student
will be paying the full fees.
/^BUT, AS FORME,
'GIVE ME LIBERTY OR
GlVEME.MAVBE.A
GREAT, BIG,STRONG,
POWERFUL LEADER I
CAN HONOR , ADMIRE,
VRESPECT
Letters
'Scientific' TM not a religion? Hogwash
"TM is a natural, easy,
systematic and scientifically
verified technique. It is not a
religion or a philosophy,, nor does it
involve withdrawal from life."
Have you ever read a similar
statement inviting you to attend a
free lecture on TM? Transcendental meditation is explained
to you to be easily learned, a
means of physical and mental
relaxation, relieving stress, expanding your awareness allowing
you to realize your full potential.
One is told TM is not religious and
that the organization promoting it
is non-profit making.
This public image of TM
presented by the Maharishi's
World Plan Executive Council
needs to be seriously quesioned.
How can TM claim to be a merely
scientific technique when it is
based on a monist philosophy of
Hinduism? Or when the initiation
rites for meditators involves a
religious ceremony?
Apple-ause
Remember being accosted Jan.
by Aggies with collection tins and
apples? Well, as a result of this,
$1,000 was raised for the Crippled
Children's Fund, a sum which far
exceeds collections made on past
Apple Days.
Congratulations to those who
gave donations, and to our first
year rep, Susan Hyde, for her
exceptional job of organizing Apple
Day.
From all of us who did the accosting, a very warm thank you.
agriculture
undergraduate society
Psychology Today (April, 1974,
p.37) writes on TM, "The Science
of Creative Intelligence, as it is
called, is clearly a revival of ancient Indian Brahmanism, and
Hinduism. Its origin lies in the
ancient texts — Vedas,
Upanishads, Bhagavad-Gita, the
teachings of Buddha, and the
synthesis of these traditions by
Shankara."
Not only is TM based upon a
religious tradition, but it is actively
a religious movement. The
initiation of a candidate involves
the recital of a Vedic hymn of
worship to Hindu deities which
serve to tune the candidate into the
spiritual power (or siddhi) of the
Maharishi and the tradition of
masters he represents.
What began in North America as
the Spiritual Regeneration
Movement with an obvious
declaration of the religious
dimension of TM, has changed its
tune to adopt a scientific image.
Why the deception of the
religious aspect of TM? To avoid
legal complications as TM spreads
into government agencies and
schools in the U.S. To the
westerner a scientific image is
more palatable.
Maharishi comments, "Not in
the name of God-realization can we
call a man to meditate in the world
today, but in the name of enjoying
THE UBYSSEY
>v
V:
FEBRUARY 8, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Taxi!" yelled Bill Tieleman as he tripped on to the road. The sleek'
yellow cab screeched to a halt. "Do you mind if we take someone else
along?" asked Kathy Ford. "No that's O.K.," he said unsuspectingly. Sue
Vohanka and Heather Walker slid into the back seat. "Take us to the stock
exchange," they demanded. Scoop the fearless newshound jumped in.
"Anywhere but the pound," he barked. Ralph Maurer dove into the front seat
and turned the meter on. "A good driver puts her meter on as soon as the
door opens," he said. Marcus Gee jumped in too. "That's right, always
collect the tip at the beginning of the trip," said Gee to Jim Matson, Ken
Dodd and Steve Howard. Chris Gainor found a place in the rear seat and
made room for Matt King and Geof Wheelwright. As she was scraping away
from the curb Paul Wilson and Rob Little jumped into the trunk. They
needn't have worried, for she had already learned the first rule of cab
driving. She charged them each full fare. j
the world better, sleeping well at
night, being awake during the
day." (Meditations of Maharishi,
p.168.)
I am sure transcendental
meditation has allowed the transcendence of ethics of public
representation as to what TM is
.marketing. Well, I say to you,
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
relaxation and inner peace are
fine, but please leave my "God-
realization" alone.
Steve Trende
science 3
On the buses
Last fall, the Alma Mater
Society presented a brief to
Vancouver city council
protesting the cuts in service on
the 49th Avenue bus route, as well
as cuts in the 41st Avenue service
in evenings and on weekends. As
a result, city council passed a
motion recommending that B.C.
Hydro restore its service on 49th
Avenue.
