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The Ubyssey Sep 28, 1967

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Array SPLAT
— kurt hilger photo
IN THE HEAT of a Wednesday noon hour, a gelatinous gooey  icky-colored   mass  of  cooked
corn starch and food coloring, aided and abetted by a long-haired co-ed, met the resigned
face of commerce president Peter Uitdenbosch. Yeah, Sullivan; you'll get yours!
.'"<%y R£M5I4_MT4$S^/
Two faces, tri-mbling* ih^mircipated horror, hung out of
holes in Music Mall plywood back-stop Wednesday noon.
A crowd of 150 screamed approval.
And the first pie in the commerce and home economics
faculties' United Appeal pie-in flew toward human targets.
These, the visages of Shaun Sullivan, Alma Mater Society
president and Pete Uitdenbosch, commerce faculty president,
soon were smeared with pies.
The noon pie-in was the culmination of the Wednesday UBC
blitz in the current United Appeal fund-raising campaign.
The first two pies missed their marks..
Then, Mary Ussner, arts 2, whomped a soggy lime-colored
gelatinous mass at Sullivan.
"Oh, Christ," mumbled Sullivan.
After several direct hits, Sullivan and Uitdenbosch began to
return the pies scattered all over the concrete.
The result: splattered onlookers.
Only 25 students forked out donations for the strawberry,
lime or chocolate goo resembling something far worse.
But all throwers gurgled with sadistic delight after the
splat of pie meeting face.
Highlight of the ceremonies was the blueberry pie wielded
by Leigh McLellan, science 3.
She marched to the backstop and flung the pastry (purchased from food services for $1.25) in Sullivan's face.
"Hey, that's good," shouted Sullivan.
Finally, the music mall was left a pinky-green mess.
The natives retreated to classes, void of frustrations experienced before the noon-hour fiasco.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No. 5
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1967
48
224-3916
$£&■+
ST. • vr
Tight '67 budget
cramps AMS style
rNN«w:
HOYE
— kurt hilger photo
FEAR OF THE WRATH  of the engineers  prompted  these
shaking souls to release some poor engineer bestocked by
a horde of frosh anxious to test the notorious reputation
of the red shirts.
Acadia finale up in air
"Construction    officials    and
the   university   disagree   over
<Sfae completion date for Acadia
Park.
Emerson Mitchell, project
manager for Laing Construction and Equipment Ltd., denied Monday that Dec. 15 was
the final completion date.
"We hope to have all the
suites ready for occupancy by
mid-November," he said.
Housing administrator Les
Rohringer last week said two
clusters plus the high-rise
would not be ready until Dec.
15, a month later than planned.
Rohringer is away and unavailable for comment.
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Poorest after the Alma Mater Society
announced its proposed annual budget Wednesday are the arts undergraduate society and programs for higher education and housing action.
None receive money this year.
The $478,900 budget was completed by AMS
treasurer Dave Hoye, who called it "tight but
sufficient."
"It's cramped, but it will
give everyone enough funds to
carry on the program they've
indicated," Hoye said.
Two biggest items are SUB
and the Men's Athletic Committee.
The Student Union Building
gets 51 per cent — $239,900—
and $67,200 goes to men's
sports.
The budget will go to council for discussion
Oct. 10.
Undergraduate societies — arts excluded —
get $8,655, up $80 from the last budget.
"Arts asked for $5,000 but they didn't get
any in the budget because I don't feel they're
competent to spend it," Hoye explained.
Arts didn't get any money last year either.
"It's really what we expected," said arts
treasurer Russ Precious.
"They figured we spent too much on the anti-
calendar. Once we gave the lockers away, that
annoyed them," he said.
Precious said arts can exist without an AMS
grant. "Most of the meaningful things we do
don't involve money anyway."
The B.C. Association of Students, which got
$25 last year is also cut out of the 1967-68 budget.
This year's budget is based on an enrollment
of 16,000 students.
One major change in the budget is the World
University Service committee allocation. WUSC
gets $5,390 this year—a cut of $5,100.
As the diagram shows most of each student's
$29 has already been committed. The AMS can
allocate only $6.21 per student — the discretionary grant.
Almost half of that — a total of $53,500 of
the $114,200 grant — pays administration costs
and general expenses of the AMS.
Little more than $3 per student is available
for such programs as intramural sports, publications and undergraduate societies.
If we had another $3 students would get
twice as much programming," Hoye said.
V ■ 00 TO UAxnCM's
Spwfe
*_>5 {* COS       4—
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IN TODAYS UBYSSEY
PAGE    3 ACADIA PK. DISPUTE
PAGE    7 LIBRARY vs MINIS
PAGE    8 WARRIAN INTERVIEW
PAGE 10 DIGGERS' PLEA TO US
PAGE 11    SPORTS PARTICIPATION Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Straight men vs hippies
on blowing your mind
Thursday, September 28, 1967
By BO HANSEN
"Individuals have the right to blow their
minds — provided they do it completely,"
quipped Jack Webster, surveying Georgia
Straight editors Dan McLeod and Peter Hlookoff
with disgust.
"Personally, I think peyote is a much better
drug than LSD," returned McLeod.
Jack Webster, CKNW commentator; Dr.
Conrad Schwarz, UBC psychiatrist; and Dan
Mcleod, editor, and Peter Hlookoff, contributing
editor of Georgia Straight debated the question
"Resolved: "Individuals Have the Right to Blow
Their Minds", Wednesday noon in a packed
Brock.
The debators talked mainly around the resolution, but 1,000 students in the audience
voted decisively for the affirmative.
Schwarz said an individual has a right to
make this kind of decision with the important
provision that he knows what he is doing.
"And the essential thing about LSD, as an
example of 'blowing your mind', is its unpredictability," he said.
Jack Webster took the position that an individual has the qualified right to blow his
mind unless he becomes a menace to society.
"Society has the right to regulate any such
substances as drugs when they are used to
society's detriment," said Webster.
Refering to the law which requires anyone
knowing of instances of the use of LSD to inform, Webster called it a "silly fascist type of
law."
"But don't underestimate the tough heroin
underworld element in Vancouver," he warned.
"As far as the hippies are concerned, I say
good luck to them — and to hell with them.
TO PAGE 3
— lowrmco woodd photo
AT WEDNESDAY'S DEBATE, psychiatrist Schw arz  begins  drifting   into euphoria  (notice  his
half-glazed look), Hlookoff smiles serenely at some inner image and McLeod contemplates
the  mysteries of THE trip. Webster  blew  hi s mind, and is out of the picture.
Housing crisis  passing
By JANE KENNON
The housing situation at UBC is past the crisis stage.
"Most students seem to have found simewhere to stay following calls last week from landlords with rooms to rent," said Don
Munton, Alma Mater Society first vice-president and chairman of
the AMS housing committee.
But the off-campus situation is still far from satisfactory,
according to Munton.
He estimates 80 per cent of the students who have board
and room suites would prefer house-keeping suites.
1,500 to 2,000 students are also in rooms not suitable for
studying, he said.
He urged students in suites to write city council supporting
a request for an extension of the permits on house-keeping
suites in single family dwellings.
The permits expire Dec. 31 of this year.
Meanwhile, the AMS housing staff report difficulty in
contacting students who have moved after submitting their names
for accommodation. If these still wish rooms or suites, they are
asked to call the AMS housing office.
Digger-type artsmen
promote free trade
The newest campus store has a difference.
There is no rebate because there is no charge. Everything's free.
Located in Buchanan Lounge, the arts free store is a
new concept in merchandising. Tea, coffee, rice, fruit,
books, and psychiatric help ("the doctor is in") are provided
to students free of charge. Supplies are collected from any
willing donors and distributed on a self-service basis.
"Our business is people," say the students who tend
the store daily. "We are trying to counteract the communication break-down on campus by just being nice to people,
sharing what we have and listening to what they have to
say," said one. "We think food should be free at the
University, and this is a start."
Fifty people are using the free store facilities daily to
eat, drink, talk, gripe, sing, browse, or meditate. So can
you say arts councillors.
CUS cash coming
Council is for retaining membership in the Canadian Union
of Students—but against increasing its dues from 65 to 75 cents
per student.
At the annual CUS congress Sept. 2-9 in London, Ontario,
members voted to increase dues to 75 cents per student.
And, to accommodate universities like UBC who said their
budgets wouldn't allow the increase, the congress allowed a
year's grace.
Universities like UBC who wanted to reconsider CUS membership were permitted to pay the former fee and still remain
in CUS.
(UBC reaffirmed CUS membership Monday and will have,
to pay the increase before next year.)
UBC's Mini - Expo  — A Great Spectacular
Don't Miss It
CLUB'S DAY'67
Today - Armouries Noon
TUNE IN!
TURN ON!
DROP IN ..
to POLITICS
Join A Campus Political Club
TODAY  •   12:30-2:30  •   ARMOURIES
58 CLUBS TO
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
A* !•____ «S*£i • C ■
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
ALPHA OMEGA
AQUA SOC
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
ARTS U.S.
ASSN. FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
BOOSTER CLUB
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
CHORAL SOCIETY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
C.I.A.S.P.
CIRCLE K
COLLEGE LIFE
COLLEGE SHOP
COMPUTER SCIENCE CLUB
CURLING CLUB
CUSO
DANCE CLUB
DEBATING UNION
DESERET CLUB
EL CIRCULO
FIELD HOCKEY CLUB
FILM SOC
FOLK SONG SOC
GERMAN CLUB
HAM SOC
CHOOSE FROM
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
LIBERAL CLUB
MUSICAL SOCIETY
NEW DEMOCRATIC CLUB
NEWMAN CENTER
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
PHOTO SOC
PHRATERES
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
PRE-MEDICAL SOC
PRE-SOCIAL WORK SOC
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVE CLUB
RADIO SOCIETY
RAMBLERS
ROD AND GUN
ROWING CLUB
SAILING CLUB
SPORTS CAR CLUB
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
SQUASH CLUB
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
STUDENT VOLUNTEER SERVICE
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNITED NATIONS CLUB
VARSITY CHRISTIAN  FELLOWSHIP
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSN.
