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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1972

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 Miners laid off as Trudeau lays it on
SUDBURY (CUP) -
International Nickel Company,
the principal employer here, has
announced that it is laying off
1,965 workers in the next three
months.
Inco's announcement follows a
speech by prime minister Pierre
Trudeau last week to Italian
workers in Toronto in which he
said: "There are jobs in the mines,
there are jobs on the farms out
west     where     some    farmers
Candidates
woo votes
of masses
complain they can't get help and
in Ontario they have to import
migrant workers from the West
Indies to work on fruit farms
because they can't'find workers
here."
As if to belie Trudeau's glib
assertion of the existence of all
those jobs, Inco said it is laying
off 725 mine workers within the
next few days. During the next
three months 1,240 more workers
will lose their jobs.
Unemployed workers across
the country must be wondering
where all those jobs Trudeau is
talking about are. Inco's other
main operation at Thompson,
Manitoba is also cutting back
operations due to the depressed
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Past Alma Mater Society
presidents have used the
presidency to jockey themselves
into prominent positions in
society, AMS presidential
candidate Fred Ferdman said
Monday.
Ferdman, grad studies 9, told
about 125 persons in the SUB
ballroom that Byron Hender, who
as AMS president in 1965-66 was
responsible for the passing of the
SUB referendum, was rewarded
with a position in the university
administration placing him in
charge of the bookstore.
Ferdman was speaking at the
all-candidates meeting held the
usual two days before the
election. Polls will open
Wednesday morning at advertised
locations.
He said SUB has worked out to
be a money-making proposition
f o r ' 'Walter Gage's
administration".
"On top of that, it will gain
control of SUB when our lease
runs out in 40 years," Ferdman
said.
The only way to circumvent
the take over would be for
students to gain control of the
board of governors, he said. This
would also permit students to
implement his main platform — a
fight against U.S. imperialism.
Students Coalition presidential
candidate Doug Aldridge, applied
science 4, said rather than using
demands or pressure to force the
administration to do what the
AMS wants they should cooperate
to get their way.
He said his slate would try to
buy out the administration food
services and place them in
students' hands.
Amid cries of "bullshit" from
Human Government caucus
members in the audience,
Aldridge told the crowd the
Human Government tried to get a
$200,000 loan and failed because
"capitalists consider them poor
security risks".
"The Students Coalition has
guarantees for loans of up to
$1,000,000," he said.
Also running on the SC slate is
Teri Ball, agriculture 2, for
external affairs.
She said she would like to see a
rapid transit system implemented
and an increase in the conference
budget.
Student Coalition secretarial
candidate Sally Clark, arts 1, said
the role of secretary had
previously been a confining one.
"I would like to see tickertape
the
the
machines    installed    for
elections  so  we could find
results faster."
Also running on the Student
Coalition slate is Lynne Phillips,
arts 2, for internal affairs.
"There should be more space
for the alternate food services,
AMS bookstore and crafts store,"
Human Government presidential
candidate Svend Robinson said.
He said they should also work
toward* determining the extent of
the   tenure   problem   and   work
THE
Vol. LIU, No. 44        VANCOU
together  for  Canadianization of
the university.
"We want to give students an
alternative to all past governments
— including the past Human
Government regime. They made
many mistakes but initially they
were a good thing," Human
Government external affairs
candidate Penny Newman said.
Other Human Government
candidates are Garth Sundeen,
agriculture 3, for secretary, and
Keith Richardson, arts 3, for
internal affairs.
Members of the ineligible
Young Socialist slate were also at
the meeting.
The elections committee
declared them ineligible because
constitutionally no member of a
political party registered with the
university clubs committee may
run in any elections outside the
club itself with the advertised
support of that party.
"This whole election is both
ineligible and ridiculous with the
non-choice between the Human
Government hopefuls and the
Students Coalition tickertape
candidates," YS presidential
candidate Joan Campana said.
"We will be conducting a
write-in campaign," she said.
state of the economy and the
consequent slump in sales.
This cutback has already cost
many workers their jobs and more
layoffs are forecast for the future
throughout  the mining industry.
Workers at the Sudbury Inco
site will lose some hospitalization
benefits on the first day of the
layoff and insurance benefits
within 30 days.
"It's almost like putting them
up against the wall and shooting
them," said Mickey Maguire,
president of Local 6500 of the
United Steel Workers of America.
