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The Ubyssey Oct 19, 1982

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 Firms accountable for j
i  i
loss
By BRIAN JONES
Vancouver accounting firms are
laying off articling students while
continuing to recruit more accounting students at UBC.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C. has documented
about 30 cases of articling students
being laid off, Don Carter, principal of the School of Chartered
Accountancy, said Monday.
"The point is not that companies
should not lay off students," said
articling student Philip Pang. "The
point is that these firms are advertising for (accounting) students."
"If you are laying off articling
students, why pretend to be looking
for CA students for next year?"
At least four accounting firms
have laid off articling students,
some of whom were in the final
stages of their CA program, said
Pang. But all four of the firms mentioned by Pang are recruiting ac
counting students in the UBC
Canada Employment Centre, and
three will be conducting interviews
with accounting students over the
next six days. These firms include
Clarkson Gordon, Deloitte Haskins
& Sells, Peat Marwick & Mitchell,
which began campus interviews
Monday, and Collins Barrow.
"You're laying off people on one
hand, and recruiting the same kind
of people on the other," said Pang.
"What kind of sense does it
make?"
The firms have an obligation to
tell undergraduate accounting
students about the layoffs, said
Pang.
"It looks like it's sort of a
game," Pang said. "Students are
used as a promotional tool by these
large firms."
But CEC acting manager Pat
Hagerman said Monday that one
would be "hard pressed" to find an
Faculty wages
faces rollback
By CRAIG BROOKS
The 12 per cent solution is too
high.
So ruled Compensation Stabilization Commissioner Ed Peck Thursday, when he sent an arbitrated
wage settlement between the university and the faculty association back
to the arbitrator for reconsideration.
"The parties should consider the
impact on the university's ability to
pay resulting from cuts in its grant
monies," said Peck.
While Peck did not directly suggest a new settlement figure, he
cited eight per cent figure in his ruling. The base raise for the group is
six per cent, plus two per cent for an
"experience adjustment factor,"
Peck said.
Vancouver arbitrator Ronald
Holmes had awarded faculty
members a nine-per cent general increase, plus a discretionary additional three for "career progress."
But only .75 per cent of the career
adjustment allowance is also
allowable, Peck ruled.
"As the parties have not had the
opportunity of addressing the impact of the aforesaid reduction in
the university's ability to pay, they
(the parties) should now do so
before arbitrator Holmes."
Peck quotes Holmes original
report, which reads "it appears my
award of nine per cent increase,
plus three per cent for career advancement, is within the current
ability (of the university) to pay."
The original settlement was made
before a 4.3 per cent reduction in
UBC's current operating grants.
In view of the budget cut, the settlement must be renegotiated, Peck
said. "Ability to pay is a global
consideration for every employer
party to a collective bargaining relationship. Hence arguments premised on an employer's ability to pay
must be accorded serious consideration."
UBC information officer Al
Hunter said Monday the university
had no position until Holmes submits a revised report.
Faculty association president
John Wisenthal said Monday the
association wants to re-establish arbitration as soon as possible. He
said the association had "certainly
given a great deal of thought" to
Peck's decision, but declined further comment pending arbitration.
Holmes was unavailable for comment Monday.
The original arbitration was submitted to Peck's office on Sept. 1.
The report came one and a half
months later.
Arbitration resumes when the
university is more than half-way
through its current fiscal year. The
wage settlement, if rolled back to
Peck's suggestion, will account for
most of the university's budget cut,
student board of governors
representative Dave Dale said.
In Ontario, faculty and staff
members were recently restricted to
a five per cent increase under provincial legislation.
accounting student who wasn't
aware that some firms were laying
off articling students.
"I am assuming that students
know which firms are laying off,"
she said.
Hagerman said the CEC will not
involve itself with the accounting
firms' layoff and recruitment practises. "I'm certainly not going to
withdraw our services to students
and employers," she said.
After 90 days of unemployment,
articling  students  are  usually  no
longer classified as students, but the
school of Chartered Accountants
has taken the "unprecedented action" of not striking them from the
register, Carter said.
But if they don't find another articling job by the end of the year,
they may lose their classification as
students and be forced to repeat
their articling year, Carter added.
Carter said he was aware that
firms were still recruiting on campus, but added that "it's not
necessarily just a numbers game."
firms need a certain mix of
students.
Bad economic conditions were
also partly to blame for the layoffs,
Carter said.
Students in the UBC accounting
program are aware of what is hap-
pening, said accounting club president Kenny Lee.
"A lot of them are quite
worried," he said. About 200 articling jobs are usually available, but
"This year it is about half that," he
said.
THE UBYSSEY
t Vol. LXV, No. 11
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 19,
228-2301
—allson hotnt photo
FIFTY THOUSAND KILOMETER check-up is on special this week. For only $9.95 for the no-cylinder version,
UBC riders can get new air filter (handy when beans are served for lunch), oil and lub, but vehicle drivers must do
tune-up themselves. Two cylinder vehicles on special next week.
-\
Great Trek gets tipsy, cheesy send-off
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
The opening event of Great
Trek week took place in the dimly
light SUB gallery lounge Monday.
Great Trekkers at the invitation
only Alma Mater Society wine and
cheese party returned to a much
different campus than the one
they marched to establish sixty
years ago.
For the dozen or so original
Trekkers the only visual reminder
of the 1922 campus was a slide-
show comparing campus scenes
then and now and a display of
historical documents.
That the campus has more
students and more buildings is obvious.
What is different about the campus now is students themselves.
When students marched to
establish the Point Grey campus
didn't   concern  themselves
Vthey
with whether the event would be
political, several Trekkers said.
"The whole spirit of the event
was 'we needed space, we were
over crowded, let's move?" said
George Banfield, a science
graduate in 1919.
Their legacy is that a specific
goal became reality. The university did move from the crowded
Fairview campus near Vancouver
General Hospital and flourished.
Great Trekkers like John Clyne,
now the university's chancellor,
staunchly refuse to acknowledge
the event was a political action.
Clyne said students directed the
event at showing the public a provincial university would be
valuable. "It (the Trek) is an
historical fact," said Clyne. "If it
wasn't for the Great Trek, I don't
think you'd be here."
Blythe Eagles added that people
then did not think that the Trek
would be an important event to
the university.
Of the 1982 anniversary Eagles
said, "There is nothing wrong
with the public being reminded of
the value of UBC. It's another
public and it's another group of
&
+ iVNjv/r,
s
Ifm
s GREAT v
V^227l9^
students."
But the differences between
students now and then is in 1922
almost every student got involved
in the event because they were
concerned and had a specific goal
to improve the university. They
had fun doing it too.
In 1982 the Alma Mater Society
is trying to tie the event to the
grave economic plight of UBC.
