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Array FRATS, BOTTLES AND DUETS WITH TOOPE SINCE 1918
THE CITY 0.
UBC: CAMPUS
AS WE KNOW
IT COULD SOON
CHANGE.
PAGES 8-12
TO
SEPTEMBER 9,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER III
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
H
EU
BYSS
EY 2/U BYSSEY. CA/E VENTS/2010.09.09
SEPTEMBER 09, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°III
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubysseyca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Vacant
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Jan Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
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e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
AD TRAFFIC
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
AD DESIGN
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Ngaio Hotte
Fabrizio Stendardo
Samantha Jung
Andrew Hood
Kathy Yan Li
Nilo Tabrizy
LEGAL
Kristy Dindorf
Gili Rosenberg
Micki Cowan
Carima Palmitesta
Kalyeena Makortoff
David Elop (Photo
page 1)
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
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pr:int~d onj[0.0%
reevcled|naGer
EVENTS
THURSDAY, SEPT. 9
H0WT0 FIND A WORK STUDY/WORK LEARN JOB
ON CAMPUS
Interested in working part-time on campus this year in Work Study (for Canadian students) or Work Learn (for international undergraduate students)? • 10am-
4pm, register at secure.students.ubc.ca/
workshops/careers, cfm.
FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Tim Burton's twist on a beloved classic
stars Mia Wasikowska as a 19-year-old
Alice who returns to the whimsical world
she first encountered as a young girl, reuniting with her childhood friends, including the Mad Hatter (Johnny Depp). • 7pm,
Norm Theatre, free screening.
UBC'S BIG NIGHT OUT PARTY: HERE TODAY,
GONE TODAY: MFA GRAD ART EXPO AT THE
BELKIN ART GALLERY
It's time to get classy, UBC. The Belkin Art
Gallery is showcasing the mind-blowing
work of its Masters of Fine Arts students.
Shine up those dress shoes, straighten
that hair and come enjoy food, drinks
and music at the world-renowned Belkin
Art Gallery, right across from the Rose
Garden. The art this year includes cutting-
edge sculpture, photography and mixed
media. Enjoy a sober night of artistic introspection before a weekend of inevitable boozing. • Belkin Art Gallery, 7-10pm,
more info at www.belkin.ubc.ca/future/
ubc-mfa-graduate-exhibition-2010.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 10
AMS WELCOME BACK BBQ FEATURING THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM
The Welcome Back BBQ is the headlining event for the first week of class and is
running for its 27th year. Gaslight Anthem
takes the stage as this year's main performance. • 2pm, Maclnnes Field, free.
DEAN'S DEBATE DEATHMATCH
Which faculty is best? Watch your dean's
(i.e. the head of your faculty) square off in
this all or nothing, no-holds-barred verbal
mixed martial arts event. Come cheer on
your faculty and watch the others be destroyed. • 2:30pm, SUB Conversation Pit.
DESIGN   CUBE  LAUNCH:
NEWSUB
CELEBRATING  THE
In June the AMS announced that HBBH
+ BH is the architect firm planning the
New SUB Project. Schematic design
with students will begin in September.
To ensure students are engaged in the
process, the AMS and HBBH + BH will
be running a series of workshops and
charettes on topics such as student
life, sustainability, student social
spaces and green spaces. In addition
to this, there will be an on-site Design
Cube (working office) in the south alcove
of the SUB. On Friday, September 10,
there will be a celebration for the grand
opening of the Design Cube, including
cake for all. • 3:30-4:30pm, South
Alcove, SUB.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
* Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategics
* Experienced Course Instructors
* Comprehensive Study Materials
* Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
* Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
VROPOLUE
0)
We offer:
* Compact and portable
Hydrogen Storage
• MH lank Refilling Services
•SackableHtMf-uel Cells
viropowacclls.cm'storc
We want you to send
us your events so we
know where we'll be
on Friday nights.
events@ubyssey. ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
TRANSPORTATIONS fc/
CONSULTATION o T __W-A^LWA
Phase Two
September 14-30
In March, we heard your ideas about where to locate permanent transit
facilities on campus and how to improve pedestrian and cycling
experiences (Phase One]. Now, we're back to report on how we used
your ideas and present three options for your feedback [Phase Two).
Your input is important so please join us in-person at two open houses
or submit your feedback online at planning.ubc.ca.
OPEN HOUSES
ONLINE
September 23
September 14-30
5PM-7PM
planning.ubc.ca
Michael Smith Lab 101
2185 East Mall
September 27
10AM-4PM
SUB Concourse
6138 Student Union Blvd.
IP
a place of mind
Campus
Community
Planning
find out about events,
our newsletter, and more at
planning.ubc.ca. 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE VACANT
AUS accounts frozen over lack of budget
Arts executive criticized for poor management
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Last week, AMS VP Finance Elin
Tayyar froze the accounts of the
Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS)
after it was discovered that they
were operating without a budget.
He lifted the freeze for September
after the AUS promised to submit a
full budget by the end ofthe month.
The AUS, which is the largest
undergraduate society on campus,
represents over 12,000 Arts students and receives approximately $ 130,000 in fees for their annual operating budget, which is collected and overseen by the AMS.
"I really didn't think there was
any problem with the budget, until I got an email from Elin saying
that our accounts had been frozen,"
said Interim AUS President Ryan
Trasolini. "I was a litde bit upset, because obviously this [was] the first
time I'd heard about it."
According to Trasolini, the AUS
executive had not drafted a budget
by the July 30 deadline because of
a later start to their term. He said
this was caused by a botched election, changes in the way that coordinators were selected and the resignation of VP Internal Elysia Pyne.
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian said that is not uncommon for
the AMS to freeze the accounts of
clubs or constituencies who are financially dependent on the AMS.
"We regularly freeze club accounts," said Ahmadian. "Freezing accounts just ensures that no
transactions canbe processed until
Societies recieve theirfunding from the AMS. GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
the club/constituency has contacted the AVP or VP Finance and submitted their budget for approval."
After the accounts were unfrozen, VP Finance Michelle Yuen sent
an email to AUS Council with a pre-
liminarybudgetfor September and
asked them to vote on it via email.
When some councillors expressed
concern about debating a budget
via email, a council meeting was
called for Monday, September 6,
which was rescheduled to Thursday, September 9.
In that email, Yuen said that she
was responsible inher handling of
the society's finances.
"Trust me when I say I hold
the strings to the purse real
tight, and anyone who has seen
me work as the AUS VP Finance
can vouch for me. I trust that
you can trust me to handle your
money with caution and reason,"
she wrote.
Trasolini said that unlike the
AMS, the AUS does nothave to pass
all purchases through council.
"We have a Une item in our code
that says the VP Finance has the autonomy to spend anything $5000
dollars or less," he said.
"We do anyways just because
we want people to be on board
with what we're doing, because
it's a team effort here. So that's
why we sent out that email, because we didn't have to, we just
wanted to make sure everyone
knows exactly what's happening."
According to AUS Councillor Michael Haack, miscommunication
was at the heart of the budget crisis. Haack, who claimed that he
was unaware that the executive had
not yet crafted a budget, said that
he "thought that the budget would
have been something handled earlier in the year...so I'm fairly certain that the rest of council was not
aware that there was [no budget]."
"Nobody had mentioned that
we need to get a budget done," said
Haack. "Rather, itwas free spending for the greater part of the year."
He also said that he and other
councillors intend to bring about
code changes on Thursday's meeting to require future executives
to present a budget to council by
a certain date.
Trasolini, however, was skeptical about the effectiveness of
such measures.
"Ithinkfor the sake of efficiency,
it's very challenging to have every
little mini-detail go through council," he said.
Ahmadian stated that the AMS
is as confident in the AUS's ability
to handle its own finances as they
are about any club or constituency.
"[We're] not very confident,"
he said.
Haack said that he did nothave
confidence in the AUS executive's
ability to run the society.
"The biggest thing I'd like people to focus on is that Ryan doesn't
know that he's done anything
wrong. He hasn't apologized for
anything, it was just business as
usual," he said. vU
NEWS BRIEFS
PEP RALLY PRANK FOILED
A plan to disrupt yesterday's Imagine Day Pep Rally was foiled by UBC
staff. Students attempted to unfurl a
sign reading "Abolish Tuition Now"
behind AMS President Bijan Ahmadian during his address to the class of
2014 with UBC President Stephen
Toope. Student Development staff
caught a few UBC students putting
up the sign and promptly escorted
them out of Thunderbird Arena
WORLD'S LARGESTTWISTER
GAME PLANNED FORUBC
In honour of Vancouver Improv's one-
year anniversary, the troupe is attempting to break the world record for the
largest Twister game. On September
12 at 2pm they hope to gather over
4160 people—the current Guinness
World record—at UBC's Maclnnes
Field to participate. 1150 Twister mats
will be available for a minimum donation of $10 with all proceeds going to
BC Cancer Research.