WORLD  UNIVERSITY SERVICE
Your Chance To Join A Club On Campus Thursday, September 28, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
y^'tJiS
■r.#ep>.
fe^s**1
— george hollo photo
"GOOD GRIEF! For $15 a year we get a student union building with eight bowling lanes
and a monster cafeteria. SUB will never catch on," moans Charley Brown, arts 4, perennial campus prophet of gloom and doom.
MacPherson report calls
drastic structure changes
for
TORONTO (CUP) — The MacPherson Com-
_ mittee Report recommends drastic changes in
the structure of the faculty of arts and science
at the University of Toronto.
Commissioned over a year ago by president
Claude Bissell, the report was prepared by a
committee chaired by C. B. MacPherson of the
political economy department.
■ Seen only by Bissell and1 a few chosen faculty,
the report was to have been released publicly
Oct. 1.
But The Varsity, the U of T newspaper, beat
them to it.
The report's main recommendations are:
# Drastic reduction of classroom hours and
use of examinations.
# Inclusion of students in policy-making
bodies of arts and science faculty.
# No course should have more than  one
» lecture per week.
<# Abolition of exams in the second year
with option to write supplementals in
case of failures.
# Emphasis on examinations reduced in all
years.
# Term work to make up 50 per cent of
* final mark.
# Revision of present honors and general
courses.
At present, U of T general and honors courses
are split.   Students taking the four-year honors
^program have smaller classes, get better library
__ privileges, and have greater access to professors
" than those taking the three-year general program.
The   MacPherson   Report   will   recommend
establishing   three-year   specialist   courses   and
four-year generalist courses instead.
The report, containing 96 recommendations
in all, is the result of 431 briefs, 317 of these
from students.
The committee was apparently shocked that
so many of these criticized undergraduate instruction given by professors at U of T.
Members of the committee were: Frank Buck,
a U of T graduate; associate professor of history,
Ramsay Cook; zoology professor, J. R. Jackson
and assistant professor of chemistry, S. C.
Nyburg.
Philosophy professor H. S. Harris of York
University; professor of Greek and registrar of
University College, R. M. H. Shephard and Paul
Hock of the political economy department.
SAC has asked acting president John Sword
fo issue free copies of the report to all 8,300
students in the faculty.
All professors are receiving a copy free, and
the report will be on sale at the bookstore for
$1.50.
Only 4,000 copies will be published, according to present plans.
Non-conformists
find their niche
TORONTO (CUP) — Glendon College has
a place for student activists, reformers and even
anarchists, says its principal.
Escott Reid told freshmen that the college
has a place for non-conformists who devote
surplus energies to cultural, creative or political
activities.
Reid said he recognizes the need for new
relations between students, faculty and administration in the management of college affairs.
"But I have accepted a post of authority in
this university. I am prepared to share my responsibilities with the student body, but I will
not abdicate either the responsibility or the
authority," he said.
Acadia slow-down
blamed on weather
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Setbacks in clearing the Acadia Park site are blamed for
delays in its completion.
Arnie Myers, UBC director of information, said delays were
"because of toad luck, particularly with the weather."
"We had 39 straight days of rain which substantially slowed
down preparations," he said.
_E. B. Mitchell, project manager for Laing Construction and
Equipment Ltd., which is erecting the row housing project, agreed
that clearing was delayed, but differed on the extent of the delay.
The clearing was done by W. D. Construction Co. Ltd., under
separate contract with the university.
Mitchell said clearing was a month and a half late. Although
the building contract was signed Dec. 16, "We didn't begin construction until Feb. 1," he said.
Franz Conrads, supervisor of construction for physical plant,
said basic clearing was finished on Jan. 16, and construction
was underway before clearing was complete.
Laing, Conrads said, was on the site before Christmas, erecting toolsheds.
"Work in earnest began on Jan. 9 with the highrise," Myers
said.
UBC and, Laing gave different interpretations of the contract.
Worth $4,250,000, it calls for two clusters in the complex to
be ready before Aug. 17,. 1967. The remaining three clusters, as
well as the 92 suite high-rise and site work, other than landscaping were to be completed within forty working weeks.
"The first units weren't due until the end of September, because we didn't begin construction until Feb. 1," Mitchell said.
Physical plant was aware of that."
Myers said that all work should have been completed in
forty weeks from the date of signing—by September 22.
Mitchell listed some delays: the window supplier was slow,
and administration ordered a change in the electrical cable to
be used. Thirteen units were re-arranged.
"We had to postpone units in cluster 3 for one month, from
Oct. 1 to Oct. 31," he said, "Abut that does not mean we are late."
Mitchell blames tardy notification of intended residents about
a delay in opening from Aug. 31 to Sept. 12 on "poor communications between housing administration and the physical plant."
At the time a clerk of the works, a physical plant official,
was on the construction site to provide liason between the university and architect Vladimir Plavsic, who supervises construction.
Referring to the delays, Myers said: "We were overly optimistic when we began. We tried very hard to expedite the project
but it seems impossible to complete it any sooner."
It was, Myers said, "a timetable unrealistic from the beginning."
FROM PAGE 2
The danger is to the teeny boppers who get involved in these
situations."
Webster's comment on the "teeny boppers" drew cheers
from the capacity crowd.
"But individuals have the qualified right to blow their
minds and become useless, unproductive, loving members of
society and must be prepared to take responsibilities for their
actions," Webster added.
Dan McLeod said a "bum trips clinic" was planned, with
"a beautiful setting — not a hospital setting."
"One big problem with LSD is that you can't get any any
more."
Peter Hlookoff repeated that peyote was better than LSD.
^Gathering nations at IH
II Does your pulse race at the thought of exotic peoples,
§  strange customs or foreign tongues?
If the answer is yes, then International House may be
the place for you.
International House is situated behind the armories in
tall whispering trees, they say.
And it features peoples of diverse and unusual cultures
and origins in educational and recreational gatherings.
If you're interested, go down and look IH over.
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|(T> THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Past Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
SEPT.  28,  1967
Unsuffering arts
Last March arts students voted to pay a fee of $2
each to implement the programs of the airts undergraduate society.
This was an unprecedented burst of generosity,
considering arts students already pay $150,000 in Alma
Mater Society fees and get almost nothing back.
Nevertheless artsmen voted 76 per cent in favor of
the $2 fee in the largest turnout of voters in the faculty's
history.
In May, however, AMS student council voted to
deny artsmen the right to their $2 a head fee. "It's unconstitutional," the AMS executive claimed, despite the
fact a respected Vancouver lawyer said it wasn't.
Wednesday, in the $478,900 AMS budget announced
by treasurer Dave Hoye, arts received $0. The arts
executive, headed by president Stan Prsky had asked
for a modest $5,000 of arts students' $150,000 contribution to the AMS in order to put together a program for
arts students.
Treasurer Hoye glibly explained: "I don't feel they're
competent to spend it."
It seems the AMS doesn't like the arts undergraduate society. One could, in fact, find evidence in
this series of events of a. calculating maliciousness on
the part of AMS officials toward arts students and their
elected representatives.
It is revealing to look at the arts programs which
Hoye finds proof of arts council "incompetence." Since
taking office Persky and co. have: held open meetings
without pretentious parliamentary procedure; produced
a highly literate student survey of arts faculty offerings;
published several magazines; promoted free outdoor
dances; dispensed free lockers in Buchanan; and distributed free food.
Persky and co.'s "incompetence," then, revolves
around three chief sins. Arts council has succeeded in:
Humanizing government by downplaying bureaucracy.
Effecting — not merely proposing — worthwhile
changes.
Having fun.
The last, in AMS officials' eyes, is the worst sin of
all. The first rule of government, AMS executives seem
to believe, is that it must involve suffering, both by
governors and governed. Persky and co. failed to obey
this rule. Withholding $5,000 is treasurer Hoye's attempt
at punishment.
Puritanism is not yet dead.
You tell em, Ouv
Traffic czar Sir Ouvry Roberts says lack of an
ambulance at UBC is "justified" because so few accidents
occur here.
Sir Ouv should tell this to student William Oldham.
The news may comfort Oldham, who lay bleeding, for
20 minutes on west mall after a car accident last Wednesday.
He was waiting for an ambulance which had to weave
its way from distant Vancouver through the endowment
land bushes.
Sir Ouv should also tell it to the insurance companies who charge under-25 drivers extortionate rates
on the grounds they are more accident-prone than their
elders.
UBC is one of B.C.'s largest communities with a
daytime population of 30,000 — and with as high a
proportion of under-25 drivers as can be found anywhere.
If we're so accident-free we don't even need an
ambulance, there must be somthing wrong with current
insurance rates.
You tell 'em. Sir Ouv.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City Stuart Gray
News - Susan Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo       Kurt  Hilger
Associate    Al  Birnie,   Kirsten  Emmott
Senior  - Pat  Hrushowy
Sports      Mike Jessen
Wire     Charlotte  Haire
Page Friday Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Ban!   Ua
"Arts giving out free food?
There must be a Blairing mistake somewhere.'
AN INTERVIEW
Skirting librarians, the mini-
wearers were warier. A debate
abated, and in preyed a minister
and two diggers. Pursing his quips,
out tripped a treasurer. And as two
Swiss guards stalked celery-chewers,
the gnue generation generated.
Pamela Muteh was a bit too, as
were Fran McGrath, Richard Bach,
Roslyn Smythe, Garth Brown, Marianne A. Beichel, and Leslie Plom-
mer. Jade Eden, Steve Jackson,
Wendy Carter, Richard Easton,
Scott McCrae, Norman Gidney,
Mary Ussner, Jane Kennon, Eileen
Fogarty and Luanne Armstrong
catalyzed.
