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The Ubyssey Sep 17, 1968

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Array THS UBYSSEY
really have
more fun?
Vol. L, No. 4
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1968
48
224-3916
* . ■*■ ' V;:f I; *^;X '
§ >: ■ P .'      ■ ^ **>«-■" **'
*ifi!,^9jjpi|
— |ohn frixoll photo
THE NEW CAFETERIA facilities at the SUB(marine?) were tested over the weekend—fresh water
and nice hot fire for marshmallows.
Faculty fails response
to arts anti-calendar
Arts undergrad society president Ralph Stanton charged
UBC's faculty and administration Monday with failing to
reply to the anti-calendar published by the society and distributed to arts students.
"Despite our efforts in pinpointing the problems, the
situation remains essentially
the same," Stanton said in an
interview. "Some professors
have made changes such as eliminating Christmas exams, but
most seem unwilling to change
the old structure.
"We want the administration
and the faculty to let us know
what changes are being contemplated — to come out with a
policy and enter into a debate
with us."
However, Stanton earlier
showed The Ubyssey a letter
sent to him from English department head Geoffrey Dur-'
rant protesting the review
given English prof Mr. Meredith Thompson.
The review of Thompson's
English   355   (Chaucer)   class
Selkirk students
start activation
Students at Selkirk College in Castlegar want to be on the
inside and will soon start organizing, says Martin Loney, president-elect of the Canadian Union of Students.
Loney visited the 550-student college Sept. 6.
"We were better received than we expected," Loney said
Monday.
"But most of the students have never been more than 100
miles from home and some thought we walked straight out of
Prague."
UBC Alma Mater Society vice-president Carey Linde, who
accompanied Loney, said the reaction of Selkirk students was
generally favorable to the visit.
"We went there to ask questions and start a dialogue, and
there was a really hot debate going when we left," Linde said.
Linde said Monday night one of the most important subjects
raised at Castlegar was opposition to the Social Credit government's education policies.
"If we don't realize we've got something against (education
minister Donald) Brothers, we should pack up right now," Linde
said.
"If we want the Socred education policy, fine, but I don't
think we do."
CUS field worker Jim Russell said there is a good potential
for organization at Selkirk but "things are still in the talk stage."
"There is a group of people that has started to work
together, and there are some good people planning to run in
the council elections on Sept. 25," he said.
Russel said a chapter of Students for a Democratic University
may be formed at Selkirk.
Linde said it is important that the issues of student control
and academic reform be raised at Selkirk because of the college's
location.
"It's in (education minister Donald) Brothers' home riding,"
he said, "and this will bring the issue home."
quoted students' answers to
questionnaires.
One answer quoted: "An
average class from Dr. Thompson may be characterized as a
number of senile orgasms."
The review continued:
"Nearly all the students regarded the course as 'a complete waste of time'."
Stanton refused comment on
Durrant's letter Monday, but
arts students who worked on
the anti-calendar told The
Ubyssey that nearly all the
replies received from Thompson's students were unfavorable.
Stanton said the publication,
a critical evaluation of courses
and professors, was produced
by a committee of 30 students
over the summer using some
10,000 replies to questionnaires
that were circulated in classes.
"The students repeatedly
asked in their replies for more
seminars," he said.
"Exams don't teach. Besides
it shouldn't be the responsibility of the university to determine competence.
"If the corporations want to,
they should bear the expense
— not the public. Many universities are successfully using
the pass-fail system on the
more effective learning basis
of classroom work and essays.
"I found that most students
have respect for their professors and I think that generally
the anti-calendar was well received by the faculty."
He summarized from the calendar four major complaints of
the students: lack of facilities
and staff, lack of deviation
from the lecture system, grading and examination policy,
and the arbitary and "frequently stupid" prerequisite system.
"The overcrowding is directly due to the regressive education policy of the Social Credit
government and I think it is
time the university took a
stand against it," Stanton said.
AMS-Senate
rap tonight
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society agreed Monday to a number of
recommendations concerning a joint student-senate conference
that it will present to senate members this evening.
Concerning the structure of the conference, these are:
• To insure having a number of students equal in number
to those appointed by senate.
• To have these students elected by council.
• To have the conference to formulate the recommendations to senate On those issues which involve senate.
• To have a chairman mutually acceptable to both the
AMS and senate.
• To have the authorization for the students to ratify
the chairman.
This action was in response to a motion in senate to have
the students on the conference appointed by the senate.
The meeting being held tonight is an introduction to discussion on reforms in the university, some of which have been
outlined in the AMS brief on academic reform.
But as outlined in a letter in today's Ubyssey, five council
members — Jill Cameron, Carey Linde, Ralph Stanton, Ruth
Dworkin, and Tobin Robbins — feel that even this introductory
discussion should be run on a more open basis.
"The AMS brief concerns student participation, and they
must be present when the matter is discussed," said Miss Cameron, AMS co-ordinator.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt had a different view on bringing the policy of open meetings to Tuesday's preliminary discussions.
"As far as I'm concerned, this is a non-issue," he said. "I
don't see what people are getting excited about."
Council retracts
Straight support
Student council Monday night backed down on its motion
of support last week for the Georgia Straight newspaper.
In a long review of motions passed last week, AMS president
Dave Zirnhelt recommended the rescinding of the motion of
support for the Straight's legal battle.
Zirnhelt said a discussion with the AMS lawyer indicated
the AMS might be liable to contempt of court charges for issuing
a declaration of support for a party involved in a legal battler
The Straight has been charged with criminal, libel against
city magistrate Lawrence Eckardt in its July 6 issue.
AMS coordinator Jill Cameron accused Zirnhelt of trying
to save his own skin when the going got rough at the expense
of free speech.
Said Zirnhelt: "It is not my skin I am trying to save.
"As it is, the society is involved and we must act in its
best interest."
Said Miss Cameron: "It is sometimes necessary to stick your
neck out in order to gain something of value."
She introduced a motion to publish a retraction of the
previous motion of support and affirm the council's support
for the court action and the suppression of free speech.
Bookstore  problems
blamed on  labor
The lack of text books in a large number of courses
can be blamed on Canadian labor troubles last summer,
bookstore manager John Hunter said Monday.
Hunter said the postal strike delayed shipments of
books from some Canadian publishers.
"Also, some books from British publishers have not
arrived, because of the seaway strike," he said.
He blamed labor unions for the prolonged strike.
Hunter said that the situation this year was no worse
than it has been it the past.
"Although there has been a great increase in the number of students buying books, there has also been an increase
in the number of staff who serve them," he said.
He said he expected considerable improvement in sales
and storage space when final plans for the new bookstore-
parking complex are approved.
The university has already approved plans to float a
$2.5 million loan for the project. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1968
STUDENTS discuss reform of Canadian drug  laws.
— fred cawsey photo
Legalizing marijuana favored
by MLA; nixed by UN treaty
People who oppose laws against marijuana
have a moral commitment to change them,
MLA Dave Barrett (NDP-Coquitlam) said Monday.
"There are means to change laws and public opinion," Barrett told 50 students at a noon
— fred cawsey photo
MLA DAVE BARRETT (NDP-Coquitlam) blasts
indifferent   students   for   apathy   towards
drug law reforms.
inois camp-in
leads to arrests
URBANA, 111. (CPS-CUP) — A "camp-in"
at the University of Illinois to protest discriminatory housing conditions led to the arrest of
some 300 black students Sept.   11.
The university administration claimed it
had "averted another Columbia" by calling
police into the student union to arrest the demonstrators. It was reported to be worried about
a student takeover of the building. Police reported extensive damage to furniture and carpeting in the union.
Students were protesting overcrowded conditions in university housing where most students are required to live. They say they are
being placed in laundry rooms, lounges and
study rooms until the shortage eases.
University officials say the blacks misinterpreted the crowding problem as discrimination;
the blacks say they are being given second-
class housing because they are considered
second-class  citizens.
All those arrested and charged with mob
action and misdemeanour were released on
bond the same day and were to register on
schedule.
meeting in Hillel House, "And the way is not
to sit back and say 'to hell with it'."
Barrett was appearing with Dr. Ben Simon,
who helped draft the B.C. Medical Association
brief on marijuana.
Simon said marijuana is not a narcotic in
the medical sense in that it does not cause
dependency   or   withdrawal   symptoms.
"It can only have harmful effects if used
in  excess,"   he  said.
Simon said he does not believe this justifies
an individual breaking the law.
In response to a questioner who said the
legal questions is irrelevant, Barret said it is the
only reality in the  situation.
"The fact is that guys are doing three
month mandatory sentences in Oakalla," Barrett said.
"What you want to do with that fact is
your business," he added, "But it's a fact."
Simon said Canada cannot presently legalize marijuana because of a United Nations
treaty barring its use.
