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The Ubyssey Oct 14, 1964

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 Mr.
President
THS UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII,  No.   11
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1964
CA 4-3916
50 arrested
Police
smash
mob scene
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) —
More than 50 screaming university students were pulled
out of anti-Canadian demonstrations before the Queen Saturday in Quebec City and
hauled off to jail.
Demonstrations began at
10:30 a.m. when the Queen
arrived at the Provincial Legislature Building to the cry of
"Le Quebec au Quebecois."
Arrests by plainclothes police and one RCMP officer in
uniform changed the yelling
to "Gestapo, Gestapo," and
changed the demonstration into
a riot, said CUP reporters at
the scene.
Within seconds orange-clad
riot squads and Quebec City
Police, assisted by RCMP and
Quebec Provincial Police
swung into action with night
sticks and restored order.
At this and four other demonstrations 50 students from
Laval Montreal and Sherbrooke were arrested.
Police declined to disclose
names of those arrested or the
charges laid until demonstrators appear in court Tuesday morning.
A check of the Criminal
Code of Canada reveals demonstrations may be in violation
of Section 49—Acts intended
to alarm Her Majesty or break
public peace.
Maximum sentence is 14
years. At press time it was
not known whether this charge
would be laid.
Demonstrations occurred at
3 p.m. after the Queen arrived
at The Citadel to inspect the
Royal 22nd Regiment.
A mob on the grass of a
nearby park chanted "Quebec
oui, Ottawa non" until eight
truckloads of police arrived
and broke up the demonstration.
Police dispersed the mob
with nightsticks.
Section 46a of the Criminal
Code of Canada states: Everyone commits treason who, in
Canada, kills or attempts to
kill Her Majesty ... or imprisons or restrains her.
Pro-French, Canadian University Press reporters on the
scene said the police action
fanned the flames of separation among French students.
"Many were moved to shout
independence slogans for the
first time," a dispatch said.
KIM CAMPBELL
unify Frosh
First female president
Kim brightens
Frosh executive
The Frosh class has its first female president ever.
Eighteen-year-old Kim Campbell was elected president of
the Frosh class with a 100-vote
margin over runner-up Gordon Murphy.
No money
for dorms,
Haar says
Housing Administration cannot improve UBC residences
without more money, housing director John Haar said
Tuesday.
More   than   25  per   cent   of
The demonstrations have ledthe Frosh   voted —  nearly
to angry headlines throughout double     the     number    which
the Commonwealth. turned  out last year.
"This  is  without  doubt  the     About    800    of    the    3,167
most massive, the most griev-Frosh .voted,
ous   insult   ever   offered   the     Steve   Beckow   was   elected
monarch,"    said    the   London vice-president;   Christine   Max-
Daily Mail's correspondent.       well,  secretary;  and  Ian Mac-
Doi'pall   executive  member.
Miss Campbell was elected
on the second ballot, after the
third candidate, Bill Thompson, was eliminated after poll-
QUEEN
SEE PAGE 2
ing only about 100 votes on
the first ballot.
The new president expressed
satisfaction with her executive.
"My aim is to unify Frosh
and give them an identity this
year," she said.
"A study will be made of
each Frosh council position
and definite duties will be assigned to each member."
She said that more use
would be made of representatives in English 100 classes
and that newsletters will be
distributed by the representatives.
Haar said Housing is laying plans for improvement and
expansion of residences but
that its hands are tied because
of lack of funds.
Haar was replying to charges
in last Thursday's Ubyssey by
married student Michael De-
land that Housing Administration is perpetuating slum conditions in Acadia camp married quarters.
PAINT PEELING
Deland said paint ,on the
walls of the 25-year-old temporary huts is peeling off. He
complained that only 130 units
are available for 1,800 married students.
Haar said the number of
units would not be increased
unless more money is made
available.
UBC married students are
being "caught in a two-way
financial squeeze, he said.
Housing can't afford more
married residences and married students can't afford to
rent off-campus  housing.
"There are many apartments
available for students in the
university area but the rent
usually exceeds the students'
financial means," he said.
LIMITED
Haar said residence repairs
and upkeep are also limited by
the budget.
"Repairs and general upkeep
are continued systematically
throughout the year as the
budget will allow," he said.
Haar said the situation became even worse this year
when 10 married student huts
were removed for the new
dentistry building.
He . said Housing is laying
plans for more residences.
"Housing Administration, on
request from graduate students, will meet with academic
planner John Chapman to discuss and analyze the needs of
married students so when and
if funds for expansion become available, information
concerning their needs will be
there."
The uneven growth in numbers of married students at
tending UBC has aggravated
the problem of providing adequate housing, said Haar.
Deans propose
mid-term break
The Council of Deans has
recommended a mid—term
break Mar. 4 to 7.
"Since this is an academic
matter, it will require approval by the Senate," said
Registrar V. E. Parnall.
JOHN HAAR
. needs money
No repairs
for shacks,
prober says
The administration does not
intend to spend any money repairing army shacks, claims
graduate student president Jim
Slater.
Slater, member of an AMS
committee investigating married housing has no plans to
replace the housing.
He said his committee hopes
a survey they are preparing
will show if replacement plans
are feasible.
He said the committee is
negotiating with university officials and the provincial government.
The Married Student Wives'
survey, to be completed at the
end of this month, will help
to point out needs and the
direction that should be taken.
Slater said.
"However, any plans for
actual construction are very
much up in the air," he said.
"There is no chance of construction this year."
Slater said he agrees with
Acadia Camp resident Michael
Deland, who last week called
the camp a slum.
He said a resident would
have to be a handyman to be
happy living there. "He'd havr
to be good at putting plastic
over the windows to keep the
water out."