Mustered forces muttering in the
darkroom included Powell Hargrave,
Chris Blake, George Hollo, Bob
Brown, Irving Fetish, and Lawrence Woodd.
How could I
disagree?
By GABOR MATE
It is the nightmare of every
cub reporter on The Ubyssey
that someday they might have
to interview one of the Alma
Mater (Society bureaucrats.
Here is the text of one such
interview, conducted recently
with Shaun Sullivan and Don
Munton, AMS president and
first vice-president respectively.
Question: Shaun Sullivan
and Don Munton, AMS president and first vice-president
respectively, what are your
favorite books?
Sullivan: My favorite is An
Introduction To The Cytogenetics of Polyploids, by Gary
William Percy Dawson.
Munton: Mine is The Mel-
anomata, Their Morphosis and
Histogenesis, by James W.
Dawson.
Question: I see. And what
are these books about?
StuUivan: Mine deals with
cytogenetics of polyploids.
Munton: And mine with the
morphosis and histogenesis of
melanomata.
Question: I see. Perhaps we
could try something else.
What, gentlemen, are your
views on student action to
back up student demands on
such questions as university
government and academic curriculum?
Sullivan: Well, yes. And
then again, no. Perhaps neither.
That is to say, maybe. Upon
reconsideration, I must propound the undeniable principle
that the consideration of mass
participatory effort must be
predicated upon the tautology
of the concept of our psychological, sociological, and political position in as much as our
terms of reference may not be
completely identical with that
of those who feel that a public
enlightenment campaign could
effect a transformation of
deep-rooted ideas and insofar
as our position must not be
based on ambiguity, indecision,
prevarication.
Munton: I don't see how I
I could disagree with that.
Question: Yes, thank you.
Perhaps we could try something else. Is it your opinion
that student politicians should
publicly state their views on
general social issues?
Sullivan: Definitely. I do not
see how we, as students, can
isolate ourselves from the issues that our society as a
whole is involved in.
Munton: I don't see how I
could disagree with that.
Question: What, then, are
your views on Vietnam?
Sullivan: I don't think I
should answer that. As you
know, it has consistently been
my opinion that student politicians should not publicly
state their views on general
social issues.
Munton: I don't see how I
could disagree with that.
Question: Thank you. Perhaps we could try something
else. How do you feel about
the criticisms made of you by
some students on this campus?
Sullivan: Well, when you
are someone like me, you expect to have the intelligent
people on campus opposing
you.
Munton: I don't see how I
could disagree with that.
Shoes and
socks and
nature
By MICHEL   LOPATECKI
Take off your shoes and
socks. Wiggle your toes awhile.
Spread them. Aren't they disgusting?
Now poke the soles. See how
yellow and soft they are. Take
a few steps on your own.
Watch how you fall on your
hands and knees on the little '
pebbles. But isn't it great to
go barefoot, really? You don't
have to stand where that dog
sat.
Everybody knows the Auda-
bon Theory: we're out of touch
with nature, we live in little
boxes, we're all made out of ,
ticky-tacky and protected with
plastic. What we need is to get
our feet back on the ground.
So I suggest we simply take
off our shoes.
We could put a new movement afoot here on the library
lawn. Our flag could be a waving sock held high on a long«^
pole. Our motto could be "A
toe in the rump for Bata-
Man."
We could all wear anklets
and put bells on our toes. We ___.
could live off the shoe leather
we've made into holsters and
sold to the Americans. We
could call ourselves the Footsies. And we'll never ever let
the campus cops shoe us away.   «
Imagine how it would be if
everyone goes footloose.
People will be aware of the
texture of the earth—whether
the leaves are falling, whether
the slugs are out. We'll all be _
more friendly — people will
carry salves and tweezers like
good Samaritans; boys and
girls will feel more for each
other under the tables in
Brock. And we'll be more honest—we'll know exactly how ^
big the Engineers are and who
the flatfeet are that have been
sent among us to keep an eye
on the pinkies. There'll be a
childish joy as we paddle in
the fountain and pick dande- "*
lions with our toes. And Pretty
Feet, the cosmetic company
which wants to take the rub
for your feet and of which I
am district representative, will
make a killing.
Now if things loosen up
enough around here I hope to
start a sister movement in two
weeks time which shall be
called the Girdlies.
Maple Leaves
Qve
rre ^oo ready to meel
your maker, babvj? Thursday, September 28, 1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 5
*_i*ji&iS^i0 rm ed it or
Answers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Concerning some of the letters on the subject of my
articles on the middle east
crisis.
I don't know Mr. Appleton
well enough to judge whether
or not he, too, is a "disturbed
personality," as he claims I
am. But I would argue: 1., that
he is no more an authority on
my psychological condition
than I am on his, and 2., that
what I am or what he is are
totally irrelevant to the question at hand. Students on this
, campus will decide the issue
not on the basis of which one
of us can hurl the better insults at the other's head, but
on which one of us has the
better facts and arguments to
back up his opinions. I haven't
noticed Mr. Appleton rushing
forward to accept the invitation issued by Special Events
to put his arguments to the
test of a public debate.
Mr. Bernard Simpson's arguments, however, — at least
those that deal with the issue
and not with the questions of
my intellectuality—do require
serious answers. The fact of
Arab hostility towards Israel
is undeniable and must be
fully considered in the discussion of the crisis. However, I
neither had space in the articles nor do I have space here
to go into a full analysis of the
situation— and I tried to make
this clear in the articles themselves. But answers do exist
to Mr. Simpson's arguments,
and I am quite willing to provide them to anybody who
wishes them. I would provide
GUERRILLA
GOVERNMENT
By STAN PERSKY
Games and Government (1).
This week our student council voted 12 to 9 to keep UBC
in the Canadian Union of Students.
••*      Not wanting the matter to become abstract, I'm able to
offer some personal response.
Politically, we only found out that the conservatives aren't
going to run student policy at UBC. For a few moments AMS
got out of its characteristic trivia (for example, two weeks ago
they spent an hour and a half talking about feeding themselves
* dinner). These strike me as small accomplishments.
I went home from the meeting feeling down. The whole
issue of a national union seemed distant. What we had fought
was merely a holding action. The talk (and it's gone on endlessly, redundantly, boringly, since the middle of summer)
seemed empty.
Again, I notice how AMS imitates the governments that
'make messes and plead self-righteousness. I'm disappointed that
people in their 20s are already sucked in by the lies. This student council, as a youth group, doesn't promise very much for
the world we're going to have. The engineers we're producing
are going to be competent technicians who care about themselves; they will try to kill the world I'm interested in.
Again and again the talk centered around organization and
•money (nice impersonal things) instead of people. You can
feel secure and self-important when you talk about money. But
when you talk about people it's scary, because you make yourself naked in order to speak of hearts, beautiful faces, the grace
of the body of someone you're about to fall in love with, or the
^effort, as one poet put it, to untie the strings of the loins.
One of the honest moments in that meeting was when Shaun
Sullivan, in an unusually good statement, spoke, in a stumbling
way, of his inarticulate sense that there was a union (and he
meant, of people) whether we paid it money or not. Engineer
Lynn Spraggs described the whole thing as a poker game, and
first vice president Don Munton mucked it up a little more by
'trying to compare everything to a game of marbles.
It's not a game. None of this is a game. Game is just a
fad metaphor. What we do is what we are doing. Even the
pompous, ignoble activity of representing other people at a fancy
horseshoe table is absolutely specific to time and where we are,
a marriage, as that poet put it, with the place and hour.
*> It seemed distant because what is immediate is how we
live together, the fact that we are dying, that death is real,
who we sleep with, how we feed each other (drinking a cup of
coffee or from somebody's body). What is immediate to me is
what I'll say to Harley and Russ tomorrow morning, how our
friendship moves, how we'll manage to make government as
real and intimate, in a world in which it's hard to move, as
what we do in making love. But, in student council, it's not
proper to talk about making love, how you live, or death. There's
no room for it, even though we're all actually doing that. This
difficulty of movement, of breathing, is what another poet I
know calls hell.
THE UBC EXTENSION DEPARTMENT PRESENTS
FOLK SONGS OF CANADA
This series of eight evening programs with MR. AL COX
will combine lectures, recordings, live performances
and audience involvement.
Thursdays, beginning October 5, 8 p.m.
Room 100, Buchanan Building
Special Student Rate: $6.00 for eight sessions
(regular fee $12.00)
Registration at the door.
Further information from the Extension Department, 228-2181.
them to Mr. Simpson himself
if he would desire to engage
me in either private discussion
or public debate.
As for the other letters and
articles that have appeared or
will appear in The Ubyssey
concerning my articles, unfortunately there is simply no
space in The Ubyssey to deal
with them all. I will have to
leave them unanswered in
the hope that those wishing to
hear the counter arguments
will on their own make an
effort to do so. Thank you.
GABOR MATE
arts 4
'Read Arabic
Editor, The Ubyssey:
As an uninterested observer
I must remark that Mr. Gabor
Mate's article on the Arab-
Israeli conflict is matched in
its bias by the author's ignorance about the facts. I have
not the zeal to enlighten Mr.
Mate's areas of darkness for
I think that he is beyond redemption.
I would, however, recommend that Mr. Mate enrol himself in an Arabic language
course so that he could read
the hate literature for himself.
DEVINDER VARMA,
Vancouver
SUPA gone
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is with great sadness that
I look upon the passing of the
Student Union for Peace Action. The continuing need for
such an organization in the
present world situation is clear.