"In every big city you find
pages of job offerings in the
newspapers", millionaire Trudeau
went on.
"Often people are unemployed
because they want a job at $3 an
hour instead of $2 or because
they don't want to move. There is
work available in Canada but
sometimes you have to move to
get it and accept something above
the minimum wage and not buy a
house in the first year."
The 1,965 who are losing their
jobs at Sudbury may find it hard
to agree with Trudeau as they
take their place with the 6.2 per
cent of the Canadian work force
unemployed this month.
And whether the prime
minister realizes it or not, January
is a bad month to try and find a
job on a fruit farm.
—daryl tan photo
FORESTRY CAR, named Omar, receives last respects from Gilbert Medicek and Stole Schneider after
engineers made modifications in vehicle's design on weekend.
*> <*S^. ^ vk. / * *> '^iC
S ^V~V^ v
Polls open Wednesday
Yeah, that's right Mildred, it's annual Alma
Mater Society executive time Wednesday for
president, secretary and external and internal affairs
officers.
As an extra enticement students are being
asked to vote on a proposed expansion of SUB and
the principle of purchasing the administration food
service in SUB.
Advance polls are open from 11:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. today in SUB, the education building, the old
auditorium cafeteria and the War Memorial gym.
Advance polls are also open from 5 to 7 p.m.
in Fort Camp, Place Vanier and Totem Park.
Polls will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday in Angus, Buchanan, civil engineering,
law, MacMillan, main library, Sedgewick library,
SUB and Woodward library. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   1,   1972
Behind the psych dispute
By BERTON WOODWARD
The current hiring dispute in the psychology
department has .three sides. Monday The Ubyssey
talked to spokesmen for two of them.
Edro Signori is the acting head of the
department, one who has shown an unwillingness to
listen to at least some of the students in his
department.
A group of graduate psychology students has
sent several letters, which Signori has refused to
answer, protesting the non-renewal of the contracts
of Carol Marx and Michael Humphries.
Humphries, a PhD graduate of Stanford
University, had his first two-year contract renewed
in 1970 but was denied a third contract.
Signori consistently refuses to answer any
questions about the two cases.
A meeting was held Monday between 29
psychology graduate students and Signori and the
other members of the senior advisory committee —
which decides department policy including contract
renewals.
The third side should be presented when those
students meet Wednesday to release a brief on their
position in the dispute.
On the subject of the letters written by
students in the department, Signori said: "I refuse
to answer letters on specific confidential matters of
policy.
"If students want change they should be
working with the rules, not breaking them.
"Grad students are on the committees that
affect their education. There is no rule or policy
about students being on the advisory committee.
They should go to the board or senate about that."
Signori was asked if he thought the students
were satisfied with the meeting.
"Probably not," he said. "1 did answer them to
the extent that is permissible with regard to the
needs of confidential information that is deliberated
by the advisory committee.
"I think our advisory committee met them with
the idea of being perfectly frank but some of the
students were clearly not interested. I think the
large majority learned something and that's what we
were trying to promote.
International
food not selling
Apparently UBC students are not ready for
another alternate food service.
The international food fair, sponsored by the
Alma Mater Society, is serving meals at noon in SUB
207-209 daily. However, very few people are
interested.
"So far, we've been averaging only 80 to 90
students per day," said Sandy Chow, owner of the
Hong Kong Kitchen.
The Hong Kong serves Chinese food every
Monday. Tuesdays, Simpatico Restaurant serves
Italian food, Wednesday it's the Curry House,
Thursday, the Acropol Restaurant, and Friday,
God's Kitchen. All meals cost a maximum of 90
cents.
"Out of the 90 cents we have to give IS cents
to the AMS, and plates and forks cost us five cents.
That leaves us only 70 cents and we barely break
even on that," Chow said.
"My wife and I both cook. If I had to hire extra
help, I couldn't do it with only 100 servings. I
would like to see at least 200," he said.
"It's not making me any money. I'm just doing
it to advertise my restaurant."
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
YOU CAN'T BEAT
ALMA
PHARMACY
224-4341
10TH & ALMA
Beautiful
clothes. . .
for
eautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
"There is always a minority using a situation
for other purposes.
"I don't want to play politics with any of this. I
don't know if students are doing this to gain some
kind of political favor.