It now appears that B.C. Hydro
is going to ignore that motion,
and service on 49th Avenue will
remain at its present level.
Therefore, any student, faculty
or staff member who is currently
inconvenienced by the service on
these routes is urged to leave a
note for me in the AMS Office, or
by calling 228-2901 and leaving
your name and phone number.
Community input is essential if
we are to change Hydro's position
on this.
David Van Blarcom
chairman
student housing
access committee
Shocking
After having attended the
Thursday night performance of
Words With Music we were
shocked to read Larry Green's
review of it in the Friday paper.
Green may have been performing the role of critic by
pointing out the faults of the
show, but he failed to be totally
honest when he neglected to
mention the virtues. Words
With Music does have some
technical faults, but the energy
that is generated by the cast
leaves the viewer with a most
favorable impression. We would
like, to thank the members of
Mussoc for a very enjoyable
evening of entertainment.
C.McIvor
arts 3
D. Raynor
forestry 3
E.Collen
l forestry 3i
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed. Pen names will be used
when the writer's real name is also
included for our information in the
letter and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241K. Tuesday, February 8, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Killer
killer
Avail ye of stout heart, UBC
brethren, especially those plagued
by fear of the killer-mink.
It has been these five weeks ere I
could bring myself to write of it as I
have never seen its likes in all my
born days.
And I thought I'd seen
everything, except perhaps an All
in the Family show that was actually funny.
It was about Christmas time it
happened.
After viciously attacking the
rear tires of my car in B-lot, a lone
killer-mink headed off with the
speed of greased lightning at the
sound of my approaching footsteps
(I myself was not far behind). But
even that speed was not enough.
From the shadows it came: a
killer-mink killer pounced. Piteous
moans and cries of lament rent the
air, but I was powerless to help,
nor did I want to.
My killer-mink killer repellent
was locked in the trunk of my car.
It was over in a moment. With a
single, final convulsive shudder,
the killer-mink breathed its last.
My god!
It had to go, but did it have to be
like that? No English 100
proficiency test was even half so
mercilessly butchered.
A killer-mink lies dead. The
species has a known enemy: the
killer-mink killer.
But who knows what may lurk
under any bush, in any shadow,
behind any maiden's smile?
Could the legendary, scarce-
breathed-of killer killer-mink killer
be lying in wait . . . somewhere,
for something ... or someone??
Robert Jordan
unclassified 5
Letters
Selfish people pass hitchhikers
I want to complain about a
frightful waste of resources on this
campus. I am talking about the
20,000or so cars which come in and
out of UBC every day.
This is an estimate from the
traffic people, based on the 16,000
stickers sold per year, the 9,000 or
so legal parking spaces, and the
number of visitors to the campus.
My point is this: why are so
many of these cars coming to the
campus with only one or two people
in them? Every morning I drive to
campus in my ancient klunk, and I
fill it up with hitchhikers. There
are often many more people hoping
for a ride along the way than I can
squeeze into my old tin can while at
the same time there is a solid row
of cars in front of me, snaking all
the way to UBC.
These cars, all Hondas, Rabbits
and Datsuns, all with just the
driver     and     an     occasional
passenger, never seem to stop to
pick up hitchhikers.
There has been a lot of talk lately
about "the parking problem." It
seems to bother the law students no
end, for example, and various
campus candidates in recent
weeks have added to their planks
the old saw of building a parking
building.
Well, I have absolutely no
sympathy whatsoever. The
parking crush would be greatly
alleviated if people simply
cooperated and picked up student
hitchhikers as a matter of principle.
You don't even have to go to the
bother of setting up a car pool
(that's just too much to expect of
such an asocial student
population). All it means is that if
you have the room, you should
always pick up student hitchhikers. And don't tell me there is
"danger" involved: you can tell if
a hitchhiker is a student a mile off!
Rather than talking about
parking buildings and even buses,
why don't we talk about some
simple cooperation and student
(and staff!) solidarity: give your
friends a free ride. But I guess that
just doesn't fit with the individualistic, acquisitive principles on which our society is
based: if you can't pay for it, you
can't have it. It's this selfishness
which leads to an excess of cars on
campus.
And as a parting shot, may I
suggest that hitchhiking and
picking up hitchhikers is an excellent way to meet all kinds of
people. Are the solitary drivers
actually anti-social? Pick up that
hitchhiker!
