UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1964

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127300.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127300.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127300-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127300-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127300-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127300-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127300-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127300-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127300-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127300.ris

Full Text

Array THS UBYSSEY
you  know
he's nuts
VOL XLVII, No.  14
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20,  1964
CA 4-3916
Women's less
Summer
earnings
too little
By JANET CURRIE
If you're an average UBC
student, you didn't make enough money this summer to
pay for your year.
And if you're a girl chances
are you didn't even earn enough to cover your fees.
The student employment office has found the average
gross summer salary of women
students is $300, of men is
$800.
• •    •
These figures do not include
money spent in the summer.
Since tuition and books come
to about $450, and housing
costs run about $600, an average student must use loans,
bursaries, scholarships or fathers to make up the difference.
And according to the employment, office, last summer's
figures were an improvement
over previous years.
The figures were released as
part of a recent survey.
Engineering men earned the
most money while men in the
faculty of music earned the
least.
The office said the big problem is finding well-paying
summer employment for women.
• •    •
The only women who are
assured of work are those with
some type of secretarial training. The others are limited to
either waitressing or sales-
clerking.
The employment office suggests a solution to the situation
could be increased financial aid
to women by the university.
Firms could also be encouraged to provide more summer
openings for female students,
they said.
And, according to the office,
many of them have experimented with programs to provide students with employment, which have been unsuccessful.
• •    •
Some companies have initiated trainee programs where a
student is guaranteed summer
employment and training in
the company for the duration
of his education.
This is on the assumption
he will come and work for
them after graduation.
However, most students are
unwilling to commit themselves to any career until they
have received their degree, the
office said.
And no employer wants to
invest in a losing proposition,
apparently.
Also, the office said, every
summer they have to contend
with employers who are dissatisfied with students they
hire.
, —don hume photo
Pretty co-ed makes pretty big donation.
Feather campaign today
Feeling cheap?
go buy coffee
If you have a class on Wednesday between
11:30 a.m., go for coffee.
Go to tne Brock or Ponderosa but cut that class because
it could turn out to be expensive.
One hundred Commerce students will be canvassing every
occupied classroom for the United Red-Feather-Red Cross Appeal.
Bruce Russell, Commerce III,
chairman of the UBC Appeal
Fund said: "We hope to collect
$2,000 in the campaign."
"This represents a little less
than 15 cents per person. That's
not much for anyone to give"
he said.
10:30  and
DIABETIC
IGNORED
See Page 2
Money from the Red Feather-
Red Cross cans goes immediately to the Administration office
for counting, Russell said.
Then, the United Appeal will
use the money to aid more than
60 health and welfare agencies.
These range from Alexandra
Neighborhood House, where
the Appeal pays $51,738 out of
a budget of $56,393, to the
"Vouth Counselling Service of
B.C., where the Appeal pays
$7,559 out of the $17,457 budget.
The Red Cross receives 11.9
per cent of all funds raised.
If you do cut that class and
go for coffee however, be pre
pared to give there too.
All food services are to be
canvassed as well.
Last year, UBC faculty,
staff and students contributed
$18,400.
Concert
killed in
union clash
The Vancouver Musicians union Monday forced cancellation of a noonhour concert by the Royal Canadian Engineers
Band.
The union insisted The Alma
Mater Society hire a 35-mem-
ber standby band made up of
union members paid at union
wages.
"We just couldn't afford the
$350 it would have cost," said
Homecoming chairman Rick
McGraw Monday.
The Engineers band had
agreed to play for free.
McGraw said Homecoming
has hired four union bands
to play at the two Homecoming dances Saturday for about
$800.
He said the union also
wanted a standby band at the
Homecoming football game
Saturday when half-time entertainment includes a performance by the Lions Beefeater
Junior band, but backed down
later.
Byron Hender, AMS vice-
president said: "The musicians
union does not, object to the
AMS paying below union rates
to student bands when these
bands are playing on ' campus,
but they object when a student
band plays off campus at below union rates and without
a standby union band."
This isn't the first time AMS
and the  union  have  clashed.
When the UBC rep pep band
played at a Lions football
game Oct. 10 the union asked
for a standby band but the
AMS refused to pay for it.
The union also wanted a
standby band at the Board of
Trade luncheon Monday downtown when the UBC pep band
played. The AMS again refused.
Hender said: "The AMS is
currently negotiating with the
union to enable student bands
to play off campus a certain
number of times a year without requiring a union standby
band."
The AMS pays about $10,-
000 a year for union bands to
play at UBC dances.
BYRON  HENDER
.... negotiating
Hot-line bugs
Acadia Camp
launderers
By JOHN DILDAY
Acadian Camp residents are
running 30 amp washing and
drying machines on 20 amp
circuits.
But Buildings and Grounds
electricians say the system is
safe.
A notice posted in the laundry room warns students fuses
will burn out.
The notice was posted after
the information was made public at an Acadia Camp council meeting, said D w i g h t
Brown, representative for Hut
31,  who posted the  notice.
The note concludes: "Anyone
wishing to buy fire insurance
see the hut rep."
A check showed one washing machine is a 30 amp unit
and the other 20 amps. The
two dryers are 30 amps.
A   spokesman   for   the  Vancouver   Fire   Marshal's   office
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:   WIRING
Student court to bring
charges for egg-throwing
A fourth year arts student will be charged with conduct unbecoming a student following an egg-throwing
spree in the cafeteria on Screech Day.
The Discipline Committee decided to lay the charge
against Don Mackay. The charge could result in a fine of
up to $25 or cancellation of AMS privileges for a year.
Complaint was laid toy AMS vice-president Bob Cruise
who said more than a dozen students were struck or splattered by eggs at the Sorority function.