UBC LAST PRIORITY WHEN IT
COMES TO RAPID TRANSIT
Metro Chief Administrative Officer
Johnny Carline and Surrey Councillor Judy Villeneuve have proposed
focusing increased transit services
in Surrey and other areas south of
the Fraser, rather than a rapid transit line down Broadway to UBC. "We
can't afford to have investments going out to UBC that take away from
investment in the major growth areas," said Carline to The Vancouver
Sun. By 2040, Metro Vancouver's
population is expected to increase by
one million people, with one third of
those living in White Rock and Surrey.
Metro Vancouver will have a public
hearing on the matter in November.
UBC students cross Canada in electric VW Wonderbug
A pit stop for the E-Beetle at Queens during Canada's first elecrica
coast-to-coast journey COURTESY OF THE UBC ELECTRIC CAR CLUB
NGAI0 H0TTE
Contributor
Ricky Gu and Colin Mastin were
jubilant as they rolled into Halifax on the evening of September 7.
"It feels great," Gu said in a
CBC interview. "I can't believe
we made it without a single problem at all."
Gu and Mastin, members of
the UBC Electric Car Club (UB-
CECC), broke records this month
when they zipped from coast
to coast in a converted electric Volkswagen Beetle. Their
6400-kilometre journey from
Vancouver to Halifax was the
first-ever unsupported trip
across Canada made by an electric vehicle.
The trip was planned to raise
awareness about electric vehicles, and to educate the public and government officials
about the viability of electric
cars for transportation, the
drivers said.
"We just proved there is existing electric infrastructure
across the entire Trans-Canada
Highway. There's countless RV
parks and campgrounds where
big RV trailers go in to plug in
their power," Mastin explained.
"I mean, electric vehicles are
going to be the future and we
can't rely on fossil fuels forever."
The UBCECC began working
on the car in October 2009, and
funded the project with grants
from UBC and $25,000 in donations from individuals and private companies. The 1972 Wonderbug, dubbed the 'E-Beetle' by
the club, was picked for its cultural significance as a symbol
of transportation for all people.
The car was fixed up and refitted by the UBCECC as an electric
vehicle with a 50 kilowatt-hour
Lithium ion battery pack. The
1000-pound battery pack charges fully in four hours, holds
enough energy to drive 300 kilometres on the highway or 500
kilometres in the city, and allows the car to reach a top speed
of 140 kilometres per hour. The
E-Beetle can be charged using a
high-power plug-in outlet, available at RV Parks everywhere, so
special charging stations are
not needed—an issue that has
slowed adoption of electric vehicles in Canada.
According to Gu, one ofthe
benefits ofthe E-Beetle is how
inexpensively he and Mastin
could travel with the car. "It
cost about $3 for every 300 kilometres. So 6500 kilometres,
it cost about $64 in electricity!"
While the E-Beetle runs on
electricity rather than fossil
fuels and causes less pollution
than most other cars sold in
Canada, the amount of pollution produced from generating electricity differs between
provinces. Fuelling up with
electricity in provinces like
British Columbia and Quebec,
where most electricity comes
from hydro power, is "greener"
than fuelling up in provinces
like Alberta, where electricity comes mostly from burning coal.
What comes next for the E-
Beetle? The UBCECC hopes that
the E-Beetle will take on the
world at the United Nations Environment Programme-sponsored Zero Race in 2011, an 80-
day race across 16 countries
to raise awareness about the
benefits of electric vehicles, tl
—With files from the CBC
Electric vehicles
are going to be the
future and we can't
rely on fossil fuels
forever.
COLIN MASTIN
UBC Electric Car Club Member 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.09.09
Animal rights activists stage protest
UBC argues animal experimentation is necessary to cure diseases
FABRIZIO STENDARDO
Contributor
On Tuesday, STOP UBC Animal
Research, an animal rights
group, held a protest at the Cecil Green Park House during an
alumni event to protest animal
experimentation at the university. Brian Vincent, a spokesperson for the group, said he
was happy with how the event
turned out.
"I'm very proud of how the
volunteers represented the organization," he said. "They adhered to the mission statement
of being very peaceful."
He also said that UBC officials
were respectful of their right to
free speech.
This protest was the latest action in a media campaign the
group has been undertaking
over the past month.
STOP, which is an offshoot of
the Animal Defense and Anti-
Vivisection Society of BC, advocates for the abolition of all
testing and research conducted on animals at UBC. They
were inspired by an 2008 article published in The Ubyssey entitled "Cruel Intentions."
In the article, Dr. Chris Harvey-Clark, director of UBC's Animal Care Centre, claimed the
university might be "the second largest biomedical campus in Canada." According to
Vincent, STOP has upwards of
200 members, including a private Facebook page.
The group claims that one of
their primary objectives is to
have greater transparency when
it comes to animal research.
"We think that the public has
a right to know how their money
is being spent," said Vincent. He
said that STOP's ultimate goal is
to hold a debate between scientists on both sides of this issue.
However, UBC VP Research
John Hepburn said that information regarding research on animals is "the intellectual property of individual researchers."
Moreover, Hepburn worried
that some of the information
that STOP was asking for could
be misinterpreted.
Hepburn said that STOP's
objective is unrealistic, which
is why the university will not
engage in a dialogue with the
group.
"It's important that UBC, as
a major research institution,
tries to find cures to major diseases," he said.
Hepburn went on to say that
testing on animals is a regulatory requirement for agencies
such as the Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada before anything can be tested on humans.
"You don't want to stop research on animals because
there is no substitute," said
Hepburn.
Recently, Hepburn sent an
email to faculty and staff warning
them to "remain vigilant...to help
mitigate potentially unpleasant
Alumnus Wallace Ewert talks with activist Isla Kay at a protest at Cecil Green House. GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
and violent situations" due to
the increased activity by animal
rights groups around UBC's Vancouver campus.
In response, Anne Birthis-
tle, another STOP spokesperson,
said that the group's presence at
UBC had been threatened. Hepburn maintained the email was
a response to a YouTube video
in which an unidentified person
tried to gain access to research
facilities on campus, which he
said was not to his knowledge
associated with STOP.
"[I believe that] STOP is a legitimate group that is representing the rights of animals,"
said Hepburn. "I am not worried about their campaign. I
am concerned with the [groups
that] follow." U
You don't want
to stop research
on animals
because there is no
substitute.
JOHN HEPBURN
UBC VP Research
VANCOUVER   CAMPUS
Monday, September 20
11:30 am- 1:00pm
The Chan Centre for Performing Arts
TELUS Studio Theatre
OKANAGAN   CAMPUS
Friday, September 10
11:30am - 1:00pm
University Centre Ballroom
UNC 200
PROGRAM
11:30-12:00
12:00-12:25
12:25-1:00
Informal reception (light lunch served)
President's update
Q&A period
Meet Professor Toope at the 2010 Town Hall
Please join Professor Stephen J. Toope for an update on Place and Promise: The UBC Plan,
and other important initiatives at our university. The Town Hall provides an informal forum and
Q&A opportunities with the UBC community and senior administration.
Your questions and comments may be submitted in advance at www.president.ubc.ca/townhall
UBC
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/5
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
THREE DAYS. TWO LOCATIONS.
ONE GREAT WEEKEND OF CONCERTS.
THE HEADLINERS: GASLIGHT ANTHEM
U: What's your favorite song to
play live?
AR: A lot of the new songs I'm
still not terribly comfortable
playing yet, but that being said,
I'd say "Spirit of Jazz" (off American Slang, their latest release).
Couldn't really tell you why
though.
U: Doyouguys ever have anytime
off from touring and recording?
What do you do when you're not
playing? I think a lot of people
imagine you driving muscle cars.
AR: I'm constantly playing, even
when we're not. That's when I get
to delve into some of my more
guilty pleasures. And I drive a
2004 Nissian Sentra. I believe
the color is 'champagne.'
U: You said in reference to Sink
or Swim thatyou were at sort of
at a turning point, whether to go
headlong into Gaslight or drop
it and get normal jobs and settle
down. How do you feel now when
you look back at that time in
your lives, considering the success you've had with the band?