Stefan Mochnacki
Grad studies 9
Don't blame aggies for act of sick mind
In Friday's Ubyssey, a letter
credited to Blair Trenholme, applied science 2, was printed. This
letter contains his comments on
the defacing of the side of the new
civil-mech building as a backup to
his defence of "harmless pranks"
by the engineering undergraduate
society.
This type of vandalism has occurred in the past and is greatly
rued by almost everyone connected to UBC. Our hopes at the
beginning of the year were that no
more painting of university
buildings would occur, but these
Bored by killer minks?
It seems that minks are not the
only species which has undergone
mutations to become deadly killer
strains; bees too have developed
this way.
The fearsome killer bees are,
thankfully, confined to the deepest
jungles of southern Africa and
South America, where they constantly inflict their warlike
passions on the surrounding environment with a fierceness never
before encountered in any animal
except, perhaps, the great white
shark.
Our research into what the effects of the bees might be on the
ecological systems they are a part
of came up with one surprising but
definite correlation — presence of
killer bees in an area coincides
almost perfectly with a total absence of snow.
How these intemperate insects
cause such a phenomenon is difficult to judge, but one thing is
clear — the unheard-of absence of
snow around Vancouver and UBC
this year is the best possible
evidence for the existence of a
killer strain of fauna in the area.
Almost certainly, the much-
glimpsed killer minks are
responsible, and if we are ever to
ski, toboggan, or barrage open
residence windows again they
must be totally exterminated.
Chris Wilson
science 1
R.C.Summerbell
science 3
have been dashed by at least one
mental deficient on campus who
finds a brush, blue paint and a
cement wall impossible to resist.
The result is an eyesore to all
perpetrated by what I believe to be
a very sick mind.
However, to put this aside and
return to Blair Trenholme, I take
offence to the obvious bias in his
letter asking people to make their
own decision as to the group
responsible for the painting.
He mentions "destructive
pranks by other groups," the EUS
being the only basis for reference
"other groups" must be other
undergraduate societies. Add this
to "blue graffiti" and "trail of
paint drippings to the back of
McMillan" you get the sum which
anyone with a modicum of intelligence can deduce and which
Mr. Trenholme appears to want
deduced, i.e. the agriculture undergraduate society.
I believe that Mr. Trenholme
would put his time to better use by
helping us find out who did the
painting, rather than trying to
implicate a group, without a
semblance of fact. However,
should his prejudice be of sufficient
magnitude to prevent him from
doing this, may I suggest what he
do with it.
Clint Ellison
president, aggies
When life
begins
I want to congratulate Cathy
McCabe for her letter (The old
question: Is the fetus human?
Letters, Jan. 27).
It takes courage to voice such
unpopular and unfashionable
opinions such as hers, namely:
human life begins at conception.
Regardless of its unpopularity,
science backs her statement up. As
every grade 12 biology student
knows, from the moment of fertilization when the deoxyribose
nucleic acids from the spermatozoon and the ovum come
together to form the zygote the
pattern of the individual's constitutional development is
irrevocably determined.
At fertilization a new and unique
individual is created which,
although receiving one half of its
chromosomes from each parent, is
really unlike either.
If a given society condones
killing, this is a moral issue. But to
manipulate, deny or distort
scientific data to fit a political or
sociological posture is prostituting
science.
A society which lets itself be
propagandized with pseudoscience
in order to protect false theories
and humanitarian claims to justify
its killing of its unborn is a sick
society.
Last but not least, it is indeed
tragic, that the blob theory, the
main tenet of the tissue-of-the-
mother school of embryology, has
been advanced for public scrutiny
without as much as a note of public
criticism from the majority of the
scientific   community.
Gabriella Zilahi
North Vancouver
SUB FILMS presents
MGMs COMEDY SURPRISE
This Thurs., Sun. — 7:00
Fri., Sat. - 7:00,9:30
Big or Small Jobs
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FAMILY HOUR SATURDAY   7 - 8:00 p.m.
MAIN FLOOR - SOUTH END - S.U.B.
Long Distance The next best thing to being there ((^Trans-Canada Telephone System Page
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
life ain't
no cabaret
-Seen Cabaret, the film about
the degenerate Germany of the
1920s?