Evidence has been turned over to prosecutor Richard
Scardina. Date for trial in student court has not been set.
Mackay was not present at the investigation Thursday. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 20, 1964
I. BAXTER
. . . confused
'Confusion
first step
for art lover
If you looked at the exhibition of Collage paintings in the
Library art gallery and were
confused, then you've made
your first step towards understanding art.
So thinks Ian Baxter, assistant professor of fine arts and a
painter who has had exhibitions in England, Japan, the
USA and Canada.
"If you're confused, then
you're getting involved," he
said.
In his classes he hopes to
impart a feeling for art, he
said.
Baxter said he is trying to
present new visual thoughts to
man in his art.
"Each artist is trying to find
reality.'' he said.
Baxter has a Master of Fine
Arts degree from Washington
State University.
• •    •
Sir John Sommerson, curator of Sir John Sloane's Museum
in England, will give an address tonight in Bu. 104 at
7:30 p.m.. sponsored by the
department of architecture.
Topic is The House and the
Street  in Georgian England.
• •    •
There will be a faculty cello
recital tonight in Bu. 106 at 8
p.m.
Eubene Wilson on the cello,
and Kathryn Compton at the
piano will play music of Carter,
Brahms and Beethoven.
Diabetic coma
Stricken student
ignored for hour
By DON HULL
A student lay in a diabetic coma in a Brock Hall club-
room for an hour Friday while other occupants of the room
were unaware that anything was wrong.
Martin    Dournovo,    Science
III, was found lying on a couch
in Room 166, occupied jointly
by Gamma Delta and the Baptist Union of Students.
. Pastor Herbert Fox, of Gamma Delta, said the student appeared to be asleep.
When Dournovo was found
to be ill Mr. Fox called the university patrol at noon. Senior
patrolman Arnott Lakin arrived on the scene at 12:06 p.m.,
Traffic Director Sir Ouvry ftob-
erts said Monday.
Lakin called a Metropolitan
Ambulance, which arrived
about 15 minutes later. In the
meantime Lakin found a diabetic card on the student, and
the boy's doctor was contacted.
On instructions from the doctor Lakin gave the student
some pop, and directed the ambulance to take the patient to
Lion's Gate Hospital.
Dournovo was released over
the weekend.
Director of Traffic, Sir
Ouvry Roberts, said the case
'iad been handled extremely efficiently from the time of the
patrolman's  arrival.
The university patrol wagon
is equipped with a stretcher,
but the outside ambulance was
called in this instance as the
patrolman thought the case
should be handled by an outside  hospital,  Sir Ouvry  said.
Wife problems
bother Belfont
UBC's Bryan Belfont has
an unusual wife problem.
The Canadian Department
of Immigration will hold a
hearing next Thursday to
determine if his 24-year-old
West German bride, Isode
Dreckmann, is in Canada
illegally. Immigration authorities here claim she was
refused entry into Canada
last Sept. 26.
Belfont met his wife while
working in Cuba last year.
Brock Greeks meet Beats
in smoky dark cafeteria
The Greek set mingled with the Beats Monday afternoon
when South Brock cafeteria became a coffee house.
Espresso coffee was served by girls in black tights.
The cafeteria was darkened and thick with cigaret
smoke.
Folk-singing, sponsored by the Folk Song Society, was
good but barely audible in the crammed hall, students said.
The afternoon was part of the Homecoming festivities.
Brock coffee house Will be open again Wednesday, when
Jazz by the Jazz Society will be featured.
ST. ANSELM'S ANNUAL
THRIFT SALE
Friday, October 23rd, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 24th, 1:00-3:30 p.m.
YTC  RECREATION  HALL
ACADIA CAMP
Better   Used   Clothing   and   Household   Articles
WIRING
(Continued  from   Page   1)
said he would have to look at
the system to see if it is illegal
or unsafe.
Acadia Council President
Jim Fofonoff, said first information on the electrical situation came from irate residents
who have had loads stuck in
the machines.
"The over-used machines go
out occasionally from electrical
or mechanical difficulties," he
said.
Rob Colburn, head electric-
Ian for Buildings and Grounds,
said the wiring is "adequate
for its designed purpose."
He did not elaborate,
"Most of the time it's the
fuses, but I feel the entire
camp wiring is inadequate,"
said Fofonoff.
The army huts used in Acadia and Fort camps were first
wired in 1946 said one Fort
Camp proctor.
Proctors and UBC electricians contacted agreed the army
huts are tinderboxes. The huts
have fire alarm systems, and
are inspected regularly.
PRESCRIPTION I
EYE GLASSES
f ^^^Rfc IncludM % JL
,95
All Doctor's Eyeglass   Prescriptions )
filled. First  quality  materials  used. 1
All  work  performed   by  qualified I
Opticians. J
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville      MU 3-8921
i^^ Money-Back Guarantee *^^
LOUSY MERCHANDISE
-BUT TERRIFIC  PRICES I
UKELELE'S, only $2.99
CLASSIC GUITARS, reg.
ONLY $20.95
$39.95
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
9S6 Granvill. MU 5-7517
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office. Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
Transportation—Cont'd.
14
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST — Man's black diamond ring
with initial B. Phone Judy. 987-
8603. Reward offered for immediate return.
TAKEN, BRIEFCASE from lobby
of Bio-Science Bldg. Please phone
TR 6-7819 after 6, ask for Don.
STOLEN — BRIEFCASE, in Library
on Thurs. noon. Texts, briefcase
and slide rule may be kept. Please
return notes and problems to Lost
& Found or Library. Badly needed.
MISTAKENLY TAKEN week of Oct.
Sth, a white raincoat, size 36 (left
A40).   Phone WE  9-5031.
FOUND — Women's   black  diamond
ring, Thurs. morning, Brock. Contact Dorothy,  FAirfax 5-6103.