Wednesday a pamphlet will be
circulated explaining issues which
are the justification for turning
this years Great Trek anniversary
into more than a celebration.
The issues listed, to name a few
are, that the university has had its
budget reduced by $7.2 million,
class sizes have increased, there
are fewer teaching assistants and
tuition is up with no increases in
student aid.
Students now, as in the past, are
challenged by government. But instead of identifying specific issues
and getting student support the
AMS has generated a week of little more than wine and cheese parties and contests.
Organizers are saying the event
is directed at public relations like
the original trek and is not intended to be a protest.
"There are myopic individuals
who feel you have to yell and
scream and call people fuckheads
to be political," said AMS vice
president Cliff Stewart.
"Anytime you get a group of
people together to affect political
opinion it is political," said
Stewart.
But somewhere along the way
this weeks Trek events have lost
the essential element that made
the first Great Trek such a successful non-political event. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19,1982
'Birds remain free
Charging students to see regular
season Thunderbird games will not
be a regular practice, an Alma
Mater Society employee said Friday.
Programs coordinator Bruce
Paisley said an admission charge to
Friday's football game against the
University of Alberta Golden Bears
is not new policy.
He said only a few people had
complained about paying the $2.50
student admission charge.
The fee was implemented to help
offset the cost of bringing the San
Diego chicken to UBC for the
game, Paisley said.
The chicken also helped publicise
that the games exist, Paisley said.
Oops!
The Ubyssey would like to correct an error that appeared in Friday's paper.
The per student fee passed by
Simon Fraser university students
for the Canadian Federation of
Students is $2.50 per semester, not
$4 as we reported.
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"When its free nobody comes."
Any profits from the event will be
split 90-10 between the athletics
department and the AMS, said
Paisley. Pepsi Cola Co. helped
sponsor the event, he added.
Full-time students currently pay
$7 per year in varsity athletics fees.
30% OFF
to all Students
Expires December 1/82
3615 W. 4th Ave.
734-3841
UBC Family Housing Film
OLIVER
Tuesday, Oct. 19, 7 p.
HEBB THEATRE
m.
Saturday, Oct 23, 3 p.
SUB AUDITORIUM
m.
With AMS card
General Adm.
$1.00
$2.00
WOMEN SHAPING THE CITY
A panel discussion with five women who shape our city — its
politics, its culture and its environment!
Here's an opportunity to meet them and hear them talk about
their careers.
 PANELISTS	
ANNE MACDONALD, Community Arts Council of Vancouver
PAULINE WEINSTEIN, SSSS^sSLSTbo^i
RONDA HOWARD, Area Planner, Vancouver City Hall
HELEN   BOYCE, Alderman, Vancouver City Council
SUSAN ANDERSON , Social Planner, Vancouver City Hall
IITMIT  I VTIirftP    Director of Women
MODERATOR: J U IN Hi LI 1 fl*LjUIii, Students'Office
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21,
12:30-1:30 p.m. — BROCK 302
SPONSORED BY THE
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
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—Xmas Special Fare to Toronto from Vancouver
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Twentieth Century-Fox I*resents %i
\ FRANK YABLANS ita*. a FRANK PERRY nim
** CHRISTOPHER REEVE in MONSIGNOR
starring
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD  FERNANDO REY JASON MILLER  JOE CORTESE ADOLFO CELI
with TOMAS MILIAN as Francisco Director of Photography BILLY WILLIAMS, B.S.C.
Music by JOHN WILLIAMS    Produced by FRANK YABLANS and DAVID NIVEN, JR.
Screenplay by ABRAHAM POLONSKY and WENDELL MAYES
Based upon the novel by JACK ALAIN LEGER    Directed b>   FRANK PERRY
Filmed in Muvietar
r L->«: Urntttth Ctt
WORLD PREMIERE ENGAGEMENTS OCTOBER 22,1982
CHECK YOUR LOCAL LISTINGS FOR DETAILS. Tuesday, October 19,1982
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
Referendum
plans here
By CRAIG BROOKS
The Alma Mater Society may be
placing an unprecedented $20 per
year student referendum before
students in November.
In what AMS president Dave
Frank calls a "do or die" referendum, students will be asked to
almost triple their current yearly fee
to $32 per year from the current
$12.
"Our AMS fees are one-sixth of
most other campuses and have gone
up only once since 1949," said
Frank.
The proposal will ask for three
funds to be set-up:
• $3 per year for intramurals.
Intramurals currently receives
$1.50, the result of a referendum
three years ago. Frank says intramurals has grown so large it must
now hire full-time administrators,
to free over worked student administrators.
• $2 for AMS general operating.
This would be used, Frank says, to
maintain and add AMS services,
such as the Pit, games room, ticket
centre, CITR, The Ubyssey and for
minor renovations to SUB plus
other general operational expenses.
• $15 for a specific list of major
capital projects, including renovations to SUB, purchasing AMS
Whistler Cabin (who's lease runs
out in a year), day care, renovating
the horse barn in B-lot, athletic
facilities, and a parking lot opposite
SUB.
Frank says the referendum is all
in one, for two reasons.
If approved, the entire package
will   represent   much   "political
weight" Frank says. "Given the
current capital building freeze, very
few facilities will be built over the
next several years, unless they are
built by students," he says.
The second reason, Frank says, is
a practical one. While many people
would support one or more of the
ideas, it is difficult to get the required 2,500 yes votes for each proposal, he said. "It's a something-
for-everyone question," Frank
said.
In a letter to all UBC organizations, Frank complains his attempts
to change things have often been
thwarted by lack of funds.
"I have done my best to solve
them, but there are several things
that I cannot solve or change unless
we put the time and effort into passing a major $20 per year fee referendum. We must pass it for these problems to be fixed over the next
several years."
Frank is currently soliciting ideas
and comments on the proposal. "I
want to be selling a referendum that
contains what students want,"
Frank said.
"We can make this referendum
fly if we want it bad enough,"
Frank tells UBC organizations in
his letter.
Frank intends to mount a
vigorous publicity campaign over
the next month, visiting classrooms
and involving other UBC organizations including faculty and staff
associations, who are associate
AMS members.
"It is time we decided to get what
we need at UBC and to shape his
campus the way students want it to
be," Frank said.
Accessibility unequal
TORONTO (CUP) — Who attends post-secondary institutions?
Who doesn't — and can anything
be done about it?
These are the questions at the
heart of the accessibility debate.
Most provincial governments claim
that Canada's universities are
basically accessible to all who wish
to study at them; most student
groups disagree.
York University sociologist Paul
Anisef has added to the debate with
a report on accessibility to post-
secondary education in Ontario,
"Winners and Losers."