On Wednesday, the
proletarian version is coming.
Kack Rebell, a Swedish-
produced film about the
Blueshirts, theatre-based
culture workers who spread
proletarian consciousness
during the 1930s, will be shown
at noon in SUB 207-209.
Included in the presentation,
Hot flashes
which is sponsored by the AMS
speakers committee and
IDERA, are talks by Swedish
filmmakers Godred Talboon and
Olaf Berggren. Unlike Cabaret,
this show is free.
Museum show
The museum of Anthropology, that great concrete
edifice tottering on the Point
Grey cliffs, is presenting a show
of the silkscreen prints and
carvings of Roy Henry Vickers
until March 15, in addition to its
usual exhibits.
People's law
The Vancouver People's Law
School is offering a free course
on the Insurance Corporation of
B.C. beginning Feb. 21.
The course, to be held Feb.
21 to 23 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
at John Oliver Secondary
School, 530 East 41st, will
explain the procedure for
making a claim and an appeal
with ICBC. To pre-register for
the course call 734-1126.
The school's new address is
10-C West 12th.
13 <3 G]G]E]G]G]G]G]G]E]E] GJG]G]G]G1E] B]E]G]E]G]E]gE]G]BlB]G]B]E]E]B]B]E]g]E]LCj
1       CANDIA TAVERNA        I
13 13
[3 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY 13
^ Call 228-9512/9513 IS
|j 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. |]
13 BlaSIalsIatalaBlalaBlalsBSlslaBIalSlaBla ElalalalalalalalaBBlala 13
y
Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 207.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB 212A.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Organizational   meeting,  noon,   SUB
211.
WOMENS CENTRE
Films, great grandmother, our dear
sisters, noon, SUB auditorium.
SKI  CLUB
General meeting and film on Tahoe
ski trip, noon, Angu 110.
AMS ART GALLERY
Religious   studies   professor   Hanna
Kassis on Islamic astronomy, noon,
SUB art gallery.
AMS ART GALLERY
PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Exhibition the arrow of time: myths,
legends,     art     and     science     in
astronomy,   until   Friday,   SUB   art
gallery.
YOUNG CONSERVATIVES
Party bagman Dave Jenkins speaks,
noon, SUB 212.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Meetingof English majors and honors
students to discuss dispersal of grad
class funds, noon, Buto 497.
CSA
Chinese instrumental  practice, 7:30
p.m., International House.
WEDNESDAY
SIMS
Introductory lecture on TM, noon Bu
313.
CCF
Prayer meeting, noon, Angus 210.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
VOC
General meeting and slide show, noon
Chem 250.
AMS SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Swedish film, noon, SUB 207.
WOMEN'S CENTRE .
Jillian Riddington on the family and
violence, noon, Brock Lounge.
CSA AND CVC
Free Cantonese class, noon, Bu 316.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
The   film    Civilization,   noon,    SUB
auditorium.
PSFG KUNG FU
Practice, 4:30to 6:30p.m., SUB party
room.
CSA
Choir    practice,    7:30    p.m.,    International House.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Afternoon   delight   night,   4:30 p.m.,
SUB 205.
CVC
Games night, 7:30 p.m., SUB 216.
AQUA-SOC
Speaker on  underwater archeology,
7:30 to 9 p.m., IRC 3.
There IS a difference!!! (oZ~l
\38th\
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Our broad range ot programs provides an umbrella ot testing know-how that enables us to otter the best preparation
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of experience and success. Small classes. Voluminous
home study materials. Courses that are constantly updated. Permanent centers open days, evenings & weekends all year. Complete tape facilities for review of class
lessons and for use of supplementary materials. Make-ups
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ECFMG • FLEX
NATL MEDICAL & DENTAL BOARDS
Flexible Programs & Hours
For more info, call
(206) 523-5224
U. Village Bldg.
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4900 25th N.E.
Seattle 98105
-H.
KAPtfN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 I
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
Feb. 14, 1977
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 to 4:30 p.m.
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
MUSSOC
presents....
an original
revue
February 2-5 &
9-12 8:30 p.m.
Old Auditorium
Tickets V.T.C.
& Outlets
Student Matinee
Feb. 10th
12:30 P.M.