Slater, who lived on campus
last year, has moved off campus this term. He was married
during the summer. THE URYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Authorized as second-class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1964
To what avail?
We said it before she came, and we'll say it now
that she's gone: The Queen should have stayed home.
Not that we're against the personage, or even the
institution, of the monarchy.
It is simply that the purpose and ideals of Canadian
unity at this time would have been better served by her
absence.
The royal presence failed — if, indeed, such was
planned—to ameliorate the grief of division threatening
Canada.
Instead, it afforded a focus for the hatreds and
lunacies of those who would like nothing better than
to see our country torn in two or more chaotic fragments.
What better way for Quebec's crackpot fringe to
attract attention than to demonstrate along the royal
tour route—a route the world was watching?
Over-zealous provincial authorities didn't help
matters, eithers. Newsreels of helmeted cops with over-
length nightsticks lacing savagely into demonstrations
and bystanders alike made Quebec look like the Mississippi of Canada.
And to what avail?
To protect the Queen from insult?
To maintain a farcial illusion that all is peachy-keen
with Canada's century-old federation?
To disguise the fact that only a handful of French*
Canadians turned out to see "their" Queen?
No answer to these questions will justify the result
of the Queen's visit; French Canada's idiot minority
has added another block to the asinine wall it is building between Canada's founding races.
And the result would have been the same if the
demonstrators had been allowed to croak and babble unchecked for all the world to hear.
Blue Tuesday
The only thing worse than Monday morning is when
Monday's Tuesday.
Thus, our cynicism boiled up yesterday in big, ugly
gripes as all the things that the world has against us
oozed down upon us like a soggy mass of cold oatmeal
porridge.
It isn't quite raining. Far worse than if it is, in which
case the sleepy decision to bring an umbrella is predetermined. It rains anyway.
Traffic bottleneck at Gates. No better anywhere else.
Worst it's ever been. Entrance to lots blocked by bureaucratic rules, narrow roads, devious entrance routes. We
pay $5 for this privilege.
Late for class. It's almost November and still haven't
done any work. Prof so disgusted with everybody he
starts calling attendance. Bad news.
Forgot lunch. Raining, so everybody jams lunch
counters. Used up all money on "holiday" weekend, so
can't buy anything but donut and small milk, white.
Still have to stand in line.
Never put newspapers out on Tuesday. Why should
we this time? Stacked all classes so afternoons free on
regular press days. All staff at Tuesday afternoon
seminars.
Tired, agitated. Giggling freshette in corner is worse
than little lightning bolt in headache tablet commercial.
Fight home through rush-hour traffic. Worst it's ever
been. Dinner in warmer, cold.
Try to read. Fall asleep. Decide it's best to pack it up
right now. Down with Tuesday Mondays. Anybody want
to sell pair of rose-colored glasses?
EDITOR:   Mike   Horsey
Managing          Janet   Matheson
News     Tim  Padmore
City    Tom  Wayman
Art   Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing    Norm  Betts
Asst. Ci*-y .. .  Lorraine Shore
Asst. News  Carole Munroe
Associate     Mike  Hunter
Associate    Ron  Riter
Magazine   Dave Ablett
Torpid Tuesdayers who managed to
grind out enough to fill this eight
wire Paul Wood, John Dilday, Art
Caspcrsoii. Frank Let", Hob Burton,
Al Francis. Hick Blair, Corol Smith,
Ian MacDougall, Ed Clarke, Jack
McQuarrie, (sports), Jim Adams,
Hob Weiser, Linda Morrisson, Lome
Mallin. Robbie West, Don Hull,
Carol Anno Baker, Jennifer Schiffer,
Mark Francis, Paul Terry, and probably some others. God what a day.
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
May we correct...
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Secretary-Treasurer Jean
Melvin of the Fort Camp Women's Council is correct in
her letter to the editor saying
that rates for wemn's residences at Fort Camp were inaccurately shown in the President's statement on residences.
There was no intent to mislead. All accommodation rates
are available on rate sheets
published by the Housing
Authority. An error occurred
in condensing this sheet for
the statement.
There are 254 beds for women at Fort Camp. The rates
for 230 beds in permanent
buildings there are $595
double or $630 single. These
are the rates charged as well
in Lower Mall residences and
the new Totem Park residences.
For 24 beds in the Mary
Bollert Annex at Fort, consisting of former army huts,
the rates are $525 double and
$630  single.
RALPH DALY,
Director of Information
Services.
V     ^f»    *p
Woe is us sheeps
Editor, The Ubyssey:
After attending several student council meetings I have
come to the conclusion that
our elected student leaders
are not leaders at all, but
sheep. Unfortunately I must
classify myself as one of the
flock.
It is absolutely disgusting
the way in which we passively, gullibly and stupidly swallow everything that Mr. McAfee decides to put before us.
We don't seem to think at
Council meetings, nor are we
given the opportunity to
think. Instead, we sit there
mutely and obediently raise
our hands when asked to.
Surely when we ran for office we believed in ourselves.
We asked students on this
campus to believe in us,
which they did. By voting for
us, they declared their faith
in our ability to think, judge,
and weigh all aspects of issues put before passing legislation on these issues.
Until now we have failed
miserably. However it is not
too late. Let us act like the
sensible, honest, vital leaders
our voters think us to be and
not like the meek sheep our
President deservedly treats us
as. Let us reaffirm the principle of responsible government by responsible people.
Sincerely, baa,  baa, baa!
V     V     V
Transport ond snobs
Editor, The Ubyssey:
There has been much talk
lately about the high expenses incurred by students,
including transportation costs.
But instead of devising ways
of meeting transport expenses, why not try to eliminate them as far as possible?
Because of the zoning laws
for the University Endowment Lands and adjacent
parts of Vancouver, and their
effects on the cost of housing
and availability of apartments, not all of the people
who work or study at UBC
and want to live in that vicinity  can do so.