AR: When we recorded Sink or
Swim, we all had jobs. We started touring and got to the point to
where as long as we stayed on the
road, we'd be good, so we never
left the road. It's kind of been the
same since...looking back makes
me nostalgic, but then again, it
does that to everybody right?
One of the few bands that pulls off the tough—but sensitive—thing. PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLEY MAILE
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
With all the negative press focused on Newjersey these days,
what with the rude housewives
and the drunk Italians with stupid names, it's nice to see the
reemergence of that old Garden State archetype: the homegrown rock 'n' roller with a chip
on his shoulder and his heart on
the sleeve of his leather jacket.
On Friday the finest band from
the state whose motto is "Liberty
and Prosperity" will be playing
Maclnnes Field at the Welcome
Back BBQ. The Ubyssey got in
touch with guitarist Alex Rosa-
milia to talk Bruce, muscle cars,
and American Slang.
UBYSSEY: West coasters are sometimes confused by the love that
bands from Newjersey have
for their home state. You've
said in interviews that The '59
Sound is loosely based on growing up in Newjersey. Why do
you think that bands coming
out of Newjersey are so fiercely New-Jersey-an?
ALEX ROSAMILIA: You would understand ifyou were from Jersey... Sometimes an accent differentiates a people, and sometimes, I guess it's just a matter
of actually liking where you're
from.
U: The obligatory Springsteen
question: can you describe the
first time you met him?
AR: Everything happened so fast
that I didn't really get a chance
to truly comprehend what was
going on until it was over...
OPENING ACT: THE MENZINGERS
Scranton's finest PHOTO COURTESY OFTHE MENZINGERS
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
Scranton, Pennsylvania is the perfect model of a seen-better-days
Rust Belt town.
"Everybody knows everybody"
says Tom May singer and guitarist
of The Menzingers. "It's like Pittsburgh, but way smaller and more
Italian.
"It's definitely a great place to be
a punk band."
The Menzingers formed following the break up of several Scranton ska bands, shortly after May
graduated high school. "Westopped
smoking so much weed and got
into punk," says May of the shift.
The members, who now include
Joe Godino, Greg Barnett and Eric
Keen, bonded over their love of The
Clash and Against Me!
May says growing up in Scranton presented him and his future
band mates with few options for entertainment. They grew up playing
veterans' halls and house shows until they were shut down, at which
point another venue would spring
up. "There's nothing to do ifyou
don't want to go to some jerk off
football game, which makes for a
cool punk scene," he says.
Scranton bred this kind of us-
versus-them antagonism into the
Menzingers, which formed in 2006.
This is evident when he talks about
a song called "Alpha Kappa Fall
Off A Balcony." In the song, May
equates the crackdowns on civil
liberties following 9/11 with the
good old boy-ism associated with
many fraternities.
May admits the song, written
when he was 19 and studying music theory at Penn State, seems a
little "black and white" in retrospect, and quickly adds that some
fraternities "give a lot back to the
community." It's more than a little
strange to hear an old punk suddenly say nice things about the Fraternity system. "Bros will be bros,"
he concedes.
Musically The Menzingers'
weak point is songwriting that can
be over the top and melodramatic. Woah-ohs, gang vocals and minute long instrumental builds are
common, and lose their emotional effect when you're bludgeoned
with them for too long. Some songs
break through the wall of sound,
like the single "I was born," which
departs from these pop punk staples. All in all, not a bad band to
be drunk in a field to. tl
SATURDAY @ PIT:
BORN RUFFIANS &
FINE MIST
BORN RUFFIANS
Born Ruffians will be playing at
The Pit this Saturday September 11. The band started in 2004
and consists of three members:
Luke LaLonde (guitar/vocals),
Mitch Derosier (bass) and Steven Hamelin (drums). All three
hail from Midland, Ontario but
have since seen international
success, touring with the likes of
Hot Chip, Peter Bjorn and John,
Girl Talk, the Hold Steady and
Caribou.
The trio's most recent album,
Say It, takes the band into a different, more sophisticated direction, and proves that these
guys are more than a "show
band." Though the album, released this summer, lacks the
catchiness and accessibility of
their original hits "Hummingbird" and "I Need a Life," it displays a more mature approach
to songmaking.
-Anna Zoria
FINE MIST
Vancouver's own Fine Mist are
a pop band with some singing,
some synthing, and a beat machine. Their debut album, Public
Domain, is out September 14.
On stage, Fine Mist have a kind
of nonchalance which alternates
between charming and a litde grating. They often perform with glasses ofwhitewine.JayArner, the beat
and synthesizer, gets stuff going on
the machines and sort of wanders
around stage, occasionally singing
some harmony or doing some keyboard magic.
The beat plods forward. When the
lines get especially catchy or warrant a singalong ("Fuck that, you're
leaving for Europe/Fuck that, you're
leaving forever"), vocalist Megan
McDonald does some bouncing.
And so it goes. Maybe you'll be in-
triguedby their on stage chemistry
or maybe you'll decide to clean out
your wallet instead.
—Jonny Wakefield
SUNDAY @ PIT: JFK
Jesse F. Keeler (JFK) was involved
with music long before he started MSTRKRFT in 2006 with Al
Puodziukas, aka Al-P JFK's roots
lie in punk and hardcore bands,
based in his native Toronto. His
best-known early projects are
Black Cat #13 and Femme Fa-
tale, the latter produced by Al-P.
At the beginning of his DJ career, JFK was better known as
the bass player for Canadian
dance-punk duo Death From
Above 1979, with his roommate/vocalist/drummer Sebastien Grainger. However, after an
exhausting four-year touring
schedule, DFA 1979 took time
off, givingJFKthe opportunity to
finish building MSTRKRFT's studios in East York, Toronto. Shortly after their yearlong break,
DFA 1979 broke up, making
MSTRKRFTJFK's full-time music project.
-Nilo Tabrizy 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.09.09
FREAK OUT AT THE FRINGE
ANNA ZORIA
associate.cultured
subyssey.ca
I know what you're thinking: theatre? Yawn. That's for squares.
Well hold up, young buck! Check your preconceived notions at
the door for the 2010 Vancouver Fringe Festival. Fringe shows are
more likely to include penis jokes and cuss words than your average
high school musical. And most of them present perspectives and
narrative styles far spicier than the warm, mealy porridge dished
out by more mainstream theatre. Mamma Mia! this ain't.
DIE ROTEN PUNKTE
Fringe has something foryou music lovers out there. Die Roten Punkte is a German hard rock parody duo made up of
two siblings, Astrid (drums) and Otto (guitar) who run around the stage belting out
their own versions of indie-rock songs in
thick German accents. The two have
some serious musical talent to back up
their ass-foolery Performance Works,
1218 Cartwright Street
WICKED SHORTS
The best part about the Vancouver Fringe
Festival is its DIY feel, which is exactly what
Wicked Shorts is all about. Four short, locally submitted plays have been chosen for the
occasion by Alley Theatre and will be presented in your not-so-average theatre setting, the coffee shop Wicked Cafe. The underlying theme of the evening will be relationships, love and secrets. Take a date along
and win brownie points for being interesting
and cultured. Wicked Cafe, 13997 Avenue West
POISON THE WELL
Two childhood friends are brought back together after being separated by war. The setting of
their reunion? A hostage crisis in Russia. Good
for those looking for something heavy, tense and
possibly heartbreaking. Playwrights Theatre Centre, 1398 Cartwright Street
Were we right? Check out our Fringe reviews in the coming issues.
The Vancouver Fringe Festival runs September 9-19.
WHAT YOU WANT
Andrew Templeton, the writer and director of What You Want, describes his creation as a Vancouver sex comedy. The
play is loosely based on Templeton's own
experiences upon his return to Vancouver after a fifteen-year absence. It centres around four characters who explore
their desires, secrets, relationships and
notions of home. Among the team behind this play are four UBC alumni, including Templeton himself. Havana, 1212
Commercial Drive
A DAY IN THE LIFE OF MISS
HICCUP
Miss Hiccup is a white-painted, flower-
bedecked, red-gloved Japanese mime
who takes you along for a ride through
her adventure-filled day. From dance to
absurd music to songs which accompany her daily routine, this is one play that
is sure to leave you smiling and giggling.