"It wasn't the western countries that
wanted that treaty," he said. "It was Africa,
India and Southeast Asia."
When asked about the possibility of progression from marijuana to other drugs,
Simon said the matter is highly controversial
in medical .circles.
Barrett said the danger exists as long as
all drugs are sold on the same illegal market.
"On day you may buy pot," he said. "The
next day you may buy something else without
knowing  it."
Wet dream in tent
fails to satisfy
OTTAWA (CUP) — Twenty students at
Queen's University spent last weekend in a
"tent city" pitched on the university president's lawn while another 20 continued their
sleep-out at the University of Toronto.
Students at the two universities were attempting to dramatize the housing shortages
in their cities.
Almost 60 people spent Friday and Saturday night at the Queen's campsite discussing
the housing problem, rent control and the university.  Only 20  slept there  overnight.
Michael Carley, spokesman for the Student
Emergency Housing Committee, claimed success: "It drew attention to a very serious housing crisis not only in the academic community
but also in Kingston," he said.
Principal John J. Deutsch, away for the
weekend, had earlier termed the camp-in
"ridiculous", and said he would remain unswayed by "stunts".
U. of T. campers survived wet dreams the
night of Sept. 9 from heavy rains that also
dampened the official opening the next day.
"The lack of student facilities is only a
reflection of the problem in housing faced by
the nation," said student president Steve Lang-
don at the opening.
The Queen's emergency housing committee
wants the university to provide more student
housing to prevent landlord victimization of
low-income tenants.
Chairman of Publicity
Wanted
for C.U.S.O. Committee
APPLY BOX 18 - BROCK HALL
Leave Name, Address and Phone Number
Orfitk. fonfid&noL
$150 and  up
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
THE RUSH IS ON
G©
.o*'
.a*
s«
SIGN   UP
NOW
First Year Girls Welcome
Rushee's General  Meeting
Thursday — Bu 106 — 12:30 p.m.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Student Assembly on the University
This Study Group has been organized to analyze and report on certain problematic areas in student-university relations. Through public discussion the Commission hopes to
promote greater student participation in and knowledgeable
comment on the politics of education.
The areas under most intensive study on which separate
reports will be written are:
1) academic curriculum;
2) student participation in governing bodies at the
university;
3) student and faculty attitudes (surveys);
4) financing of education (for the student and for
the university);
5) teaching, research and promotion;
6) student housing and university physical planning;
7) dropping-out.
Anyone interested contact:
Fred Grauer, Chairman, 266-2133
or
AMS Office, 224-3242 Tuesday, September 17, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— fred cawsey photo
THE UBYSSEY'S PHOTO EDITOR Fred Cawsey took this shot of the language lab in downstairs Buchanan.
Craik claims some
campus jobs cut
By JAMES CONCHIE
If you thought you starved this summer for lack of a job,
you may be little more than a skeleton before the winter is out.
Placement officer Cam Craik of the Office of Student Services, has had over 400 applications for part-time work since the
beginning of July. Of these he has been able to place more
than half.
However, for the two hundred who have not yet found jobs,
and for the flood of students who are registering with Craik
every day, the picture is grim. As of last Wednesday, Craik's
office had 32 jobs open.
Craik said, in an interview Wednesday, "This situation
should improve shortly, as city firms, to whom we have sent a
form letter offering our service, answer with job openings."
The number of part-time jobs available in the library and
food services has been cut in half this year, Craik said, "because
of unreliable students who did not show up for work regularly".
Food Services director, Miss Ruth Blair, denied this. "We
have never had any problems with student workers," she said.
However, librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said, "Yes, we have
had some problems with student help and as a result we have
replaced some part-time staff with permanent staff. But we
employ more students this year than we ever have."
Although Craik's office is primarily concerned with finding
part-time work for students, it also helps graduates find perma-
nant employment. Speaking of last year's arts and science graduating classes, Craik said, "Of those who registered with us, a
large number have still not found work."
St. Johns
students
end strike
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP)
— Over 2,000 striking high
school students returned to
school here Monday after receiving promises that classroom shifts would be back
to normal within 30 days.
The schools opened with
a three shift system that
saw some starting classes at
8:30 a.m. and finishing at
2:30 p.m., others starting at
8:30 a.m. taking a four-hour
break from 11 a.m. to 3:10
p.m. and returning until 5:50
p.m., and the rest starting at
11:50 a.m. and quitting at
5 p.m.
The students promised to
strike again Oct. 11 if no
action was taken.
The schools say the three
shift system is necessary because of crowding, but the
students argue building
more classrooms would solve
the problem.
Campus housing-
students involved
By ERIK BRYNJOLFFSSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Student involvement on housing advisory committeess leads
to better understanding, says housing director Les Rohringer.
UBC has two presidential advisory committees consisting of
students and administration officials.
One committee is concerned with future housing, the other
with the present residence facilities.
These committees hold regular meetings, some of which
Rohringer says are "frustrating, too long, but the end results
are always better and the decisions based on a wider knowledge
of the situation."
Four students represent the AMS on the future housing
committee. The university appointed five members to represent
the administration.
There are five students on the residence advisory committee
—one representative from each residence area and one from
the AMS. The administration is represented by five appointees.
Rohringer chairs both comittees.
"More good comes out of the committee approach than the
old way of 'the administration knows all the answers'," Rohringer
said in an interview Monday.
"Decisions are accepted better because the people affected
by the decisions were involved in making them."
Asked whether he could recommend more student involvement in other aspects of the university, Rohringer said: "Based
on my experience, it is a new way, maybe a more difficult way,
but it definitely produces better results." Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1968
**w<
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising,  local 26.  Telex 04-5224.
SEPTEMBER 17, 1968
■Psi"    - '*. -    v' * ~ *■<.*>
Burn baby burn
Burn the university down.
Irresponsible, some might say.
But a precedent has been set by the action of mobs
when constructive proposals from minority-group leaders
are ignored.
Let's draw an analogy between black ghetto residents and students.
Blacks are discriminated against because of skin
color.
Students are discriminated against because of lack
of education. "Get your last few years" we are told,
"then come back and see us." But there are hundreds,
if not thousands, of unemployed BA's in Vancouver.
Blacks can't get jobs, and are crowded in ever-
increasing number into housing areas that can't keep up
with the influx.
Students can't get jobs in the summer, even less in
the winter, and are crowded in ever-increasing numbers
into facilities that can't cope.
Blacks, their houses stuffy and crowded, sit on doorsteps and wander the street to escape the overpowering
numbers.
Students, forced into the aisles in classrooms, unable
to find a place in cafeterias or libraries, sit or wander
about the halls, looking for something to do.
Blacks get welfare.
Students get loans.
Blacks get a few token positions in the governing
power structure, scj they can be pointed out as 'participating'.
Students get four senators, and token representation
on committees.
Blacks are surplus manpower, to be put in the
ghetto 'over there' until a need arises for them.
Students are surplus manpower, to be put in the
university 'out here' until needed.
Blacks don't own the houses in the ghetto, they
don't own the restaurants, or the department stores.
Neither do students.
Blacks have in the past turned to indescriminate
sex, drugs, and gang fights to pass the time of day and
give some meaning to the existance.
Students do a fair bit of hustling, take some dope,
certainly some faculties engage regularly in forms of
violence upon others. They are also most adept at mental
games, constructing complicated theses upon bases that
have no concrete-use: This gives meaning to life.
Blacks occasionally feel that the ghetto life is so
overpowering and inescapable, they hate it so intensely,
that they rampage and destroy the ghetto.
Will students ever do the same?
A slum is a slum, even if it has shiny new buildings
and lots of lawns. It is the atmosphere of life within the
slum that will determine the frustrations.
From these frustrations, however, leads the conclusion that perhaps, if the residents were to control the
way of life within it, perhaps a meaningful society could
be built.
If the slumlords refuse to allow this self-determination, they are going to see their slum go up in smoke.
The slumlords, of course, won't go until they are
forced out, for they are reaping great economic benefit
from it and don't want to see their ownership lost.
This is not to advocate, of course, that rampaging
students burn UBC down.
All that the responsible student radicals advocate
is that students take over the board of governors of their
slum and re-direct it towards something that is fit for
habitation and meaningful life.
But seeing that it is unlikely that the slumlords will
go for this, history offers us some examples of what
might occur next.
OPEN INVITE
Mass Participation
Tonight, at 8:00 in the main lounge of International House, there will be a meeting of the
AMS and the senate. The meeting has been
called to discuss reforms in the university,
some of which have been outlined in the AMS
brief,  "Fair Weather  or Foul".
The aim of the AMS brief is to democratize
the university and democracy is not compatible
with meetings between student elite and faculty elite. The discussion can be fruitful only
if every interested student and teacher is allowed  to  participate.   Therefore,   we,   the under-
signed as members of your AMS, invite you to
join us at this meeting.