FOUND—Marg  Campbell trig text-
 book.    AMS  Publicatio*s_Office._
FOUND — ROSS' KONDO zoology
textbook. AMS Publications Office. "	
FOUND—Richard the Third RGE
text.    AM8 Publications Office.
FOUND—English zoo text. Please
identify.     Phone   J.    Croll,     WA
_ 2-5062. .__    	
FOUND—MICRO-MASTER copy of
Seismographic Geophysical Survey Recordings. Contact Don Bar-
cham  Lasaere  311,  or  phone  733-
4709.
*"OUND — LADY'S WRISTWATCH
on U.B.C. bus Friday. Oct. 16.
Phone CA 4-6261, ask for Knut.
LOST ■— a black non-reversible ski
jacket in vie. of playing field behind Brock. Finder please call
TR 4-7786 anytime.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED from 28M block
is.it 54t tor 8:3u classes Mon.
to Fri.   Phone John, 434-6122 eve-
_nings._	
RIDER WANTED along 41st~~from
Boundary and Kingsway for 8:30's
Mon. to Friday. Phone Rod, HE
3-5S26.
WANTED, ONE MAN to form two
member carpool from North Vancouver, preferably Delbrook area;
drive alternate days, arriving in
time for 8:30's Mon. to Fri. and
staying out till 9:00 p.m. Vhone
Pete, YU 7-3979 weeknights after
_ 9:30.	
RIDE WANTED for 8:30 classes,
from Knight Rd. and Kingsway.
Please phone Judy, TR 6-6665.
Wanted 15
URGENTLY NEEDED text book for
. French   411,   "19th   Century"   La-
garde    &    Michard.     Phone    AM
1-7557 after 6:00 p.m.       	
WANTED — Charming vivacious intelligent Frosh Queen named Pat
Jardine  for Homecoming Queen.
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
HEALEY 3000, new paint Job, wire
wheels, white walls, overdrive, radio and heater.    Phone AM 6-1212.
I960 STUDEBAKER LARK, radio,
excel, cond. N. Pollock, Geog. Dept.
Mon., Wed., Fri., 10:30-1 p.m. or
3353 W.  29th.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS
Music
63
CLASSICAL GUITAR tuition to advanced level. Segovia technique.
W.  Parker,   682-1096.
INSTRUMENTALISTS WANTED,
interested in accompaniment for
test recordings.    Phone  731-6874.
Tutoring
64
PHYSIOLOGY 804 and Zoology IM
Esp. Lab.) tutoring wanted. Judy,
TR 6-6666.
RIDERS WANTED to 8:30 lectures
every morning from Slocan Vi E-
2Sth. W»rm bi" car. Park in A-Lot.
Phone Bill, HE 3-8192.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
from the Phrateres Club. Only 75c.
TOTEM PRE SALES now at the
AMS office.
V
o
T
E
Michelle SPRING
for QUEEN
Jules "FORSYTH HARDY will present SONGS OF SCOTLAND
and other shorts."
jlm "Oh  hell II  not more of those glossy travelogues.
Jules "Hegvens no.    SONGS OF SCOTLAND is an
experiment in sound and vision.    The film
is in effect a short recital with a camera
handled with feeling and with imagination.
MARK MY WORDS."
/im "It remains to be seen."
juleS "Right, see you then."
Thursday, 22nd Oct., 12.30 p.m.
at Buchanan 102 Tuesday, October 20,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
UP, UP goes load of concrete for eighth storey of new
multi-million dollar Commerce building at corner of the
Main.Mall and University boulevard. Commerce and social
sciences complex will be completed for next year.
Words; not force
Canada's power
Canada will bcome a world power. But it will be as a
negotiator rather than as a military force, a. Liberal MLA
___——Mi.^___ said here Monday.
Bargain courses
offered students
Two special courses are
being offered to students at
bargain rates by the Extension Dept.
Music of the world's
People will start at 8 p.m.
Oct. 6, Hut 0-15. Student fee
is $8 for eight sessions, or
$15 for 16 sessions.
Art of Primitive Cultures
classes will be held for nine
Wednesdays starting Oct. 7,
at the Anthrapology
Museum, library basement at
8 p.m. The fee is $10 for students.
To register for either
courses contact Extension
Dept. local 886, or attend
first evening lecture.
Full slate
for UN week
It's UN Week on campus this
week and the UN Club has a
full week of activities planned.
Today, Turkish Dr. I. I. Por-
oy, assistant professor of economics, and Greek Stamatis
Kambasis, chemistry grad student, will discuss Cyprus at
noon in the upper lounge of
International House.
Wednesday noon former external affairs minister Howard
Greene speaks on Canada and
the UN in Bu. 104.
Thursday noon films on
West Africa will be shown in
IH with a discussion to follow.
Friday is UN Day on campus. At noon Bimce Belovsky,
Yugoslavian ambassador to
Canada speaks in Bu. 104.
Friday at 7:30 p.m. a model
security council will discuss
admission of China to the UN
in the IH upper lounge.
Dr. Pat McGeer, MLA for
Point Grey, spoke to about 50
students on Canada's Confederation and future at a meeting sponsored by the United
Nations club.
He said: "As a supplier of
raw materials, Canada has all
the assets for playing the role
oi  a world power."
"But," he continued, "Her
assets are out of proportion
with her population."
Referring to Canada's policing role in the Cyprus situation, McGeer claimed Canada
was chosen because of her understanding of the two-culture
problem.
"Our heritage of two foundling nations can contribute
greatly to a unified and peaceful world. And it is in the capacity of a world negotiator
that Canada can lead other
countries."
McGeer said Canada should
be flattered to be considered in
this light.