"I find them unwilling to listen to fact.
"I think they were clearly going through the
drill today - reading something already written.
"There's discrepancies between the facts and
the way the facts are manipulated (by these
students).
"Frankly I don't give a damn about them (the
'minority')."
Signori said the advisory committee gets
student assessment on all candidates up for contract
renewal.
"We attach considerable importance to it.
Teaching is a very important part of what a
professor does but on the other hand we have to
take into account a much broader pattern as well.
"You must keep in mind that in recent times -
the last two years - there has been a significant
shift (in hiring practice) simply because people
don't want to lead staff into believing they would
have long term prospects when there is an ample
supply of staff.
"It is important they make a decision as soon as
possible. This is made in terms of long term
perspective."
Signori related those long-term trends to the
decision-making process.
"I think staff who have been around are better
able to see trends in psychology. You can't deny
that members of the (advisory) committee have
more experience."
Humphries won't deny that but he sees easy
abuses in a system that won't tell professors why
they've been fired.
"The senior staff is pretty autonomous," he
says. "They say 'we're experienced, we'll judge'
Somebody's got to override that, oversee that. Some
kind of open appeal.
"I think they're hiding behind the secrecy
aspect. Secrecy can help the staff member or it can
really hinder the process.
"There are some judgments one individual
makes on another that are confidential but when
secrecy permits them to provide only vague or
misleading answers it lets them hide behind it."
Humphries said the reasons given for the
non-renewal of his contract last year were "quite
vague".
"The letter from (arts dean Doug) Kenny and
the senior staff said something like I'm 'not
performing at a level appropriate to the position'."
He said the only specific statements about why
his performance came from individual committee
members in private.
"The decision must be able to be defended in
front of some other body. The faculty association is
useless.
"What I'm getting now is hearing about some
faculty members talking to Signori about issues that
I never got to answer in person.
"Someone in the senior staff can make
statements about me that I can't respond.,to.
"I think there should be written documents —
right now I have to correlate all these things I hear
that people have been saying about me and I hear it
second or third hand.
"I have a lot of support of junior staff. To deny
them a voice is legal but whether the senior people
can defend that position much longer is
questionable.
"I think the junior faculty have the potential of
becoming a militant union."
 HELD OVER "~
THE
BIRTHDAY
PARTY
by Harold Pinter
January 31-February 4
TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR
FRIDAY, FEB. 4,8:00 P.M.
Box Office Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
 HELD OVER	
Complete facilities
for
BANQUETS
AND
RECEPTIONS
TELEPHONE: 738-7231
738-1110
(The
Mmtse
OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE
Feb. 12,24 p.m. Refreshments Served!
2723 West 4th Avenue (AtMacdonald)
PHOENIX 72   presents
A Night at the Ponderosa
Only Advance Tickets
50c in SUB Concourse
Wed. Feb. 2
8:00-1:00
REFRESHMENTS-3/$1
There's Something for Everyone
All Star Entertainment — Games — Films
And More
PHOENIX 72
presenfs
PARADE OF SPEAKERS
Aid. Art Phillips
At   12:30  Tues.,   Feb.   1   in the SUB Art Gallery for a
discussion of local relevant issues.
Canadian Poet Bill Bissett
At 12:30 Wed., Feb. 2 SUB Art Gallery. Readings from his
works.
Psychiatrist Dr. Bennett Wong
12:30   Thurs.,    Feb.    3   SUB    Aud.   Speaking   on   the
dehumanizing effects of our present society — with slides.
Georgia Straight Editor
Dan McLeod
12:30 (tentatively) Friday, Feb. 4 SUB Art Gallery.
Discussing some of the current hassles facing the
Straight.
Author LaVerne Barnes
Time to be announced. Speaking on her controversial
book The Plastic Orgasm. Tuesday,  February  1,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
INELIGIBLE  BUT INDOMITABLE, Young Socialist AMS presidential candidate Joan
Campana holds forth at Monday all-candidates' meeting in SUB ballroom. YS candidates,
—warren mayes photo
ruled out on technicality, are conducting write-in campaign. Above at far right are Human
Government candidates Penny Newman and Svend Robinson.
Reforms planned for education
By SANDY KASS
Sweeping curriculum reforms are being planned in the
faculty of education.
Plans calling for a complete revision of the
elementary and secondary programs are in the final stages
of faculty approval, education dean Neville Scarfe said
Monday.