Anisef's report concludes that
higher education in Ontario is not
equally accessible to everyone. He
said university enrolment is
unrepresentative of society as a
whole because of financial barriers
and socialization.
People in the education community have begun to react to the
report.
Bob Hildebrand, research director for the province's colleges and
universities ministry, agreed that
socialization has a major influence
on the likelihood of going to university.
"Accessibility is part of a
person's value system," said
Hildebrand. "I don't necessarily
agree that all people aspire to
university education, even with accessibility. Is university the be-all
and end-all? ... Do poor people
— we're stereotyping here — want
university education? Is this a good
thing which they value?"
Carolyn Barrett, the ministry's
university affairs officer, said
potential students must make up
their own minds whether they want
to go to university.
"How much direction or intervention is the government willing
to take in order to ensure that every
student has an equal opportunity?"
asked Barrett. "We are not going to
try to stream people into certain
choices."
James Ham, University of
Toronto administration president,
said "the report has struck dead on
at a very important social issue. It is
a deep problem which we neglect to
our shame."
Anisef recommends that:
• compensatory education programs be established for disadvantaged groups.
• high school guidance programs
be improved.
• a tax-deductible higher education savings plan be created.
• the government establish a fund
for parents who wish to deposit
their family allowance benefits
towards their child's post-
secondary education.
• rewards and incentives be
established for staff and high
schools where large numbers of
students move on to post-secondary
institutions.
But Anisef is still waiting for the
provincial government to respond.
"There has been no input from
the Ontario government to show
they are interested," said Anisef. "I
haven't heard from anybody."
»***$/**
—allaon ho«na photo
GARBAGE IS NOT only found on pages of Ubyssey, as cub reporter Sam Smoop is caught on trail of latest
physical plant error, disposing of radioactive waste from Buchanan. "I knew all those glowing arts profs had
something behind them," said Snoop. "It must be their radiant dean."
UBC may follow SFU lead
By BRIAN JONES
Self-interest will motivate UBC
students to vote to join the Canadian Federation of Students, a student organizer said Friday.
"UBC is not exempted from cutbacks," said CFS national chair
Brenda Cote. "The more that cutbacks occur, the more students will
organize and want to be part of a
national organization."
Cote was in Vancouver last week
to promote the CFS national Week
of Information and the CFS
membership referendum at SFU,
which passed with 62 per cent of
voting students being in favor of
joining CFS.
UBC alone can not successfully
lobby governments, and needs the
assistance of a provincially and nationally organized body, Cote said.
"With the present economic
situation, students should not be
left alone to work on their issues."
Cote said she was not worried
about the low turnout for the CFS
referendum at SFU, where only 800
of 9,000 students voted. "I think it
was good because SFU has a
reputation of low turnouts. They
usually get three per cent, while we
got nine per cent," she said.
CFS holds no illusions about the
work it must do to win UBC
membership, said Cote. "I know
that there have been problems with
referendums at UBC in the past,
and not only with CFS," she said.
"If we do have a referendum here
(at UBC) you're talking about (CFS)
fieldworkers making it a priority,
and bringing in national staff for a
month," she added.
"I think we can pull it off if we
can get the University of Toronto,"
said Cote. "Politically, when you
have referendums on large campuses the no campaigns are basically on Ihe fee."
CFS membership costs $7.50 per
student — $3.50 for the provincial
organization, $3.00 for the national
organization, and $1.00 for services.
Such a fee level is necessary to
hold forums and conferences and to
hire staff workers and researchers,
said Cote. "You can't expect a national organization to do this, and
not give them a cent," she said.
CFS currently has eight paid staff
workers, who are paid approximately $17,000 each, said Cote.
"It's low for the work they are doing. These people are putting in
close to 15 hours a day," she said.
"But that is all we can afford (to
pay) right now."
CFS is $60,000 in debt, which
was inherited from the old National
Union of Students, said Cote.
Feds push for camps
Constipated running
The Alma Mater Society administration director by-elections on
Thursday and Friday could have done with a good dose of Ex-Lax.
"There were several events which could be termed irregularities,"
elections commissioner Al Irwin said Monday.
Scott Ando won the election with more than half the votes cast.
Ando got 869 votes, while Alan Pinkney got 526 and Chris Fulker
trailed with 118 votes.
Irregularities allegedly occurred when one candidate, who was not
named by elections committee members, campaigned after the 4
p.m. Wednesday deadline. Poll clerks in several campus locations
were also caught actively electioneering for Ando and Pinkney, according to elections committee member Neil Smith.
The federal government is
reviewing a proposal to establish a
$260 million youth camp which
would reduce high unemployment
among 18 to 24 year olds.
The proposal states that during a
seven week session 10,000 people
could study languages and Canadian history courses. In addition,
they could participate in an intensive physical exercise program.
Donna Morgan, Canadian
Federation of Students — Pacific
chair, said the program would not be
very effective since each session
would only last seven weeks.
"It's not a very effective way of
reducing unemployment," she said.
A confidential government study
on social aspects of volunteer work
states unemployment among people
under 25 is very serious, and
"urgent measures must be taken to
avoid a catastrophe."
During the depression of the '30s
work camps were established by the
federal government to combat high
unemployment. This procedure of
placing the unemployed in work
camps was known as the government's "out of sight, out of mind"
policy.
Although Morgan doubts the
camp proposal will be implemented,  she is surprised  that
politicians are reviewing the idea of
work camps.
"It's a really serious thing to
think that the government would
consider putting unemployed people in camps," she said.
Blind ambition
A winner of the First World
Marathon for the Blind in Vancouver last May opened Exceptional Person's week with a keynote
presentation in SUB auditorium
Monday.
Harry Cordellos, a 43 year-old
San Francisco athlete, said it is important disabled people receive proper motivation.
"It's all a matter of attitude," he
said.
"The loser is not the one who
came in last in a race, but the one
who never went to the starting line.
What it takes is not people who say
we can't, but people who say if
there is a way to do it, we'll find it.
"We can accept ourselves as we
are. No obstacle is impossible to
overcome," he said, quoting from
his autobiography, Breaking
Through. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19,1982
Campers all
What do you do when unemployment gets out of control, and the
prisons are already full?
Establish youth camps, of course.
The answer is so simple and obvious that our esteemed leaders in Ottawa were bound to think of it sooner or later.
It used to be that the military could soak up the excess labor power that
found no room in the factories. At least in this regard, the "youth camps"
will be a slight improvement. Recruits will now have the opportunity to
"study" and participate in an "intensive physical exercise program," which
we, perhaps naively, assume will not include marching in formation.
And why exactly will the small elite of 70,000 lucky souls get this opportunity? It appears the federal government has discovered that unemployment among young people is "extremely serious," and that "urgent
measures must be taken to avoid a catastrophe."