Since the senate has  voted  itself into  an
open body, we assume that this meeting will be
an open one. However, should the senate revert
back to its old-fashioned ways, decide to close
the meeting, and ask students and faculty to
leave, we, the undersigned, will leave with you.**
JILL CAMERON
CAREY LINDE
RALPH STANTON
RUTH DWORKIN
TOBIN ROBBINS
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
pumpkin — reflecting the con- that for years sat in the warmth
|\l IQCfPf     /     CflTl formity   and   subservience   ex- of   Koerner's  patronage—  but
I ''yycl      *      *-"" pected from the GSA; which by he does not represent graduate
Massa Editor  Suh- and  larSe  our  representatives °^°n"   A fact  that, Koerner
lam^deepVho'nored that a a~ «* too happy to provide. ^ do well to take cogni-
newspaper     of    your    calibre BJf^^**£Z^ I   take   issue   with   Tilley's
should nominate lil ol' me — apologising tor  the    incident nrostitllHon „„t anH „„*■-, fn_ tw
me   of   all   the   hard-workine is deplorable. There is only one prostitution act and call for his
me   oi   an   tne   nara-worKing                                     anni*-.*-**!*™-.  rm resignation as it is clear that he
darkies on this here plantation Person  who  can   apologize   on .     ,         ,     .     ..      .    .       .
—for vour Niffger of The Week Tweedie's   behalf  and   that  is 1S   inadequate   to  the   task   of.
ior your -Nigger oi ine wee* „,         ..     v,ilv,c„*n*    --.„   +v,„   r,o1 negotiating  with   the  adminis-
award. Shucks, I can't even say Tweedie himself.  On the bal- «           «
that   T  worked   hard   for  the ance of indignities I think that tra"°" and taculty*
that  I worked ha rd for the „              .    .      __oloEies from We have on campus the spec-
pnze.   I  just  used  the  intelli- J^ Werner LdSley tacle of wealthy men erecting
fhTlawd   gaT m/Td *£ ^S^Sl^Lerner moaument. to their own omni-
manners that Mammy learned 'f ?** *£ structure and state Potence.    There■    *    Ladner
me and did what was right. of graduate affairs on campus. tha/reauire_     t le„st   further
Iexoectthereare a few other " is a fact that our elected re- that requires, at least, furtner
studentrnretendiL   thly   are presentatiVes will undertake no adornment-a permanent erec-
students   pretending   tney   are ^                     mio,(   _«__,,   «,„ tion   to   Ladner's   designs   on
whiteys who will make it neces- action  that  might   offend  the grandem.
sary for me to make another great man. '           Koerner*s thing
stand for the majority. If I do,         The   minutes   of   the   GSA rraduate Student Cen-
I hope thafl'll be eligible for meetings can never be written - the Graduate State* Cen
another  of   your   awards.   I'm up  in full  as  Koerner is fre- J-^™™,^
told   that  if  one  is  nieeer of quently discussed—not always cutlYe eats out °f hand and in
told  mat  it  one  is  nigger oi *-i         M.    .  _.   ,iaM          M ley is ever ready to do obeis-
the week three times you fasten ln   a   flattering   light   —   but *
a commemorative plaque to the Koerner reads the minutes and a      *                 graduates to ex-
hell tower as he also calls the shots our J calJ uP°n. graduates to ex
bell tower. executive    behaves    like    anv Press their disapproval of Til-
Yours humbly, executive    oenaves    HKe    any **-        ar-tirm*-* anf1 condemn the
^e                  ,. some GSA executive members that flourishes at the graduate
L/ISSentlOn are hushed down by our erst- centre.
I^IJJCIIIIV/lf whiie president if there should Or,   are  we  like  they,   just
Bditor, The Ubyssey, Sir: be   a  faint  possibility   of   our 8°°d nig8ers*                PRATTIS
Friday's issue of The Ubyssey patron's toes being trod upon,
carried   an   article  by  Persky         While   one   may   appreciate Ph.D. rop     gy
that    requires    comment.    As Koerner's initial financial con- ^ _
should  be  evident  to   any  in- tribution to the graduate cen- editor* ai Birnie
dividualist,  Leon Koerner has tre his "Mayor Daley" act can
the  right  to   accept   or  reject be tolerated no longer. cit* Desk   PauI Knox' Mike F,n,ay
whom he likes. It's  time  the  GSA found  a     News John Tv"99
However, he should clear his little moral courage and a few     Managing   Mike Jessen
idiosyncratic   tastes   with   the principles by which to operate. Photo     Fred cawsey, Powell Hargrave
lesser beings that surround him Though Koerner has the vague     wire   Peter Ladner
in order that invitations to his bribe  of further donations  in     Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
cocktail  parties  do  not  reach the air the prostitution act must Tittering timidly, the tired toddlers
ciihupr-aive hnnd<! finish tapped tweaky titillaters tirelessly. Most
SUDVerslVe nanas. linisn. notable was Alex Volkoff, who braked
James Tweedie, as an invited         The graduate body has prob- 14 hours of pure tape certified red.
guest, suffered the indignity of lems   of  representation  in  de- ™J," lamefctnchie! cSrtStoltoS!
not  being  accepted  by  our  pet partments  and issues of expan- <*zyk,   Hanson   Lau,   Donna   Hammond.
, ....         .               f.                   ■      -1 a ■                                      i, Ulf Ottho, Elaine Tarzwell, Nader Mir-
bilhonaire; yet he was invited sion  coming to  the   crux;  we hady, and Ann Bishop, who found her-
by merit of his membership on also have an elected body of re- sel* in. a position to come back.
J                                         ..                  .,                                 .                                            ., Cooking   Spaghetti   was   Bjorn   Stav-
the   student   executive   of  the presentatives    to    look    after rum, but d. Bruce Dixon thought he
Graduate Students Association, these  affairs -  this  includes J£ £ ™£ °0fhna ££?»£_-£ ££
It seems apparent that Koerner Koerner. a fiery orange tomato, but Nate found
is only prepared to deal with         It is apparent that our pre- S™ 'the ^"Voddam ^tstgn*
"his" kind of person. sent leadership lacks the neces- Pat*y y°u ever saw* a^o there were
_,                   .    ,          . .,        .    _,      .                              ....          ,        .         ., Flank   Flynn,   Erik   Brynjolffsson,   Dale
The remainder of the student sary   qualities   to   handle   our wik,   Peggy   shewchuk,   me   Nyiand,
executive, in charcoal gray and interests. Frank Scheruw and pick Button.
.             ,           , %_                           __ ,,                    .                   ... No-shows included Irene. See you on
fixed smiles adorned Koerner         Tilley  as  nigger  epitomizes Wednesday, Irene,
like a halo around an ageing the  series  of  gutless  wonders Tuesday, September 17, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Cameron comes out for sex
-In classrooms yet!
— dick button photo
HARD WORK and little glory is the pay The Ubyssey staffers
get. Some, like Erik Brynjolffsson, are lucky enough to get
a specific beat, white others get the best training possible
on Canada's greatest student newspaper.
By NADER MIRHADY
UBC students have come up
with a number of interesting
ideas regarding the future of
the clock/bell tower.
These ideas consist of three
types: the constructive type,
the destructive type, and the
unimaginative type.
Of these the last two can
be readily accounted for. The
unimaginative type wants to
leave it as a disgusting example
of what not to do to a
university. The destruc tive
type run to more variety —
either blow it up and put in
an interesting and convenient
multi-story parking lot or dig
a hole under it until only the
clock face protrudes, then
using the hollow insides for
dumping excess blorgs and
other undesirable elements
existing on campus such as administrators and AMS bureaucrats.
The constructive ideas range
from the impractical through
the obscene to the brilliant:
• Round off the corners,
paint it pink and put a
fountain on top.
• Put a Minuteman missile inside it for the defense
of our university.
• Use it as a gallows for
effigies and real people too.
• Destroy the university
and use it for the control
tower of a new airport
when people realize the
new Sea Island airport is
obsolete.
• Measure it off in inches so people can see how
fast they are growing.
• Paint a mickey mouse
face on it and weld the
arms together so they always have the same angle
between them.
• Rent the top for a
lover's leap.
• Put a revolving restaurant on top.
• Fill the inside with
bunks to alleviate the housing shortage.
• Use it for a torture
chamber for fun and
games.
• Use it for a studio for
RADSOC.
• Fill it with beer —
first person to drink the
whole thing at one sitting
wins the university for a
dollhouse.
• Use it to get rid of unwanted children like Leon
Ladner by exposing them
to the elements.
• Use it for a platform
for Indian sundancers.
• Parking lot for Volkswagens and roller skates.
• Residence for president Hare's rabbit hutch.
• Place to stack old
copies of The Ubyssey.
• Seminar room for
graduate giraffes.