Five operations
Five heart-lung operations
are scheduled every week in
Vancouver. They require 30
pints of blood each.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538  West  10th Ave.
Ready to Help with
All Your Photo Problems
Complete Stock of
Darkroom Equipment
and Supplies
Your   B.C.   ILFORD   Stockist
The Store with the Technical
Photo knowledge
224-5858
224-9112
Ai least 100"
Better exchange
program urged
AMS first vice-president Bob Cruise has proposed a vast
expansion of student foreign exchange programs.
Cruise said  the  program
Homecoming
here with
three firsts
Homecoming's     here
with a few firsts.
again
This year for the first time
there will be four bands at the
dance Saturday.
• •    •
For the first time Lance Harrison will appear with rock 'n
rollers.
And for the first time dancers may be permitted to change
buildings after 10 p.m., said
Homecoming chairman Rick
McGraw.
• •    •
Half-time entertainment,
featuring the Goodtime Singers
will be staged first in the Armory at about 10:15 p.m., followed by the Homecoming
Queen candidates presentation.
Both groups will later appear
at the Field House.
• •    •
The Pep Meet at noon Thursday in the gym will feature
Lou Gottlieb and the presentation of the Great Trekker
award.
The queen's fashion show
will go on at noon today in
Brock.
would involve at least 100 students studying abroad in exchange for an equal number of
foreign students here.
There are only about 15 exchange scholars at UBC at
present.
Cruise said the AMS could
not finance the program.
Institutions, large corporations, the UBC Board of Governors, and perhaps the federal government are likely
sources for backing, he said.
Cruise said he is investigating the cost of sending and
supporting UBC students overseas. If the scheme is launched.
World University Service of
Canada will control it, he said.
There are now six foreign
scholars at UBC on WUSC
scholarships:
Mary Chihaya, Keito, Japan,
Political Science; Marianne
Cornelsen, Bonn, Germany,
Botany; Rcgine Chriz, Hamburg, Germany, Commerce;
Akiko Hirano, Tsuda College, Japan, English; Juan Ko-
kaly, Santiago, Chile, Commerce; Mark Markin, Leningrad, U.S.S.R., Philology; and
eight UBC scholars abroad.
Cruise said: "This is as yet
only a dream, but the educational benefits of such a plan
are obvious.
"The best way for students
to understand world problems
and views is to go over and experience them  first hand."
3 Chile lovers
needed for trip
Fond of Chile? The country, that is.
The World University Service of Canada is looking for
three students to go to their
international seminar in
Chile this summer.
Applications are available
in the WUSC office, Brock
Extension 257.
Total cost to those selected
will be $250.00.
China talks
still open
Lectures on Russia, China
and current international affairs, sponsored by the extension department, will be open
to students Wednesday and
Thursday.
Rene Goldman of UBC, who
studied at the University of
Peking from 1954 to 1958, will
speak on China in five Wednesday lectures starting at 8
p.m. Oct. 21 in Buchanan 222.
Sino-Soviet relations will be
discussed by Prof. Ivar Spec-
tor, University of Washington,
in Buchanan 104, Oct. 22 at 8
p.m.
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.   10th  Ave.
24 Hr. Service       CA 4-0034 THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, I'niversity of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are ihti.se of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the ["niversiiy. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
I.oc. 2li. Member Canadian I'niversiiy Press, Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mad by Post Office Department,
ttttawa. and  for payment  of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1964
wmmmmm
I
Homecoming, rah!
Ho-hum, it's Homecoming week again.
This week hundreds of alumns will be on campus
drinking in nostalgia, dark-colored liquids and memories
of a greater UBC.
Students will undoubtedly ignore the event with
their usual aplomb and drop it into financial chaos.
Last year the student portion of the program lost
$2,000 owing to poor attendance.
This year the program would appear to be as good
as any in the last four years.
The university, for reasons of size and diversity,
doesn't have much of the old rah, rah left.
In the early thirties students were screaming such
things as:
We are, we are, we are,
the men of Arts.
We'd tear, we'd tear,
the Sciencemen in parts.
We'd eat, we'd eat, we'd eat
their dirty hearts.
Only we don't care for Sciencemen.
So undignified.
Before that students were considering such names as
Sea Slugs, Philistines, Tartars and Seagulls before
eventually settling on Thunderbirds for their teams.
But it isn't the same as before. If an alumn asks if
you know his son just smile politely and point out
that there are 730 other John Flackenzorkers here and
that you don't even know your own name — just your
number 3733613.
Organizers of Homecoming events have partially
realized this, this year by breaking up the program
into smaller events to get more student participation.
Hence the change in name from just Homecoming
to Homecoming Festival—a number of events such as
lectures, a sports car rally, sailing regatta and coffee
served a la beat coffee house style have attempted to
decentralize Homecoming.
If this year's efforts fail to attract student interest
then we had better forget about Homecoming and take it
home to bed.
Or, organize the whole show around these smaller
events catering to specific interest groups.
To draw students to our big dances and charge
nearly $4 a ticket, you have to have top entertainment.
It seems a big name presentation that might interest
UBC students would be Mao and the Third World War
or perhaps the Second Coming.
Anything less  is  anti-climatic.
"Four years with London Ballet before Sir Ouvry even considers them.'
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Frenchy debate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Club Creditiste of UBC
graciously acknowledged the
"applause" for our "ambitious
adventure". That the Debating Union is dubious and confused is understandable but
intolerable.
To alleviate their doubts,
to remove their confusion, to
He's there alrighty
prove the efficacy and value
of our movement, it is with
pride not unmixed with joy
that the Club Creditiste accepts the invitation of the
Debating Union to a debate.
In the interests of expediency we will accept the topic.
With reservations we accept the language.