He said, if approved, the plans would result in
completely different programming for students entering
the first two years of the faculty next September.
The plans, known as the Bentley Report, named for
education professor Roy Bentley who chaired the joint
committee on undergraduate programs which compiled
the report, call for longer student teaching periods in the
public schools, development of more flexible programs for
education students and an integration of the secondary
and elementary programs.
It also recommends an extension of the four-year
elementary degree program to five years.
Under the Bentley plan, students would enter the
education faculty in third year, completing their first two
years in the faculty of arts or of science.
Third year, or education I under the new plan, would
be an introduction to the philosophies and disciplines of
education.
Fourth and fifth years, or education II and III, would
involve a highly concentrated professional program with
eight to 10 weeks of practice teaching.
The Bentley Report comes at a time of criticisms of
the UBC faculty, which appeared in a January survey of
Vancouver principals and teachers by the Vancouver
school board's personnel and services committee.
At the Jan. 24 Vancouver school board meeting,
school trustee  Peter Bullen  told the board Vancouver
principals and teachers are not happy with UBC education
graduates.
Bullen said they are not happy with "the period of
time given for practice teaching and the inadequacy of
training for open area and team teaching situations."
Scarfe said these criticisms stem from a quantitative
judgment of student teaching and not a qualitative one.
"At Simon Fraser University which Vancouver school
officials seem to prefer, education students are given seven
weeks of practice teaching per year. But during those
seven weeks students are expected to learn all the teaching
methods which we spend a whole year on.
"We teach students methods and then give them an
opportunity to apply those methods in a school situation.
"Also, we bring children into UBC for our students to
work with," he said.
Scarfe said public school teachers sponsoring SFU
students are paid by that university to teach them the
classroom methods they use, as well as giving them classes
to practise on.
"This is fine if students can be guaranteed of getting
good sponsor teachers all the time, but that is just
unfeasible."
He said the criticisms on the lack of training for open
area and team teaching situations are "just untrue".
He said Queen Elizabeth elementary school in
Vancouver has one of the finest team teaching and open
area programs in the Lower Mainland and "the people
running this program are graduates of UBC".
Education students' association president Kerry
Bysouth said the education council has approved the
report in principle.
Although the report currently lacks elementary
division approval, Scarfe said he is confident it will have
the necessary approval for its implementation in
September.
The elementary division will meet Feb. 16 to approve
or reject the report. It was approved Thursday by the
secondary division.
Rhododendrons to improve
UBC has received two federal government local
initiative grants worth $39,575 to develop botanical
garden facilities on campus.
UBC PReports editor Jim Banham said Monday that
one of the grants, worth $26,325 (with UBC adding
another $4,500), will be used to install drainage facilities
in the new botanical garden nursery at the south campus
research area.
"The   money   will   improve   UBC's   collection   of
rhododendrons, Canada's largest, and will also prepare
installation of a public display of the plants on Marine
Drive," he said.
Banham said the other grant, worth $13,250, will
provide for centralization and cataloguing of plants of
B.C. and of other areas in a new herbarium in the
biological sciences building.
He said no definite date has been set for the work to
start on the botanical gardens because of a lack of funds.
Exposure; a consumer column
Probably one out of every three
Ubyssey staff meals consists of pizza, so
what better food to turn one's stomach
(to) than pizza.
The materials used in making a pizza
(flour, water, cheese, tomato and spices)
barely account for 10% of the purchase
price. The bulk of the cost is labor and
upkeep of the ovens. The profit margin is
extremely high.
Restaurant pizzas usually come in three
sizes — small, medium, and large — and
contrary to any preconceived notions, in
general it is the small size which is actually
the most economical.
For our consumer test we purchased
one small, one medium and one large
mushroom pizza from Boston Pizza (our
favorite place). Their weights and sizes are
indicated in the attached table.
IS A LARGE PIZZA CHEAPER THAN SEVERAL SMALL ONES?
Advertised
Measured         Weight
Cost       Cost/oz.
Cost/sq. in.
Type
Size .
Size                  ( oz. )
(4)      (4)
(4)
Small
10 inch
9 inch            15.3
150          9.8
2.4
Medium
12 inch
12 inch            21.1
260         12.3
2.3
Large
14 inch
14 inch            30.2
360        12.0
2.3
The outer crust on all was quite small
and the mushrooms were evenly spread
over the entire surface of each pizza.