• Practice climbing
ground for Varsity Olympic Club.
• Fill it with water and
use it for a communal bath.
• Speakers' platform
for party rallies so we
won't have to listen.
• Secret midnight meeting place for the board of
governors.
By HANSON LAU
"UBC is not ready for revo-
ultion until everybody starts
fucking in their classrooms."
So said Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator Jill Cameron on
Monday when she was asked
by The Ubyssey if she feels
sexual frustration is a basis of
student revolution.
At the World University
Service seminar at Edmonton
Sept. 3-7, German professor
Jeorg Huffschmild stated that
sexual frustration, particularly in segregated residences, is
a contributing factor in student
revolution.
Stan Persky, arts 4, one-time
elected but disqualified AMS
president, said that revolution
should be made by sex-happy
people.
"I encourage people to sleep
with one another and to change
the world." Persky said. "I feel
very sexually frustrated today,
Sept. 16, and I find that masturbation isn't as good as sleeping with another person.
"There are a lot of people
that I would like to sleep with
and when I asked them they
say they would rather not."
"Sex is more than just fucking," said AMS vice-president
Carey Linde. "Sex, to me, is
anything that involves the
physical senses. And by this
definition, the confrontation
between the university and the
students will most certainly
have strong sexual motivating
forces.
"When you are forced by the
social habits of the institution
to take your girl or guy in the
back of your small car in C
lot, forever worrying about the
Brown Shirts from university
patrol, this is sexual frustration
Faculty
resignations,
appointments
There are sixty to seventy
faculty resignations annually
on campus, according to the
UBC information services.
There are also 150 new appointments this year. New department heads are Dr. E. G.
Pulleyblank, new head of
Asian Studies, and Dr. Michael
Batts, the new German department head.
Temporary heads are presently in the faculties of arts,
and the geography, fine arts,
mineral engineering and poultry science. Permanent heads
are expected to be announced
later this year.
that is caused by the university.
"The top priority in the SUB,
as I see it, is to have a large
area where guys and girls can
relax and spend the night, if
they want to," Linde said.
"Student power, to me, is
the power to make the university a community where all
the sexual implications of one's
existence will not be frustrated."
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AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1968
AMERICAN FIRM GETS SUB COLLEGE SHOP
An American store chain has
beaten out the UBC commerce
undergraduate society for the
lease on the new student union
building college shop.
Student council Monday
night accepted the application
of National Student Merchandising Corporation for the
seven year SUB lease.
The contract may be renewed for an additional three
years at the end of the seven
year period.
Council refused to consider
an application by commerce
president Russ Grierson on the
grounds that application was
too late.
NSMC vice-president and
director Donald Fergusson presented his company's application to council with the assurance the AMS was getting a
good deal.
"For the first few years of
our operation in SU® we expect to lose a considerable
amount of money," said Fergusson.
He said the company, though
American owned, was represented by a large number of
Canadians on the executive
level.
"Many of us are graduates
of this university," he said. "It
is an American company, but
we   are    hoping    to    expand
throughout Canada."
Fergusson said NSMC has
grown over the last six or
seven years to be one of the
fastest growing enterprises in
North America.
"We now have 34 stores on
U.S. campuses," he said. Our
advertising posters have won
us several awards."
He said the UBC store will
stock the regular UBC mugs
and crests, but will also supply
toiletries, paperbacks, candy,
cigarettes and numerous articles found in drug stores and
small shops.
Law president Peter Braund,
one of the negotiating committee that agreed upon a contract
with NSMC on Thursday, said
he contract was advantageous
to the AMS and would bring
in much needed extra revenue.
Grierson attempted to present a proposal of the CommUS
to council but councillors voted
him down.
"I have heard from a commerce student who worked for
Collegiate Advertising, a subsidiary of NSMC, over the
summer, and he says they will
make a killing with the present
arrangement," said Grierson.
"It has been pointed out that
the shop will be stocking faster
moving items and that they
will be in a more advantageous
position than the present shop.
"I do not think this contract
should be approved until there
has been a greater investigation of the value of the space."
Grierson said commerce students manning the shop under
his proposal would have the
assistance of several commerce
professors and a number of
master of business adminstration candidates would be willing to oversee the operation.
AMS vice-president Carey
Linde questioned the ethics involved in accepting the bid of
a large American company
without considering the offer
of a group of UBC students.
Braund said he did not
know of the proposal by Grierson until two days after the
contract negotiations were
completed.
(Original prospective lessess,
The Bay, backed out of their
contract in July NSMC did not
enter negotiations until late
August.)
Fergusson told council that
if his offer was not accepted
at the Monday meeting, (he
would declare the previous
negotiations null and void and
start anew.
Fergusson's statement was
labeled blackmail by several
councillors, including arts
president   Ralph  Stanton.
Said Stanton: "This action is
another example of the government acting as the servants
psycophants of corporate interests.
"It shows once more how the
little fish are eaten by the big
fish and how the government
acts in the interest of the bigger man."
Observers say the presentation of NSMC appeared very
professional, with a number of
nubile women allegedly hired
by   NISMC   to   staff   the shop
acting to entice the councillors.
When AMS co-ordinator Jill
Cameron accused the girls of
allowing themselves to be
manipulated as sex objects on
parade, one girl replied:
"You're  just  jealous."
Miss   Cameron  laughed.
Fergusson said the new shop
should Ibe open by Nov. 1,
and will keep its doors open
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and noon to 6 p.m. weekends.
November meeting
to debate brief
Student ideas welcomed on
wireless housing complex
The wireless site complex,
planned for the area where the
UBC traffic office is now situated, is planned for completion
in 1970, housing administrator
Leslie Rohringer said Monday.
"But it won't be finished until every student has the opportunity to make suggestions,"
he said.
He said he expects the final
schematic concept will be
approved by the future housing committee early in October.
"Architectural preliminary
design drawings including
some outline of specifications
will then take about two
months to complete," Rohringer said.
"If these are approved by the
future housing committee, a
mock-up room will be prepared."
Students will be invited to
view this room and make comments which will be discussed
by the future housing committee, Rohringer added.
""The committee will then
recommend to the Board the
project be committed to contractors.
Rohringer said that this idea
of a "negotiated contract" is
new to UBC residence constructions.
"Contractors and the Board
will then enter into contract
negotiations which will take
about two months.
"The wireless site is a wide
open project. It will be continually changed to suit requirements."
A general meeting has been
called for early in November
to discuss the Alma Mater
Society brief on academic reform.
"We want to ask the students
for ratification of the Fair
Weather or Foul brief, and will
do so at this general meeting,
probably to be held Nov. 7,"
said AMS president Dave Zirnhelt on Monday.
"The problem is that the issues aren't yet clear," he said.
"The students don't even believe that it is an issue yet."
This was the view aired by
student councillors after Friday's noon rally aimed at
clarifying the situation.
"It would seem by the response before and during the
rally, that students are happy
about the system," Zirnhelt
said.
At the rally, Zirnhelt suggested that education involved
more than just sitting in a
classroom.
"Perhaps we should not only
worry   about   granting   credits
for non-academic activity, but
should think about revising the
whole system," he said.
Afterwards, the councillors
commented on the lack of success at the rally.
"It was the most terrible
thing I've ever seen," said Jill
Cameron, AMS co-ordinator.
"We had prepared nothing to
say, and nothing got done until we split up with smaller
groups."
Vice-president Carey Linde
said that council refuses to
take issues seriously and realize that it must act as a team.
Miss Cameron said that before anything constructive
could be done, there had to be
changes in the structure of
AMS.
"AMS is bloody -undemocratic," she said. "And we hope to
discuss constitutional revisions
at the general meeting.
"We have so much to discuss
— the revisions, the brief, and
also SUB policy — so I hope
we can have more than just
one meeting."
Black and Blue names
Gage best prof again
Students once again have named Dean Walter H. Gage
the best professor in the faculty of science.
In the Black and Blue Review, published Friday, Gage
was rated ahead of Dr. Peter Larkin of zoology and Dr.
J.   Malcolm  McMillan   of  physics.
At the other end of the 375 profs in science were Dr.
Robert E. Delevault of geology and Dr. E. G. Gerlach of
math  who  tied  for  the   distinction  of  worst  teacher.
A notable name in the list of ten worst profs is Dr. C. A.
MacDowell, head of  chemistry.
"We started work right after exams finished," said editor
Fran McGrath, science 4, in an interview Monday, "But we
have been delayed by the printer for close to a month.
"More than 8000 questionnaires were returned and processed on the UBC computer," she continued, "And all computer time was donated by Dr. J. M. Kennedy, head of the
computing  centre."
Miss McGrath also said that copies of the 170-page review
are on sale in Math Annex 1119 at $1 per copy.
"We have been unable to produce it free for the students
because Donn Aven, Alma Mater Society treasurer, insists that
we make money or break even.