We will not accept the inference that the Club Credit-
>    , ,,  i -\,-
By Richard Simeon
Wild world of wooly signs at Yale
NEW HAVEN—A spectator
at a political rally here can
have more fun reading the
signs waved by the audiences
than listening to the speeches.
Hundreds of students spent
hours painting signs to wave
in front of Hubert H. Humphrey when he spoke here this
week.
•    •    •
Some of the results may
win awards in a pop art show,
but they won't win any medals
for poetry writing.
If signs could win elections, Goldwater might as
well give up now.
A sampling:
"Make the world safe for
Goldwater—vote LBJ."
On the other hand, you
col id "Help Goldwater stamp
out peace," or "How I became
a radical Conservative and
learned to love the bomb".
The Republicans made a
mistake with their slogan "In
your   Heart   you   know   he's
Richard Simeon is a former Ubyssey staffer now
studying political science al
Yale. He was part of a movement called the Calafhum-
pians vrtiich ran candidates
in an AMS election two
years ago, just in case you
are wondering.
right." There are dozens of
take-offs on that.
For example: "In your
heart, you know he's trite,"
or "In your heart, you know
he isn't very bright" and "In
your heart, you know he's
right . . . extremely so."
For those who prefer gut
issues, there's "In your guts,
you know he's nuts." (Not too
subtle, these sign painters.)
If you vote for LBJ, said
one sign, "The country you
save may be your own."
One man didn't like Gold-
water's attitude towards the
TVA. "Sell TVA? I'd sell Arizona first."
•    •    •
Other examples of the sign
painters art were: "Miller
makes Goldwater look good,"
to which I say Amen.
Or "Goldwater for Hallowe'en, HHH for the USA." One
girl isn't going to be happy
whatever the outcome of the
election. Her sign read, "Bet
ter a prudent thief than an
honest maniac."
Said another: "Don't
gamble with my life, vote
LBJ."
Booby prizes could be
awarded to the bright students
who dreamed up "Cold water
on Goldwater," and "Bilge-
water, strangewater, Gold-
water."
In the middle of the crowd,
waving one of the largest ban
ners of all, was a dark stranger, with a turned up collar
and a turned down hat brim.
Observers speculated he may
have been a subversive agent
from Canada.
His sign said: "Vote in a
lump, vote Calathump."
Trouble is, the Calathumps
didn't make it onto the ballot.
iste is composed only of men.
Ladies and gentlemen this
is our answer.
JENNIFER WHITTALL
Conr. Sect'y,
Club Creditiste.
•*•     Tr     V
Thanks chaps!
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Would you print this letter
to thank five fellows who
piled out of their car into the
rain at six o'clock last Thursday on Marine Drive to help
the owner of a grey Fiat with
a flat tire.
I couldn't get the wheel
off, but they had the tire
changed in nothing flat
(woops—that's a pun).
Three cheers for them.
PATRICIA  GRIFFITHS
Education V
>y,       .   - >:   ■.- w%\
EDITOR:   Mike   Horsey
Managing    Janet   Matheson
News   Tim Padmore
City   Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing   Norm  Betts
Asst. City  Lorraine Shore
Asst. News Carole Munroe
Associate  ~   Mike  Hunter
Associate   Ron  Riter
Magazine  _. Dave Ablett
Shore Swam. Noted lecturer on
woman's rights, one L. Shore was
thrown brutally into Buchanan
quadrangle pool late Monday afternoon in celebration of her nth
birthday. Among those contributing
— directly or indirectly — to her
demise were Doug Halverson, Lynn
Curtis, Rick Blair, Corol Smith, Bob
Burton, Lome Mallin, Al Francis,
Carol Anne Baker, Joan Godsell, Ed
C'arke, Sheri Galen, Robbi West,
Brent Cromie, Mona Helcermanas,
Bob Osmak. The indirectly is explained this way: contribution to
tension already manifest and exploding in deep, but not altogether
unforseen, URGES. (Like swimming,
clean  up your minds.) Tuesday, October 20,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
X
THE  BRIGHT  SIDE  OF  LEADERSHIP . . .
Delegates smile for photographer
University President Dr. John Macdonald leads singsong
then Whitelaw's water bomb .
—photos by John tyrell
and don hume
Leadership-
water, water
everywhere
By RON RITER
Ubyssey Associate Editor
The Alma Mater Society
leadership conference started off with a splash this
year.
Two conference organizers
stepped straight into the salt
chuck from the M.V. Hollyburn as it docked at Camp
Elphinstone Friday night.
Everything else went
swimmingly at the tenth annual conference.
More than 150 students,
alumni, and faculty and administration representatives
gathered for the weekend
conference, an in-depth study
of the AMS.
Keynote speaker was classics head Malcolm McGregor
who addressed the conference Friday night.
Saturday's panel discussion featured UBC president
John Macdonald, faculty association president John Norris, alumni president Dave
Brousson and AMS president
Roger McAfee.
Leadership was held in
camera and could not be reported directly by the press,
but the conference heard
lively discussions on AMS
council, UBC's administrar
tion, teaching and The Ubyssey.
Frosh president Kim Campbell shows Engineering president
Steve Whitelaw a thing or two
Sun goes down on Leadership conference Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 20, 1964
Sports shorts
Field hockey
one for four
In men's field hockey games
over the weekend UBC teams
came up with only one win in
four games.
Varsity was the only winning club with a 3-0 victory
over Vancouver "A" Saturday.
In another game Saturday the
Blues lost 3-0 to India. Sunday
the Blues tied the Hornets 1-1
and Golds were defeated 2-1
by the Hawks.
• •    •
In women's field hockey
UBC was undefeated in four
games played on the weekend.
Saturday Varsity tied Brits
Cubs 0-0 while UBC was tying
North Van by the same 0-0
score. Sunday Varsity defeated
North Van 1-0 with Liz Philpott scoring the winner and
UBC beat Brits 2-1.