So while the volume of
commuters and traffic jams
grow and grow, these areas
continue to be inhabited
largely by people whose only
reason for living there is
prestige.
Might not a change of zoning laws help the situation?
Or must our education suffer
because of snobbery?
NORMAN  THYER.
Institute of
Oceanography,    UBC.
*r     •!•    ^r
Girdle me o car
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Hey, you people who park
cars with big hips. Slip a
girdle on your chassis and
park your cars closer together.
Why are there great six-
foot gaps between parked
cars in the student lots?
Are you afraid of scratching your pride and joy or
more often Daddy's pride and
joy?
Shift your hips kiddies, so
that we too can forego the
daily strut pass the odifer-
ous Aggie barns.
LORNE  MALLIN,
Education I.
English beefs pleose
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Students who have complaints about courses and instructors should bring their
grievances before the appropriate authority. Your correspondent, "A Future English
Major", would be well advised to identify himself, arrange to see me, and state in
specific terms the basis of the
opinion he expresses in his
letter to you (Ubyssey, Oct. 6)
on behalf of 1600 of his classmates. I will be glad to consider any reasonable comments he may wish to make.
J.   deBRUYN,
Chairman,
English 100.
V     •**     •*•
Where's the Survey
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Last year I, and I was lead
to believe several thousand
other students, filled out a
questionnaire for the Alma
Mater Society.
It was a very personal sort
of thing, you kndw, about how
much I was making in the
summer, my sex, age, how
much mommy and daddy
made. That sort of thing.
So when I returned to the
university this fall I thought
I would be able to read the
results of this so-called survey.
Your paper says two things
on the subject. It cost over
$3,000 of student money to
have it done and it isn't ready
yet.
All I want to know is why?
A simple request surely. Your
paper also said we hired our
president for the summer. Did
he, I wonder, spend any time
getting the results of this survey.
What's the matter? If the
powers that be hold onto the
results much longer it will be
like making a quick survey of
the population's need and requirements for model T Fords,
now.
Since I have just taken the
federal government's $1,000
loan offer up, I am more than
interested .  .   .  and broke.
MIKE GRENDILLER Wednesday, October 14, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
—don hume photo
SCIENCE QUEEN, Mary McQueen, studies a 1000 milliliter
beaker. Mary, 19, second year science, is very scientific,
as you can see. Registrar J. E. Parnall reports enrolment
in Science faculty is climbing sharply.
Queen no Canuck
with Creditistes
The UBC Creditiste Club welcome the visit of the Queen
----------------------------------- of Canada.
rTimriiT  /•/Mir)T       "We don't object to the head
STUDENT COURT
HEARING
Take notice that the Discipline Committee is investigating the mailer of egg-
throwing at Screech Day.
Persons desiring to give
evidence in this matter are
directed to the hearings to
be held at 12:30 p.m., Oct.
15, 1964 in the TV room.
Brock  Hall.
DICK   HAYES,
Chairman,
Discipline Committee.
Jabez haunts
Alma Mater
Those gales of laughter you
heard in the next room were
probably coming from Eric
Nicol's class in Creative Writing 202.
He was a Ubyssey staffer for
10 years writing his famous
jaberwocky column under the
pseudonym   'Jabez'.
Nicol is coming back to the
university on a temporary assignment, probably for one
year, to help out the English
department.
of any foreign government vis
iting Canada," Barry Cooper,
president of the club, said.
The club had 60 members
at its organizational meeting
Friday.
Cooper said that the club
was not affiliated with any
separatist movement in Quebec.
"There cannot be any social
union with two cultures as
separate as French and Anglo-
Saxon," he said.
The club's objective is to
present the French-Canadian
viewpoint  to UBC  students.
The club plans a sale of bilingual sweatshirts — with "Je
Suis Creditiste" on the back
and "Creditiste Club — UBC"
on the front.
A speech by the former vice-
president of the Danish Social
Credit party is also planned.
The club will schedule a debate and a Creditiste Social.
Dates and locations for these
events will be announced later.
The club elected its executive and named Real Caouette,
leader of the Quebec Creditistes, as their honorary president.
Beer-logged survivors
await Rushing results
By BOB BURTON
Today I find out if I really
am a frat rat.
This is Bid Day for the 18
fraternities at UBC—the day
when 250 pledges join the
Greek  letter  societies.
These students are the survivors of the Fall Rush which
started Sept. 28.
• •    •
Today when I open that envelope, I and the many other
students rushing would like to
see a bid from a frat.
But I'm not sure why.
I've undergone the torture of
two weeks of rush functions.
A function is a minor hell of
handshaking, monotonous conversation, and standing for
three hours without a break.
The rushee can, however,
ease his throat with all the
beer he can drink.
• •    •
But having a binge at the
frat's expense usually results
in being dinged (cut from the
list of rushees to that fraternity).
The rushees must try and
make an impression on the
fraternity actives, but he
shouldn't look like he's trying
too hard.
He has to be nice to people
he's never met and will forget
two minutes afterward.
• •    •
But when I pick up my envelope tomorrow, I still want
to be able to sign one invitation and be greeted by my new
brothers.
A   fraternity   will   associate
Chile seminar
World University Service of
Canada Summer Seminar for
10n5 will be held in Chile.
Presidents
challenged
to log ro
Forestry Undergraduate Society has challenged AMS president Roger McAfee, all Undergraduate society presidents and
Ubyssey editor Mike Horsey to
a log-rolling contest.
The contest will be held in
the Buchanan quadrangle pool,
Thursday noon.
Two logs will be placed in
the pool.
The contestants will don
caulked boots supplied by the
Foresters.
They will then board a log
and start  it rolling.