From the table it can be seen that you
get over 20% more pizza for your money if
you order a small than if you order a large.
A medium sized pizza is the worst buy of
all.
Note also that our so-called 10-inch
pizza was really only 9 inches in diameter.
Over the summer about 10 small pizzas
from Boston Pizza were measured. They
averaged 9V*inches in diameter.
One can only suppose that if the small
pizza was actually its advertised 10-inch
diameter it would be an even better buy.
This is because the surface area would be
significantly greater and the amount of
cheese, et cetera would cost 1.9 cents per
square inch making it the best buy in terms
of area.
The point of all this is not that Boston
Pizza is particularly a rip-off joint. Several
other pizzas places such as the higher-priced
Jon's have similar pricing inconsistencies.
This is perhaps an example of people
being fooled into thinking that quantity
purchases lead to lower unit prices.
On a broader scale the principle is that
many consumer goods in Canada are
neither unit-priced nor unit-packaged.
Large boxes of soap are often more
expensive per ounce than small ones;
canned fruits can often be cheaper in small
tins than in large ones; food services' large
soft drinks are still slightly more expensive
per ounce than small ones.
Until the NDP has its way, forcing
large supermarkets through appropriate
legislation to unit price their goods, we will
still have to be very discerning consumers.
In the meantime us pizza eaters had
better stick to small pizzas — they're
cheaper. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   1,   1972
Inco et al
Just in case anyone is wondering why we're
running a front-page story on mining layoffs, we'd like
to say a few more words on the subject.
To people who care about what's happening to
Canadian workers, the general importance of the story is
obvious. But it does have a specific application to the
student condition, because students can increasingly
look forward to becoming workers rather than
managerial personnel.
As always, this didn't just happen in some magical
way.
A University of Toronto Communist Club
publication, Campus Politics — Class Politics, gives this
explanation:
". . . economies based on raw material extraction
characteristically require far fewer trained personnel
than do economies in which manufacturing and
processing industries play the dominant role. To put it
bluntly, you don't need college degrees to be hewers of
wood and drawers of water."
Hence, we are now finding that Canadian
universities are experiencing a net drop in enrolment as
the message at long last comes home that, courtesy of
U.S. imperialism, a university degree in Canada ain't
what it's cracked up to be.
Two points emerge:
First, Canadian students must begin to look
realistically at their altered class interests.
And second, as future workers we must recognize
that as long as our country's economy is based on
extracting resources for the U.S., the Canadian workers
will always be the first to be hit when the crunch comes
in North America.
Vote Wednesday
Letters
Obsolete
The power-plays in the
departments, and between deans
and students, as they come to
light, make those of us, seemingly
uninvolved with campus politics,
realize that it is just this
politicking that makes school so
rotten this year.
Teachers are either rebelling,
and being made to feel sick into
the bargain, or they are being
yes-men and yes-women afraid to
rock the boat. In the process we,
the students, are the losers. If we
did not pay the dues, if we did
not enrol, you would have to rely
on   your  publications,  on  your
Canada Council grants, and all the
politicking in the world could not
save you from becoming obsolete.
I think students as a body
deserve respect, just as we
students would like to be able to
respect you. We come to this
institution with high expectations,
willing to listen, to read, to work,
to discuss; and we are sickened by
your cynism, your protectionist
attitudes.
We are not revolutionaries,
some of us are not even very
young, but we have expectations
of teachers and these expectations
are not met.
Personality Theory (psych
department) is a case in point. I
FEBRUARY 1, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Page    Friday,    Sports,
Three, count 'em, three throbbed Lesley Krueger as she handed over
Nate Smith and Mike Finlay to the attentions of Kini McDonald and Oaryl
Tan who, clapping lenses on the ankles of Gord Gibson ran yelling his Joly
Jim off to Sandy Kass who was crass and Randy Frith who was miffed
about Sandy Shreve's dandy crawl to Paul Knox. And thus it came about
that David Schmidt happened across Michael Sasges in a compromising
position with a paper clip and Kathy Carney's desk, which made it all the
more interesting when Jan O'Brien and Irving Fetish ran over Kent Spencer
mincing words with Leslie Plommer and Garry Gruenke mincing minces
with Berton Woodward to the croon of the latest Fred Cawsey album, and
all in all, it was all.
am told it has been taught in the
same way for 10 years. This
attitude by a head of department
towards his own institution,
towards the privileged position of
being a teacher, but last and not
least towards the students, is
despicable.