• •    •
The Women's golf team
placed third in an WCIAA
tournament held in Edmonton
over the weekend.
Composed of Gayle Hitchens,
Diane kirby and Judy Ander- |
son the team finished with a
36-hole score of 597. Individually Miss Hitchen's score was
173, Miss Kirby's 202, and
Miss Anderson's 222.
• •    •
Any club or fraternity interested in entering a team in the
Intramural Bowling League is
asked to contact Mr. Allen in
the Memorial Gym Lanes
any time this week.
Many teams are needed to
complete the schedule. Students are reminded that this
year the lanes are outfitted
with new automatic pin setting
machines.
• *    *
The University Tennis Club
has the use of the courses in
the Field House every Wednesday evening, from 8:30 p.m. to
11:00 p.m.
The club is open to students,
faculty and staff at the following rates:
Faculty and staff
(single) $  6.00
Faculty and staff
(double) $10.00
Students      _ _  _ .      $ 3.00
For further information contact Miss June Barnish, Fine
Arts Dept. Office, Frederick
Lassere Building (local 344).
• •    •
Another highlight of Homecoming week for UBC students
will be the Pep Meet to be
held in the Memorial Gym
this Thursday at noon.
It will mark the beginning
of a full slate of feature sports
events.
Friday there will be a basketball jamboree at the Memorial Gym; Saturday the football game in Varsity stadium,
and Sunday the hockey jamboree at the Winter Sports
Centre.
The Thunderbirds basketball
and hockey teams will be on
display for the first time this
year during the  weekend.
By 5 - 7 score
In PCSL action
AUTO INSURANCE AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bob Balnr of A. R. Balrar Ltd.
1337 Marin*, W. Van.       922-41M
Sad home debut for Soccer T'Birds
It was a sad home debut
for UBC's Thunderbird soccer
team.
Saturday at Varsity stadium
they were defeated 5-1 by the
New Westminster Royals.
At half time the Royals had
a 3-1 lead on goals by inside
left Sigi Gohringer, right
winger Don Wilson and left
winger Metro Gerela.
In the second half New
Westminster added two more
on Gerela's second of the afternoon and one by substitute
forward Rob Goodheart.
ALERT PLAY
UBC's lone goal was scored
by Harvey Thorn from his left
wing position on an alert play
from a goal mouth scramble.
It came early in the first half
and tied the score 1-1. But
the Royals soon went back in
front to stay.
The Bird's most serious
problem seemed to be their
inability   to  put   the   ball   in
their opponent's net. In the
middle of the field, helped by
their youth and speed they
easily held their own. But
their passing cohesion disinte-
KEITH COMMONS
. . . hustling
grated   upon   reaching    their
adversaries' goal area.
Another problem was the
Bird's occasional slowness at
clearing the ball from their
own end.
OPPORTUNISTS
Although the Royals did
not dominat e the play
throughout the game their experienced forward line was
lightning quick to take advantage of every opportunity as
demonstrated by Gerela's
first goal.
UBC was breaking out of its
back pass. But it went back
too far and the Royals' Wilson
swooped down on the ball and
streaked towards the Birds'
goal pulling the ione UBC
defender to one side and making a perfect pass to Gerela
all alone in front of the Bird's
goal.
PROFESSIONALS
The difference between the
Birds    and    the    top    Coast
League clubs seems to be the
fine edge between polished
professionals—which no one
can deny most Coast Leaguers
are—and hustling amateurs.
HARVEY THOM
. . . pays off
Consider the time you spend getting your degree. It would be about 11 %
of your working life. To get the most out of the remaining 89% your work
should provide the opportunity and the scope to use your professional
knowledge and natural ability to best advantage.
Cominco, one of the world's largest mining, metallurgical and chemical
enterprises, has much to offer you. Its range of activities provide interesting
and challenging opportunities for graduates in most branches of engineering, in geology, physics and chemistry, and in other professions.
In calculating your future, make it a point to see our personnel representatives when they visit your campus. Or write to our Personnel Division, Trail,
British Columbia.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND SMELTING
COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED Tuesday, October 20, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
AROUND THE CAMPUS
By BRUCE KIDD
For Canadian University Press and by special arrangement
with The Ontario-Quebec Athletic Association.
Kidd, a Canadian middle distance runner in the Olympics,
is receiving no compensation, either direct or indirect, for
this series.
The three-day drizzle that preceded the official opening of the XVIII Olympiad was a nuisance for some athletes here in the Olympic Village and could prove to be
the kiss of death for others. For the trackmen there's only
the threat of colds, but since slippery throwing circles
are dangerous for both athlete and bystander, the field
event men were forced indoors.
For athletes who have completed their preparatory programs a layoff is often a good thing. But for those who
counted on sharpening up here, especially the athletes
from south of the equator who have just come through a
long winter, three days missed could cost a medal.
• •     •
As the day of reckoning approaches, fewer athletes
show up each evening at the large recreation hall and
those who do have become quieter. Conversely, those commercial firms who hope to profit by the Games accelerate
their activity.
Undoubtedly the most heated competition between these
commercial camp followers occurs in the market for track
shoes, where the amateur status of the athlete iz ruthlessly
exploited. The advertising value of having a gold medal
winner break the tape in Brand "X" shoes is tremendous,
so all companies flood name athletes with their shoes in
hopes they will be worn in a final event. One company
has even changed the basic coloring of its shoe because the
new color scheme will show up better on television. This
same company also has tailor-made shoes for one or two
favorites, although all shoes they sell are manufactured
on an assembly line.
• •     •
The amateur code bars athletes from taking money for
sporting a particular brand of spikes. But this doesn't
prevent athletes from accepting numerous pairs of shoes
as gifts. In fact, among sprinters a man's reputation is in
direct proportion to the number of shoes he has been given.