Of course, the government's definition of "catastrophe" does not include being forced, either by physical compulsion or by economic necessity, to go to a youth camp for seven weeks.
At least each camper will temporarily be removed from the unemployment statistics. And as unemployment among the young is artificially and
temporarily reduced, the government will no doubt proudly pat itself on
the back.
But $260 million is a tad much to spend on such a program. The state
could save itself some money by combining this program with their plan to
build camps in which to detain "agitators and suspicious citizens" when
war breaks out. Two camps in one, so to speak, and a lot of money saved.
When war starts, just remove the unemployed and detain the dissenters.
There is another option, but it may be too logical to warrant consideration. Why not spend the $260 million on job creation programs or on programs that will make post-secondary education more accessible, or on
both?
Have a nice day, campers.
Rant to publicize plight, make free placards
On Oct. 23 students will be marching through downtown Vancouver, starting at 11 a.m. in
celebration and as a reminder to the
public of the Great Trek which took
place in 1922. At that time, students
marched because the government
was ignoring the growing needs of
the university and refusing to give
financial aid for expansion. The
students walked from the old campus at Fairview to Point Grey where
we are today.
In 1982 UBC students are feeling
the effects of:
• a $7.4 million cutback in the
university's budget.
• increased student enrolment
and consequently bigger classes.
• reduction of courses.
• fewer teaching assistants and
freezes on teacher and staff hiring.
• withheld government grants
for students.
• reduced summer employment
(25 per cent - 30 per cent student
unemployment this summer).
• progressively increasing tuition fees.
UBC needed a 19 to 15 per cent
budget increase in order to maintain
existing services. Due to cutbacks in
budget we will only see a 10.8 per
cent increase.
B.C. is the only province where
grants have been withheld to this
date. There are rumours that there
will be a 25 per cent reduction in
grants given. At present the maximum amount of money available
in a loan-grant combination to an
individual is $3800. This is less than
welfare even before you subtract
the cost of tuition and books. Tuition fees will be set for next year in
October and November and again
we are likely to see a substantial increase in tuition fees.
We cannot let ourselves be pushed around any longer. If students
could increase public awareness and
get government aid in 1922, we can
do it today. The objective of the
Great Trek march is to let the public
realize   the   importance   of   the
university to their community and
to show our concern for misguided
government priorities.
Details of the march will be
posted in Buchanan lounge. There
will be a Great Trek meeting on
Thursday, Oct. 21 in Buch. 100 and
all those interested in participating
in a float are encouraged to come.
There will be a sign up list on the
door of Buch. 107; leave your name
and we will contact you about further details on the march.
On Oct. 19, 21, 22 there will be
placard making sessions at lunchtime in Buchanan. Materials will
be available, so come and make
your sign. Join in the Trek and
show you care. Eva Busza
Arts President
'Ubyssey last radical bastion'
Workers don't deserve crap
Nothing bothers me more than
seeing a person who has worked
thanklessly for hours on a project
and then has been dumped on for
weeks as a result. This is what has
happened to Jane Newton who put
together the Alma Mater Society
leadership conference this year.
Oh granted there were problems.
There are always problems. The
trick is to ensure that the mistakes,
which Jane herself has listed out,
don't happen next year.
You cannot criticize someone for
hard work and taking a job no one
else wanted. Jane showed enough
guts to hold the conference in a new
location, saving students thousands
of dollars; she phoned groups to get
them out, typed a large portion of
the material herself and continued
to work on the conference through
September, despite being sick,
registrating and classes. It would be
nice if she received more than
criticism as reward for this.
So I'd like to thank you for all
the work you did. People who try to
do things for students don't ever
deserve to be crapped on and
should never have to put up with it.
Dave Frank
A.M.S. President (still here)
Clerks allegedly electioneer
Some very serious allegations were brought to my attention during the recent director of administration election.
On at least four different confirmed occasions, electioneering was carried on by polling stations clerks. These events occurred in SUB,
Sedgewick, and Totem park. Needless to say, such activities could greatly
effect the outcome of an election enough to declare the whole election invalid. The polling clerk's purpose is to supervise proper voting procedure.
It is not to perform a last minute campaign bid for his/her favorite candidate.
To the polling clerks who were not involved in this, thanks for your time.
To the polling clerks who did electioneer, because of your careless actions,
you've wasted a lot of people's time and could cost everyone hundreds of
dollars if the election has to be rerun.
Neil Smith
elections committee
member
Your editorial of Oct. 5 entitled
Preppy Parade is absolutely typical
of the outdated thought processes
which have characterized The
Ubyssey for as long as I can recall.
You portray the Oct. 23 parade
marking the sixtieth anniversary of
the Great Trek as little more than
an excuse for pom-pom waving
sorority girls to stage a street party.
In your view, we should instead
seize the opportunity to wave
placards, hurl stones, and scream
abuse at the System in an effort to
convince the public that we deserve
still more of their tax dollars.
Permit me to clue you folks in on
two rather basic points which you
have obviously never come to grips
with.
First, lunatic rantings do not
elicit sympathy from the government. It has been shown time and
time again on this campus that
hysterical protest marches and mass
tantrums produce no positive
results whatsoever. Effective student representation has been, and
always will be the product of
diligent students making civilized
and rational arguments on behalf of
their constituents.
The Great Trek of 1922 was a
peaceful, yet persuasive appeal to
the provincial government with the
supportive backing of the voting
public.
Second, if, as you suggest, the
citizens of Vancouver think poorly
of us now, then by ranting up and
down their city streets for more
money, you will surely alienate
them completely.
Wake up, boys and girls of The
Ubyssey. Times are tough. The
public is already of the opinion that
they get insufficient value for
money out of the universities, and
that students are a pampered lot.
Seeing students demanding more
money of them will only reinforce
their views.
UBC is a magnificent, world-
class university. Oct. 23, 1982
should be a day to recognize the
legacy with which our predecessors
of 60 years ago have endowed us.
All may not be perfect in the realm
of higher education, but our future
today is infinitely more secure than
was that of the Trekkers of 1922.
The unpalatable truth for the tiny
group that is The Ubyssey is that
you are the last feeble bastion of the
trendy radicalism of a decade ago.
The vast majority of students do
not relate to, nor agree with your
points of view. Bren, Tynan
Law 3
EUS gives thanks for blood
The engineering undergraduate society, co-sponsores of the fall 1982 Red
Cross blood donor clinic held from Oct. 4 to Oct. 8, would like to thank all
the people who helped to make the blood drive a success. A total of 1781
people attended the clinic, representing about ten per cent of the current
student population. Over 400 of these donors had never given blood
previously.
The faculty of science were a great help with publicity, as were the many
radio stations who made announcements. Prizes were provided by Keg
Restaurants, Canadian Odeon Theatres, Filmsoc, Dr. John Brockington,
and the Arts Club Theatre.