One reviewer described it as a "Japanese
cartoon character on acid." Performance
Works, 1288 Cartwright Street
FUCKING STEPHEN HARPER
Journalist Rob Salerno's Fucking Stephen Harper: How I Sexually Assaulted
the 22nd Prime Minister of Canada and
Saved Democracy is based on the time
he was assigned to interview the PM and
actually ended up getting arrested for sexually assaulting him. Sure the title is a cheap
trick, but even if everything goes wrong
at this show, you still get to hear about
Stephen Harper's balls. You can't lose!
Performance Works, 1218 Cartwright Street
52 PICK-UP
52 Pick-Up is an audience favourite,
with no two performances ever exactly the same. The play is a romantic
tale, spread out over 52 scenes. The
order of the scenes is determined at
the beginning, when a deck of cards
is tossed into the air. The cards, each
of which has the title of a scene written on it, are then picked up and acted out. Waterfront Theatre, 1412
Cartwright Street
IMAGES COURTESY VANCOUVER FRINGE FESTIVAL 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
Its all nice on ice
Crevasse-hoppin at Garibaldi
VOC members on the ice PHOTO COURTESY OF GILI ROSENBERG
GILI ROSENBERG
Varsity Outdoor Club
"Jump!" I shouted to Maya. She
was standing on the edge of a
deep crevasse, along wide gap in
the glacier. Peering down into the
depths, all she could see was darkness. Looking right and left, the
crevasse extended dozens of metres to each side. We had no choice
but to cross it. Finally Maya threw
her hiking poles over to the far
side, and with one easy stride
made it across.
Crossing the Garibaldi Neve in
summer is a challenge. We went
in knowing that finding a route
through the maze of icefalls and
gaping crevasses mightbe impossible. In winter the crevasses are
filled with snow, making route-
finding much easier. Nevertheless, Christian, who organized
the trip through the Varsity Outdoor Club, led about 20 enthusiastic hikers through the endless
sea of ice ravines.
Our trip started just past Squamish, at the Diamond Head parking lot. We followed the immensely popular hiking trail to Elfin
Lakes. There we left the beaten
track, crossed a mountain stream
and hiked past Opal Cone, an extinct volcano. Snow and ice began
to build up until at last we set foot
on the actual glacier. We put on
crampons, which are spiky contraptions that allow one to walk
safely on hard snow and ice. For
many of us, this was our first time
on a glacier.
OUTDOORS WITH
THE VARSITY
OUTDOOR CLUB
When we reached a section of
the glacier where the crevasses
were covered by snow, we roped
up in small groups. That way, if
one of us fell into a hidden crevasse, the rest of us wouldbe able
to pull him or her out. For the
steeper parts we held ice axes,
which we would use to hack into
the ice if we happened to fall and
hurtle down an icy hill.
At the end of the first day we
camped in tents on snow, right
below Mt Garibaldi and Atwell
Peak. After a long day in the sun,
we were exhausted and looked
forward to a hot dinner—noodle
soup followed by pasta. Christian
played his ukulele, and the group
sat huddled together, sang some
songs and gazed at the stars. The
next day we woke up early had a
hasty breakfast and watched the
sun rise up like an orange fireball through skies hazy from forest fires.
The hardest part ofthe route lay
before us. In the distance I could
see a menacing maze of an icef all,
which we would have to cross.
One group went ahead to look for
a good route. If we couldn't find
one, we would have had to turn
around. No one was looking forward to retracing our steps.
The call came that we should
follow the intricate route found
by Roland, which involved going right through the icef all, hiking down and back up on narrow
bridges of ice.
A bear appeared on a small
ridge up ahead, saw us, and scampered off. I imagine he was quite
surprised to see people in such
a forlorn place. Finally we were
back on firm ground on Brohm
Ridge, but my thoughts raced back
to the icy world we had left behind, u
This trip was organized
by the Varsity Outdoor
Club (VOC) of UBC. The
club organizes outdoor
activities, such as hiking,
scrambling, rock climbing,
kayaking, backcountry
skiing and mountaineering.
You can find them in the
VOC clubroom, located
in the basement of the
SUB, or at ubc-voc.com.
Is your fridge running?
Enjoy your cold beer, leftovers
LIFE WITH
KRISTYDINDORF
Last weekend, I did something
so far from my projected career
path, it's barely even in the same
universe: I became a mini-fridge
salesperson. Those ofyou currently navigating the sparse job postings on Craigslist will understand
the source of my frustrations—the
never-answered email resumes;
the desperation for a job, any job.
As a mini-fridge salesperson, I
have inhaled copious amount of
bleach, been yelled at by numerous angryparents, and witnessed
the first freshman Walk of Shame.
Your first priority as mini-
fridge salesperson is to cleanyour
product so it's fit to rent. Having
known freshmen lastyear whose
fridges grew happy little civilizations out ofthe milk they spilled
at the beginning of the year, I
knew some heavy duty Windex
and bleach was necessary. For
hours we toiled away in a dark
room. At one point the manager of the storage unit next door
walked by and gave us a lecture
about the perils of inhaling bleach
andhowwe would never bear children, but luckily the lack of oxygen in the room meant I could
barely register him.
For every fridge
we rented, we were
mistaken for the
registration desk
three times.
Then came the set up. I found
myself sitting behind a table in
the commons area during Freshman Move In day at 8 am. It made
for good people-watching: highlights included a toga-clad girl
skipping through the commons,
presumably still intoxicated from
the night before. Sadly she didn't
stop to rent a fridge. Many people seemed confused by the whole
idea of fridge rental. For every
fridge we rented, we were mistaken for the registration desk three
times. I can't begin to count the
number of times we were asked
for directions to the washroom.
The most importantpart ofthe
fridge rental game is to convince
people (or parents) they needyour
product. This is where the angry
parents came through in force.
They were unhappy about their
kid leaving them, and even un-
happier they were footing the bill.
Walking around with a scowl on
their face, they sniffed around the
fridges with fierce intensity, demanding only the finest. Meanwhile, various mother hens asked
with worried eyes if their child
was going to starve without one. I
hadn't the heart to tell them most
people just store beer.
Thanks to our efforts, the freshmen population will remain fed,
their stomachs full of cold beer.
Just try not to spill any milk, tl
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Come to the
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September 16th
from 1-5pm and
meet the editors.
We're in room
24 in the SUB
Basement.
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc
Tofino twice a day... Every day...
Calil.866.986.3466
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Drop by for our general meetings
every Tuesday at noon. ^ iEUBYSSEYc 8/UBYSSEY.CA/GOVERNANCE/2010.09.09
GOVERNANCE
UBC IS A UNIVERCITY
JUSTIN MCELROY &
SAMANTHAJUNG
What is UBC?
The short answer is a university. But it's also a community.
And therein lies the tension.
When a bus heading west
passes Blanca Street, it leaves
the City of Vancouver and enters the unincorporated area of
Electoral Area A. There are bars,
grocery stores, condos, parks, salons and everything you would
expect in a city.
Except UBC isn't a city. It has
no mayor and no council for all
citizens. Instead, the Board of
Governors reigns supreme. The
Board grants power to different
groups to make decisions, but
a majority of the board is appointed by the provincial government. If it sounds confusing
and somewhat unaccountable,
it's because it is.
We served as the news editors of this paper for the last two
years, and we can tell you that
virtually every major issue on
this campus is influenced by the
unique governance structure
at UBC. Lawsuits about parking tickets. Conflicts with permanent residents. Food options
in and around campus. Complaints against the RCMP. They
are dealt with and resolved in a
way that is unique to UBC and
seems strange to most students.
That may be changing. Tired
ofthe lack of clarity, the provincial government has asked UBC
to oversee a process that would
see the university lands incorporated into...something. What
that will be is hard to foresee.
How much formal power would
UBC have? What sort of governance structure would be set
up? Would students who live on
campus be given the same rights
as permanent residents?
We don't know what's going to
happen, but we are sure of two
things. First, whatever form of
government comes into practice
at UBC will affect everyone on
this campus, from permanent
residents to students. Second,
that students need to have a say
in the decision-making process.
We have yet to find a way to give
direct input to the governance
of this campus. But this is a university. It operates for students,
and it's up to us to be a part of
plans that could affect us.
So read all thatyou can, and
educate yourself on the past and
present, so thatyou know what
to expect for the future, tl
WHO MAKES UP MY GOVERNMENT?
THE FOLLOWING GROUPS HAVE A SAY ABOUT WHAT GOES ON IN YOUR CAMPUS
UBC: The university has tasked
itself with the zoning and construction of all developments
on campus. It conducts its zoning through a body called Campus and Community Planning,
which creates and updates a
Land Use Plan (formerly Official Community Plan) for the
UBC campus, and UBC Neighbourhood Plans for residential
housing. Formerly, residential
zoning occurred with the cooperation of Metro Vancouver, although tensions between the
two parties arose on occasion.