To win, a contestant must
stay on his log while swamping
his opponent.
Following the contest there
will be a boomstick race between representatives of Nursing and Home-Ec.
A boomstick is something
like a peavey.
The contest marks start of
Forestry Week,  Oct.  13 to 16.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
me with a group smaller than
the faculty of education.
It will also give me a chance
to be involved in student activities.
•    •    •
But if I do get accepted
today, my troubles don't end.
The pledge must undergo a
larval stage which lasts from
one to three months, depending
on the fraternity.
He must satisfy the frat as
to his academic ability, that
he pass his Christmas exams
and, finally, be initiated.
Besides all that, I still have
to fork out between $95 and
$140, again depending on the
fraternity and the cost of the
jewel-studded pin.
Vance leads milk crusade
against residence cafeteria
A one-man rebellion is underway in Fort Camp
cafeteria.
Student activities coordinator, Graeme Vance, Fort
Camp resident, refuses to pay an extra 5 cents when he
takes a second glass of milk at the camp's cafeteria.
"The 'budget for meals is cut so fine that a growing lad
is missing his proper amount of calcium," he said.
He said he will continue to take his extra glass of milk
without paying until something is done about the situation.
Pole prank
Seven remanded
in Totem theft
By DON HULL
VICTORIA—Seven students from Victoria College were
remanded for a. week Tuesday, on charges arising from
theft of a totem pole from Thunderbird Park this week-end.
Four   of   the   students
are
charged with theft over $50
and three with possession of
stolen property. The students
spent about two hours in jail
and were released on $300
bail.
Seven students stole the pole
Saturday while dressed as
workmen, taking it away on a
truck.
The act was described by
Peter Bowers, editor of the
Martlet, as a college prank,
but he stressed it was not sponsored by the college.
Bowers said the students
fully intended to return the
pole the next morning but
were picked up by the police
before they could do this.
The police, he said, were acting on a tip from an unidentified woman.
"Such acts are headaches to
the department — taking men
away from their regular jobs,
and depriving the public of its
required protection," said
Chief V.  G. Gregory.
Frosh sloshed
TORONTO (CUP) — The
Frosh picnic at the Ryerson
Institute of Technology was no
place for adults. Fifteen students were summonsed for
liquor violations during the afternoon whirl.
AUTO  INSURANCE  AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers  24 yrs. &  up
Call Bob Baker of A.  R. Baker Ltd.
1327 Marina, W. Van.       922-6188
Ukeleles, from  $ 3.99
Guitars, from  $10.99
Tuneable  Bongos, from    $16.50
Baritone Ukelele  ....$14.99
Used   Banjo    $39.95
Drum Outfit (English) ....$149.95
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
986 Granville MU 5-7517
Oxxidsmb: ddtivitisA
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THAT S. I. HAYAKAWA, INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS
SEMANTICIST AND ONE OF THE FOREMOST PHILOSOPHERS OF OUR TIME, IS COMING TO UBC. HIS
TOPIC WILL BE "PROBLEMS IN COMMUNICATIONS",
AND HIS TALK SHOULD BE WELL WORTH ATTENDING. HE WILL BE SPEAKING AT 6:00 P.M. SHARP
TONIGHT ONLY, IN THE FREDDY WOOD THEATRE.
ADMISSION WILL BE $1.00 AND TICKETS WILL BE
AVAILABLE THIS AFTERNOON AT THE AMS OR
TONIGHT AT THE DOOR. WE URGE YOU NOT TO
MISS  THIS OPPORTUNITY. Class of'6 ... career men of '66
A talk with the IBM representative
could make yours a career of achievement
There is a climate of achievement at IBM. It is a
rewarding climate for men like yourself, with opportunities in a variety of fields. For our interest is
spread over the physical sciences, mathematics,
electronics, business administration, commerce
and finance and engineering. We have skilled
people with us who hold practically every kind of
bachelor's degree. This breadth of academic background which we are constantly seeking, and the
emphasis on problem-solving at IBM, helps account for the intellectual vitality here. We think
of it as a climate for professional achievement.
That is the ideal IBM tries to attain. The kind of
ideal that encompasses your environment, your
security and your career goal.
Your education may well have prepared you for
entering these rewarding fields of opportunity at
IBM: • marketing and system development
• administration and finance
• computer programming
• science and engineering
But there are no rigid limitations. For, as you
would expect of a vigorous, modern company,
recent arrivals at IBM represent a tremendous
variety of interest, experience and personality.
Whatever your degree, if you are interested in a
stimulating job that is mentally as well as materially rewarding, it would be well worth your
while to consider a career with IBM. We have a
brochure describing career openings. Consult your
university placement officer. He can also put you
in touch with our career representatives when they
visit your campus. But, if you prefer, contact:
Mr. W. E. Redpath
1445 West Georgia Street
Vancouver 5, B.C.   682-5515
IBM
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
COMPANY LIMITED Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Black votes scarce
Jus' answer the question, nigger
By MIKE HORSEY
HATTIESBURG — Any
Negro who is free, white and
over 21 can vote in this
southern Mississippi town of
35.000.
There are 7,000 Negroes
here over the age of 21. Few
are free. None, obviously, are
white.
The result: only 350 Negroes here have registered to
vote in the upcoming U.S.
presidential election.
Before anyone — white or
colored—registers in Mississippi, he must complete a 22-
part questionnaire on the registration  form.
Like everything else in Mississippi, it is designed to prevent  the  Negro  from exercis-
Ubyssey edilor Mike Horsey spent the first two weeks
of September in Mississippi.
His trip was financed by the
AMS and the sole purpose
was to find out what makes
black and White tick in the
state. His article follows his
Friday story of fear in the
beautiful Mississippi valley.
ing anything which looks like
equality with the white Mississippian.