Agriculture won the Interfaculty blood donor competition and will
donate the $980.00 raised to UNICEF in conjunction with World Food
Day. Helen White
UBC blood drive co-ordinator
THE UBYSSEY
October 19. 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office next door. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising. 228-3977.
"Cows can have horns and not be bulls" stated Arnold Hedstrom and Charles Campbell.
"That's bullshit, Arnold, haven't you been paying attention to the men around the Ubyssey
office?" retorted Brian Jones and Muriel Draaisma. As the staff retreat got underway at
Saturna, bullish conversations dominated the weekend. "Hey, Stephen Wisenthal, come
here and watch us talk about Craig Brooks," chimed Alison Hoens and Bernadette gonzalez.
"Yeah, it's all a legitimate part of our forum on better staff relations, autonomy and putting
out a good student newspaper," said Jane Bartlett and Robby Robertson. "Come here, you
sexist (bleep)," Kelley Joe Burke gently said to Robert Beynon who quickly condemned
himself as being part of a 49 per cent minority and started talking to Nancy Campbell. Peter
Berlin was aware of Rick Katz's presence, and immediatelY took to that corner of the Saturna
cabin. The weekend continued happily, with Shaffin Shariff serving tea to Phil Kueber. > -
Tuesday, October 19,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Korean seeks pals
It is my great pleasure to write to
you. I expect you will be pleased to
accept my appeal regarding oversea
pen pals for our students.
I am a student of English course
in a noted university in Seoul,
Korea. My English course class has
about 57 students of both sexes. I
am eagerly seeking foreign students
Letters
who would like to correspond with
our students. There are also many
Korean students who want to exchange letters and friendship with
Canadian peoples, and they frequently request me to let them have
foreign pen friends since I have
been to Canada in the year of 1980.
Throughout my career, I've
noticed this would help not only
their English and emotional life,
but also expand their knowledge of
foreign lands. This would also promote world-wide friendship and
mutual relationship as well as serving as a true foundation of world
peace.
I feel it is necessary to publish
this simple wish among the students
of the world. Therefore, I
courteously request you to run this
letter in a corner of your valuable
paper.
The only information I need of a
student is his or her name, address,
sex, age, hobbies and picture if
possible. I expect to receive many
letters from your readers wishing to
correspond with our students.
I will appreciate it very much if
you let me have the chance to do
this for my fellow students. This
would be a warm and thoughtful
favor. Awaiting good news, I remain. Park Jeong II,
P.O. Box 3315,
Central, Seoul,
Korea
presents
JIM BYRNES
Wednesday & Thursday
9—12 p.m.
Til October 31
"Entertainment Nightly"
"Come See Our New
Dining Room"
4397 West 10th Avenue — 224-4216
"CA" Looks Good with
BSc, BA, LLB, BEng or BEd
Some graduates have their future taken care of soon after they leave university. Their skills and judgment are needed by organizations that range from
family farms to multi-nationals, and from manufacturers to entertainers. Their
work is diverse, novel, challenging and financially rewarding.
These men and women have degrees in science, history, law, commerce and
education. They're Chartered Accountants. Surprised?
Make your degree work for you. If you are in your final year of university, look
into the Graduate Admission Program of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of
British Columbia.
Many large CA firms are now hiring graduates on the Graduate Admission Program. A list of CA firms is available at your campus Canada Manpower Centre.
UCPA forms must be submitted directly to these firms before October 30. Contact
your Canada Manpower Centre today.
Your university degree is worth more than 'just a job'.
PAl
Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
562 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C. V6C 2K8
EXTRA GOOD
GOING DOWN.
Now you're talkiri taste. Page 6
TODAY
FAMILY HOUSING
Oliver,   the  film,   Hebb  Theatre   (note  place
change), 7 p.m.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wendo, •erf-defense for women. Pre-register at
women students' office, 228-2415,  12:30-2:30
p.m.,   SUB 215.   Continues Wednesday,  4-6
p.m., Brock hall 302.
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Celebration   of   Eucharist  with   Rev.   George,
noon, Lutheran Campus centre.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in badminton, 6:30-8:30 p.m.. Gym A and
B.
SCIENCE FICTION
Meeting, everyone attend (or get disintegrated),
noon, SUB 206.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Greet trek week continues.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series, 7:30 p.m.. International House.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, noon, Osborne centre gym A.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, 11:30 p.m., St. Mark's lunchroon
LAW UNION
Forum on legal aid cutbacks, representatives
from legal services society and attorney general's
office, noon, Law 169.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY CLUB
MLA Dennis Cocke, NDP health critic will speak,
noon, SUB 207/209.
LATIN AMERICA SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
General meeting, 4:30 p.m., Grad centre lounge.
LAW STUDENTS' LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon, SUB 111.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Verne Detwiller, administrator from UBC health
sciences centre, speech on medical administration, noon IRC 1.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Meeting for recycling groups, new members
welcome, noon, SUB 230b.
FAMILY HOUSING
Film series: Oliver, 7 p.m., Hebb theatre, $1 whh
AMS card and children under 12, $2 general admission.
AMS WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Wendo for woman, $15 for 6 weeks, pre-registration at women's student office, 228-2415.
Starts today, noon-2:30 p.m. SUB 215, and to
morrow 4-6 p.m. Brock 302.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Soccer, 5:30 p.m., soccer fields behind SUB.
PRACTICAL WHITING SERIES
Developing a writing style that gets results, with
Donald Townson of Cominco, noon. Computer
Science 200.
EXCEPTIONAL PERSONS WEEK
Wanda Justice, director of the Berwick centre,
discusses the roll of the centre in the community,
11:30 a.m., Scarfe 209. A representative of
Hero's restaurants will discuss this unique work
experience program that is geared toward disabled adolescents, noon, Scarfe 1024.
Displays, 11:30-1:30 p.m., SUB. Continues to
Friday.
Wheelchair tours of UBC and simulation
workshops continue to Friday.
WEDNESDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance languages, 7:30 p.m., licensed, International House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
General meeting and byelections, new members
welcome, noon, SUB 216e.
BIOCHEMISTRY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Wine and cheese night, free for members of
BSA, new members welcome, 4:30 p.m. to ?,
SUB 213.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Inaugural meeting, 4:30-7 p.m., SUB 212. Meet
Bill's sister.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting to elect an executive and new
leader (Joe's gone), noon, SUB 213.
COOPERATIVE     CHRISTIAN     CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Community feast followed by dialogue on
theological issues, 6 p.m. precisely, Lutheran
Campus centre.
INTRAMURALS
Rehab wheelchair challenge obstacle course. $2
to Canadian wheelchair sport's assoc,
noon-1:30 p.m., SUB plaza.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214.