SUPA's most tangible function, of course, was to aid
American war - objectors in
seeking Canadian refuge, yet
even the mere existence of
SUPA was a sign of hope. Pacifists must not be discouraged
by the fact that war continues
to be an ever present phenomenon. Instead, they must see
that it is for them, individually and through such organizations as SUPA, to act as a
counterforce    to     militaristic
pressures     throughout     the
world. Finally, the pacifist
ought not to restrict his attention only to war, but should
instead confront all forms of
suffering inflicted by men on
other men, whether it be slavery, torture, or killing of any
kind.
A PACIFIST
arts 3
Comments
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Some comments about the
CUS situation: somehow your
paper failed to report the
question raised about council's
"good faith". UBC is committed, if it stays in CUS, to pay
an increased levy; the CUS
congress left it to our "good
faith". Once council rejected
the motion to withdraw, there
was a motion to honor this
commitment. It was defeated.
So much for the "good faith"
of the AMS. (This motion was
opposed by the "enlightened"
heroes of The Ubyssey.)
MIKE COLEMAN
law 3
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INCORPORATED 2»° MAY 1870 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 28, 1967
MClPF    I FTTcpc
iwi   \jr IV mm ItL    I     I    L  I\ %_#
Pub crawl
Editor. The Ubyssey:
It appears, either by design
or accident, that The Ubyssey
has once again stumbled on
that nuisance called inaccuracy. As much as the literary
masterpiece in The Ubyssey,
Sept. 26, page 2, is appreciated
by all, I might point out that
the facts seem to have been
strangely misplaced.
I'm sure none is too concerned with the printed results of the WUS inter pub
rally, since most students recognise The Ubyssey's inability
to accept defeat; but I would
appreciate your acknowledging all participants. Like in
science was entered, and according to accurate reports,
came third with a time of 49
minutes. Accurately yours,
ROBIN RUSSELL
SUS president
'Desperate'
Editor. The Ubyssey:
"Ludicrous" is the word
used by a prominent math,
professor to describe the traffic situation along Southwest
Marine Drive. Rushing into an
8:30 a.m. lecture Monday, ten
minutes late, he'd left his
home at 7:30.
Most students, not as good
humored as this philosophical
prof, have far more explosive
adjectives for the ghastly congestion which inevitably occurs as two lines of traffic are
forced to converge into one.
Liquid may flow easily through
a funnel, but the solid metal
of automobiles doesn't flow—
in fact, it doesn't even move
most of the time.
As you sit in your motionless
car for five minutes, then
have the privilege of inching
forward for two minutes at
six miles per hour, your tension mounts until you feel
there must be angry smoke
curling out of your ears.
Why was all that money
spent just to create a problem? Traffic was slow along
Marine before, but at least it
moved. If the job couldn't be
completed, why was it started? Why was beautiful green,
peaceful Marine desecrated by
an ugly modern "freeway" to
frustration ? Mr. Gaglardi,
HELP!
DESPERATE DRIVER
ed.5
$2  tor arts
Editor. The Ubyssey:
This letter is addressed to
arts students.
We voted last spring to give
our arts undergraduate society
$2 in fees to support the new
programs they wanted to implement. The Alma Mater Society ruled that these fees cannot be collected officially. The
arts undergrad society has
proved itself by implementing
new programs anyway. In
order to make their services
free they have given up the
fees paid to them by students
using lockers in Buchanan.
They have put out the anti-
Calendar, and they are serving free food at noon in Buchanan lounge.
They seem to be the only
major student group on campus making a real effort to
reach the student body and to
try some new exciting programs. How are they going to
be able to continue without
funds?
Well, what's the matter with
us? We voted them the money,
what is to stop us from giving
it voluntarily? If we, the arts
student body, won't give the
money we promised without
being forced into it by an
official ruling, we don't deserve
the dedicated leadership and
exciting experimental government we now are lucky enough
to have.
If we feel we don't have time
to serve on the executive, we
can at least show them we appreciate what they are doing.
I suggest we go to Buchanan
lounge, find out what's happening and give our representatives our $2 so that they
will be able to continue their
programs.
JANE    HANNA
arts 4
Impressed'
Editor. The Ubyssey:
I was greatly impressed by
Gabor Mate's two articles, The
June War. This is because
since the recent hostilities began I tried to find out the
reasons for the unrest by discussing and reading. The unorganized conclusions which I
came to were put into a logical
pattern by Mate's articles.
I believe our individual obligation is to form unbiased
opinions by knowing both
sides of the story. With the
modern subtle propaganda
methods this is very difficult.
Mate used pro-western and
pro-Zionist articles in presenting his case and I feel that he
has done an excellent job.
It  is  unfortunate that Ber
nard Simpson, law 3, in his
letter to the Editor (The Ubyssey, Sept. 26th) had to resort
to ridicule of Mate as an intellectual. To make such remarks
is merely building up hostilities when understanding is desired. Each is entitled to his
thoughts.
BYRAN SANCTUARY
grad. studies
Ha, ha!
Editor. The Ubyssey:
It is the opinion of some
members of the staff of The
Ubyssey that the educational
system on the campus is a
laughing stock. Well, the university is suffering from a
high student to faculty ratio
in many courses, a malady aggravated by the poor quality
of some students. The severity
of the illness might be alleviated by the hiring of more
faculty members. Any fee increase resulting from the increase in operating costs attendant upon such a measure
probably would raise a storm
of criticism from students, even
if it did mean an improvement
in the educational system. I
propose, therefore, the following alternative. Starting
this year, the university institute entrance examinations.
The examinations should be
demanding enough to reduce
the intake of freshmen by one
quarter of one-third of the
present number. Coupled with
more demanding academic
standards within the university itself, this measure would
produce other benefits,
amongst them an easing of the
shortage of student housing
and a relief of the overcrowding in classrooms and other
facilities on campus.
TONY WARREN
microbiology
Cut Jocks
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The obvious solution to the
AMS's money problem is to cut
down spending on athletics.
Student's money should be
spent on general student welfare, such as The Ubyssey and
student housing. If the AMS is
to be a truly democratic
organization, more regard
should be given to the minority within the student body
who strongly object to having
their money spent on what
they consider non - essentials.
Why can't sports pay for themselves?
T.  BOULONGE
graduate  student
CUSO
Director of Research
FRANK BOGDASAVAGE
"(DwsJopby^ TlatiojnA."
BROCK LOUNGE • 12:30 FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 •  10c
Wor-in ?
PANGO  PANGO  (UNS) —
Opposing opalescent ivory and
smooth puce blorgs Wednesday
staged a war-in on the roof of
this island capital's city hall.
TEA FOR TWO
at
International House
3:00 p.m. today
FREE     -     FREE
CINEMA 16 SHOWING
THAT MAN FROM RIO
Friday, September 29
12:30 & 8:00 P.M. - AUDITORIUM
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretory
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18, 1967.
Elections for the Positions
of Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office
of Student Senator:
1. One student registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to be elected by the students registered in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies only. To be eligible for
election to this position, a student in the academic year
most recently taken prior to the election shall have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at
this University and satisfied the academic requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies; he shall
also have been granted clear admission to, and be
enrolled in, the Faculty of Graduate Studies of this
University as a full-time student.
2. Three students from the student body at large (including the Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected
by the student body at large. To toe eligible for election to one of these positions, a student in the academic
year most recently taken prior to the election shall
have taken a full winter session programme of studies
at this University and attained at least a second class
standing; he shall also be registered as a full time
student at this University.
Terms of Office:
1. The student elected by the faculty of Graduate
Studies shall hold office for two years.
2. Of the students elected by the student body at
large, the candidate receiving the highest number of
votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations:
Nominations are open immediately.
Nominations will close on Wednesday, October 4, 1967
at 4:00 p.m.
Voting will take place on Wedesday, Oct. 18, 1967.
Nomination forms and copies of election rules and procedures are available at the AMS office, in Brock
Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 53. For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd vice-president,
224-3242. Local  47.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student administration advisory  committees:
Bookstore — 4 students
Food Services — 3 students
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Letters of application should be addressed to
Kim Campbell, AMS mailbox No. 53. On the evenings
when appointments are to be made applicants will
appear at a meeting of Student Council. The dates are:
Bookstore and Food Services: Monday, October 2, 1967.
Housing, Library, Traffic & Parking: Monday, October 9, 1967.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47. Thursday, September 28, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
MKB&i-il
V''
— photo powell hargrave
THREE INCHES above the knee still shows lots of leg says
library  assistant   Deborah   Grey.   A   memo   circulated   to
female library employees this week discouraged hemlines
more than three inches above the knees.
IDEAS AT LARGE
By ARNOLD SABA
In case you didn't know, you can now have a cup of
brown rice free every noon hour in the Buchanan lounge.
Also apples, plums, and various other healthy goodies.
This year's Arts council, a group of radicals who somehow got elected last spring, has set up a "free store" on
the site of its former office, which was stolen last weekend.
This may seem a bit useless at UBC, where the students
somehow manage to pay a million dollars each, per year,
and most people have places to live.
But it does have one thing going for it.
It's a nice idea.
I mean, really, why not? I don't know how they can
afford it (they want donations of money and food, by the
way), but somebody has this lovely idea of giving food
away.   It should be an example to all.
If you believe in direct action, watch the store. How
else can you demonstrate and try to start a new "free"
world, besides action? Anyone can stand around and feel
like a pauper on the colony eating brown rice five days
a week.   Try it.   It humbles you.
The whole idea is rather futile. The best ideas always
are. But for a wonderful loving feeling, visit the free
store.   Or start your own.   All you need is love.   And rice.
™<%™S JS^*. * . .-•     4. ??>!•■" j
- *?*£«?;>*'•'-'
^rLife seminar formed
Are you looking for a new meaning to university life?
A meeting will be held Friday noon in Bu 2201 to discuss
formation of a seminar on the purpose of higher education.
The seminar will be conducted by Dr. Robert Rowan of
'-v;the philosophy department and is under the sponsorship of the
r Student Christian Movement.
Rowan, who taught last year at Berkley's Free University,
holds the view that the purpose of higher education is the
creation of citizens.