"If we sell all of the 1000 copies printed we will just break
even.
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Winnipeg, Montreal Tuesday, September 17, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — The Busy Body, Pango Pango
University's activist student newspaper, today ceased publication
because the Pango Pango Asses and Mules Society could not end
their meeting before 5:53 a.m., the Busy Body's press deadline.
Observers say the AMS deliberately delayed the meeting
so news of their dirty dealings could not be relayed to the world.
— John frizell photo
ANYBODY got cheap plans for an Ark? Conta cf Noah c/o The Ubyssey.
STUDENTS THREATEN CHAOS
MEXICO CITY (CUPI)—Mexico City College students have threatened to disrupt next
month's Olympic Games unless they win con-
- cessions from the Mexican government in then-
two - month - old strike at the University of
Mexico.
"We are not about to back down in our
- fight for democratic liberties now that we have
in our favor the fact that each day is closer to
the arrival of the contingents which will participate in the Olympics," leaders of the 88,000
students told a press conference Wednesday.
Thirty-seven Catholic priests issued a document calling for educational reforms and agreeing with "the awakening of youth".
The students have not made public their
"disruption tactics, but rumors of everything
from silent protest to violence fly around the
. capital city.
The students are demanding liberation of
political prisoners, dismissal of three Mexico
City police chiefs, disbandment of the riot
police, payments of indemnity to those injured
Petition opts
for SUB hours
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Jill
-Cameron has started a petition to keep the
new student union building open 24 hours a
day.
Miss Cameron said in an interview Monday
- that the building would be a good place for
students to camp during the housing shortage.
"Also, how many times have you been asked
to leave in the middle of a good conversation?"
•she said.
At present, the building is open from 7
a.m. to 1 a.m. daily.
The petition, which has no official council
support and no signatures as yet, may be signed
in the co-ordinator's office in south Brock.
in earlier demonstrations and protection of
university autonomy.
Although Javier Barrios Sierra, rector of
the University of Mexico, has called on the
students to return, leaders feel the strike must
continue despite expressed sympathy with
Barrios  Sierra.
"If we do not take advantage of this Olympic period to settle our disputes we can expect
a return of repression after the games are
over," they said.
Student unrest
in South Africa
JOHNNESBURG (CUPI)—The South African
government threatened a severe crackdown on
student unrest after demonstrators Sept. 10
protested government interference in academic
affairs.
Students at Witwatersrand University demonstrated in support of 200 students from
Africans-only University of Fort Hare who
were suspended last week after refusing to end
a sit-in.
Bantu affairs minister Michiel Betha said
the government "will not tolerate interference
in the affairs of Fort Hare and its body of
students."
Despite   government   threats,   students   at
the English-language universities intended to
continue a program of protest against the Fort
Hare  suspensions.
They plan to drive in convoy to Fort Hare
for an interview with the principal and will
hold a torchlight vigil and mass teach-in at
Natal and Cape Town universities.
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VANCOUVER 8, B. C. Page  8  (Advertisement)
THE     UBYSSEY
(Advertisement)
The Greek Way
The Greek system has existed at the UBC since 1924 when Phi Kappa
Pi came into existence.
Since then 14 other fraternities have joined forces to make it a
large and representative force on campus. The aims and policies of the
various local chapters are as numerous as is their membership.
The fraternity does have much to offer.
It gives the member a chance to experience and accept responsibility.
It enables the individual to express himself among equals. Most important, it attempts to prepare men for effectual living and for use to
the community.
Ideally, the Greek chapters place stress on scholastic achievement.
There are powerful movements among the International Organizations
themselves to place less emphasis on social activity and more on the
intellectual personality with the hope of securing the best all-round
education possible.
More than a place to go on campus, fraternities provide fellowship
through participation in intramural athletics, university work, and
social activities. Chapters throughout North America provide a wide area
of association and alumni contracts can prove beneficial in many ways.
Events such as Mardi Gras which donated $20,000 to charity last year and
Songfest provide an enjoyable university year for those interested in
participating.
Most fraternities are steeped in tradition and ritual. The formal
pledging and initiation ceremonies are patterns of acceptance that have
evolved from the middle nineteenth century when many fraternities
were formed. These procedures are as demanding as they are impressive,
but they reflect a nobility and beauty that is not easily forgotten.
The Greek chapters open their doors to students with at least 12
units credit every fall through the formal 'Rush' period when an aspiring
candidate gets the opportunity to attend social functions conducted by the
Greek chapters of his choice. He then decides which organization fits his
needs and best satisfies his interests. Upon acceptance he experiences a
pledge period of varying duration during which he prepares for initiation
and membership. The Greek way has much to offer to those who feel
do feel inclined don't miss the opportunity!
DEAR RUSHEE:
You are about to begin an interesting and sometimes hectic
experience,, and the purpose of this letter is to explain some
of the rules and practices of Rush.  First of all rushing places
you under no cost or obligation.  All expenses, including transportation to and from the various functions, are borne by the
various fraternities.  Upon completion, the decision whether to
accept fraternity membership rests with you and you alone.
The fraternities on our campus feel that for a rushee,
rushing is not only a time to decide which fraternity to join,
but initially to decide whether fraternity life would be at all
suitable to the specific individual.
INVITATIONS:
A few days before the function, one or two members of
the particular fraternity will call on you to deliver the invitation.  At this time, transportation can be arranged.  It also
gives you the opportunity to become acquainted with at least
one member of the fraternity before the function and to ask
questions about the fraternity or about rushing generally.
FINAL FUNCTIONS:
These are on Tuesday, October 8 and are divided into two
parts, one from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and the other from 9:00 p.m.
to 12:00 midnight, in order that you may have a final look at
the two fraternities most attractive to you.  You will want to
attend the late function of the fraternity toward which you are
leaning.
BIDS DAY:
Wednesday, October 9th is a day of silence until you
sign your bid at noon in the auditorium.  By this, it is meant
that you are not to speak to any fraternity member.
Please remember that you are not to attend any fraternity
functions during rush except those that are a part of fortnaL rush.
Rushing by fraternity members is confined to functions and delivering invitations.  If this rule is violated, the fraternity concerned may be fined or prevented from pledging the particular
rushee involved.
If you have any questions or problems concerning rush
please don't hesitate to see myself or any member of the Inter
Fraternity Council executive during registration hours upstairs
in Brock Hall.  As well there will be Inter Fraternity Council
representatives at every rush function to answer any general questions you may have about rush.
I hope you enjoy Fall Rush and wish you the best of luck.
Yours very truly,
Dave Dale-Johnson,
Vice-President,
Inter Fraternity Council.
The Inter'Fraternity
Council Executive
1968-69
President
John Simson
Vice-President
Dave Dale-Johnson
Treasurer
Bruce Stevenson
P.R.O.
Tom Gove
Secretary
Hugh Maddin
AN INVITATION
THE INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
of
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
cordially invites you to participate in the
FRATERNITY FALL RUSH
Registration: September  16th  to 20th,   1968 —  12:30-2:30
in the TV Room in North Brock
Open to students in second year and above
Rushing places you  under NO  cost or obligation
UBC Fraternities
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Upsilon
Kappa Sigma
Phi  Delta Theta
Phi  Gamma  Delta
Phi  Kappa  Pi
Phi Kappa Sigma
Psi  Upsilon
Sigma  Chi
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Psi
FRATERNITIES Tuesday, September 17, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Disturbed children clinic
short of efficiency funds
— ian lindtay photo
WHAT HOUSING SHORTAGE? This enterprising student has found himself a permanent home
on one of the comfortable (sic) couches in Brock.
Freshettes allowed to rush
as sororities change rules
The rush is on for the first year girls.
This year for the first time freshman girls
will be able to rush sororities.
"Until this year, a girl couldn't rush until
her second year on campus," said Carolyn
Stark, president of the Panhellenic (all-sorority)
Council. "But last spring the board of governors
dropped this restriction.
"We already have a large number of first
year girls signed up for rush which begins on
Saturday and we expect a few more before
** then."
A rushees general meeting will be held on
Thursday at 12:30 p.m. in Bu. 106 to outline
sorority life and explain rush procedure as well
as sign girls up for rush.
"We think a sorority has a great deal to
offer a first year girl," said Carolyn.
Sorority activities include Pledges on Par-
'Bourgeois press'
hacks CUS quote
TORONTO (CUP) — Canadian Union of
^Students president Peter Warrian Thursday
claimed he has been misquoted by "the incompetent bourgeois press."
At a meeting of the University of Toronto
student council, Warrian  charged that newspaper accounts of his speech at the CUS congress in  Guelph,   Ont.   have  branded  him  a
v violent revolutionary.