GAY AND LESIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 117.
EXCEPTIONAL PERSONS WEEK
Cheer on Rick Hansen, the world renowned
wheelchair athlete as he wheels 20 miles around
UBC to raise money for B.C. Wheelchair sports
and his fellow athletes, 11:30, SUB plaza.
Teem wheelchair challenge, obstacle course,
11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., SUB plaza.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
Jonas Krisjansoon, Icelandic literature dept., on
Fact and Fiction in Sagas, noon, Buchanan 204.
THURSDAY
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Celebration service, rejoice in the lord always,
again I say rejoice, noon, Chem 250.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Associate dean of dentistry Yeo lecturing on admission to UBC dental school. $2 fee for non-
members, noon, IRC I. Sink your teeth into this
one.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in volleyball, 7:30-9:X p.m.. War Memorial
Gym.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
GAY8 AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speekere series meeting, noon, SUB 125.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Leslie Jones of Laurel House, 11:30 p.m., Scarfe
208.
Music therapy, Do it with Music, noon, Scarfe
1024.
Puppet show: Kids on the block, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
and 1:30-2:X p.m., SUB auditorium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Musical program, noon, SUB 213.
THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, October 19,1982
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Marie's music room.
UBC CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel discussion on women shaping the city,
noon. Brock 302.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Maintenance and mechanical seminar, 7:30
p.m., SUB 205.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Debate: technology vs. humanities, 7 p.m..
Graduate student centre, garden room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m., licensed. International
House.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
George Hermanson, campus minister; changing
people's minds, (this talk has nothing to do with
Maranthas) sorting out the ethical issues, noon.
Computer Science 200.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: the Mendi, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Tour of new wing at St. Paul's hospital, all members signed up welcome, meet noon, G-30 (pre-
med office, IRC).
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Seminar: prediction and explanation of turnover,
2:30 p.m., Angus.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, organizing for Great Trek,
noon. Bio. Sci. 2449.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
AND RECREATION
Lecture: exercise stress, fitness evaluation, training of wheelchair users, microprocessor control
of paralyzed muscle, speaker Dr. Robert Glaser,
noon and 7:30 p.m., IRC 6.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Christian life seminar on Revolutionary Evangelism, noon. East Mall Annex 117. Please note
room change.
FRIDAY
NEW STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Danca. 8-12 p.m., SUB 207/209.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup  lynch,   11:30-2  p.m.,   St.   Mark's  lunch
room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Folk night, 8 p.m.. International house.
INTRAMURALS
Run — university gates road run, (3 end 5 km!
noon, east mall SUB.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Info table, noon, SUB foyer.
CANOE CLUB
Pool sessions for kayakers, 10-12 p.m.. Aquatic
centre indoor pool.
THEATRE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION -
ORAL ROBERTS SUB-CLUB
Informal weekly gathering — to read aloud from
some form of creative literature or rehearse a
class presentation, give a monologue, or just
read a poem, noon. Brock hall 302.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Denver, non-conference game against NCAA
Denver Pioneers, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Andrea Sam, on the hearing impaired, 11:30
a.m., Scarfe 209.
Living with deaf-blindness, Pier Morten,
12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB partyroom.
SATURDAY
FEDERATION OF B.C. WRITERS
General meeting,  12:30-6 p.m., VCC Langara
campus.
INTRAMURALS
Badminton,   Buchanan  badmintoi    grand  prix
round I, »5, draw up Wednesday, u ti A and B,
Osborne centre. Continues Sunc.3',
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATE'<
Volleyball team practice. 6-10 i <      Osborne
gym A.
Tennis night, bring your own racqu«rs i   d balls,
7:30-10:30 p.m.. Armoury.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Intra-squad meeting, 1 p.m., Aquatic centre.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Second non-conference game against NCAA
Denver Pioneers, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Last  league  game  of  the  season,  2  p.m.,
Thunderbird stadium.
CANADA WEST FIELD HOCKEY
Women's field hockey tournament, all day, Warren and McGregor field. UBC is number 2.in the
nation.
CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR
CHOICE ON ABORTION
Dr. Henry Morgentaler of Montreal speaks on
the abortion issue, 2 p.m., Tupper Secondary
school, 419 East 24th.
RAPE RELIEF HOUSE
Celebrate the first year, dance to the sounds of
ad-hoc, 8:30 p.m.. West End community centre,
870 Denman.
FAMILY HOUSING
Oliver, the movie, 3 p.m. Hebb Theatre Inote
room change).
SUNDAY
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Open house and swap meeting, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
SUB 207/209.
CANADA WEST FIELD HOCKEY
Women's field hockey tournament, all day, Warren and McGregor field.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice and Horacio de la Cueva memorial
game, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
QUICK!
take me to
2134 WESTERN R\RKW3Y
at the back of the village
where I can enjoy
Exotic Coffees & Coolers,
Great Food
&
Fabulous Desserts.
Licensed FYemises
VISA
hair studio inc.
Make an appointment today
and give your head a rest.
5784 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
In UBC Village next to Bank of Commerce
224-9116
SUBFILMS presents
There's more
to love than..
* \     M     A     K    I     N    G
£ LOVE
7:00
Sr
^"^  9:30 Thurs.-Sun.
$1.00 SUB AUDITORIUM
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; addi-
** tional tines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE: Purple Appollo 10-speed with
suntour honour gears in good condition.
$110 O.B.O. Phone Rob at 224-6527.
JON, I want my IO as soon as possible.
Tony.
70 — Services
15 — Found
20 — Housing
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD-
beat the res blues at 224-9620.
2 BDRM. Furn'd bsmt. for rent near UBC
$380/mo. incl. ut. ph. 266-6541.
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can accommodate Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore students. Furnished, convenient.
Mandarin/Cantonese only. Please phone
324-1477 evenings or 255-6001 mornings.
HYPNOSIS TAPES
Learning/study, weight,
smoking, sports, stress, confidence, and others for
brochures call 681-7388
Alpha Hypnosis Clinic
25 — Instruction
LEARN TO SAIL- 30 ft. sailboats, course
1 month. C.Y.A. certificate registration
734-1675 after 7 p.m.
30 — Jobs
35 - Lost
LOST —  Men's gray
Phone 261-3078.
dress pants. Reward
RED VW VAN stolen Oct. 7, Dunbar area.
Contained 10 books of music marked
"WILDROOT" in 18" chest. REWARD
731-8050.
50 — Rentals
MODE COLLEGE of Bartering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
85 — Typing	
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Word Processor. Clemy
266-6641.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES, papers,
thesis, etc. W/electronic typewriter. Rate:
$1.25/dble-spaced page. 732-3647.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further. Resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes, theses.
IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates. Rose,
731-9867.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing, theses and
essays,  from legible work.  738-6829 ten
a.m. to 9 p.m.
TYPEWRITING, minimal notice required,
phone 732-0529 mornings to noon or eves,
till 10. Reasonable rates, Kits location.
40 — Messages
90 - Wanted
52      Phone 224-5615
SCHLONG THINKS Alpha = Ace
Number 1.
WANTED — Egyptian person who can talk
about Egypt in Language Institute class.
Contact John Brodych 228-4463. Tuesday, October 19,1962
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
letters
mmmm
-H
Baby experiments shock
News of test-tube baby pioneer
Dr. Robert Edward's experiments
on "spare' human embryos' (The
Province, Sept. 28) recently shocked the Western world. But why are
we so indignant? As the article concludes, quoting Dr. Raanon Gillon,
"It is irrational to prevent research
on early embryos if one accepts that
abortion is permissible. "
What is so rationally or morally
different from "pinning a baby
down on a board and doing experiments on it," as put by Dr.
Walter Hedgecock, and dissecting
that same baby in the womb? In
fact, Dr. Edward's position would
seem to be the more moral and rational of the two, since he says his
experiments will "ensure that embryos to be implanted are healthy"
Moreover, as healthy and normal
embryos — babies — become easier
and easier to determine, selection
will conform to higher and higher
standards, both in test-tube baby
pioneering and in therapeutic abortion. There will be an increasing
number of unhealthy, abnormal
and spare embryos — babies — for
our Dr. Edwards to experiment on,
and our standards will be further
upgraded.
We have gotten what we asked
for. Let's not waste the shock value
of this sorry situation, and the insight it has afforded us into the
nature of our abortion practices.
It's never too late to turn around,
though it does get harder and
harder.
Debra Esau
graduate student
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays * Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a. m. I
4656 W. 10th Ave. - 224-19121
I
i_.
We accept Chargex
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tuesday, Oct. 19
12-2 p.m. — Shefa Vegetarian Lunch featuring bagels, cream
cheese, egg salad, and vegetable salad.
Wednesday, Oct. 20
12-2 p.m. — Shefa Vegetarian Lunch
6 p.m. — A surprise dinner! Whose cooking? Renee, Sue,
or. . .? The Executive Director of the Canadian
Jewish Congress — Mark Silverburg will talk on
why he gave up a successful law degree to work
for the Jewish Community.
Thursday, Oct. 21
12-2:00 p.m. - Shefa Vegetarian Lunch
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
for
Six Characters In Search Of An Author
by Luigi Pirandello
(January 12-22)
Directed by John Brockington
Open to all UBC Students, Faculty & Staff
THURSDAY, October 21
FRIDAY, October 22
MONDAY, October 25 12:30 — 2:30 p.m.
ALL A UDITIONS IN ROOM 206, FREDERIC WOOD THEA TRE BLDG.
Audition appointments may be arranged in advance through the Theatre Department Office, Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre Bldg. or
Telephone 228-3880
COME ONE
**********
COME ALL
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
mil, mi
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOLT BEER
Lesson #2 "Storage and temperature"
Unlike wine, beer should be stored upright to avoid the
extra surface contact with air in the bottle. Lagers should
not be served below 7°C (45°F). Ales and dark beers
taste better over I0°C (50°F); stouts, porter and bock at
about I3°C (56°F). In fact, the English do not refrigerate
their ales, porter and stouts at all.* These temperatures
are suggested as a guide by our brewmaster who
believes many people have a tendency to serve their
beer a bit too cold. "Still," our brewmaster adds, "it all
comes down to personal preference. Some like it warm,
some like it cold, and I'm sure there's someone,
somewhere who even likes it hot."
*But then some people think that the English
also drive on the wrong side of the road.
Lesson #2 from the College of Beer Knowledge Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 19,1982
'Birds come from behind
By PHILIP KUEBER
The Chicken entered Thunderbird stadium Friday night, but
everyone thought it was the Golden
Bears football team that was going
to lay the egg.
It had been a frustrating and
disappointing season for Alberta's
Bears, their lone win this year coming at the expense of the Calgary
Dinosaurs.  In their previous en
counter with the 'Birds, the Bears
had been humiliated 32-4. Their
porous defense had given up a
league high 176 points.
A pushover for the number one
team in Canada. Right?
If asked, head coach Frank Smith
would disagree. The 'Birds temporarily lost their intensity on the
weekend, only to regain it and beat
the University of Alberta 25-22.
It was their second come from
behind victory in as many weeks.
Cornerback Mark Beecroft deserved credit for this weekend's turnaround.
Early in the third quarter the
Bears had a commanding 22-8 lead,
and were threatening to put another
major on the board. Bear wide
receiver Dave Brown ran a simple
out pattern, one that had been suc-
"I'M TWICE the man you'll ever be," Thunderbird Number 14, Rob Ros taunts cringing Albertan in lucky seven
shirt. But Golden Bear evaded improper advances and completed punt return, leaving Peter Vanden Bos (66) to
look on from behind. UBC took game 25-22, achieving seventh straight win of season.
Wind buffets rugby match
By ALISON HOENS
There was more than one form of
opposition for the rugby Thunder
Birds to battle with last weekend:
one adversary was the opposing
team, the UBC Old Boys, the other
in the guise of billowing, nose-
numbing wind.
UBC eventually won the game
10-6. It was a tough match but the
weather made it tougher; the ball
wavered in the gusts of wind making it virtually impossible to react
to.
"The difference in the game was
that we played better going into the
wind than the Old Boys did," said
coach Don Spence. "Further, we
stuck to the game plan and
demonstrated great self-discipline."
The Bird's record now stands at
7-1-0. Since Spence began here in
1967 there has never been a losing
season.
Last year they were inconsistent.
The season began with an amazing
4-1-1 record on a tour to Ireland.
But they became too confident
upon returning and lost several
games. Near the end of the season
they regrouped and regained their
winning ways.
"The experience from last year
together with a new attitude to
work harder indicate the potential
for another great year." Spence
believes that an exceptional season
depends on a combination of
"depth in personnel" and some
"luck of the bounce."
The depth appears to be there,
particularly with the addition of
several new players: prop forward
Phil Buchanan, flanker Charlie
Foster, and backs Gary Vine, John
Devlin, and Eric Kettleson. Also
impressive has been Canadian
junior player Mat Kokan who is
playing with an injury received in a
match versus Japan.
The quality exhibited by the new
players is creating healthy -competition within the ranks — another indication of the team's potential.
Important upcoming games for
UBC are an October 30 game
against the University of Victoria, a
McKechnie Cup match on
November 11, and a tour to
California in February.