Construction on campus and in
residential areas follows what
is laid out in the Land Use Plan,
and is conducted by Properties
Trust, a private company held
entirely by UBC.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS (BOG): The
21-member board is responsible
for all affairs ofthe university, including administration of property, revenue and business affairs. The Board meets formally five times per year, and has
several subcommittees that
meet periodically. Along with
the president and chancellor,
eleven members of the board
are appointed by the provincial
government, three are elected
by faculty, three are elected by
students (two from UBC Vancouver and one from UBC Okanagan) and three are elected by
non-faculty staff.
UNA: The University Neighbourhoods Association, founded in
2002, represents residents living in the various "neighbourhoods" created by UBC, including Hampton Place, Hawthorn
Place and South Campus. As
a self-described approximation
of a municipal council, they
seek to represent the 7500
permanent residents of UBC
as well as administer bylaws
in the area. Although not officially a municipal government,
their representatives are elected, and the university grants
them de facto jurisdiction over
municipal-type bylaws such as
noise control.
ELECTORAL AREA A: The current
municipal designation of the
UBC area, as defined by Metro
Vancouver. UBC and the University Endowment Lands are
included in this area, whose
citizens can only vote for the
Director of Electoral Area A.
The director, who sits on the
Metro Vancouver board, is the
sole elected official representing members of UBC and the
UEL at a municipal level.
Top: An aerial view of the parking lot-filled UBC Campus in 1974
TIMELINE: UBC GOVERNANCE
1890-1906: VANCOUVER COLLEGE
Passed in 1890, legislation entitled An Act
Respecting the University of British Columbia
leads to the establishment of Vancouver College in 1899. Later renamed the McGill University College of British Columbia, the institution is governed by Montreal's McGill University, and would later become UBC. Located in the Fairview area of Vancouver, only first
and second-year courses are offered to Arts
and Science students.
1907-1908: THE UNIVERSITY
ACTS
In 1907, the University Endowment Act allows for the sale of
up to two million acres of land,
mostly in the Cariboo region,
for funding a provincial university. It is followed by the University Act the next year, which
grants the university autonomy
from McGill.
1915: UBC BEGINS
Point Grey is selected as the building site
for the University of British Columbia.
Meanwhile, on September 30, 1915, the
first session begins, with classes taking place at the McGill University College buildings in Fairview. Construction
at the Point Grey campus does not begin until 1914, and is quickly halted after the outbreak of WWI.
1921: UEL LANDS ARE CREATED
The University Endowment
Act, which had failed to generate revenue due to a lack
of land sales in the Cariboo
region, is amended. Roughly
3000 acres adjacent to the
Point Grey campus, where
construction is still halted,
can be sold to finance the
school.
MAY 2010: BILL 20
This bill makes the BC Minister of Community and Rural Development responsible for local and regional land use planning on the UBC Point Grey campus. The
UBC Board of Governors will create land
use plans, which the Minister will be able
to adopt. Metro Vancouver continues to be
the regional government and provides services to the UEL, but will no longer hold
land use powers.
NOVEMBER 2009: METRO VANCOUVER VS. UBC
Metro Vancouver introduces a zoning proposal
for the use of academic land on campus, noting
that UBC is in a conflict of interest as the planner
and developer of land on campus. Current UBC
President Stephen Toope issues a press release
and email to students, staff and faculty informing them of the university's concerns with Metro Vancouver's announcement. The email claims
that Metro Vancouver could potentially endanger
the academic freedom of the university.
OCTOBER 2009: UBC DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK
As UBC is not located within an incorporated municipality, the university uses this guide
much like municipal zoning. It sets the requirements for obtaining development approvals in
areas with neighbourhood plans. Metro Vancouver argues that UBC lacks the authority to
outline such measures. The university believes
the document is in accordance with managing
its own land for both institutional and non-institutional development.
2008: UBC H
Campus an<
ning putsfoi
for the camp
elude the UI
a farm of si«
size. The pi;
and residen
Vancouver\
for keeping 1
in its entiret 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/GOVERNANCE/9
GUEST EDITORS JUSTIN MCELROY»coordinating@ubyssey.ca
SAMANTHA JUNG»sjung@ubyssey.ca
FEATURES EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»features@ubyssey.ca
BILL 20 OPENS NEW CHAPTER AT UBC
SAMANTHAJUNG
sjung@ubyssey.ca
New legislation recently passed
by the provincial government
will not only have an impact
on how UBC governs its land,
but on how students experience
campus.
Bill 20 outlines the transfer
of land-use planning oversight
from Metro Vancouver to the
province's Ministry of Community and Rural Development.
This would essentially give the
university more control over
campus, something that it has
been advocating for months.
The university is pleased by
the legislation. "I think it's going to be a very exciting period," UBC VP External, Legal and
Community Affairs Stephen
Owen told The Ubyssey in May.
The legislation is a "two-stage
process" that UBC and the province are in the midst of, according to Owen. Both groups will
now be working together towards a governance model-
considered a long-term solu-
tion-for UBC.
UBC and Metro Vancouver
have not always seen eye to
eye. Although the two governing bodies have agreements
in place regarding land-use
planning, such as the Official
Community Plan enacted by
the two groups in 1997, they
have had disagreements in the
past. In 2005, Metro Vancouver intervened during a dispute between the Wreck Beach
Preservation Society and UBC
over the proposed Marine
Drive Residences, which forced
UBC to curtail the number and
height of the towers.
In November, the university accused Metro Vancouver of
overstepping their boundaries
when they proposed further zoning guidelines for the university. Metro Vancouver responded by saying that the university needed firmer guidelines
around governance of land development on campus.
Owen was blunt about Metro Vancouver's input on how
campus is governed. "They're
a 27-person board of Municipal politicians from all over...
they have very little to do with
issues that come up here, local
issues," he said.
However, not everyone is
pleased about UBC's increase
in power.
"UBC's mission statement
says it is 'preparing students
to become exceptional global
citizens, promoting the values
of a civil and sustainable society'" Colleen Garbe, president of
CUPE Local 116, told The Georgia Straight in August. "These
values have failed to translate
into an exercise of democracy.
UBC has taken on the dual roles
of both regulator of property development and developer."
Lois Jackson, Chair of the Metro Vancouver board, also raised
concerns over the province's
decision.
"Situations where UBC acts
as proponent, developer and approver for development projects
have been cause for concern for
some time," she said.
Jackson referred to Campus
and Community Planning, a
wing of the UBC administration that plans land use development on campus. The university
also employs Properties Trust,
essentially its own private developer, to construct most buildings on campus.
Situations where
UBC acts as
proponent,
developer and
approver for
development
projects have been
cause for concern
for some time.
LOIS JACKSON
METRO VANCOUVER BOARD CHAIR
As for what will happen now,
Owen said there will be two
phases.
"[Phase 1 will be a] whole long
series of public meetings, web-
based commentary, some more
workshops and public hearings
in the fall," he said, adding that
the Board of Governors will then
make recommendations to send
to the Minister of Community
and Rural Development.
"Phase 2 is, what does UBC
want to be when it grows
up? What does the province
want?" til
—With files from Arshy Mann
WHO IS
GETTING
LEFT OUT?
ottom: An aerial view of the UBC Campus in 2009. COURTESY OF UBC ARCHIVES
UBC STUDENTS: There are over
45,000 students who go to
UBC Vancouver, and they are
allowed to elect two members to the Board of Governors and engage with the university through the Alma Mater Society (AMS), UBC's student union. However, students
who live in UBC Housing or the
UEL have no municipal representation, other than voting for
the Electoral Area A director.
METRO VANCOUVER: The governing body of the Greater Vancouver Regional District, which includes the University Endowment Lands. They administer
services that span the region,
including transit, sewage and
transportation, as well as housing. They also provide oversight
to unincorporated areas in the
Lower Mainland, such as Barn-
strom Island and—for now—
Electoral Area A.
BY TREVOR RECORD & SAMANTHA JUNG
GRAPHICS BY TREVOR RECORD
1922: THE GREAT TREK
Growing frustrations with the crowded
Fairview campus and failure to resume
campus construction in Point Grey leads
to the "Great Trek." The result is a $1.5
million loan from the government to resume construction, which is completed
by 1925. This loan makes the leasing of
endowment lands for residential housing
unnecessary, and by the Great Depression in 1929, no longer feasible.