The oft-misquoted passage, he said, was:
"Some people say that this is the year to
sock it to the administration and sock it to
„ their buildings, but we must also take it to
the students, knowing that democratization and
liberation are achieved not by manipulations of
a few but by the struggle of all."
There is a distinction, Warren said, between "advocating violence and creating a
framework in which violence can be discussed."
The Vancouver Sun Aug. 31 quoted Warrian as saying:
"Some people now say this is the year we
really sock it to the administration, sock it to
their buildings and burn them down, if necessary. And it may be."
< The Sun story added, "Warrian said later
his speech was intended to strengthen students'
resolve in asserting their demands for university reform."
UBC Alma Mater Society vice-president
Carey Linde, a delegate to the CUS congress,
said the University of Toronto bought a new
fire truck the day after Warrian's speech.
Warrian is not reported to have denied
^mentioning that this is the year to burn down
* buildings.
ade, Mardi Gras, Song Fest, a pledge party, the
annual formal, as well as numerous exchanges
with fraternities and other groups, she said.
"We also have guest speakers on everything
from the stock market to student activism,"
Miss Stark said.
"Each sorority has a community service
project as well as helping with various fund
drives on and off campus."
"Any girl wanting further information can
come to Thursday's meeting, or call me at 733-
2500," said Carolyn.
8 students to sit
on McGill Senate
MONTREAL (CUP)—McGill University is
reportedly ready to open meetings of its board
of governors and senate and to allow eight
students voting rights on the senate.,
The suggestions came in a report on restructuring university government now under study
by the board and senate. It is to be made public
later in the month.
Student council president Robert Hajaly has
already objected to the report's proposed conditions for the election of student senators.
The report asks that senators be full-time
students of the university in good standing,
having completed at least one year of full time
studies. They are to be elected either by the
student body at large or by faculties with no
more than three coming from any one faculty.
Hajaly says student council must be the sole
body to determine the requirements for student
senators since it is the only recognized medium
between students and administration.
Student leaders also demand that part-time
students taking three course or more be allowed to sit on senate since they are defined as
full members of the students' society by its
constitution.
STRAIGHT
FROM P. 1
After council members assured her that they
were not opposed to the principle of free speech
but only acting for the benefit of the society.
Miss Cameron retracted her motion.
"I just thought I might put it up for your
consideration," she said.
Observers say a motion would been have
put in any case by certain members of council
who left last week's meeting before the Straight
motion.
Law president Peter Braund maintained the
motion was rescinded on legal grounds only.
A new campus clinic for disturbed children needs $20,000
to reach its maximum efficiency level.
A psychiatry department official said university grants to
the clinic have fallen short of
the amount needed to operate
the clinic efficiently.
He said the Alma Mater
Society's Mardi Gras committee has been approached for
assistance since it has donated
money to retarded children's
charities in past years.
The official refused to be
identified because the university permits projects such as
the cilinic to accept funds from
charity organizations but does
not allow them to solicit such
funds.
It will enrol children with
emotional or education problems for treatment and provide
consultative services to schools
requesting them.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her first year or equivalent and is a fully registered
student for the 1968-69 academic year. Candidates must
have attained in the previous sessional examinations an
average of no less than 60% for 15 units or more, and
65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wed., Sept. 25, 1968
and will close at 12 noon Thursday, Oct. 3, 1968. Voting
will take place Wed., Oct. 9, 1968.
Elections for the positions of
Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office of
Student Senator:
Three students from the student body at large (including
The Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected by the
student body at large. To be eligible for election to one
of these positions, a student in the academic year most
recently taken prior to the election shall have taken a
full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second class standing; he
shall also be registered as a full time student at this
University.
Terms of Office: Of the students elected by the student
body at large, the candidates receiving the highest and
second highest number of votes shall hold office for 2
years, the candidate receiving the third highest number
of votes shall hold office for one year.
Nominations are open immediately. Nominations will
close on Oct. 3, 1968. Voting will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1968.
Nomination forms are available at the AMS office in
Brock Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 55. For further information contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS mailbox number 55.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant will
assume responsibility for running all referenda and AMS
elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications and questions should be addressed to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Elections Committee
Applications are now being accepted for the Elections
Committee. Four members-at-large will be appointed by
the Student Council. The Elections Committee helps
govern the running of the Alma Mater Society elections
including drawing up rules and checking eligibility.
Applications and questions should be sent to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Public Relations Clan
All those presently involved in AMS Public Relations
or those wishing to be, please contact Ruth Dworkin,
Vice President (Internal Affairs) or leave name and
phone number in AMS Box 51, Brock Hall. Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1968
GARRY THOMPSON bulges the net behind North Shore goalie Gerry Macey, giving the Birds a 1-0 win on this last-minute penalty shot.
— dick button photo
Birds and Lady Luck
earn last-minute win
By RIK NYLAND
With the help of Lady Luck the UBC soccer Thunderbirds
pulled off a narrow victory over North Shore United last Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
Even though they were in full control throughout the major
part of the game the Birds needed a timely penalty shot in the
last two minutes of play to pull off a victory.
Garry Thompson, the Bird's straight-shooting forward, took
the penalty shot and made no mistakes as he drove the ball to
the lower right corner, giving North Shore's Gerry Macey no
chance whatsoever.
The UBC team looked very impressive with their short,
crisp passes which eluded the North Shore team.
But North Shore played excellent defensive ball as the Birds
tried time and time again to penetrate their defence.
There were very few good shots taken by UBC.
The UBC defence was caught on two occasions late in the
first half and UBC goalie Barry Sadler was called upon to make
a beautiful one-handed save to keep the Birds in the game.
With the final score 1-0 the Birds won their second game in
as many starts, leaving them in first place.
This could well be the year the Birds win the league
championship as they have a well-balanced club with no apparent weaknesses.
Should any injuries occur, head coach Joe Johnson has the
necessary bench strength to keep the Birds flying at a winning
pace.
■ EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY
Chapman's
5-Pin Lanes
1312 WEST BROADWAY
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Monday To Sunday
11:00  a.m.  to   Closing
VILLAGE BISTRO
2081   WEST 4th AVE.
Mother Tuckers Yellow Duck
Tuesday through Sunday
Reduced  rate for students
with card
OPEN FROM 8 P.M.
TEL. 736-9920
BOWLERS
< V*    * * * - *;*&..*•*?* v     v*
8 new fully-automatic 5-Pin Bowling Lanes
open Sept. 23, Student Union Building —
Students, Faculty, Staff . . .
FORM YOUR LEAGUE
OPEN BOWLING
•
Free instruction or Beginners
Contact Dermot Boyd, S.V.B. - 224-3242
or 228-3692
— dick button photo
BARRY SADLER saves the Birds with a beautiful one-handed
save.
Sept.
21
Sept.
28
Oct.
5
Oct.
12
Oct.
21
Oct.
26
Nov.
2
Nov.
9
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL SCHEDULE _ 1968
University of Alberta (Edmonton) — Away
Williamette University — Home
University of Hawaii (Honolulu) — Away
University of Puget Sound (Tacoma) — Away
Simon Fraser University (Empire Stadium) — 8 p.m.
Pacific Lutheran University — Home
College of Idaho (Caldwell) — Away
Oregon College — Home
Home games  2  p.m., in  Thunderbird  Stadium
SB INYIttTIIN18
AN ENTERTAINMENT BOOK FOR STUDENTS ONLY!
Includes...
TWELVE ODEON THEATRES
SKIING (WHISTLER MTN.)
SKIING (MT. BAKER)
FREE GOLF-FREE SKATING-FR-E BOWUNG
KING OF CLUBS
THE REEF
VILLAGE BISTRO
RIVERQUEEN
MAISON LAWRENCE
2 GROUSE MTN. SKYRIDE TICKETS, 2 PIZZA- $4.50
TWENTY OTHER SPECTACULAR  OFFERS
2 tickets for price of 1
2 tickets for price of 1
2 tickets for price of  1
$2.00 FREE food
$2.00 FREE admission
2 tickets for price of 1
2 tickets for price of 1
25% off everything
• at THE BOOKSTORE
• at HE & SHE CLOTHING, University Square
Cost only $2.50 Tuesday, September 17, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
■fv .*■*! •^*-\r*5*i''-** "■*,»-;•_
* >•*<*
— ian lindsay photo
THE UBC RUGBY THUNDERBIRDS held their annual intra-squaa. practice game Saturday. Sweat
and valuable experience were the winners.
Football Thunderbirds 68
should be better than 67
By RIK NYLAND
Frank Gnup's Thunderbirds
open their 1968 season this
weekend   when  they  take   on
the University of Alberta Golden Bears at Edmonton.
The Golden Bears, who were
National  Collegiate  champions
A critical look
at UBC soccer
By FRANK SCHERUBL
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds could come up with only a
1-0, last-minute victory over North Shore United last Saturday
afternoon.