Soccer teams fade over weekend
The chances of UBC making first place in the
western division and going to the national soccer
playoffs finally expired on the Prairies this weekend.
On Friday, while UBC were beating Saskatchewan
1-0 in Saskatoon, the University of Victoria beat
Alberta to gain the two points they needed to put
themselves out of the Thunderbird's reach.
On Saturday, in a game that hardly mattered, UBC
lost 3-1 to the University of Alberta.
On Friday, Bruce Thompson marked his first appearance as an attacker with the only goal. "Our problem is that we haven't been scoring goals" said coach
Joe Johnson. "They didn't have a shot at goal and we
should have scored four or five." Instead the match
was in the balance right until the end.
On Saturday, UBC again carried the the game to
their opponents but their inexperienced attack was
unable to capitalize on the team's overall superiority
after the defense had given away a soft goal the confidence slipped away and the team slid to a 3-1 defeat.
Kurt Burkholder scored the solitary goal.
The Thunderbirds wind up their college fixtures with
two games against Victoria away next weekend and at
UBC the weekend after. Johnson said he hoped his
team would win twice and finish the season by upsetting the press, who have rated Victoria Canada's
number one team.
* * »
The 'Birds women's soccer team proved two games a
day are too many as they tied in the morning and lost
in the afternoon Sunday.
The 'Birds tied their first league game against North
Vancouver United 2-2 at Wolfson field.
The team expected an easy victory before the game,
but found itself down 2-0 at the half.
But the team scored twice in the second half as the
game opened up and the 'Birds took control. Donna
Kuyer and Jane Lovell combined to score the first goal
and Laurie Kremsater scored the second on a penalty
kick five minutes later.
The 'Birds then lost a make-up league game 4-2 to
Vancouver Edmonds. At the half the 'Birds were again
down 2-0, but they scored twice in the second half and
might have tied the game 3-3, but Edmonds scored
again and won. It was a strong, running game which
was marred by inconsistent refereeing.
The team next plays the University of Washington
this weekend.
cessful for two touchdowns earlier
in the game. But Beecroft read the
third one perfectly and stepped in
front of Brown for an interception.
The 57 yard return, coupled with
a roughing penalty, put the 'Birds
in excellent field position. Although
they managed only a field goal, the
complexion of the game completely
changed. The 'Birds got back on
track and were able to win in fine
fashion.
Running a post pattern against
Bear DB Frank Salvera, 'Bird wide-
receiver Pierre Des-Lauriers hauled
in a 55-yard pass from quarterback
Jay Gard.
It was enough to put the 'Birds
ahead for the first and final time.
The win pushes the 'Birds record
to 7-0, and if they can beat the
Saskatchewan Huskies next
weekend, it will be the first time a
UBC football team has enjoyed an
undefeated WIFL season. To date
the Thunderbirds have an impressive 14 consecutive regular
season victories.
Chicken lays yet
more golden eggs
Why would a college graduate
wear a chicken suit and romp
around a field 200 days per year?
To cross the road and make a six
figure salary a year, that's why.
Ted Giannoulas, also known as
the San Diego chicken, dropped into UBC Friday to egg on the
Thunderbirds onto a 25-22 victory
over the University of Alberta
Golden Bears.
Chicken received $3,500 in
chicken feed for the event. The cost
was covered by a foul $2.50 student
charge for normally free football
tickets.
Giannoulas was plucked from the
San Diego state campus by radio
station KGB for a one week promotion at $2 per hour in 1974. He flew
the coup in 1974 with a degree in
journalism.
The    UBC    engagement    is
Chicken's first college football
game in Canada during his five
years of freelancing. The fluorescent orange and yellow bird places
UBC fans "Ahead of good crowds
at (Vancouver baseball) Canadian
games," Chicken said.
He refused to disclose his salary,
only saying he scrambles together
"six figures" per year.
"That's about $5/hour shelled-
out after Canadian taxes," he said.
Chicken plays more than roosts
each month, and flaps more than
500,000 miles in a year.
He is proud of his Canadian
citizenship, which he has retained
despite his permanent nest in San
Diego. "I was born and raised in
London, Ontario," he said, "that's
why I saluted the Canadian flag at
the game."
(  'Bird Droppings-")
DISABLED SPORTS
. The sporting content of exceptional persons week is highly significant.
The Rickathon which starts in the
SUB carpark at noon on Wednesday will give able-bodied athletes a
chance to participate with their handicapped counterparts. And it will
give UBC student Rick Hansen a
chance to show that he is exceptional by any standards.
Rick, a paraplegic, broke eight
wheelchair world records at the first
Pan American games. He does the
marathon in well under two hours,
considerably faster than the able-
bodied world record. On Wednesday he will be racing 20 miles
against the clock.
Disabled sports are instrumental
in helping disabled people make the
able-bodied aware of their abilities
and integrate themselves into the
community. Doug Mowatt, a
veteran quadraplegic athlete at a
talk on disabled sports said Thursday.
Wheelchair athletes need 60-70,;7o
less medical care than their non-
athletic fellows, he said.
Marshall Smith, the talk's chair,
said organized sports allows disabled athletes to rediscover their
respect for their bodies and to come
to terms with themselves after the
initial shock of a sudden and crippling injury.
Through sports many disabled
people have been able to discover
just how much they are able to
achieve, said Smith. On Wednesday
everybody else will have a chance to
share that discovery and understand
that 'Exceptional Persons Week' is
not an ironic title.
SWIMMING
UBC swim teams took a preseason competitive plunge at the
University of Victoria relay meet
and came up with a second overall.
The men came in second out of
seven teams after 14 events; beaten
only by a Simon Fraser club team
containing some non-student swimmers.
The women finished first out of
three teams.
Coach Jack Kelso said that the
meet gave no real indication of how
the team would do when regular
competition starts in January
because he'll not need to put four
breast strokers or four butterfly
swimmers in the water in normal
meets.
ROWING
UBC's Lisa Roy is one of 40
rowers — the cream of North
America's women rowers — invited
to the Head of the Charles Regatta
single sculls in Boston,
Massachusetts.
In August, Lisa and her doubles
sculls partner Janice Mason won
the bronze medal at the world rowing championships in Lucerne
Switzerland.
HOCKEY
It is satisfying to know you're
read in high places. Following last
Friday's Bird Dropping moan
about the notice board the Athletic
Department has followed our advice and advertising both next
weekend's football and hockey
games at once.
By the way, in Friday's exciting
game UBC hockey tied 4-4 with the
alumni.
ARTS '20
More than 1300 runners will take
part in the ever popular Arts '20
relay this Thursday.
This year the race is being tied in
with Great Trek week celebrations
as the token gesture towards the
health of student bodies. What a pity the celebrations couldn't even
contain a token gesture towards the
health of the student body politic.

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