Although the seminar will deal with questions of morality
it will be conducted on a secular basis.
Librarian vetoes
glaring garters
By EILEEN FOGARTY
When is a mini-skirt too mini?
According to the university library circulation department,
it's when the length of the skirt is not "decent beyond doubt".
Ruth A. Butterworth, head of the circulation department,
issued a memorandum this week:
"While matters of dress are normally left to individual
discretion, some of the short, short skirts which have been seen
lately make it necessary to remind staff that in a public service
division, you are expected to be decent beyond doubt.
"Generally speaking half way between the hip and the knee
is too short.
"Knee length or up to three inches above the knee is preferable."
Miss Butterfield and I. F. Bell, of the librarian's office said
the reason for the memorandum was a lack of decency.
"When a mini-skirted girl bends over, her garters show,"
said Miss Butterfeld.
"Phooey!" said one mini-skirted staffer. "We all regard
the memorandum as a joke."
Library officials said the memorandum was not a rule but
a reminder and offenders would not be punished.
BACK-TO-THE-
B00KS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
STUDENT DISCOUNT
tVofaQptfal
seven
locations
in Greater
Vancouver
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENSES
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant
will work with the interim returning officer during
the October 18th elections, after which he will assume
responsibility for running all referenda and AMS elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications
and questions should be addressed to Kim Campbell,
2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53, or
224-3242, Local 47. Appointment will be made at a
meeting of Student Council, Monday, October 2, 1967.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Student Union Building
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Student Union Building applications should be addressed to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53.
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51.
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this committee are
asked to contact Barbara Vitols, Program Director at
the Alumni Association,  Cecil Green Park, 228-3313.
JOHN WEISS
| LADIES & GENTS TAILOI
2934 West Broadway
RE 3-6711
!• He
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Room 400,  I.  House
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In 1964, in Ontario, there were
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up to 3795. Today, a motorcyclist's chances of being killed
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3 Key Steps that are needed to
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Two Fine Stores  lo Serve You Page 8
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, September 28, 1967
.<*=.--" ". 'A1   _T '
M^*&^\^xm'&}mmmmmmi?% s;s__^^a^*w_^,-;r
CUS boss promises action
The following is an interview with Peter
Warrian, president-elect of the Canadian
Union of Students.
Warrian becomes president of CUS after
ihe next CUS congress one full year from now.
By FRANK GOLDSPINK,
Special lo Canadian University Press
GOLDSPINK: Three words were kicked
around a lot at the CUS congress: syndicalism,
consciousness and expertise. Could you define
these terms and explain how they apply to
CUS's program this year?
WARRIAN: Student syndicalism is students acting collectively in terms of their
rights and interests, first in education and
then in society. This is implied in the revised
declaration of the Canadian student.
Syndicalism is actively applied in Quebec
now but will not toe in the open for a few
more years in English Canada. This is because
culturally the English are significantly differ-
ent from the French and don't have a ibase of
support for syndicalism.
Consciousness is awareness of the self and
its social situation. The student must become
conscious and act so in terms of his position
in education and society.
Expertise is competence in a particular
learning to get at the guts of the education
learing to get at the guts of the education
system and try to change it.
GOLDSPINK: What is your plan of operation when you (become president of CUS?
WARRIAN: As president I can only facilitate getting the field work done. There has
to be someone strong in the presidency to get
it done and I feel I have experience in field
work and projects to help the secretariat.
The secretariat will be chosen from people
who are presently active with campus projects. These are the only people capable of
doing the field work.
I won't be making the Grand Tour of CUS
campuses. I've never found the Grand Tour
helped to build a strong base for CUS.
GOLDSPINK:  What are your  priorities for
action by the Canadian Union of Students?
WARRIAN: My first priority is quality of
education, my second is social action and the
third is international affairs. Social action
includes the human rights motions passed at
this year's congress.
GOLDSPINK: Are CUS and these priorities representative of the students?
WARRIAN: We are involved in value judgments here. At the congress we tried to state
the legitimate concerns of the students. Now
we try to establish a broad base of support
by getting students involved in the suggested
programs.
Our experience with these programs will
be a test of our judgment. In this way we'll
be democratizing CUS.
GOLDSPINK: How do you intend to implement education policies passed at the congress?
WARRIAN: There must be a complete
change in the institution. Students aren't
strong enough to turn over this system in a
frontal assault. Change has to be approached
selectively, in particular crucial places. It's
a type of guerilla warfare. The student-
centered teaching resolution is a good example
of this.
Curriculum committees are also an area
of crucial juncture. We must get the student
involved and things may change. We must get
rid of this passive prof-student relationship in
the classroom.
GOLDSPINK: How important is an international affairs program?
WARRIAN: This program is necessary because society is involved in international
affairs. We can't cut it off but the program
must make sense. Last year there was a high
quality international affairs program but it
didn't make sense at the local campus level.
I'm happy we're retaining our relations in
the international student movement.
GOLDSPINK: Do you anticipate any
trouble in implementing the human rights
and education resolutions?
WARRIAN: The human rights question
must be addressed squarely. Society may come
crashing down on our heads tout I don't think
the reaction will be so severe that CUS will
lose members.
Education will be an area of considerable
controversy. High schools are becoming more
authoritarian all the time. The system turns
teachers into cops.
The program must develop consciousness
in people by linking their personal experience
to public life. The high school resolutions must
not be an abstraction but a concrete goal.
GOLDSPINK: What will happen if the
direction of CUS reverses next year?
WARRIAN: I have no idea what will happen if it does but there isn't much chance of
this. The direction has been definite for three
years and I think it will be sustained.
GOLDSPINK: What was the basic problem
at this year's congress?
WARRIAN: People were not clarifying
their positions well enough at the congress so
there was no basis for mature political compromise.
If strong views consolidate later it might
affect local campus implementation but not
the secretariate of the national office.
GOLDSPINK: Do you think you connections with SUPA will affect you in your term
of office?
WARRIAN: I have never denied that I was
connected with SUPA and I'm not very happy
with people who make a priore judgments.
I hope they look at the programs before becoming paranoic about a grand conspiracy.
GOLDSPINK: Will you make use of other
national organizations in your program of
implementation?
WARRIAN: If they want to help there are
official liaison mechanism between them and
CUS. At the local campus level the secretariat
will be working with anyone who is interested.
GOLDSPINK: What will you toe doing this
year relative to CUS?
WARRIAN: I'll be in Ottawa for a day or
two each month and I'll always be in close
contact with the national office.
Hare here, unlimited talk
Everyone from UBC president Dr. Kenneth
Hare to Burnaby Reeve Allan Emmott will be
speaking  in   this season's  Vancouver  Institute
Brock gut-rot shop
open on Sabbath
Students can now eat Brock food on weekends.
The never-on-Sundays rule of food services
has been changed.
Brock cafeteria will remain open from 7:45
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, and will also be open
Sundays, after the Thanksgiving weekend, from
2 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Starting Oct. 10 Brock will also stay open
until 10 p.m. on week nights.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said the new
ruling was influenced by the food services'
advisory committee, a student-administration
body.
lecture series.
Hare will speak Mar. 30 on Universities
Unlimited. On Oct. 14, Emmott will discuss the
future of Greater Vancouver.
Cabinet minister Edgar Benson, minister of
national revenue, will discuss the handling of
government money on Nov. 25. Arthur Laing,
minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development will lecture on The Indian of Canada
Mar. 23.
The new dean of pharmacy at UBC, Dr.
Bernard Riedel, will speak of psychedelic drugs
March 2.
Other lecturers will be Dr. Michael Futrell
of UBC Slavonic Studies and Dr.'s B. P. Bierne
and Laughlin Currie of Simon Fraser University.
A brochure giving further details can be
obtained by writing to the information office at
UBC.
PROFS LOCKED  UP
Student gherao tactics
disturb Indian  leaders
NEW DELHI, India (UNS)—Indian educational authorities
are disturbed by a tactic used by students to get their demands
accepted by authorities.
The tactic, termed "gherao", calls for the illegal confinement
of a college authority until the students' demands are accepted.
The tactic was introduced by Communist-dominated trade
unions in West Bengal to solve industrial disputes.
The unions have confined employers and senior industrial
staff for two or three days until their demands have been met.
Picking up the tactic,  students of the Nagpur University
in central India confined the principal of a local college in his*
car and prevented him from announcing a decision to increase
college fees.
When the principal arrived in his car to address a press
conference about the fee rise, about 50 students surrounded his
car shouting slogans against the proposed fee hike.
The principal remained in his car for 45 minutes with the
"gherao" lifted only when he promised to return home.
In another incident, a professor at an agriculture university
in an eastern Indian state and a faculty dean were locked up for
four hours by a student group pressing for the acceptance of
their demands.
The two teachers were requested by about 70 students to
come out of a staff meeting for a few minutes for discussions.
They were then forcibly taken to their respective rooms in the
colleges and locked up. ■
Educational authorities in India are worried that a serious
situation may arise if this tactic spreads.
VOTE
Clubs day at the Liberal booth
Choose our
next leader
□
Paul Hellyer
D Mitchell Sharp
□
Allen MacEachen
D  Pierre Trudeau
□
Jean Marchand
G John Turner
□
Paul Martin
□  Robert Winters
Write in 	
tSHELL.
WW
FALL SPECIAL!!
BRING THIS AD AND  GET
10% DISCOUNT
ON ALL TUNEUP WORK, PARTS AND LABOUR
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 234-0828
Our humble apologies
To the 500 who had to wait until 10 p.m. on Friday night
for the music to start.
It won't happen again, but because you came we are extending our summer DOLLAR DANCES to include next weekend, Sept. 29 & 30
Friday   UNITED EMPIRE LOYALISTS
9-2   AM. Cify B|||es
& other happenings
Saturday   MY INDOLE RING
Strange Brew
& equally hip groups
RETINAL CIRCUS
LIGHT SHOW & DANCE    1024 DAVIE Thursday, September 28, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
WITH CO-OP...