Two questions usually trip
up the Negro and prevent his
registration  from  being valid.
The questionnaire asks for
a reasonable interpretation of
a   section  (one   of   14)   of   the
JOYCE BROWN
. frustrated
Mississippi State Constitution
and a "statement setting forth
your understanding of the duties and obligations of citizenship under a Constitutional
jorm of government."
Civil rights workers say the
two questions are so subjective that most Negroes who attempt to register are turned
down immediately.
"There seems to be no set
standard for the registrar to
follow when grading these
questions," said Joyce Brown,
21-year old Negro civil rights
worker.
"We have had 4,000 application forms filled out this summer and yet only 350 have actually passed."
Communists draw the line
at speaking to J. Birchers
Campus  Communists  aren't speaking   to John Birch.
In a letter to AMS president Roger MacAfee, yesterday, the communists replied to proposals for a John Birch
versus  Communist   club  debate.
George Ilewson, Communist club president said the
proposals were only  superficially  interesting.
"It is an attempt to place an extremist, conspiratorial
American sect on the same level as a legally functioning
Canadian   political  parly,"   he  said.
Hewison said tile Communists would talk to anyone
else.
"Student Communists have always invited debated
with any legitimate religious, cultural or political group,
but debate with the John Birchers would be a stab at the
heart of Canadian democracy."  he said.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
TRYOUTS
U.B.C.   DEBATING  TEAM
OCT. 22, 1964
Apply   in   writing:   Secretary,   Debating   Union,   A.M.S.
Deadline: Monday, October 19,  1964,  12:00 Noon
"It's discouraging and frustrating," she said.
"We can't conquer the fear
of fellow Negroes," Miss
Brown said, "We can only
compensate.
"Night after night we go to
homes and explain things—
things about constitutional
rights and basic freedoms.
"And we have only started
to win if we can convince
them they have the law on
their side, and that exercising
their right to vote will eventually mean better treatment
for them."
After that comes the really
painful part.
Hours must be spent with
Negroes memorizing every
possible answer the registrar
of voters might possibly consider.
Educated Negroes have attempted to pass the registration questionnaire as many as
16 times without success.
Since it takes better than
two weeks to grade each form,
the process is a long one.
The length hurts, for every
■ime an application is turned
down a few more Negroes give
up, regarding the situation as
hopeless.
D. K. Bivins, a negro and a
former truck driver, now
working with the civil rights
movement, has experienced
the frustrations of voter registration.
"They catch you on the smallest things," he said, "They
are never quite satisfied when
you go back and ask what
went wrong.
"Until the civil rights bill
we were not given a copy of
the form but now we are, and
we can see what the registrar
refuses and what he takes.
"Before it was like working
in the dark," he said.
"Even the civil rights bill
doesn't stop the registrar from
being arbitrary on the question of what constitutes the
duties of a citizen.
"Tell me, would you, as a
student, expect every student
in your class to give the same
replies in an essay on citizenship?" he asked.
"And you still have to be
really careful," he said, "I've
seen dozens of cases where
the date was put on wrong, or
the writing was claimed to be
illegible.
"Sure, a mistake can be
made putting the date on the
form but this sort of thing is
overlooked when the registrant is white."
Civil rights workers have
been gathering evidence in
Hattiesburg to show that
many, possibly hundreds, of
whites have been let through
the registration without their
applications being graded.
At this rate 7,000 theoretically eligible colored voters
in Hattiesburg might well
wait for the Presidential election of 2064,
Housing body
set up Thursday
UBC now has a student housing committee.
Following a student council
resolution Monday night AMS
met with university bursar
William White Thursday to set
up the committee.
Chairman has not yet been
announced.
PRESCRIPTION
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GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861  Granville MU   3-8921
a Money-Back Guarantee^™
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
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JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.   10th  Ave.
24 Hr. Service       CA 4-0034
A PROTAGONIST for HUMANISM
on the Avenue K£N    McALLISTfR
-SPECIAL  EVENTS-
again   presents
Giving   an   up-to-the-minute   talk   on
"RUSSIA,  CHINA and  the WEST"
THURSDAY, OCTOBER  IS,   12:30 AUDITORIUM Wednesday, October 14, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
FOR THERIRDS
For Canadian  University Press and  by Special  Arrangement with
The    Ontario-Quebec    Athletic    Association
Bruce Kidd is a middle-distance runner for Canada in the Olympic Games
By BRUCE KIDD
Greetings from the other side of the world. After three
days in Tokyo's Olympic village we're still fighting the reaction to having our day tossed upside-down like an hourglass.
Getting acclimatized—adjusting to the clock, climate,
food and drinking water—while maintaining a normal training routine is much like trying to recover from five football
weekends within a ten-day period. But if our experience at
the British Empire Games in Australia in 1962 holds true,
the continual nausea which has kept us close to our quarters
since we arrived should clear in the next few days.
The Olympic Village, a former US Army base, is a self-
sufficient unit. The 150Jbody Canadian contingent is housed
in a group of bungalows which formerly served officers and
their wives, so they're quite comfortable.
•        •        •
Two large dining halls are each divided into six separate
restaurants which serve countries with common diets—for
example, Canada shares her restaurant with Australia and
New Zealand—but athletes are free to try the fare of other
countries. I'm told the Italian cuisine is the best in the village
—the Italians insisted on bringing their own cooks—but I
won't plan to eat there until after my competition.
Also contained in the Village, which is enclosed by a 15-
foot barbed-wire fense and patrolled by armed guards, are a
bank, postal and telegraph facilities, an elaborate shopping
plaza, a theatre, two large recreation halls and all sorts of
services such as laundry, tailors and barbershops.
The Village has been liberally stocked with bicycles to
assist the athletes in getting around, but they may provide
organizing officials with their only major embarrassment.