The shoe acceptance record was established in the
last Games in Rome when 400-metres hurdles champ Glenn
Davis of the U.S. sent home 47 pairs of shoes. A top
runner rarely uses one-tenth of the shoes he collects and
most give them out to younger runners in their home
clubs who would otherwise have to buy their own.
A less exclusive item of Village collection is the souvenir badge. Most athletes come armed with several pins
decorated with their own country's official insignia, plus
any other trinkets which they hope will attract a trade.
Swapping keeps the Village moving 24 hours a day.
• •     •
The most astute traders come from behind the Iron
Curtain. They trade in groups to intimidate you and they
offer a miscellaneous assortment of pins in exchange for
your maple leaf.
When you show your pin the Hungarian grabs it and
then passes it around to all his friends, who grunt either
approval or disapproval—you're not sure if you'll ever see
it again. Then if you're not careful, he'll reach into his
pocket, pull out a fairly good-looking pin with a red star
on it, wave it in front of you, give it to you, and disappear.
When you look at your acquisition closely, it'll read something like "World Youth Festival, 1951."
• •     •
In addition to official team coaches Bob Adams and
Jim Daly, most athletes will have their own personal
coaches along. The presence of your own coach can be
a big factor in the Olympics for he can quickly dispel any
doubts about your own training and techniques that you
might pick up in Village gossip. In athletics, there are
many different training diets which can nourish a champion, but it is imperative o stick to your own. Inconsistency
can be fatal.
UBC rugger chaps
give Lomas College try
UBC's rugger chaps lost their first game of the season
Saturday.
, Meralomas' P; Preston scored a try in the dying moments of the final half and nicked the T'Birds 19 to 17.
Seconds before Preston's breakaway score, UBC's
Gary Rowles crossed the Meraloma goal line—but the try
was disallowed.
Brian Cartmel led UBC scorers with two penalty goals
and a conversion. Chuck Plester scored two tries and Bob
Pertland rounded out the scoring with one.
'Bird coach Brian Wightman agreed that the game was
close and his boys played extremely well but "we just
didn't possess the ball long enough," he said. "Dick Hayes
was again a standout and newcomer Stewart Schofield,
playing his first game at scrum half, acquitted himself quite
well," he added.
RON KINCAIDE
... 3 majors
LLOYD DAVIS
. . airway thief
JOHN REYKDAl
. . . strong line
In Football
Headhunters like 'Frisco
By ED CLARK
UBC Thunderbirds came
home with a 27 to goose win
but Lome Davies' headhunters left their mark in San
Francisco on Saturday.
The big defensive wall of
Shatzko, McLaughlin, Stein
and Donald held the once
powerful University of San
Francisco rushing offence to
only 20 yards in 23 carries;
less than 1 yard per carry
iverage, as the T'Birds shellacked their host in the American city.
KINCAIDE STARS
UBC opened scoring in the
first quarter when Ron Kin-
caide plunged over tackle
from the one yard line behind
George Brajcich's block. The
blistering fullback scored his
second of three majors on a
40-yard run in the second
quarter and dived over tackle
for three yards for his third
touchdown in the third quarter.
Kincaide's    TD    run    delighted even his victim's fans.
Shooting through a gaping
hole sliced in the Frisco line
by UBC's powerful offensive
blockers he danced his way
through the defensive secondary — cut to the sidelines —
and broke into the clear, leaving his would be tacklers muttering in the mud.
Norm Thomas rounded out
the 'Birds' scoring in the final
quarter when he combined
with quarterback Roger Hardy
on a 41-yard pass and run
play.
STATISTICAL  STORY
Ken Danchuk clicked on
three converts; the fourth was
nullified on a holding call.
Roger Hardy completed
eight out of 14 passes for 162
yards    and    the    UBC   squad
gained a massive total of 352
yards total offence. The biggest gun was Kincaide who
gathered up 119 yards of real
estate in eight carries.
The big difference was the
defence; besides the outstanding play of the front wall, the
'Bird defensive backfield
picked off five interceptions
and recovered two 'Frisco
fumbles.
Lloyd Davis and Ken Danchuk each had two interceptions while John Reykdal gathered in" the fifth. It was the
second   week   in  a   row  UBC
had made five interceptions.
Assistant coach Lome Davies said that offensive tackle-
George Barjcich and linebacker Dave Reid played their
usual outstanding game but
credit must go to everyone as
it was a team effort.
The only casualty was halfback Bob Sweet who suffered
a mild concussion and didn't
play  the   second   half.
The Thunderbirds enjoyed a
night on the town Saturday.
According to Lome Davies il
was an enjoyment well deserved.
SCRIPTS WANTED
Material of any type
Suitable for  Revues
Cash or royalty wil
be paid if used
"PRO-ACT"
1865 W. 12th Ave.
731-6874
Professional Actors
Production Activities
A TRIP TO EUROPE FOR
LESS THAN $100
Switzerland, Oct. 5 — The International Travel Establishment will locate job opportunities in Europe for anyone
who likes the idea of a fun-filled, low cost trip to Europe.
Jobs are available in all fields in every European country.
Interested students should send $2 to ITE, 68 Herren-
gasse, Vaduz, Liechtenstein (Switzerland) for a complete
do-it-yourself kit which includes the key to getting a job
in Europe, the largest European job selection available,
applications, instructions, money saving tips and information guaranteeing you a trip to Europe (including transportation) for less than $100.
Welfare, General Administration, Public Relations, Economics
«
E
E
o
u
2?