1988-1989: UNIVERSITY TOWN
Under UBC President David
Stangway, the leasing of university lands for funding of the
school begins anew. Properties
Trust is created for the purposes of developing and managing
real estate assets for the university. The first residential neighbourhood on campus, Hampton Place, is created in 1989.
1992: UBC MAIN CAMPUS PLAN
This plan applies to the academic core of
the university, designates which areas of
the campus are academic space and outlines areas for future development. It is
the vehicle which enables the construction, maintenance and preservation of
buildings and landscapes. The current
Campus Plan consultations are intended
to create a new plan to replace this document, which will be in effect until 2030.
i Community Plan
ts which do notin-
3C Farm, or include
gnificantly reduced
ans upset students
ts alike, and Metro
'oices their support
:he 24-hectare farm
y-
2008: THE UNIVERSITY NEIGHBOURS'
AGREEMENT
This document formalizes
the relationship between
the UNA and UBC, quasi-legitimizing the semi-
governmental functions
ofthe UNA.
2004: MARINE DRIVE
RESIDENCES
UBC is stong-armed by Metro
Vancouver to cut two stories
from the original plans for Marine Drive residences because of
backlash from the Wreck Beach
Preservation Society, and has to
reduce the number of floors by
two and the number of towers
from six to three.
2002: THE UNA EMERGES
In response to the municipal
needs of UEL residents, the
UNA is created. Although elected, it is not a legal institution so
much as a group of representatives which advises the university, exerts power over resident
strata chairs to enact bylaws, provide municipal services, and represent residents ofthe university.
1997: OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN (OCP)
The university's OCP is enacted as a bylaw bythe GVRD
Board of Directors and establishes generalized land use
and provides policies and other criteria for development
of UBC Vancouver as well as part of Pacific Spirit Regional Park. Prepared for UBC as part of the GVRD Livable Regions Strategic Plan, this land-use document
established eight neighbourhoods for further planning.
This would lead to a number of "Trek" plans, community plans and agreements between Metro Vancouver
and the university.
The MOU outlines responsibilities that Metro Vancouver must deliver to the university and its endowment
lands. Metro Vancouver has control over the development and planning of family housing property, while
UBC has control of the development and planning of
academic or institutional land. The CCP provides more
detail on the eight local areas designated in the OCP.
The CCP allocates density objectives for each local area
neighbourhood. 10/UBYSSEY.CA/GOVERNANCE/2010.09.09
UBC Farm:
In the Official Community Plan (OCP) enacted in 1997, the UBC Farm was
marked as a "future housing reserve." As the years passed, calls for the
university to protect the area increased. UBC argued that while they no
longer intended to develop the farm, rezoning individual parts of the OCP
was not allowed. As Bill 20 grants UBC the power to create a new land-
use plan to replace the OCP, the university has proposed that the Farm
be rezoned as "green academic." Friends ofthe Farm has advocated
that the Farm simply be zoned as "UBC Farm." Ultimately, the university
will decide how it is zoned after consultations with the public.
RCMP:
Our mounted police force has local jurisdiction in all areas that are unincorporated municipalities, including UBC. The university's detachment is
run by Staff Sergeant Kevin Kenna, who oversees a force of less than 20
people. When large events happen on campus, the RCMP frequently has
to request the services of other police detachments.
Bill 13:
In November 2009, the government amended the University Act to give
post-secondary institutions in BC more jurisdiction overtheir campuses.
Interestingly, it granted UBC the ability to regulate noise and parking on
its campus.
Parking Tickets:
In March 2009,the BC Supreme Court ruled that UBC had to pay back$4
million worth of parking fines, and that for years they had been illegally
issuing parking tickets. The decision came as a result of a class-action
lawsuit launched by Daniel Barbour in 2005.
The decision stipulated that while the university could tow and impound vehicles, they could not issue and collect parking tickets. The decision was appealed by UBC, and in July of that same year, the Appeals
Court decided to stay the decision—meaning that UBC could continue to
collect parking tickets until the appeal was resolved.
Upon the passing of Bill 13, the issue was laid to rest altogether. Bill
13 allows universities the power to regulate parking and noise on their
campuses, allowing UBC to avoiding repaying the $4 million in fines.
PASSING 1
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Our news meetings are Mondays at noon. Come by
to pick up a story.
news@ubyssey. ca
Tomorrow's Professionals Apply Today!
Apply Online!
OMSAS     www.ouac.on.ca/omsas/
Ontario Medical School Application Service
September 15,2010: Last day to create an account for the online application
October 1, 2010: Application deadline
OLSAS     www.ouac.on.ca/olsas/
Ontario Law School Application Service
November 1, 2010: Application deadline for first-year English programs
May 1, 2011: Application deadline for upper-year programs
TEAS       www.ouac.on.ca/teas/
Teacher Education Application Service
December 1, 2010: Application deadline for English programs
March 1, 2011: Application deadline for French programs
%#i
ORPAS        www.ouac.on.ca/orpas/
Ontario Rehabilitation Sciences Programs Application Service
(Audiology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy/Physiotherapy, Speech-Language Pathology)
January 7, 2011: Application deadline
ONTARIO UNIVERSITIES APPLICATION CENTRE
CENTRE DE DEMANDE D'ADMISSION
AUX UNIVERSIT6S DE L ONTARIO
170 Research Lane
Guelph ON N1G5E2
www.ouac.on.ca 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/GOVERNANCE/ll
HE GATES?
HE LINGO
University Endowment Lands (UEL):
The parcel of land which includes the UBC campus, Pacific Spirit
Regional Park, and all university neighbourhoods. These lands are
unincorporated, which means as an entity outside of any municipality,
their bylaws are created or approved directly by the province, which
also collects residential and commercial taxes.
War on Fun:
Aterm popularized by Tyler "Che" Allison when he ran for AMS
President in 2008, the "War on Fun" is a catch-all term for the crackdown on beer gardens and concerts overthe past decade on campus. Proponents of the term blame the RCMP for limiting the number
of Special Occasion Licenses they give out, and UBC for building up
market housing at the expense of a greater student-oriented campus
community. The RCMP argue that because UBC is unincorporated,
their resources are limited and to have too many events happening at
once would overextend their resources.
Fraternity Village:
Ever wondered why the frat houses are so close to each other? In
2003, seven out of eight on-campus fraternities moved into the current
Fraternity Village located at 2880 Wesbrook Mall. At the same time, the
fraternities signed a 99-year lease with the university.
The remaining fraternity, Beta Theta Pi, stayed in its current location. "We think the current location is better compared to where
they're being moved to," Beta President John Fang told The Ubyssey
in 2002.
The Fraternity Village is close to the campus RCMP detachment. It's
also next door to Greenwood Commons, a residence for researchers
and mature students with families. The university's East Campus Plan
resulted in the construction of Greenwood Commons, and the result
has been tension between the fraternities and the residents of Greenwood.
"I've woken up to people pissing in our yard," James Fitzmorris, a
resident of Greenwood Commons, told The Ubyssey in 2008. "We pay
a lot of money to live there. It's overpriced. Why should we be taking
[this] from our neighbours?"
TECHNICAL & COMMERCIAL STUDENTS
The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and
see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish
protein to stop gas freezing in subseo pipes? One of our people did.
And right now we're looking for more people who can bring a fresh
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Learn about student and graduate opportunities and apply at
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Come by to help decide what we do. It's just that
simple.
news@ubyssey.ca tyj   [EUBYSSEYc UBYSSEY.CA/GOVERNANCE/2010.09.09
WANTED: DEMOCRACY AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT FOR UBC-AREA RESIDENTS
LOIS JACKSON
Metro Vancouver Board Chair
When will the rapidly-growing
residential community at UBC
have its own democratic and
accountable local government?
A family with a farm on Barn-
ston Island and a professor who
lives at UBC have at least one
thing in common: they both
live in one of the unincorporated areas that are collectively
known as "Electoral Area A." Every threeyears, instead of voting
for a mayor and council, these
Canadians elect one person as
their representative. That person becomes one ofthe directors
on the Metro Vancouver Board,
which represents communities
with a total population of almost
2.5 million people.
The UBC campus and the University Endowment Lands are
the only urbanized lands in Metro Van without their own municipal councils and local government. An estimated 16,000
residents and students now live
there. By 2020, that residential
population is projected to grow
to 24,000.