$2.00
Tickets
A.M.S. Business Office
Coming February 9-11
WILLIAM
STRINGFELLOW
the AUTHOR    the SOCIAL CRITIC
the THEOLOGIAN    the ATTORNEY
WEDNESDAY - FEBRUARY 9
12:30- Law School Rm. 101
"THE LEGAL PROFESSION VS. JUSTICE"
1:30 — Seminar Rm. 179 Law School
7:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
"THE DEMONIC ELEMENTS OF PROFESSIONALISM'
THURSDAY - FEBRUARY 10
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"ETHICS FOR CHRISTIANS AND OTHER ALIENS"
7:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
"THE CHARISMATIC GIFTS OF THE CHURCH"
FRIDAY- FEBRUARY 11
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"SIGNS OF HOPE"
3:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
Open Discussion
Attention
ALL SCIENCE STUDENTS
the SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
wants nominations for
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
S.R.A. REPRESENTATIVES (4)
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
ACADEMIC & SOCIAL COORDINATOR
ATHLETIC COORDINATOR
PUBLICATIONS OFFICER
SECRETARY
Nomination forms may be picked up and deposited at
the A.M.S. Business Office until 4:00 p.m. Friday,
February 11, 1977.
Elections will be-held February 16, 1977.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lilies, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 17:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
20 — Housing
SKIMMING
- MIDTERM BREAK
- $68, INCLUDES
EVERYTHING
ALL RUNS OPEN WITH
64 cm BASE
—Contact coordinator Bill at
224-9866
AT APEX
40 — Messages
THIS SECTION is reserved £or Special
Valentine's Messages Friday 11th
Feb. Don't delay — deadline: 11:00
a.m.   Thurs.,   Feb.   10th  .
65 — Scandals
GAY UBC — Disco Dance this Saturday! Grad Centre ballroom. Flill
facilities $1.75 person.  Join us.
CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE. Vancouver
Folksong Society plus Hard Times
Two. Friday, 8:30 p.m. Lutheran
Campus  Centre.  $1.00.
70 — Services
ECKANKAR
The Path of Total Awareness
"The Sun that never sets is visible
to the naked soul and my music is
audible to the spiritual ears only."
Paul Twitchell, The Tiger's Fang:
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
12:30 Fri., Feb. 11 SUB 213.
85 — Typing
EXCELLENT TYPING at home on IBM
Selectric. Vancouver pick-up. Reasonable   rates.   986-2577.
THE GRIN BIN — Largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3209 West
Broadway (opposite Super Valu) Vancouver.  738-2311.
CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE. Vancouver
Folksong Society plus Hard Times
Two. Friday, 8:30 p.m. Lutheran
Campus Centre. $1.00.	
10 — For Sale — Commercial
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast accurate
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 731-
1807  after   12:00.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Work at home.
Rate: 70c per page and up. Phone
876-0158   if   interested.
EFFICIENT    SELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home.   Essays,  thesis,  etc.  Neat  accurate work. Reasonable rates. 263-5317.
90 - Wanted
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612. 3616 West 4th Ave. Open 10
a.m.
SINGER   IN   A   ROCK   BAND.
Call   325-7241.
VERY MUCH want to buy Germaine
Greer ticket. Please call Anna at
224-4266.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER	
Rent cabin day/week.  732-017* eves.' Tuesday, February 8, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds win two, move into second
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbird basketball team moved into a second
place tie with the University of
Victoria Vikings this weekend, by
defeating the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns in two straight
games 73-72 and 69-62.
Friday, the 'Birds were outshot
by the Pronghorns, but managed to
outrebound the smaller Lethbridge
team on the offensive boards which
contributed to the win. UBC pulled
down 46 rebounds, 30 of them on
offence, to Lethbridge's 28.
Top scorers for the 'Birds was
centre Ed Lewin with 19 points and
nine rebounds. Lewin shot a
consistent 75 per cent from the
centre slot.
League leading Uof A
downs UBC in hockey
By ROB LITTLE
Operating more like a bulldozer
than a hockey team, the University
of Alberta Golden Bears defeated
the UBC Thunderbirds 7-3
Saturday.
Before two minutes had elapsed
in the first period the Bears led 2-0.
Breakwell picked off an errant
clearing pass and beat 'Birds
netminder Dave Fischer. On the
second goal Fischer was screened
on a high shot taken by Primeau.