After one American wrestler broke his leg when he fell off
a bike, the whole US team was ordered to do their travelling
on foot. (That command has been enforced without success.)
Nor are pedestrians safe. Yesterday, Toronto runner
Ergas Leps was knocked to the ground by a mad Hungarian
who forgot to use his brakes.
• •        •
Outside the Village, language is a serious problems—
even Japanese sign language is incomprehensible. But the
Village itself swarms with interpreters—usually university
students eager to get a crack at the "real thing". Even the
pay phones are staffed with interpreters—they will call your
number and do the talking until an English-speaking person
comes to the phone.
English is the Village's second language; so far I'm not
able to report how easily athletes with obscure tongues can
get interpreters.
Although Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern
Olympics, insisted all his life that the Games be a competition between irtdividuals, not countries, flag-waving has unfortunately taken a prominent place in Olympic activities.
Canada and seven other nations consumed the best part of
one afternoon in an official flag-raising ceremony to mark
their "official" arrival at the Games.
Since the sun sets here about 5:30 each evening (which
is 4:30 the morning before back in Toronto) training time is
scarce. But many officials consider the marchpast more important than training.
• •        •
The efforts of Vancouver's Harry Jerome to get the Pearson maple leaf flag were unsuccessful, so the Red Ensign was
hoisted while the band played "O Canada". The only light
touch in the ceremonies was provided by the Poles; when
the Stars and Stripes were raised, they clapped.
Probably the most common characteristic of a Village
at an international games site is the popularity of the sweatsuit as the standard article of dress. These aren't cheap cotton
suits, mind you, but usually well-tailored nylon, and the
majority of athletes from other countries never seem to take
them off.
This practice makes identity quite simple, and a few nations consider a distinctive suit an effective weapon for psychological warfare. As an example, many distance runners look
upon the black suit of New Zealand—the home of Murray
Halberg and Peter Snell—somewhat the way the Chicago
White Sox regard the Yankee pin-stripe.
UBC - VRC rowing crew
eliminated in Tokyo
Canada's eight-oared crew, represented by the UBC-
Vancouver Rowing Club, failed to qualify for Thursday's
final when Yugoslavia beat the Canadians in the repechage
at the Olympic regatta in Tokyo, Tuesday.
Previously the crew missed making the final by a boat
length, finishing second to Czechoslovakia. The Canadian
crew, which won a silver medal in the last two Olympics,
was timed in 6:07:19 compared to the Czech's time of
6:03:8:
George Hungerford, Arts III, teamed with Roger Jackson of Toronto to win the "pairs without cox" heat and
qualify for the final.
Canada's field hockey team, which contains four UBC
students was defeated in their first game by Germany 5
to 1; on Monday they lost to the Netherlands in the preliminary round 5 to nothing.
T'BIRD END NORM THOMAS ... is about to snare a pass from quarterback Roger
Hardy before being tackled by a PSC d efender. Thomas caught six passes for 115
yards at UBC defeated PSC 13 to six. During the game Hardy completed 13 of 23 passes.
T'Birds upset Vikings
By JACK McQUARRIE
Most successful football
teams today have an effective
pass-catch duo; the B.C. Lions
for example, rely greatly on
the passing of Joe Kapp to Sonny Homer.
The UBC Thunderbirds, as
they proved again Saturday in
a 13-7 upset of Portland State
College at Varsity stadium, are
beginning to rely on the passing of Roger Hardy to Norm
Thomas.
Behind a strong line QB
Hardy threw six strikes to offensive end Thomas for 115 of
UBC's total of 265 yards. Another went for a touchdown
which was nullified by a penalty.
This   combination   kept   the
Sports shorts
Soccer Birds
poor in defeat
A poor defensive effort by UBC's Thunderbird soccer team
resulted in a 3-0 loss to Vancouver Canadians in Pacific Coast
League Soccer action Saturday at Callister Park.
Canadian goals were scored
by Normie McLeod with two
and Chris Hansen who scored
the winner midway through
the first half.
Head soccer coach Joe Johnson was disappointed with the
work of his fullbacks who were
repeatedly caught out of position. He also commented that
the whole team played a poor
checking game. "To much talk
and not enough action" was his
main complaint about his players.
UBC plays its first PCSL
home game this Saturday at
Varsity stadium. Their opponents will be the New Westminster Royals. The Royals
have won more Dominion
Cups, a total of eight, than any
other Canadian soccer team.
RUGBY
T'Birds defeated Barbarians
12 to 11; without the services
of captain Jimmy Mitchell who
was injured with only two minutes gone in the contest. Gary
Rowles scored two tries; Chuck
JERE MITCHELL
. . . short game
Plester   and  Bob   May   scored
one each.
Braves were blanked by
Meralomas 16 to nothing;
Hawks walloped Barbarian II,
41 to zero; and Totems were
shellacked by Meralomas I,
30-nil.
T'Birds in good field position
throughout the game and set up
the winning score.
Bob Sweet scored both Bird
touchdowns, the first coming
with 3 minutes remaining in
the first quarter. Sweet burst
over from ten yards out behind
a fine block by Bop Paulley
and the convert was missed to
give the home club a 6-0 lead.
The lead held up until Dick
Curtis scored for the Vikings
on a 15 yard pass with five minutes left in the third quarter.
The convert was good and PSC
jumped in front for the first
time 7-6.
Sweet scored the clincher for
UBC midway through the final
frame and Ken Danchuk kicked the convert to make the
score 13-7.
Semantics Dept.—Bird mentor Frank Gnup thought his
boys "played a hell of a game".
This in Gnupese means that
his club played a real fine
game . . . Line coach Lome
Davies stated that "everyone
did a job".