... UMBRELLAS
Arts remains in motion
You'd feel less of a drip
picking up just any old umbrella if people didn't rain
contemptuous looks on you.
So thought participants of
Tuesday's arts council general
meeting when they set in motion a project to communalise
umbrellas.
The two-hour discussion in
Buchanan lounge generated a
volley of such motions: a sit-
in at the next board of governors meeting, experimental
college and an aid to American
' political refugees program.
A rock band and free food
in the Mackenzie quadrangle
today, and the fall symposium
next week in Bu. 106 every
noon are also planned.
"While everyone else is
standing about talking, arts
council   is  doing  something,"
said arts  president Stan Persky.
No bureaucracy, no pressure,
just people trying to make the
university a better place for
people—these are the aims of
the council, said Persky.
He told the meeting anyone
who  wanted   to   could  be   a
member of the council, no
matter what faculty they were
in, non-students are welcome
as well.
The most important thing,
said Persky, is to deal with
people in a civilized manner.
FREE     -     FREE
CINEMA 16 SHOWING
THAT MAN FROM RIO
Friday, September 29
12:30 & 8:00 P.M. - AUDITORIUM
Blessed beets
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Thousands of hairy green
blorgs today marched in a
solemn procession to the great
puce river of Ognap, the
sacred stream of the Pangolian
theology. Legend says if the
inhabitants are pious during
their trek, the Great Indigo
blorg will reward them with a
record sugar beet harvest.
Picasso style change
war horror  reaction
Picasso changed his style of painting in 1917 because he
was reacting to the horrors of war, a visiting art expert said
--Wednesday.
"All fields of art during this time reflected war horrors,"
said Sir Anthony Blunt in a lecture in the Lasserre building.
He said Picasso's switch from Cubism to
classical after the war was thus understandable.
Blunt, director of the Cortauld Institute
in London, supplemented his lecture with slides
of Picasso's work during his classical period.
He said Picasso's classical style is shown
especially in the Greek features found in most
of the portratism.
-* "The painting of the mother and child is the most important
in showing the style of this period in Picasso's work," Blunt
said.
BLUNT
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
ACTORS   AUDITIONS   ACTORS
GET   INTO  THE   ACT
ROLES GALORE
EVERYTHING FROM STRUMPETS TO DUKES
xs
5h
by Wm. Shakespeare       directed by John Brockington
(Playing November 17-25)
ORGANIZATIONAL  MEETINGS
(to Arrange Individual Audition Times)
FREDRICK   WOOD   THEATRE
Monday,  Oct.   2 -   12:30   p.m.
Tuesday, Oct.  3 -  12:30  p.m.
———FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE—^—.
&
WHAT'!!
LAB COATS ONLY $5.00 (Long)
$4.00  (Short)
at the COLLEGE SHOP?
Plus a complete selection of U.B.C. insignia
* "University of B.C.7 Jackets
* Selection of Lightweight Jackets
* Faculty Jackets
* Faculty Crests
* Tremendous Assortment of Sweat Shirts
* Complete Range of Lecture Supplies
* Made-to-Order U.B.C. Rings
* Beer Mugs
* Sportshirts
* Blazers
* Sweaters
* Socks
* U.B.C. Scarves
* Nylons
Remember, this is your College Shop ... COME IN AND BROUSE
BROCK HALL EXTENSION Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 28, 1967
Co-eds get  Pill  info
TORONTO (CUP)—The Students' Administrative Council of
University of Toronto voted Wednesday to provide birth control
information to co-eds. *
According to the Criminal Code of Canada such an education
program would be illegal, and SAC president Tom Faulkner said
if the SAC were prosecuted! "I realize that the president might
have to go to jail."
U of T health services advises married couples and sometimes single students on contraception.
The staff also gives prescriptions for the Pill to married -
students, engaged couples, and sometimes single students living
together, said Faulkner.
The SAC birth control education program is mainly directed
toward freshman co-eds.
— kurt hilger photo
Ah, fall. Beautiful scenery, lovely legs, mini-skirts.
Diggers turn to students for help
The diggers are out there to The Diggers, c/o Canadian you with no place to stay, or
helping, but they need bread, Imperial Bank of Commerce, hospital bills to pay, or no
man. Fourth and Yew," Ranee said.     Place to eat'" Kirkpatrick said.
Viet   liberationists
begin  tour  of  Quebec
MONTREAL (CUP)—Three members of the South Vietnamese National Liberation Front arrived in Montreal Wednesday to begin a two-week tour of Quebec.
The students, Lyuan Sou, Ngeum Ngok Eungnkthe and
Le May were invited to Quebec by Union Generale des Etudiante
du Quebec, which is absorbing all the costs.
Addressing a press conference, Lyuan Sou explained his*
primary purpose in coming to Quebec was to explain the situation
in Vietnam.
He added a better understanding between people would
emerge from the visit.
He also condemned what he termed "the American barbarism" and affirmed that the NLF would be victorious.
UGEQ president Pierre LeFrancois said Quebec^ students
support the struggle of the NLF.
The three will circulate throughout the province, ending'
in a speaking engagement at Sir George Williams University.
Victor Rabinovitch, vice-president of UGEQ, said the NLF
members were here through UGEQ and hadn't been sponsored
by the Canadian Union of Students.
The three have visas which last for two weeks.
Diggers Jim Ranee and Eric
Kirkpatrick told The Ubyssey
Wednesday they cook and provide a place to sleep for 40-60
people, who otherwise would
have no place to go.
Three clergymen, Rev. Jim
McKibbon, Rev. Harold McKay and Rev. Paul Moore
have set up a trust fund for
the diggers and appeal for financial support.
"Donations   should   be   sent
The diggers have a house at
2227 W. 3rd. Phone 734-8344
if you'd like to help, or donate
clothes.
Working with the diggers
are social workers and the
Children's Aid Society in trying to get runaways to return
as -well as paying rent on the
house, and providing food and
clothing.
"What can you do but try to
help   when  someone  comes to
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
CAMPUS
A GO-GO sat. oct 7
WILDEST DANCE OF THE YEAR
tlie best in soul
3 BANDS *•*-**•-*   P
the best in psychedelic
and the sexiest GO-GO GIRLS on campus!
UBC ARMOURIES SuSSST
DANCE
TURN ON TO THE UNDERGROUND ROCK OF
PAPA BEAR'S
MEDICINE SHOW
BROCK MIXER, FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 AT 8:30 P.M.
Guys 75c Girls 50c Everybody Welcome
X£
THE YEAR'S BEST TRIP
VOLPONE
(THE FOX)
by Ben Jonson
with Derek Ralston and Lee Taylor
directed by Donald Soule
designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Sept. 29-Oct. 7
Student Tickets 75 cents
(available for all performances)
Speciql Student Performances—Mon., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207 or 228-2678
SAVAGE     •     GROTESQUE     •      HILARIOUS
THE FIRST AND GREATEST BLACK COMEDY
SUPPORT YOUR  CAMPUS THEATRE
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.
JW Thursday, September 28, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
jiurf talk
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Are you overweight? Are you having trouble sleeping at
nights? Do you feel tired all the time?
If you do then the UBC recreational department has the
-»  remedy for you—exercise.
In 1965 the university senate decided that the interests of
students would best be served by a voluntary recreation program instead of the required program.
With this ruling, a lot of bodies went to pot.
Why not rescue your flesh and join one of the many activities available to you?
If you like arrows, then there's archery.
Badminton, bowling, basketball and ballroom dancing may
„ appeal to others.
Circuit training or curling will put you in shape in a hurry.
Fencing, football, field hockey, gymnastics, golf and Scottish or folk dancing will limber up those seldom used muscles.
Ice hockey and judo sessions will assure you of a good
night's sleep.
Rugby, swimming, skin and scuba diving, and tennis will
provide a welcome break between periods of studying.
Wrestling and weight training can be enjoyable pastimes.
All equipment needed is supplied by the school of physical
> education and recreation.
If you come with the appropriate attire for each sport
then you can start right away.
Give your mind a rest and go to the athletic office in
"■*   Memorial Gym where you can get all the details..
But you say that you want to travel and see the world.
Then the thing for you to do is join one of the Thunderbird
teams.  If   you  want  to play  basketball,  football,  ice hockey,
soccer, rugby, or any other sport, see the coaches in the Memorial Gym.
*~ They're approachable.
Up  and  coming
Practice will begin soon for the UBC hockey Thunderbirds.
Those who have already signed up for the team are asked
to check off the times that they would be avaialble to come
out to practices.
A yellow sheet has been posted for this purpose in the gym
dressing room.
Anyone who has not signed up but would like to play for
the Birds is asked to get in touch with coach Bob Hindmarch.
His office is room 212 in the gym.
If he can't be found, leave a note in the ice hockey box
in the gym office.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS
12:45 to.2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.»
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
/- December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
GRAD PHOTOGRAPHS
NOW BEING TAKEN FOR '68 GRADS
MOBILE STUDIO LOCATIONS:
EDUCATION BUILDING
OCT. 2 to 13
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
TOth & Burrard 736-0261
FOOTBALL SCENE
Coach crosses fingers
The UBC football Thunderbirds will play their second
game of the season Sept. 30
when they travel to Salem,
Oregon, to play the Williamette University Bearcats.
"This game will be the turning point of the season for
us," said head football coach
Frank Gnup Wednesday.
"If we do well, though not
necessarily win, then this
could determine how we play
for the rest of the season,"
added line coach Bill Reeske.
The Birds have played the
Bearcats seven times dating
back to 1946. Willamette has
won six of these games.
It was the last time that
these two teams met in 1963
that UBC came through with
a 19-0 win.