UBC nearly scored at the nine
minute mark of the period. Danny
Lucas hit the post on a slapshot
while on the power play.
For the remainder of the period
the 'Birds were on the defensive,
successfully killing off two
situations in which they were two
men short.
UBC appeared as if they would
make a comeback shortly after
Primeau's goal. Jim Stuart blasted
a shot by Cummings at 6:55 and
Matthews deflected the puck into
the Edmonton net at 9:25 to close
the gap to 3-2.
The 'Birds lost momentum when
Lucas took a needless interference
penalty. Shortly after the penalty
ended an Edmonton shot deflected
high into the air and fell into the
'Birds' net. The period ended 4-2 in
Edmonton's favor.
Alberta continued to roll along in
the third period. Primeau scored
one of the three Bear goals in the
final period, to complete his hat-
trick.
Bill Ennos tallied once for the
'Birds.
Friday night was a different
matter. The Bears took a 2-0 lead
and outshot the 'Birds 18-1 until the
15:26 mark of the first period.
Then the Bears' Broadfoot took a
double minor. At 19:07, while on a
power play, 'Birds' John Dzus and
the Bears' netminder Cummings,
got involved in a goalmouth scrap.
Dzus was obviously getting the
better of Cummings so Broadfoot
left the penalty box to help. UBC's
John Jordan then pulled Broadfoot
off Dzus.
A second Alberta player grabbed
Dzus and UBC's Tom Onno entered
the fray. The remainder of the
players stood around holding each
other.
Referee Al Paradice ended the
period and retired to the dressing
room to sort out the penalties while
linesman Darryl Abram received
seven stitches in a cut hand.
When play resumed the 'Birds
had a one man advantage for seven
minutes. Ten seconds later Ross
Cory deflected a shot by Derek
Williams past Poplawski into the
Edmonton net.
At 3:22 of the second period, Jim
Stuart tied the score while on the
same power play.
In the ten minute overtime
period, Jim Offrirri, the league's
leading scorer, picked up a loose
puck at his own blueline and fired it
past Lefebvre on a two-on-one
break.
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Wednesday
9 February
UBC forward Jan Bohn added 12
points to the total and got 15
rebounds, 11 of them' at the offensive end of the court. Bohn had
a lot of trouble shooting Friday, as
he managed to sink only five of 17
shots. Bohn currently leads the
league in field goal accuracy
shooting a season percentage of 53.
Guard Jim Coady managed to net
10 points for the 'Birds.
The scorers for Lethbridge were
Wayne Simpson with 20 points and
nine rebounds, Harry Bekkering
with 16 points and four rebounds
and Craig Hunter adding 10.
The Pronghorns shot a steady 49
per cent from the field while the
Birds maintained only 38 per cent.
UBC doubled the Pronghorn's
turnover total 29-15. Bohn was
responsible for nine of the 'Birds
total.
Saturday UBC held on two
second half drives by the
Pronghorns to win a close game 69-
62.
At half time the Pronghorns
trailed 39-26. They rallied to come
within ten points of the 'Birds, but
UBC recovered and moved back
into a 15 point lead. A late
Pronghorn comeback was killed by
the final buzzer.
I1MM4
Both teams shot poorly during
the nationally televised game. The
Pronghorns shot 36 per cent while
the 'Birds potted only 32 per cent of
their attempts. UBC again had
problems with turnovers losing the
ball 21 times to Lethbridge's 12.
High scorers for the 'Birds were
Bohn with 17 points and six
rebounds, Lewin with 15 points and
11 rebounds and guard Chris
Trumpy with 10 points and seven
rebounds.
Bohn was in much better form
Saturday shooting a consistent 57
per cent while Lewin had his
problems managing only 30 per
cent.
Joe Shackelford led the
Pronghorns with 16 points and 6
rebounds. Perry Mirkovich shot a
team high of 60 per cent to add 13
points for Lethbridge and grabbed
nine rebounds.
Mirkovish,   who  averages  15
points a game for the Pronghorns,
missed Friday's game due to an
injury. His rebounding average is
fourth in the league at nine per
game.
In other league action the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears moved to within one win of
clinching first place in the Canada
West league by defeating the
University of Calgary 86-76 and 86-
70! The loss dropped Calgary back
into the third place spot the 'Birds
occupied last week.