During the game . . . Some
wag in the press box suggested
after Bob Sweet's second touchdown that PSC was "being
forced to take the gitter with
the Sweet".
After the game . . . Assistant
Viking coach Roy Love, doing
the spotting for his team,
claimed that Bird QB Roger
Hardy "is the finest quarterback we've played against this
year."
. . . Noticed that UBC came
up with 5 interceptions for the
second week in a row. This
was due in part to an alert defensive gackfield and due mostly to the fact that PSC quarterbacks were throwing up "buckets of garbage" all afternoon.
Bud McRae was UBC's top
garbage collector with two. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 14, 1964
'tween classes
Addiction spectre
today
on screen
Drug addicts are especially invited to free film on drug
addiction "Vulture on My Veins" noon today in  Bu.  104.
Film is sponsored by the Associated Full Gospel Students.
•    •    •
NCF
Re-scheduled general meeting to elect executive at noon
today in Bu. 227. All natives
are urged to attend. All others
welcome.
•    •    •    •
VOC
General meeting noon today
in the Hebb Theatre. Rock
climbing lecture at noon Thursday in Chem. 150.
• •    •
NDC
Organizational meeting in
Bu. 203 at noon today. All
members and those interested
please attend.
• •    •
G. M. DAWSON CLUB
D. Rotheringham will speak
on The Geology of the Endako
noon today in F. and G. 102.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
Illustrated lecture on Modern Trends in Psychotherapy.
Election of first and fourth
year reps noon today in West-
brook 100.
• •     •
EL CIRCULO
Meeting Friday noon in Bu.
204. All students interested in
Spanish culture are cordially
invited  to attend.
• •     •
COMMUNITY   PLANNING
Heart of the City part four
of the current film series will
be shown in La. 102 today at
noon.
• •     •
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting noon today
in Bu. "227 (note the room
change). Elections.
• •    •
UBCSCC
A Novice Rally at noon
Thursday. Start at the top of
C-lot near the Arena.
• •     •
NISEI VARSITY
Ice skating party tonight
7:30 - 9:30 p.m. at the T-bird
Arena. Admission 25 cents.
Everybody welcome.
• •     •
EAST ASIA SOC
Business meeting noon today in Bu. 218. Bring $1.00
membership fee. New members
welcome. Friday night, first
evening Bull Session.
• •     •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Another up-to-the-minute
talk on Ru.ssia. China and the
West by Felix Green Thursday
noon  in Auditorium.
Editors censure
Michigan brass
MINNEAPOLIS (UNS) —
A convention of American
college editors has censured
Michigan University's administration.
Cause was suspension of a
Michigan editor for attempting to carry out a survey on
the sexual activities of Michigan's students.
This was the first official
criticism of an administration  by the organization.
LEADERSHIP
All registrations for Leadership Conference must be in by
4:00 p.m. today.
• • •
FENCING CLUB
Members who borrowed
equipment over the summer
are requested to return it to
the Women's Gym 7:30 Wednesday.
• • •
FIGURE SKATING
Low test skaters and dancers
are needed by the Figure Skating Team. Anyone interested
phone Trudy, AM 6-4584.
• • •
ARTS  US
Arts Council meeting today
at noon in South Brock Council Chambers. Natalie will be
there.
• • •
PARLIAMENTARY
COUNCIL
General meeting and election of president. All political
parties please attend noon today in Bu. 204.
• • •
BRIDGE AND CHESS
Meeting of club 7:30 p.m. tonight in Brock TV Lounge.
Duplicate Bridge Tournament
and instruction for Bridge
players.
• • *
UNDERGRADUATE
WRITERS
Workshop Thursday at 8:30
p.m. at 2249 York Street.
• • •
CURLING CLUB
No curling today. Watch The
Ubyssey for further announcements.
• • •
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Adrien Marriage of Social
Work department speaks on
The Angry Young Man, Wednesday 12:30, in Bu. 100.
Radsoc warming up
for hot-line program
PAUL THIEL
. . . hot air
Semanticists
purrs, growls
here tonight
The purr word man is on
campus.
Dr. Samuel I. Hayakawa,
Vancouver - born semanticist,
aow teaching at San Francisco
3tate College, will lecture on
communications at 6 p.m. today in the Frederic Wood
Theatre.
Dr. Hayakawa, well-known
to most students for his famous
essay on "purr and growl
words," is noted for his easy-
to-understand approach to the
complicated subject of semantics.
The students' address will
follow an earlier one at 10
a.m. Wednesday in the Hotel
Georgia.
Admission for the campus
lecture is $1. Tickets are available at the AMS office and at
the door.
By BRENT CROMIE
The kingpin of university
radio, 23-year-old Paul Thiel,
plans a hot-line program to
boost the quality of Radsoc this
year.
"Otherwise the emphasis
will be on less talk and more
music," said Thiel.
Keynote of the new approach will be an open-line
type program whereby students can come to Radsoc's studio and argue their views on
the air.
Talks by faculty and graduate students are also planned.
Blind at birth, a series of
operations gave Thiel ten percent  vision.
Coming to Vancouver in
1956  from  Germany,  he com-
Trent turns
300 away
PETERBOROUGH, Ont.
CUP) — Canada's newest university opened its doors to 105
ludents this week.
Trent University, in Peterborough, received 400 applications for the 100 places in the
first class.
Because oi the number and
! quality of the applicants, the
university admitted five more
students than planned.
Only three students are doing graduate work.
The first class includes students from six provinces and
five overseas countries.
Music auditions
Further auditions for the
Opera Workshop Program,
sponsored by the Music Department, will be held in the Music
Building Tuesday at 7 p.m.
Those interested contact
French Tickner, Music Department or Ian Docherty, Extension Department.