"They have a well-drilled
team and an outstanding
coach," moaned Reeske.
Ted Ogdahl is entering his
16th season as head coach at
Willamette. His record over
15 years is 71 wins and 46
losses with 10 ties, good for a
60 per cent average.
Willamette lost its first
game of the season Sept. 23.
The Bearcats were beaten
32-15 by the University of
Nevada Wolf Pack.
Gnup hopes that the Salem
team doesn't take out the
frustrations caused by this
first loss on the Birds.
Player wise, Gnup has been
forced to make some changes.
Moe Hayden is out for the
year with torn knee ligaments. He was injured in the
Junior Varsity game against
Wenatchee Sept. 23.
Bill Reid has been brought
up  from  the Jayvees   to  re
place  Hayden.
Gordon Hardy will be Gnup's
choice for starting quarterback. Young Hardy will be
matching passes with the Bearcats' Mike Shinn.
Last year Shinn completed
89 of 205 tosses for 1,493
yards.
He was the third leading
passer in the Northwest Conference in 1966.
Gnup will play Tom Ellison
at split end and Jack Christopher has moved from the
defensive squad to play offensive left tackle.
The offensive backfield will
consist of Kent Yaniw, Dan
Tokawa, Tom Kirk and John
Bellamy.
The opposing backfield is
one of Willamette's strongest.
The main reason for this is
Jim Nicholson, a 190 lb. junior who last year led all NWC
rushers  with   1,085   yards   on
180 carries for an average of
six yards per   carry.
He was also the leading
Bearcats' scorer with 14 touchdowns.
Nicholson is very fast. He
has run 50 yards in 5.9 seconds with full gear.
A good pass receiver also,
Nicholson last year made 19
receptions for 318 yards.
Its no wonder that he is
nicknamed 'Tiger.'
Gnup's main speed lies in
20-year-old Dave Corcoran.
The problem here is that Corcoran is recovering from a
pulled hamstring muscle.
With two days to go before
the game, Gnup hopes Corcoran will recover.
"We lack speed this year,"
said Gnup.
With the situation as it
stands, Gnup is just keeping
his fingers crossed and hoping
for the best.
Like to row to Mexico?
The UBC rowing Thunderbirds competed at the Pan
American Games at Winnipeg
this summer and won a silver
medal for Canada.
Aiming for a gold medal,
the UBC rowers lost to the
powerful Harvard crew by
two lengths in the 8's.
Practice began in early May
with twenty student oarsmen,
along with coach Wayne
Pretty and assistant coach
John Cartmel training at the
Crystal Waters resort on Kal-
amalka Lake.
In the past Thunderbird
crews have done well at Pan
American Games.
In 1959, the rowers won a
silver medal in the 8's, losing
only to the U.S.
At Sao Paolo, Brazil, the
1963 crew won a gold medal
in the 8's.
Even though this year's
crew didn't have the physique
of /former crews, style, determination and technique earned them the 1967 silver medal.
The general meeting of the
rowing crew will be held on
Friday, Sept. 29 at noon in the
War Memorial Gym in rooms
211-213.
No previous experience is
needed.
If you are at all interested
why not attend — and perhaps
you will be in Mexico City
next year for the XIX Olym-
piade.
- Milt  ^WIIIIIIiyilMIN  )_HVI«
GRIM DETERMINATION SHOWS on the faces of the UBC rowing 8's as they propel their
shell through Coal Harbour waters during a practice session. This crew won a silver medal
for Canada at the 1967 Pan American Games held this summer in Winnipeg. Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 28, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Clubbers gather,
hunt fresh blood
UCC
See 58 campus clubs in
action, today, noon, armory.
UBC's mini-Expo — Club's Day
•67.
RAMBLERS ATHLETIC
CLUB
New members welcome. Visit
hut B-9 or clubs day booth.
CIASP
Anyone interested in doing
community development work
in Mexico next summer, visit
the Amigos booth at clubs day.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
General meeting tonight, 7
p.m., Lutheran Campus Center.
Informal supper at 6 p.m.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French conversation and culture, today, noon, armory.
PRE MED SOC
Witness skilled surgeons at
work, today, noon, armory.
KARATE CLUB
Organizational meeting today, noon, chem. 250.
MARKETING CLUB
Organizational meeting today, noon, Ang. 213.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Join the fastest club on campus at the club booth, clubs
day.
SUS
Science mixer Friday, 8:30
p.m., Brock lounge.
SUS
General meeting today, noon,
Henn. 200. Stunt— one gear
required, no experience necessary.
IH
Coffee hour today, 3 p.m., IH
upper lounge.
SYNCHRONIZED
SWIMMING
Practices today, 1 to 2 p.m.,
CYC pool. Sunday, noon to 2
p.m., Crystal pool.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
See what makes the world
go round at the club booth,
clubs day, armory.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Executive meeting today,
noon, gym. 211.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Film The Threatening Sky,
today, noon, Bu. 102. Admission 15 cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Seven plays and lectures for
$10 at special night at Playhouse Theater Company. For
information phone 684-5361.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting   Friday,   noon,   Bu.
203. Slides will be shown.
IH
Canadian   and   foreign   students dance, Friday, 8:30 p.m.,
IH. Live music.
COMPUTER CLUB
Organizational meeting Friday, noon, chem. 250. Anyone
interested welcome.
ROWING CREW
Those interested in rowing
are invited to a meeting Friday,
noon, gym. 211.
LOWER MALL
ASSOCIATION
Dance to the Shockers, Friday, beginning at 9:30 p.m.
Admission 75 cents.
Sao£ on SooliA
We BUY and SELL new & used
university or high school text books
hard covers or paper backs
BUSY W BOOKS
146 W. Hastings St.
Across from Woodward's
MU 1-4931
MAX DEXAIL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers,  rubbers  and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 daj* $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CATCH THE LATEST IN "NOW"
music, Friday, September 29 in
Brock. Turn on with Papa Bear's
Medicine Show. From 8:30 til Midnight. Guys 75c girls 50c. Everyone
welcome.
HANK AND THE HOBBOS AT THE
P.N.E. Showmart Building, Friday,
Oct.   13th.   Hard   Times.
CANADIANS AND FOREIGN STU-
dents meet Friday at 8:30 p.m. at
I.   House.   Dance   to live   music.
FOUNTAIN    PEN    FRIDAY    MORN-
ing.     Sheaffer.     See   Ubyssey    Ad.
Dept. Brock Hall.	
SEE THE PSYCHEDELIC SCIENCE-
men turn on Friday, Sept. 29. Brock
Hall.  Everyone welcome.
SUPREMES — TEMPTATIONS —
Beatles—All at the Nisei Varsity
Club Frosh Mixer on Friday, Sept.
29 at 8:30. Brock Extension. Frosh
and all girls—Free. Members 35c.
Non-members 50c. Everyone welcome.
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic Theatre.   685-1711.
GEOLOGY HAS A BACK FROM THE
Bush BASH Friday, Oct. 13. 8:30-
1:00. Hallmark Hall, 6550 Fraser
Street. Tickets $3.00 per couple.
Room 112. G & G.
MULTI MEDIA DANCE & LIGHT
shows every Friday and Saturday
at Kits Theatre — Lights by the
Magic Teleporting Floral Light
Quasar? Do it!
Greetings
 12
TEA   FOR   TWO   AT   OUR  COFFEE
hour   at   I.H.   today,   3   p.m.	
Lost & Found
IS
LOST GOLD RIMMED GLASSES IN
black case. Phone 278-1337.
LOST: CHANGE PURSE CONTAIN-
ing $30 plus change. Finder leave
at Publications office, Brock Hall,
reward.
LOST MEN'S WATCH FIELD
House. $10 reward offered. Contact
Publications   Office,   Brock   Hall.
WOULD THE CLOWN WHO TOOK
the Black Briefcase from South
Brock Monday kindly contact below. 3 bottles home-brew. Reward.
987-5767.   John.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF LET-
ter addressed to H. F. Scott, R.R. 1,
Summerland — Contains important
papers.  Phone Ted 224-9161.
FOUND COM. 492 NOTES BELONG-
ing to David Park. See C.U.S. Office.  7th  floor Angus.
WILD ARCHITECTURE, SPEC-
tacular displays, stupendous excitement, Expo 67, no — Club's day today, Armouries, noon. Don't miss
it, it will happen only once.
WHITE RABBIT PRESENTS A
multi media dance night show every
weekend at the Kits Theater. Pri.
French hand laundry featuring Ray
Lawrsen on Worry and Barry
Hall's  new  band.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
-i.62   TR-4   GREAT   NEW   TOP.
1889   after   six.    $1,000.
MUST     SELL     NEW     1967     TR-4A.
$2,800.   596-3595.
_S61 VOLVO FOR SALE. EXCEL-
lent condition. Phone 596-2260, after
6 p.m.
1962 DELUXE VW REBUILT
motor, radio, w.w. tires, call 224-
9845,   Rm.  6 after six.
EXCELLENT VALUE 1962 ALPINE
completely rebuilt recently only
$800.   987-2059,  private.	
1956 PONT.-AUTO. RADIO, NEW
TIRES,   $125.   263-8403  after  5   p.m.
AUSTIN 1100 FOR SALE, 1965. EX-
cellent condition, $1250. Ph. 224-4008.
_S»57 METEOR WAGON, GOOD
transportation, mattress included,
$200—offers?!! Doug, 224-9073.
FOR SALE: 1958 VW. GOOD SHAPE,
runs well, $350. Contact Frank,
684-0705 evenings.
1959 SINGER GAZELLE. GOOD
condition: new tires, etc. low mileage.  Phone  224-9939,  Hut 18,  Room
1962 VAUXHALL, NEW PAINT JOB,
20,000 mile, rear end in good condition. Over load springs, heavy duty
shocks, portable radio. Low, low
price. Phone 921-7041; ask for Chris.