The 'Birds next games will be
this weekend when they take on the
league leading Alberta Golden
Bears in War Memorial Gym.
Canada West league standings:
W
L
F
A     Pts.
Alberta
13
3
1344
1253   26
UBC
10
6
1274
1142    20
Victoria
10
6
1304
1092   20
Calgary
9
7
1283
1227    18
Sask.
4
12
1199
1352     8
Lethbridge
2
14
1096
1334     4
"4
TieiMbetg
v.],it, it; -■"•*iy;r '
/•■■'.•::::;|:-^r^
'.'  ■'litliakli-nFT
^%;.-?>^i
RCsgreattastingbeer,
...because its slow brewed with the pure
spring water from Shannon Falls Park. Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8, 1977
UBC grad charged in book theft
UBC head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs testified in B.C. provincial
court Monday that he found 260
UBC library books in the apartment of a UBC graduate charged
with stealing $3,000 worth of books
from UBC libraries.
Charged   is   Brian    Charles
Dobson, a 1976 graduate of UBC's
architectural faculty.
Stubbs told provincial court
judge Jack McGivern that he
accompanied RCMP officers to
Dobson's apartment last Aug. 27,
when the books were found.
The thefts occurred between 1973
and 1976, Stubbs said.
"In some cases the call numbers
were removed from the spines of
the books, making it difficult to
identify the original location of the
book," Stubbs told the court.
Questionnaire results show
people want UEL as park
ByBILLTIELEMAN
A proposal for research park in
the University Endowment Lands
was opposed by 71 per cent of
people responding to a questionnaire distributed last month.
The questionnaire was
distributed by the provincial
government's UEL study team,
which is preparing a report on the
future of the area, at a public
forum held Jan. 26.
The results were obtained from a
preliminary examination of about
165 questionnaires. Final results
will be known later this month.
Retaining most of the UEL as
parkland was approved by 96 per
cent of those who responded to the
survey.
People living in Vancouver, west
of Granville, comprise 50 per cent
of those surveyed and UEL
residents made up 35.5 per cent.
The preliminary results of the
questionnaire were released
Monday night at the third and final
public forum on the UEL, held at
Lord Byng Secondary, and attended by about 250.
The public forum, sponsored by
the study team, was held to discuss
and attempt to reach a consensus
on the team's proposals, team
member Byron Olson said Monday.
The proposals were presented to
about 750 people at the Jan. 26
forum.
The forum Monday was held to
allow public discussion of the
proposals in small workshop
groups, Olson said. Workshops
scheduled for the second forum
were cancelled because the team's
presentations took longer than
expected.
Preliminary results from the
questionnaire indicated that 43 per
cent of those answering the survey
agreed with the team's proposals
and 40 per cent disagreed.
The team's proposal for 20 acres
of lowrise, compact housing on the
UEL was opposed by 63 per cent of
those responding, while 32 per cent
supported the idea.
About 80 per cent of the people
who responded approved UBC's
continued use of the  UEL  and
about 68 per cent agreed with UBC
participation in the administration
of UEL parkland.
The topics discussed in
workshops at the forum were UEL
land use, administration, the
Musqueam Indian band's land
claim of the UEL, the planning
process for the UEL and other
concerns, ideas or interests of the
public.
The study team will be
presenting its final report on the
UEL to the government this
month.
New AUCE vote
A petition signed by 60 UBC
library and clerical workers has
forced the 1,200-member union to
hold a second vote about whether
to comply with a wage rollback
ordered by the Anti-Inflation
Board in December.
Fairleigh- Funston,
spokeswoman for the Association
of University and College Employees, local 1, said Monday the
petitioners claimed the wording of
the original motion was ambiguous
and members were not sufficiently
informed about the consequences
of not complying with the AIB
ruling.
The AIB reduced a 19 per cent
wage increase gained in 1976 to 15
per cent and ruled the union must
pay back the four per cent in excess wages earned since January,
1976.
On Jan. 26, union members voted
56.7 per cent in favor of complying
with the AIB ruling. They also
voted to reduce their salaries by
$32 per month to comply with the
rollback.
The results of the new vote, to be
conducted by mail ballot, will be
known Thursday, Funston said.