Until recently, Metro Van
oversaw land use administration on the UBC campus. Situations where UBC acts as proponent, developer and approver
for development projects have
been cause for concern for some
time. The inherent conflict of
interest contributes to a lack of
accountability in the burgeoning UBC campus on Point Grey.
Metro Van attempted lastyear
to introduce land use develop-
mentprovisions that would have
made progress toward increasing accountability. This was by
no means unusual, given that every other major Canadian university situated within a heavily urbanized metropolitan area
operates under a zoning bylaw.
However, introduction of a zoning bylaw was opposed by the
university. In November 2009,
UBC President Stephen Toope
called Metro Vancouver's proposal "an attempt to intervene
in the governance of UBC in a
way that could be devastating to
our academic freedom."
Metro Vancouver agrees that
academic freedom is one ofthe
hallmarks of a democracy. Another is a citizen's right to have
a democratic and accountable
local government.
In May 2010, the Province enacted Bill 20. That law contains
a provision that makes the BC
Minister of Community and Rural Development responsible
for local and regional land use
planning on the UBC Vancouver campus. The UBC Board of
Governors will be responsible
for development of a land use
plan as well as the process of
public consultation associated
with it. Under the new authority, the Minister will be able to
adopt a local land use plan prepared by UBC. Metro Van will
continue to be the regional government and will supply regional utilities and services. With the
transfer of Metro Van's local and
regional land use planning responsibilities, future plans for
accountability remain unclear.
However, this is not a viable
long-term solution since it does
not address the long-standing
Boardpriority of finding an alternate governance system for UBC.
The Metro Vancouver Board
asked Victoria to initiate a new
governance system for UBC.
The Board never asked for, or
expected, the bill now passed
by legislature.
UBC has grown into much
more than a university. It is a
vibrant and diverse community with expanding scope, a
growing population and international recognition for innovation and sustainability. The Metro Vancouver Board supports
governance reforms that will
lead to greater accountability
at UBC and will provide access
to formal democratic avenues
found in other Metro Vancouver municipalities.
The Minister of Community and Rural Development and
UBC have agreed that it is time
to explore a more representative
form of local government for its
Vancouver campus. The speed
in travelling this road to democracy will depend on the interest
and involvement ofthe university and residential communities.
Metro Vancouver would hope
that the province will work with
area residents and UBC to develop democratic and accountable
governance structures, because
sustainability and accountability go hand in hand. UBC residents and students deserve no
less.
Let their voices be heard. Let
them have their own democratic and accountable local government, tu
UP IS NOT DOWN, AND THE UNA DOES EXIST
_-. «3V.
MIKE FEELEY (& JIM TAYLOR)
Present and founding UNA Chairs
We read with surprise Delta Mayor and Metro Vancouver Chair Lois
Jackson's recent opinion piece decrying the lack of democratic governance in UBC's residential neigh-
bourhoods. We were particularly surprised since we live at UBC
and have been involved in providing democratic governance for the
past nine years.
Neither Ms Jackson, nor anyone
else from Metro, contacted anyone involved in UBC residential
governance before writing her
piece. How can she write about
our situation without talking to
at least one of those involved?
How could she show so little regard for the views of the people
for whom she claims to speak?
She ends her article with "Let
their voices be heard." Couldn't
Ms Jackson have asked for the
residential voice before she
wrote decrying what she describes as the dilemma we face?
We are the current and founding chairs of the University
Neighbourhoods Association
(UNA). The UNA was established
by agreement between UBC and
Metro in 2001 to provide municipal governance for the residential neighbourhoods UBC had
been developing on its campus.
The UNA delivers essentially all municipal services to residents and receives all of the
residential or related commercial tax-like monies raised from
residents. We use them to maintain parks, operate a community centre and repair roads—just
like any municipal government.
The UNA has the power to enact and enforce rules for matters like noise and parking. We
also do a couple of extra things;
for example, we help UBC run
a composting program for our
multi-family housing.
Ms Jackson inaccurately describes the situation on the UBC
campus as like "every other major Canadian university." This
is wrong. UBC has developed a
market residential community
within its campus—creating in
effect a true university residential town. And a town like this
presents some unusual governance challenges that the UNA
and UBC have been working hard
on for nearly a decade.
The UNA Board is actively and
continually involved in consulting with our neighbours on the
question of governance and other
matters. Through public meetings
and surveys one view has been
clearly and overwhelmingly expressed: UNA residents cherish
the local character and ambience
afforded by our current model.
There are changes that could
improve our current model of governance while retaining local control. We welcome a fair, informed
and respectful discussion on this
topic. But, please, can Metro stop
pretending that up is down and
that the UNA does not exist? We
do exist. We provide governance.
We are democratic.
And we do not need the Mayor
of Delta to come to our rescue, tl
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GAMES & COMICS
SUDOKU
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production@ubysseyca ^J 1     \__ U DlSSE Y.C
ACROSS
1. Injectable diazepam, in military lingo
5. Cotton thread used for hosiery
10. Dog-poweredsnowvehicle
14. Ancient Greek coin
15. Bandleader Shaw
16. Abominable snowman
17. Monetary unit of Lesotho
18. Customary
19. Entre	
20. Clouded
22. Assisting the memory
24. Pilfer
25. Was merciful to
26. Ink spot
28. Pond insect
32. First name in scat
35. Craze
37. Dowry
38. Become an ex-parrot?
39. Ice cream substitute
41. Lennon's lady
42. Yearly records
45. Drag
46." the night before Christmas ..."
47. Island in the East China Sea
48. Coconut-husk fiber
50. "Hundred," to non-military
types
54. Locations
58. Deception
61. Canal site
62. Autobahn auto
63. Birthplace of Muhammad
65. One way to run
66. Bloodsucking insect
67. Men
68. Network of nerves
69. Blue hue
70. Crackerjack
71. Belgian river
DOWN
1. Young male horses
2. Close to
3. Dame
4. Arabian Nights hero
5. Extol
6. Apr. addressee
7. Stub
8. Woody vine
9. Conger catcher
10. Pertaining to a church council
11. Boxer Spinks
12. Sewing case
13. It may be compact
21. Sick
23. Office note
25. Celestial body
27. Rubs out
29. Arab sailing vessel
30. Actress Rowlands
31. Archer of myth
32. Dutch cheese, wrapped in
red wax
33. Director Wertmuller
34. Fast time
36.Speck
37. Fast-food option
40. Expression of disgust
43. Not sociable
44. Good fortune
46. Consisting of three parts
49. This stick-up!
51. Helping theorem
52. Mountain nymph
53. Recurring series
55. Domesticates
56. Chew the scenery
57. Brown and white Eurasian
falcon
58. 27th president of the US
59. Dominion
60. Brain wave
61. Gone by
64. Brown-capped   boletus
mushroom
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SUSTAINABLE REGION INITIATIVE
TURNING IDEAS INTO ACTION
Metro Vancouver Invites Comments
about Electoral Area A Election Administration
Metro Vancouver is reviewing the way it administers its elections in
Electoral Area A, with the aim of making improvements in time for the next local elections in
November 2011.
Metro Vancouver is interested in hearing whether the electors of Electoral Area A have enough
information before, during and after the election, whether they believe they have a good opportunity to
participate in the process, and where they think improvements could be made.
We invite you to write to Metro Vancouver with your comments and suggestions by October 1, 2010.
Please forward to:
Mail:      Chris Plagnol, Deputy Corporate Secretary
Metro Vancouver
4330 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC
V5H 4G8
Email:  chris.plagnol@metrovancouver.org
A response form that outlines key topics in the election process is available, if you wish to use it. Visit
www.metrovancouver.org and go to "elections" to access it in electronic form.
Your responses will be summarized and a public report will be considered by
Metro Vancouver's Electoral Area Committee.
Metro Vancouver elections are administered in accordance with the requirements of the Local
Government Act. The Act defines many aspects of the election process, including schedules, official
notices and the way voting places operate. It also determines who is eligible to vote and how they
register to vote.
Electoral Area A comprises University Endowment Lands, University of British Columbia lands, Bowyer
Island, Grebe Islets, Passage Island, Barnston Island, and those areas of Howe Sound, Indian Arm and
West Pitt Lake in the GVRD not within a municipal corporation.
metro
Vancouver
www.metrovancouver.org
TRADITIONAL
SOUP
COMPANY
Welcomes Back UBC
Students with a Chance to
Win a $200 UBC
Bookstore Gift
Certificate
Receive an entry ballot with every purchase of a Regular or Large
Soup, Tex Mex Chili or Daily Special. Prize will be drawn oo Friday
September 17, 2010 @ 4 PM.