Automobile Parts  23
TR-3 TONNEAU COVER, ZIPPER
bro'i m, J12 VR-2 - 3 repair manual,
$8. Phone Mike, 738-8370 after 5:30.
FOR SALE: TWO 600 x 14 TIRES.
Phone Laurie, CR 8-6658 evenings
or 357 Catalina Cres., Richmond.
28
Motorcycles
'65 DUCATI STREET SCRAMBLER.
Very fast, reliable, excel, cond.,
$480 or best offer.  224-0835 after 6.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
FOUND TRANSISTOR RADIO NEAR
parking lot H. See John Byrne, Hut
B6—Room  33.
BLACK SKI JACKET: LOST. RE-
ward offered. Call 922-1150. Thank
you.
LOST $100. 5/20's. FINDER CON-
tact Jim, Hut 29, Room 7. Acadia
Camp.   Phone   224-9826.
Rides & Car Pools
 14
DESPARATE NEED CARPOOL TO
Caulfeild, West Vancouver. Phone
Pete   926-1581. 	
CARPOOL WANTED IN NEW
Westminster area. Call Dave 526-
6517  or   Sue,   521-3262.
CARPOOL NEEDED. BETWEEN
Granville and Arbutus on 25th Ave.
Phone 733-7963. 	
RIDE NEEDED: FROM 15th AND
Dunbar 8:30's Monday - Friday.
Phone   (after 5:00.)  224-7332.	
RIDERS FOR 9:30 CARPOOL IF YOU
are west of Granville and vicinity
of 41st or 49th. Phone Gerry 261-
6430.
RIDE NEEDED: 41st AND MAIN.
8:30's M.W.Th.F. Leave 4:30 or
later.  Phone:   Carol 325-5787.	
TWO RIDBS WANTED FROM
Richmond for 8:30 Mon. to Fri. vicinity No. 2 Rd., Railman Ave.
Phone  Bob 266-6402.
RIDE WANTED FROM 14th & ALMA
8:30  classes phone  Shirley 224-3692.
WANTED: SEXY CHICKS FOR
Swinging North Van. Car Pool.
Phone   987-1932   after  7  p.m.
Special Notices
15
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON ON CAMPUS. Ladies' haircutting—no appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.  228-8942. 	
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W 10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.   .
CINEMA 16 PRESENTS "THAT
Man From Rio" on Fri., Sept. 29
at 12:30, 8:00 in Aud. Admission
free.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP open 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m., Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
5736 University Blvd.
HONDA-FLAT
Motorcycles  -  Cars
Generators  -  Utility Units
New   and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
o IN PAINTED FURNITURE. SELEC-
tion of desks, drawers and bookcases. Bunk beds, complete with
mattresses, $49.50. Broadway Paint's
Ltd.,   548  W.   Broadway,   874-5424.
THERE WILL BE OVER 7000
glasses of 7-Up waiting for you at
the  Undercut.
Help Wanted—Male
52
BASE GUITARIST REQUIRED ON-
campus group. Also any bands
wishing to Join syndicate. Phone
Rob,   224-0088.
Male or Female
 53
MATHEMATICS AND SCH-NCE
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate,    736-6923,    4:30-6:30   p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
HELP! STUDENT IN DESPERATE
need of a first-year chemistry
tutor. Phone 277-9611 after 4 p.m.
Ask  for  Steve.
Work Wanted
54
BABYSITTER NEEDED? LATE
afternoons, evenings, weekends. Reliable.   Phone   after   4   p.m.,   Chris,
738-8069.
RETIRED  NURSE—GIVE  ALL DAY
care my home, 5 days week.  Small %
babies   especially,   UBC   area.   224-
7141.
INSTRUCTION
Music 82
CONCERT     GUITAR,      AMPLIFIER,
detachable   pick-up,   $100.   738-6078.
63
Special Classes	
CREATIVE  ART   CLASSES   FOR-
CHILDREN
Ages 5-8   yrs.: Tues.  3:30-5:00P.m.
5-8 yrs.:  Fri.   3:30-5:00 p.m.
9-12 yrs. Wed.   3:45 - 5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs.:Thurs.  3:45-5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs.: Fri.   3:45-5:15 p.m.
Fees:  $8.00 per class for the full session.  All materials  supplied.  For information     and     registration    phone
228-2141,   local  118.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block .from   gates.
lHE BEST SELECTION OF CLEAN,
rebuilt:
washers
dryers
fridges
freezers
ranges
dishwashers
Mclver Appliances
Sales & Services
3215   W.   Broadway,   738-0021.
NEW  POLES   AND   SKIS   (185 cms).
Tel.   261-3978  after  6  p.m.   $40.'
FOR SALE 2 SINGLE HOLLYWOOD
beds with headboards, near new
condition.    Best   offer.    Phone   681-
8751.
REMINGTON RAND STANDARD
typewriter,   $75.   Phone   RE   8-872S.
PHILIPS   300   TAPE  RECORDER,   4-  g
track   stereo  playback,  $169.  Phone
Doug at 224-9946 after 8. .
100 - WATT TUNER AMPLIFIER,
solid state, AM-FMX, $198.00, terms.
736-6910.
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE, 3235 West Broadway, Tel.
732-6811.
Rentals - Misc.
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS
Costumes    for    all    occasions,    5620
^Dunbar   St.   Phone   263-9011.
37
Scandals
OR A CERTIFIED SCUBA DIVING
course less than $10.00 inquire at
Aqua Soc behind Brock under the
Diving Flag.
-xEXT LEADER. PICK THE MAN
to follow Lester Pearson. Clubs day
Liberal   booth.
WE CAN SAVE YOUR HAIR AT
the Campus Barber Shop, 153 Brock
Hall ext. Just bring a bag.
ANYONE WISHING TO SEE FREE
movie "That Man From Rio", report to Aud. on Fri., Sept. 29, at
12:30 or 8:00.
SEE THE PSYCHEDELIC SCIENCE-
men turn on Friday, Sept. 29, Brock
Hall.   Everyone welcome.
VOTE FOR PIERRE ELLIOTT TRU-
deau for next Liberal leader. Liberal Club booth today at the Armouries.
IT'S    ON    FRIDAY    THE    13th,    SO
only  1300 can go to the Undercut.
HAVE A BALL AT THE BASH
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30 - 1:00. Tickets
$3.00 a couple. Room 112, Geology
building.
FORT CAMP  VOTE—MAKE SANDY
Edwards your Queen.   	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
COFFEE   HOUR   TODAY,   3:00   P.M.
at   I.   House.   Everybody   welcome._
INTERNATIONAL FALL TEA SUN-
day, Oct.   1st at I. House, 2:30 p.m.
Everybody   welcome.
GORDON "E" MEETING, MON.,
Oct. 2nd, 7:30, 2019 West 30th. All
members invited. AM 3-6634 You
Too Mark Alexander.
GEOLOGY PRESENTS THE BASH
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30 -1:00. Hard
Ties. Everyone welcome. Hallmark
Hall,   5550 Fraser.
CAMPUS A-GO-GO WANTS TOPLESS G-GO DANCERS for Sat.,
Oct.   7.   Phone   926-1049.
RAMBLERS HEREBY FIRMLY
deny stealing the Arts Undergraduate   Society   office.
GOOD USED  FURNITURE
AT   LOWEST   PRICES
Good   used   washers,   from $19.50
Also, new 252   coil Hollywood
beds,  each  45.59
Unpainted,   3-drawer chest  12:96    *
Unpainted  students'  desks,
from           15.95
We carry a flul $15.95 mfwyp ffw
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted   furniture.
KLASSEN'S  USED FURNITURE
MART
3207 W.  Broadway RE 6-0712   %
Beer Bottle Drive-in at rear of store.
SEALY MATTRESS AND BOX
spring. Used 1 year. Excellent con-
dition.   Best offer,   433-8535.	
FOR SALE: Zoom MOVIE CAMERA
with pistol grip and tripod. Dave
after  6:00 p.m.   RB 1-1826.	
ARTY  CARDBOARD AND LUMBER
for sale.  Apply Hut B-9. Ramblers.
RENTALS 8e REAL ESTATE
Rooms 81
BASEMENT ROOM FOR TWO. Kerrisdale, near bus. Single beds and
study facility. 263-4504.	
GIRL   HONOR   STUDENT   WANTED
to   exchange   light   duties for  room %
and   salary.   Professor's   home.   733-
6556.
FOR RENT — 1 ROOM — MALE OR
female. Hot plate, refrigerator. 2970
W. 5th Ave. Phone 731-2880.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR ONE MALE.
3350 West 3rd Ave.  733-7500.	
ROOMS,    ON    CAMPUS    CLOSE   TO
meal  services.   2250   Wesbrook.   Ph.
224-9662.      ___
FEMALE       ROOMATE       WANTED.
Must be 21. Will have own bedroom
furnished.    Call   Barb    at   684-1808,
evenings.	
MADE    STUDENT     SHARE    ROOM
near   UBC.   AH   facilities,   224-4788.
Room & Board
 82
ROOM AND  BOARD  PLUS  TRANS-
portation.   327-6910   evenings.	
Sewing - Alterations
38
SEWING,     ^ALTERATIONS,       R E -
pairs.    Reasonable   rates.224-7141.
Typing
 40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
CAMPUS A - GO - GO WILDEST
dance of the year, needs GO-GO
DANCERS for SAT., OCT. 7. Phone
926-1049.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE;
one now, one Oct. 1. Phone Don
224-9665   after 6.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD TO FE-
male student in exchange for light
duties vicinity 41st & Granville.
AM   1-3605.
2 MALE STUDENTS 2 SHARE
double room, single beds — meals
served 5 days wt, 5 blks. gates,
224-5169.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE SUITE
near University. Transportation
available,   $40.00   per  month.   Phone
733-8058.

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