She said the wording of the
motion has been changed to read
"That the membership of AUCE
local 1 comply with the AIB
ruling."
The motion which was approved
said "That the membership of
AUCE local 1 refuse to comply with
the AIB ruling."
The petitioners claimed the
original wording was confusing
because "no meant yes and yes
meant no," she said.
COLOR XEROX
PRINTS FROM 35mm
SLIDES
.75 FOR STUDENTS
At the
SLIDE SHOP
(Near UBC Gates)
4528   WEST   10th
TEL:   224-1424
SWEDISH COUNTERPART TO CABARET'
Film—"KACKREBELL9
DIRECTOR-Godfried Talboom
About Working Class Culture in the 1930's in Sweden
FREE
Wed. 12:30 in SUB 207-209
Sponsored by A.M.S. Speakers Comm.
A.M.
Lunch
12:30
1:30
WED.
Feb.9
U.B.C. WOMEN'S WEEK 9
THURS.
Feb.10
FRI.
Feb. 11
SAT.
Feb. 12
WOMEN STUDENTS
ART EXHIBITION
9 a.m. - 10 p.m. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Lassere Lobby
Jillian
Riddington
"Violence
Against Q"
M. Brock
Lounge
Germaine
Greer
SUB
Ballroom
7:30
Sara
David
"Emotional
Self-Defense"
M. Brock
Lounge
Avis Rosenberg
"Ci 8, Art"
Lasserre 102
Films
"Karen
O in Sport"
2 NFB Films
Auditorium
RAPE
RELIEF
"Rape is a
Social Disease'
SUB 224
7:30
WOMEN'S
BEAR
GARDEN
with Ferrin
M. Brock
Lounge
4:00 - 8:00
MON.
Feb.  14
TUES.
Feb. 15
MENTAL
PATIENTS
ASSOCIATION
"9
WED.
Feb. 16
205 SUB       |
-FILM
AUDITORIUM
POETRY
Marlene
Wildeman
&
Cathy Ford
M. Brock
Lounge
TUITION
FEE SEMINAR
SUB 207
Sharon
Burrows
"Women's
Sexuality"
M. Brock Loung
"In other cases the date due
label was removed."
Stubbs said the books were likely
taken with an altered UBC library
card.
Crown prosecutor Hugh Mc-
Callum produced Dobson's library
card as evidence and had Stubbs
examine it.
Stubbs said three keypunched
holes on Dobson's card were filled
with adhesive or liquid plastic and
new holes had been punched in
their place. *
McCallum asked Stubbs what
effect alterations would have on
the library's computer records.
Stubbs explained that if the
alteration was accurate it would
result in a different number than
the student's original number
being registered as the borrower.
If the alteration was inaccurate the
card would be rejected.
He said that a book could be
charged out to a non-existent
student number if the  doctored
Health
Collective
Workshop
Mawdstey
Lounge
Place Vanier
Residence
2:00
WOMEN'S
COFFEE
HOUSE
with singers
M. Brock
Lounge
8:00 - 12:00
WHERE IS MY
PRINCE
ALREADY
Ti-Grace
Atkinson
"Romance
&
Romanticism'
IRC 2
7:00
Helga
Jacobson
"Women
in China"
SUB
Art Gallery
7:00
Dorothy
Smith
"Feminism
&
Socialism
SUB
Art Gallery
7-.00
Marlene
Wildeman
CR.
WORKSHOP
M. Brock
Lounge
keypunch holes registered certain
combinations of numbers because
of the way the computer is
programmed.
In this case, Stubbs continued,
the library has no record of the
number and so cannot trace it
when the book becomes overdue.
However, using the library's
history file, which has records of
all transactions in the library
circulation, library staff were able
to trace 40 books checked out to
false numbers back to Dobson's
card, Stubbs said.
He said these books were found
in Dobson's possession.
Stubbs said the subject matter of
the books is mostly architecture,
interior design and the
psychological effect of environment on humans.
The books were from Sedgewick,
fine arts, main, Woodward, music
and agriculture-forestry libraries
and from the architecture reading
room.
The case continues.
One
Last Shot
When you're drinking
tequila, Sauza's the
shot that counts.
That's why more and
more people are
asking for it by
name.
TEQUILA SAUZA
Number one in Mexico.
Number one in Canada.

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