It took a penalty shot with two minutes remaining in the
contest, from Gary Thompson, last season's leading scorer, to pull
.off the victory.
The game featured some brilliant goal-tending by Barry
Sadler on behalf of the Thunderbirds, as well as some exciting
end-to-end rushes by both teams.
A fast-breaking North Shore offence almost caught the Birds
napping several times early in the contest. It was at times like
these that Sadler had to make two exceptionally beautiful
saves on his way to a well-earned shut-out.
It was also at times like these that the UBC defence showed
alarming  pregnability  against  a  fast-breaking  offence.
Offensively the Thunderbirds displayed a great weakness
for long passes and long shots, but they were very efficient in
maneuvering the ball by means of short, snappy passes.
It appeared, however, that as soon as they came within close
proximity of the net all ability left them and they were unable
to control the ball, let alone pass or shoot.
After the game, coach Joe Johnson was heard to comment:
"That's a pretty cheap way to win it. The boys were just playing
silly; but then that's been our history against North Shore. Even
though they're at the bottom and we're usually near the top,
that doesn't seem to mean much when we play them."
Despite their performance the Thunderbirds are expected
to stay at the top of the league and take the champsionship.
This is hardly possible without fan support, however, and fan
support was certainly lacking at last Saturday's contest. The
,few people that did show up gave as much vocal support as
possible, but a much greater number is needed if the players
are expected to respond with an inspired performance.
Admission is free if you have an AMS card, and the games
are certainly worth two hours of your time.
last year, scored a 34-3 win on
Saturday over McMaster University Marauders, the team
they defeated 10-9 in the Canadian College Bowl last season.
The Thunderbirds, sharpened up by a controlled scrimmage at Western Washington
last Saturday, appear to be
much stronger than last year.
The scrimmage at Belling-
ham gave coach Gnup an opportunity to see his players in
action and try different players
in different positions.
Dave Corcoran and Bernie
Fanrich, who provided the
basis for the Birds' running
game last year, both sat out
the scrimmage due to injuries,
but both will be ready for this
Saturday's game. Last year Alberta downed the Birds 29-0 in
a league contest but Gnup predicted that this time "we'll
give 'em a hell of a good showing".
STUDS NEEDED
The team could still use some
heavy muscle up on the front
line, especially in the guard
and tackle positions or, as Gnup
phrased it, "Tell 'em we need
some big studs."
The Junior Varsity squad,
coached by Nestor Korchinsky,
will host the Wenatchee Junior
College Knights at Thunderbird Stadium this Saturday at
2 p.m. Last year Wenatchee
scored a 26-0 win over the Jay-
vees.
Korchinsky is still looking
for interested players. All you
have to do is show up at Thunderbird Stadium any day at
4:30 p.m.
*%*'A'ArJ*'Jl'A'AWM'*WA
'   \     ]\- .' '       M' '   .'    x/—M:.:
. .   • .-*•*
• „'     X*C ~-X*
— dick button photo
THfc UBC FIELD HOCKEY TEAM continues to workout in preparation for the upcoming season.
This year's team will be travelling to England after the regular season is completed. Interested
players are asked to contact coach Eric Broom in Rm. 212-C in Memorial Gym.
UBC outdoor club vague
on SFU canoe challange
The UBC Varsity Outdoor
Club is entered in a canoe race
—but club members apparently
don't know about it.
The Outdoor Club of Simon
Fraser University issued a challenge, and the UBC's VOC, the
Canadian Youth Hostels, and
the Dogwood Canoe Club have
accepted, according to an SFU
news release.
But a Ubyssey check of the
VOC office Monday showed
club members hadn't heard of
the race.
VOC officials were unavailable for comment.
The 40-mile race starts at
Mission on Sept. 28 and ends
on Annacis Island on Sept. 29;
with an overnight stop at Fort
Langley.
Technical Faculty Rep.
Wanted
for C.U.S.O. Committee
APPLY BOX 18 - BROCK HALL
Leave Name, Address and Phone Number
engineers
& sciencemen!
get 10% discount on Clarke & Stuart's complete
line of engineering instruments, drafting
supplies and drawing materials. We have one
of the most complete lines available  in
Vancouver, including Dietzgen and Staedtler.
We're open Saturdays, too. AMS cards must be
shown to obtain discount.
CLARKE & STUART, Div. of
WILLSON STATIONERS
550  Seymour  Street  682-6688
8 Underground
FILMS
(16 mm)
LSD WALL —(1967) by Jack Hawkins 6 min color
PENNY BRIGHT & JIMMY WEATHERSPOON/HOT LEATHERETTE — (1967) bw & color. Two short-short statements (8 min
in total) by Robert Nelson.
PEYOTE QUEEN-(1965) by Storm DeHirsh 9 min color
MORNING LIGHT-(1968) by Ulvis Alberts 8 min color
Canadian Premiere of this film created from  1200 feet of
outdated  film  stock.   1968   Bellevue  Film   Festival Selection.
LOTUS WING-(1968) by Jerry Abrams  17 min color
MALCOLM X —(1967) by John Turner and Lebert Bethune
22 min bw. An All-Negro production in memory of the
life and.message of one of Black America's leaders.
NIGHT AND FOG-(1955) by Alan Resnais 30 min bw &
color. A profound and disturbing treatment of the horror
of Nazi Germany's concentration camps with the emphasis
on their relation to modern society's problem.
TONIGHT, WED., THURS. — SEPT. 17, 18, 19
ONE SHOWING ONLY NIGHTLY AT 8:30 P.M.
Olympia Theatre
2381  E. Hastings (at Nanaimo)
Adults $1.50 (At the Door) Students $1.25 Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES . .
Dance club stages stomp
DANCE CLUB
Meet for lunch in Brock 362
(old clubroom, not dance
lounge) till SUB opens. Old
and new members welcome.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau (of the Experimental College) will be
speaking on Goethe's Faust
today at 12:30 p.m. in Bu.
100.
UBC SOCREDS
Come and hear Dan Campbell, minister of municipal
affairs, today at 12:30 in Angus 104. Everybody welcome
including hecklers.
FROSH RETREAT
All first year students interested in going on Frosh Retreat (Sept. 20-22), apply at
the AMS office in Brock
Hall. There will be a general
meeting on Thursday at noon
in Bu. 203.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
There will be an organizational meeting of the Archaeology Club on Wednesday at
12:30 in Bu. 205. Old members please attend; new members welcome.
AGRICULTURE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
The AUS is having a coffee
party on Wednesday at 12:30
in the Women's Lounge of
Forestry-Agriculture Building for the Aggie Frosh to
meet with Aggies and Faculty.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
New members are urged to
attend an organizational
meeting in Bu. 204 on Thursday, Sept. 19 at 12:30 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Come and hear "Where Is It
At?", a panel discussion on
the direction of the student
movement, to be held on
Thursday at 12:30 in Angus
104. Speakers: Martin Loney,
Stan Persky, Dave Zirnhelt,
Carey Linde.
SAILING CLUB
A Sailing Club general organizational meeting will be
held on Wednesday, Sept. 18
at 12:30 in Bu. 212. All welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Interested members and Executive, come and plan the
year's activities on Wednesday at 12:30 in Bu. 103.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
There will be a general meeting of the Science Undergraduate Society on Thursday at 12:30 in Room 200 of
the Hennings Building.
UCC
A vital meeting re Clubs
Day will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 12:30 in Bu.
204.
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Rush fraternities: registration is in the TV room,
North Brock, daily from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
HILLEL HOUSE
Schara Tzedeck Synagogue
welcomes all students to
attend the High Holy Services. For seat reservation
please contact as early as
possible: Rabbi M. Hier, Director of Hillel House.
—Rosh Hashana, Monday,
Sept.  23.
—Yom Kippur (Yishkor),
Wednesday, Oct. 2.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Paul Boutelle, a black militant from the U.S. who is
the Socialist Workers Party
candidate for vice-president
will speak at 12:30 on Friday, Sept. 20 in Bu. 102.
Don't miss it.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
The East Asia Society will be
holding an organizational
meeting on Wednesday, Sept.
18 at 12:30 p.m. in Bu. 203.
Everybody welcome.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance Club Open House at
both Totem and Lower Mall
Residence Ballrooms on Monday through Thursday, Sept.
16-19, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
This includes free instruction
and demonstration. All welcome.
EDUCATION
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Come to the free dance on
Thursday at noon in the Education Lounge — featuring
"Tomorrow's Eyes!" Also,
see all the contestants for
Miss Education at the same
time.
JUDO CLUB
A meeting will be held on
Thursday, Sept. 19 at noon in
Hennings 200. Plans for the
fall will be made and judo
films will be shown. New
members welcome !
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
All interested,  come to the
meeting at noon on  Thursday, Sept. 19 in Bu. 212.