£
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
with the
GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA
for university graduates of ALL faculties including
Arts, Economics, Commerce, Science, Law
as
JUNIOR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
and
FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS
STARTING SALARIES
$405 TO $505 A MONTH
Depending Upon Qualifications
EXAMINATION PROGRAMME
Oct. 21, 7 p.m.—ALL CANDIDATES—Objective Test
Oct. 22, 7 p.m. — FOREIGN SERVICE CANDIDATES — Essay paper and, for those with a
knowledge  of  French,  a  written   language test.
D
•5]
o
1
Q
2
Q.
i"
3
&
3
».
o
I
a
.5"
O
o
N*
o
5"
a
»•
I
3-
8.
FOR COMPLETE DETAILS SEE YOUR
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICER
Editorial, Legislation, Personnel, Indian Affairs, Labor Relations Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 20, 1964
'tween classes
Noted pianist plays here
Noted Polish pianist Merek
in the Auditorium. Jablonski,
sponsored by Special Events.
• •    •
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Your Words: Keys to Fulfilment or Destruction, a talk by
Michael Cecil, Wednesday noon
in Bu. 221.
• *    •
SCM
Rev. Allen Jackson, Anglican
chaplain, will speak at noon
Wednesday in Bu. 100 on The
Noble Savage.
• •    •
NDP
Labor expert Clyde Lytle
will speak in Bu. 202 Wednesday noon on the recent British
election.
• •    •
UN CLUB
Dr. I. Poroy, for Turkey, and
Mr. S. Kambarris, for Greece,
discuss Cyprus at IH, noon today. Everyone invited.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
Dr. Schwartz presents two
films on Schizophrenia. Noon
Wednesday WE. 100. Admission charge;  members  free.
• •     •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Miss Egoff. school of librarianship, speaks today on funds
available for Librarianship students. Bu. 225. All welcome.
• •    •
DEBATING UNION
AH members of the Debating
Uriiori wishing to participate in
intra-Union (Forum) Debates,
please meet, in Bu. 217, noon
Wed. No- experience necessary.
Jablonski plays today at noon
here on a West Coast tour, is
Admission is 25 cents.
SUS
General meeting noon Wednesday in Hennings 200. Meet
the Science Queen. Stunt.
• •    •
RAMBLERS
All hockey, football and volleyball players report to club-
room noon today to check on
game times.
• •    •
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Dr. A. Jospe, national director of programming and resources will be here from
Washington      this      afternoon.
• •    •
UBC SQUASH
General meeting Bu. 202 today and every Friday from
now on. All attend.
• •    *
BADMINTON CLUB
Badminton 8:30 tonight in
War Memorial Gym. Everyone
welcome.
• •    •
STUDENT COMMITTEE
ON CUBAN AFFAIRS
First General meeting noon
today, Bu. 216. Elections. All
members and interested parties
welcome.
• •    •
DE MOLAY
Executive elections noon today in Bu. 227.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Regular lunch-hour discussion meetings are now Monday and Wednesday in Bu.
1221.
NOW  PLAYING
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3123  West Broadway   -   October   19th -24th
2ND VANCOUVER SHOWING OF
"DEAD RINGER" at 9:15 p.m.
What Bette Davis does to Bette Davis
and to Karl Maiden and Peter Lawford
n"DEAD RINGER"s just what
Baby Jane's people will adore!
pJjUA
REX  HARRISON RITA HAYWORTH
"HAPPY THIEVES" at 7:30
Witty Sparkling Comedy!
ADULTS ONLY 50c    ■    Doors Open 7 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting in Bu. 214
Wednesday   noon.
• •    •
SCM & AA
Dr. Bartolli speaks on Education Redefined, Bu. 100 at
noon today.
• •    •
WUS
Meeting now Wednesday
12:40 in Brock T.V. room.
• •    •
LUTHERANS
Gamma Delta meeting noon
Wed. The third on Hinduism.
Everybody welcome.
• •    •
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
CBC series Wednesday noon
in La. 102. First in How to
Look at a City.
• •    •
IH
All students are invited to a
ea from 3-5 p.m.
• •    •
NDC
Dr. Hall, exchange professor
from London University,
speaks noon today in Bu. 102
on Viet Nam, The Present
Crisis.
• •    •
YOUNG BOURGEOIS
Pick of Pique meets 12:30 in
Brock   Boardroom.   All   YBA-
VA's appear trailing clouds of
glory.
Ubyssey extends coverage
through Pacific Northwest
SEATTLE (PSP)—An organization to provide The
Ubyssey with news coverage of Washington state was formed at a meeting of student editors here this weekend.
The meeting of nine student editors from college
papers in Washington state and The Ubyssey set up the
Pacific Student Press—(PSP).
The meetings were held on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Hosts were members of the staff
of the University of Washington Daily.
PSP will provide an exchange of stories and features
between member papers.
The Ubyssey covers the rest of Canada in a similar
fashion through Canadian University Press—(CUP).
For purposes of the news service The Ubyssey will
continue to recognize Canadian sovereignty south to the
Columbia River.
Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Whit* k Mm Ceate
Shirti 4 Aicmiw
■Nm linn
•hectors' CmH Sates ft Reatea
OVIS 2.000 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FIOM
E. A.  LEE   Formal  Wear Rentals
423 HOWE (OovMtein) MU J-24I7
IMS Granville (et 10th)      44S1 Kinttws* (thy.)
 REJ-4727 (fcy Sm») HE 1-1100
-SPECIAL EVENTS-
presents
OCT. 20, TUESDAY
Noted pianist on West Coast tour —
Wl&A&ck QabLonAki
"Most important pianist since Glenn Gould"
12:30 Auditorium
REGULAR
and
KING SIZE
du MAURIER
a  product   of  Peter   Jackson  Tobacco   Limited  —   makers  of fine cigarettes
o

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127300/manifest

Comment

Related Items