Location:
Lower Foodcourt University Marketplace
Phone:
604-221-2241
Mon - Sun:
11:00 am-9:00 pm
We encourage our customers to try our free samples.
Make your voice heard on campus! Send
us your letters and opinions.
feedback@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc
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SAM to 1AM EVERYDAY        WWW.KINGHEAD.CA 2010.09.09/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
WE NEED BETTER BUS SERVICE
It's happened to all of us. On a drizzly Vancouver morning, you wait on Broadway for the bus.
And you wait. Then a glimmer of joy lights within you as you see two headlights and a sign that
says "99-B Line" in orange lights floating through
the haze. And then it passes by you. As does another. And maybe even another.
Overcrowded buses are a daily reality for
students who commute to UBC, the second-
largest transit hub in BC. And for manyyears,
talk of a rapid transit line along the Broadway
corridor was a dream that students longed for.
That dream has now become a little bit further
from reality.
Last Friday, the Metro Vancouver Board drafted a regional growth strategy that downgraded a UBC line to the bottom of their priority list.
The status quo is unacceptable. The three-hour
commute that many students have to endure every day makes them less productive, less engaged
and generally miserable.
But rapid transit isn't the only solution. Even
if the SkyTrain were to be extended out to UBC, it
likely wouldn't be ready until at least 2020, and
students need a better way to get to school now.
The obvious answer is to house more people
on campus and the university's goal for having
50 per cent of students living at UBC is a step
in the right direction. But no matter how many
rooms we have in residences, there will always
be a large number of students who find it more
affordable to live with their parents.
There are numerous ways that we can make
commuting to campus a better experience in the
short term. A dedicated bus lane, like the city employed during the Olympics, would be a fairly simple way to shorten commute times. This would
require building more parking off of Broadway
itself so that shops don't suffer.
Buses should be given priority signaling at traffic lights so that they only have to stop at major
intersections, something that is common in cities across North America.
Most importantly, TransLink needs to increase
bus service to campus. We need to start looking
at all solutions, both long term and short term.
Rapid transit is necessary in the long term, but
we need to be able to get to class on time now.
NEW SUB NEEDS YOUR HAREBRAINED IDEAS
A discrete room in which casual marijuana use
is permitted. A miniature golf course on the roof,
accessible through the AMS offices. Wicked "jam
spaces" for students to chill out with some folks
and kick out some Phish. A shark tank.
These are some examples of things that, regrettably, will probably not make it in to the new student union building. But since we intend on submitting them, they will be the only suggestions
that are considered unless you go out to the design cube and put forward whatyou want in the
new Student Union Building.
While the general outlines of what will be in
the SUB have been decided, this year will be the
crucial planning phase where the architects decide how it will look. And they want your help.
The design cube, which opens on Friday in the
south-east section of the main floor of the SUB,
will be accepting student input. We suggest that
you come forward with yours.
We don't know yet if anything you suggest will
actually be used. Ifyou suggest the installation of
a 20-foot tall fountain depicting Chuck Bukowski using a kitchen sink as a toilet, then probably
not. But ifyou have good ideas and concerns, they
just might be heard.
There are many problems with the current SUB,
as well as possibilities for the next one. Whether
you want more outlets in lounge areas, or better
internet access in the basement, there are plenty
of ideas you can come up with that are so practical that the architects would be fools not to take
them into consideration.
And the best part is that since some of you will
actually be around when the new SUB opens, you
are in a unique position to see your ideas used. Or
atleast, to be really ticked off when they aren't, va
et
6iC'ZM     kosiz-f ,    ±    d&*)r
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KAI GREEN ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
TOO SEXY
RIOTOUS READERSHIP,
Too Sexy is officially back for the year! We
knowyou're all effulgent with the semi-
erotic glow of anticipation for more of
Too Sexy and we don't blame you.
We'll get into today's letter, a saucy
little tale about the mutual stroke and
poke, in just a bit, but first we wanted
to take the time to remind you how
you can celebrate your favourite sex
advice column's return.
Having sexy parties, using a mutual love of Too Sexy to seduce a lover, and writing your scarlet letters to
toosexy@ubyssey.ca are all acceptable
ways to celebrate. Starting a riot using condom water balloons, screaming 'Too Sexy is baaack' from the top
of Gage, and referring to yourself as
a gentleman pervert are also acceptable ways to celebrate, in our minds at
least, though perhaps these methods
are less endearing to your neighbours
and should be refrained from unless
you hit truly divine heights of rapture
during a Too Sexy session.
Now let's talk about mutual masturbation and people as porn.
HEY TOO SEXY,
Sometimes—not all the time, but sometimes—I'd rather masturbate to/with
my partner than have sex with them.
Is this normal and healthy, or am I getting too removed from the sexual act
itself? I know there's a lot of levels to
what goes on in the bedroom, but I just
worry about what my sexual activities
say about myself...
I like to treat my partner like
they're super-hot porn. But is that...
weird? Shouldn't I just enjoy the person for the situation we're in, and not
need to apply a bunch of meta-men-
tal techniques just to enjoyably toss
a semi-liquid load across their lusciously golden-hued epidermal layer?
—Just Expressing Randomly Known Officially Fictional Facts
HI-DE-HO.JERKOFF.
The short answer to your question is,
as tends to be in these 'weird' situations: if both you and your consenting adult partner are into masturbation as a dyadic sex act, then go for it.
Enjoy. Knock yourselves out (although
not literally; that's a different fetish).
Spray unto him/her as you would
have him/her spray unto you. Make
your partner your canvas. Whatever
floats your boat. That said, here are
a few troubleshooting splatters you
(and anyone reading this) may want
to consider:
LIS IT...WEIRD?
No. What JERKOFF is describing is basically a two-part pickle. First off, we're
talking about mutual masturbation
and some cum play. Now, admittedly, this is the kind of behaviour that,
when practiced in public, can cause a
mild fuss. That being said, as long as
everyone is having a good time and no
one calls the cops after, this is not the
kind of behaviour that we would call
weird.
The second part of this is the objectification ofyour partner into a porn
analog. Like most sexual practices, a
little objectification in a healthy, consenting relationship/fuckbuddyship/
whatevership is totally fine. Objectification is negative only when you do
it to someone a) without their consent
and b) in such a way that it results in
negative emotional, psychological, or
physical consequences for that person.
Sometimes—not all the
time, but sometimes—
I'd rather masturbate to/
with my partner, than
have sex with them. Is
this normal and healthy,
or am I getting too
removed from the sexual
act itself?
Treating your aware, consenting
partner like they're super-hot porn isn't
abnormal, unhealthy, or weird: in fact,
it just shows thatyou are physically attracted to them. Ever get distracted by
your partner's heaving bosom/beautiful eyes/heroin-chic shoulder blades
in the middle of a sentence? Bam! You
just objectified 'em. The bottom line
is, don't objectify your partner all the
time, as this may make him or her feel
as though he or she is just a fuck toy
to you. If the entirety ofyour connection to someone is as an impersonal,
objectified porn-thing, you might be
better off just getting an impersonal
porn-object. Fleshlights are cheap and
inter-porn is as good as free.
Mutual masturbation
makes pleasant late
stage foreplay and as
long as you're willing to
compromise, you may
find that your interests
are fairly conducive to
a great and flexible sex
life.
That being said, the odd vacation
into objectified lust-land with a partner can become an intimate experience. As long as it's a mutual fantasy
and done in moderation, it can be fulfilling for both of you.
2. MUTUAL SEXUAL SATISFACTION
In brief, remember that while expelling geysers of sexiness all over your
partner may be enough of a sex life for
you, your partner may require something different. It's okay to have specific sexual interests ofyour own in a
relationship; just be certain to tend to
your partner's sexual interests as
well. Mutual masturbation makes
pleasant late stage foreplay and as
long as you're willing to compromise,
you may find that your interests are
fairly conducive to a great and flexible sex life.
3. SAFETY
While the tossing of semi-liquid loads
across lusciously golden-hued
epidermal layers poses very few pregnancy and/or health risks, make
sure to play safe. Avoid fluid contact
with your partner's eyes, mouth, nostrils, genitals, or any open cuts. Alternately, if you and your partner both
feel comfortable, get tested and then,
well, cum as you are.
Anyways, that's it for this week. Send
in your letters and you could feature in
our next article, tl 16/UBYSSEYCA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.09.09
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