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
There will be a meeting on
Tuesday at noon in AMS
Council Chambers, South
Brock.
JUDO CLUB
Judo workouts have started!
Times are Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 4:30 in
the apparatus gym (under
the War Memorial Gym).
New members welcome.
PANHELLENIC
ASSOCIATION
Sign up now for sorority
Rush. Frosh welcome — to a
meeting Thursday at noon in
Bu.  106.
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Science jackets and sweaters
are on sale every noon hour
this week in the Hennings
Lobby.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
A   lunch-time   discussion   of
activitites   will   be   held   in
Bu. 313 at 12:30 today.
ARTS US
ALL Artsmen are invited to
International House Upper
Lounge at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 17 for a discussion on academic reform
with the senate.
GERMAN CLUB
A German film (in Deutsch)
will be shown in the Upper
Lounge of International
House today at 12:30. Everyone welcome.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
The science anticalendar —
"The Black and Blue Review" — is now available
daily at the science common
room — Math Annex 1119.
UBC LIBERALS
Come to the special meeting
on Thursday at 12:30 in Bu.
205 to select convention delegates. All 1967-1968 members are eligible.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
A testimony meeting will be
held on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
in Music 301. Everyone welcome.
AQUA SOC
A general meeting of Aqua
Soc will be held on Thursday in Bu. 202 between 12:30
and 1:30. New members welcome.
LUTHERAN
STUDENT MOVEMENT
Come and see "Summerhill"
at noon today in Bu. 106. Admission 25 cents.
SDU
Students for a Democratic
University meets Tuesday,
Sept. 17 and Thursday, Sept.
19 at 7:30 p.m. in Carey
Linde's office in Brock Hall.
Open to all.
VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Come and hear a dramatic
talk on "What is VCF —
UBC?" by Rev. Hubert
Butcher on Friday noon in
in Angus 110.
MEN'S GYMNASTICS
A meeting for all those interested in men's gymnastics,
competitive or otherwise,
will be held on Wednesday,
Sept. 18 at 12:30 in room
211, War Memorial gym.
BUSY"B"
BOOKS
Used University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75-f, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING TOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6781.
MEDDY'S PEOPLE AT PLACE
Vanier, Friday, September 20th. 9:00-
1:00. Residents $1.00. Non-residents
$1.35.
DANCE DANCE DANCE AT THE
Virginal Aorta featuring Tomorrow's
Eyes, Sept. 21, 9:00 p.m. Totem
Park Maids 75c. Makers $1.00.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
PAIR OP GLASSES IN HUNGARIAN
engineer's car Monday, 1 p.m. Call
Jane 685-3606.
LOST: SMALL MULTICOLORED
change purse. Please notify Sheila
MacLean, Isabel Maclnnes Hall,
Fort Camp. 224-9047.
FOUND PAIR OF GLASSES AT UNI-
versity beach during registration
week.   Phone  224-7666.
LOST, GOLD WEDDING BAND. RE-
ward. 435-1550. Tom.
FOUND IN PONDEROSA, LADIES'
white purse containing watch, see
Rosalind, at the Campus branch,
Bank of Montreal.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NORTH VAN. EAST OF 2nd NAR-
rows Bridge for 10:30 classes, Mon-
days and Thursdays. Phone 929-400*6.
RIDE   NEEDED  FROM   CAPILANO
Highland    area,    North   Vancouver.
Please call Nancy at 987-8079.
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST VAN.
Glenmore. Will join carpool of 4.
Phone Del,  922-3581.
RIDE NEEDED FROM CAPILANO-
Highland area. Call Bob at 985-1708.
2 BLIND GRAD STUDENTS NEED
ride for 8:30's Tues., Wed., Fri.,
12th & Hemlock. Can get special
parking privileges on campus for
driver.  228-2373  or 738-1587.
NORTH VANCOUVER RIDE WANT-
ed, to/from. Desperate, call any
time at 985-2743.
HAVE CAR — WANT PASSENGERS,
from Coquitlam or Burnaby (Lougheed Hwy.). Phone 936-5643 after 6
p.m.
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6622 *•
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
INSTRUCTION
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
GIRLS ACQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon  Enterprises,  736-6223.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
RELIABLE BABY SITTER REQUER-
ed  4  days  a  week,  3-6  p.m.  Phone
263-6838 after  6.
Sales.   Young   man   or   woman.   —
PART-TIME EXPERIENCED SHOE
Hughes Fine Shoes, 4516 W. 10th
Ave.  Ph. 228-8115.
Work Wanted
54
Instruction  Wanted
61
Music
62
ELECTRIC BASSIST — ANY BAG —
can gig two nights a week. Phone
988-4564.
Special Classes
63
WILL YOU OR WILL YOU NOT
survive   your   own   cooking?   Insure
now! Attend Adult Night Course.
"Cooking for Bachelors". Carson
Graham Senior Secondary School,
2145 Jones Ave., N.V. 10 classes,
$15.00. Thursday, Oct. 3, 7:30-9:30
p.m.	
Tutoring 64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RIDE   NEEDED,   No.   5   ROAD   AND
Cambie,  Richmond. 278-8274.
Special Notices
15
FREE—CANADA CAREERS DIREC-
tory for class of 1969 only. Packed
with carrer opportunities in industry and government. Also information on school boards and graduate
schools. Call at the Placement office
for your copy now.	
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.
FRENCH ENGLISH BILINGUALS
desperately needed for psychology
experiment. Phone 688-5002 after 5
p.m.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at 11101 Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
VOLVO 1966 PV544 MICHILEN-X
radial ply tires. Phone 228-8408. Ask
for Wayne.     	
•61 VALIANT 4 DR., «, AUTO. 4
new tires (2 snow). 224-9088 (Vinay)
or 738-8119.
1965 FIAT 1500 SPORTS CAR. BLACK,
red interior. Excellent condition.
$1,450. Phone 985-3734.
'60 VW FACTORY EQUIPPED CAMP-
er. Rebuilt engine. Custom tent extension. '60 sedan de Ville Cadillac,
power, air-conditioned. Call 228-2803,
after 6 p.m. 277-0647. 	
36 SUNBEAM ALPINE, 1 OWNER,
31,000 mi.; convertible, green, excellent condition, radio, new tires. $1980.
291-2039.
'62 SPRITE; NEW TRANS., CLUTCH
and paint.  $850.  Call 732-8032.	
■ONE    OF    A    KIND."    1953    XK120
Jaguar.   Immaculate.  926-3163.	
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED:    VESPA   SCOOTER,    291-
2039.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats 8c Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
'68   HONDA   175,   HELMET,   WIND-
shield. $540. 731-2270.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating &  Copying 32
BIRD CALLS
YOUR    STUDENT    TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets  for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANICA 1966*
with 67 & 68 Yearbooks & case. Call
738-4509.
VARSITY  SPECIALS
Students'  desks   from 14.95
New bunk beds  pair 29.50
Book cases    from 8.95
New  252   coil   Hollywood  bed
complete       49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
FOR   SALE:   1965   YAMAHA   250   CC.
Good condition. Phone Don, 876-1587.
YAMAHA   AMP.:    TREM.,    REVERB
plus   Ace-Tone   organ.   Together   or
separate.   Offers!   Ph.   Pete,   738-3644
after  5:06.
JUST   BROKEN   IN!    SIZE   42   UBC
jacket, $15. Also a science cardigan,
$9. 922-7384.     	
SLR CAMERA PENTINA, TESSAR
2.8 plus telelens, utility bag (leather)i
lightmeter, filters, proxi lenses, bac-
tery flash,  2 years old,  $95. 291-2039.
SIX FOOT FRIDGE FOR SALE.
Only $30. It works great if defrosted
every three weeks. Call 874-7468.
Ask for Ken, or leave message.
VICKS TV AND RADIO CO., 513 W.
Pender, Mutual 5-8622. Reduction on
all tape recorders (cassettles & reels),
radio, TV's etc. 10% additional discounts  to  students  with  this  ad.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM, PRIVATE ENTRANCE, KIT-
chen privileges. 2 male students.
738-6785  eves. 	
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE HOUSE
with three of same. Phone Bob or
Ken, 228-3089, 263-9603.
HAVE FURNISHED APARTMENT
to share. Prefer grad student. Visit
at 2304 W.  5th Ave.  6-8 p.m.	
2 ROOM FURNISHED SUITE, 3456
W. 2nd for 2 students, $75. See Gil
or Phil, Law East.
FOR RENT: FOUR BEDROOM FTJR-
nished house. Individuals or group.
Shared facilities. 738-0784.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
INTELLIGENT, WELL TRAVELLED
fun loving single working girl wishes
to share apartment with same.
Leave name & number for Rosalind
at Bank of Montreal, campus.	
Halls For Rent
85
Houses For Sale
86
Other Cities
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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