SEE  BETTER
LOOK  BETTER
WITH
CONTACT LENSES
At a Reasonable Price
LAWRENCE CALVERT
Call: MU 3-1816
70S  Birkt  Bids.
9:30 am   - 5:30 pm
Saturday till noon
Grad Photographs
NOW BEING TAKEN
MOBILE   STUDIO   AT   STADIUM
Hours:  9 a.m.  to 4 p.m  .
Limited Time Only - Don t Delay
This service covered by your Grad Fee
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard RE  1-6012
pleted high school and proceeded to UBC where he is
now in fourth year Arts.
Thiel has been with Radsoc
two-and-a-half years, and as
program chief is responsible
for all broadcast material.
He controls news, editorials,
music, and program produc-
production.
Thiel said: "The development of more responsible
broadcasting and a stable organization will pave the way
to a broadcast licence in the
not too distant future. It is a
prize we are hoping to earn."
If the licence is granted,
Radsoc would be operated by
a paid staff.
The University of Alberta
and McGill University presently have such operations.
'Money rolls in for sex,
gambling at campus frats
Campus fraternities have turned pornography into a
lucrative business,  according to one fraternity  executive.
An executive of an off-campus fraternity admitted that
pornographic movies, gambling and an occasional stripper
create great financial gains for the fraternities.
These affairs are a definite factor as to whether the
fraternities go into the red or not, he said.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $ 75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost  &  Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brook Hall., Local 26,
_224-3242.	
POUND MONEY in Wesbrook Lecture room Thursday, October 8.
Apply   AMS   Cashier.   _
FOUND SLIDBRUDE in Buchanan
class room Friday. Phone Gigi,
YU  7-2316.
LOST — Dark grey collarless jacket
in   New   Chem.    Bldg.   Thursday.
_Calljrrank, 277-8393.	
LOST — Gold charm bracelet,  sen-
 timental value. Reward. CA 4-4462
LOST — Man's black diamond ring
with initial B. Phone Judy, 987-
8603. Reward offered for Immediate return. _
PERSON WHO TOOK Red-marked
umbrella by mistake from Library
Thursday please phone RE_8-2860.
LOST — Light blue wallet, please
return identification cards and
drivers He. to Brock Hall Proctor.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED for 8:30 classes
from 35th and Granville. Phone
AM 1-1164 after 7 p.m.	
Autos For Sale Cont'd.
21
I960 ALFA ROMEO Sprint, $2,200.
Contact D. Hennelly, 224-9054 between  7:30-8:30 p.m.	
FOR SALE — Austin A-40 1954
Sedan,  $160. J738-1107.	
'60 HILLMAN, low mileage, excel.
condition, 4 dr. Sedan. RE 3-4526,
3579 W. 22nd.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typewriters  & Repairs 42
STUDENT TYPEWRITERS^ aU
makes, all prices. Free delivery.
Modern Business Machine Corp.
Ltd. 461 E. Hastings. Phone 682-
4016.
Typing
..       42A
HOi ELY rates. Thesis, etc. Typing.
Fast, accurate, reasonable. Will
gl\e estimates. 254-1440.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
RIDE WANTED from Fraser and
Marine for 8.30 lectures. Call
Nesta, 325-0327.
FEMALE IN DISTRESS! Ride required Wednesday evenings anytime after 8.15 to Richmond. Even
Marpole. Interested parties phone
CA 2-9017,  Fred  Cunningham.  	
PEOPLE~FOR CARPOOL between
41st & Granville to 25th & Angus,
8.30 classes.  AM 1-4134, Bill.    	
RIDE WANTED from 58th & Main
for 8.30's. Wish to stay out for
evenings. Phone FA 7-6532, ask
for John.	
RIDE URGENTLY needed from W.
Vancouver central location, phone
WA  2-2227  or WA 2-1580.	
RIDERS WANTED vicinity 25th &
Granville for 8.30 lectures, Monday to Friday.  Phone RE 8-3982.
Wanted
15
TIRED OF RUNNING in bare feet.
Need men's track shoes, size 11.
Will pay for quality. YU_ 7-2156.
WANTED IMMEDIATELY competent electric bass player with heavy
duty equipment. Phone 224-6356
after  4.     	
WANTED CHEM. 200 LAB. write-
ups. Phone 224-9880. Ask for Richard in Room 8.
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1!>">8 SIM-CA Aronde. 4 dr.. blue, low
mileage. Rood condition. Best offer.
Phone  73S-7909,  anxious to sell.
~-2~ MKRCURY. Radio, good tires,
St2"> or reasonable offer. Call Dave
Suibhs. T'nion College. Phone 224-
5214.  evenings.
PEOPLE ARE NEEDED to decorate the Field House & Armouries
Sat. aft., Oct. 24, for the Homecoming Dance Sat. Pay $1.00 per
Hour. $2.00 per hr. overtime. Apply
Arts  Office,  BU.  115.
INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS
Music
63
CLASSICAL GUITAR tuition to advanced level. Segovia technique.
W.   Parker,   682-1096.
Tutoring
64
TUTOR wanted. Italian 100. Phone
CA 4-9957. Ask for Richard Cairns.
Leave  message.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DESK AND BOOKCASE, like new.
Contact Chuck Campbell at Union
College. CA 4-5214 or UBC Local
642.	
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
from the Phrateres Club. Only 76c.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS  office.
SCOOTER FOR SALE, "Allstate"
second hand (one owner). Please
phone  Don at RE 8-8859.
RENTALS   &   REAL   ESTATE
Furn. Houses & Apis. 83
STUDENT  WANTS  other  to   share
downstairs of house, private entr.,
private room, share kitchen, bathroom.   $30.   224-5693.	
WANTED — Girl to share furn'd
Apartmt. in block at 4th & Alma.
Phone Linda,  922-7750.

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