Teachers should be required to
listen to a tape of their lectures, at
least once a year. We are not
interested in WWII reminiscences,
nor in sermonizing about the bad
youth of today. We want to hear
something new, we want to
discuss some real worthwhile
ideas, and we object to having to
regurgitate 'the notes' at exam
time. I do not want to single him
out as the only poor teacher, but
it seems obvious that this attitude
of non-respect and "my way is
right" spills over into his relations
with his department.
The trend around the Lower
Mainland    towards    alternative
New art
I was dumbfounded Monday
morning at the truly high quality
and taste of the new art readily
visible around the campus.
I sincerely trust, in the
interests of the cultural
advancement of the human race,
that the superb intelligence of
those responsible for the TP-ing of
assorted UBC trees and bushes
will be promptly recognized by a
swift promotion to grade one.
Gail Jackson,
Science 1
education, now that degrees begin
to mean less and less, should make
the powers that be at UBC realize
that they too could become
obsolete before too long.
In my four years at this
institution I have had only four
good teachers.
Name Withheld,
Arts 4
Sculpture
It is gratifying to see that the
oft-maligned men of Buildings and
Grounds have at last come up
with a meaningful contribution to
the campus.
I refer to their free-form ice
sculpture in front of the library.
Who but B&G would have had the
imagination to create such an
ever-changing masterpiece just by
leaving the library fountain turned
on in below-freezing
temperatures.
As an added attraction, the
subsequent overflow of the pool
has produced a sheet of ice
suitable for skating or perhaps
curling. I am disappointed that no
innovators have taken advantage
of this.
Also, the flowing water ensures
an open area in the pond suitable
for that favorite pastime of
certain groups on campus. They
may now throw people into the
pond regardless of the weather. I
say hats off to B&G for its
foresight and imagination.
Jon Nightingale,
Science 4
Report
The paper's reporting gets
shittier week by week.
An article in The Ubyssey of
Jan. 24 stated that 100 people
attended a Progressive
Conservative Student Federation
meeting in the SUB art gallery to
hear provincial PC leader Derril
Warren.
Why you would send a reporter
both deaf and blind confounds
me.
To set the record straight: The
meeting was held in the SUB
party room, not the art gallery;
there were at least 140 people in
attendance; Warren never said
"the NDP doesn't know what it
stands for," and all remaining
quotes were pulled out of
context.
This reporting can only be
compared with that of the
Vancouver Sun. This is a great
example of either poor or slanted
reporting — which the university
can well do without.
Gordon Sim,
Arts 2
You're right - we did goof by
saying the meeting was in the art
gallery.
But as for what Derril Warren
actually said, we think our
reporter did an adequate job of
setting down the essence of
Warren's comments within the
limitations of newspaper space.
You might be interested to
know that we contacted Warren
and he didn't have any
complaints. yBtJi^*
i
1111111111111111111
PIT
-a bigger, more comfortable pit area,
-draft beer facilities built in for future
license,
-carpeted,   intimate   area   for   lounging
when not in use as a pit.
-raised   area   for   stage   for   noon  hour
events and concerts.
111 111 111111111 1111111
2
22222222222222
COFFEE    SHOP
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
CM
— kitchen facility to serve fast food and
light meals to both pit and coffee shop.
— coffee  shop to be open at all  times
building is open.
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
IO
ro
io
io
io
io
io
io
222222222222222222
3
33333333333333
BOOKSTORE
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
— a    permanent    home   for   the   Co-op
Bookstore.
— better  facilities   area for the  outdoor
clubs.
— service-revenue area.
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
4
44444444444444
LOUNGE
— better, more comfortable lounge area.
— less   traffic   through   conversation   pit
area.
ai en.
— better setup and increased seating for
the listening lounge.
3333 3333 33 33 33 33 33
444 444444444 444444
•Pt
•pt
■P»
■F*
-P*
£>
■Ft
5
555 555555 555 555 555 555 555 555 555555555
OTHERS
— reading room facilities.
— expanded cafeteria if students take over food services.
— late night space.
cn
en
cn
cn
cn
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555 555 555 555 555 555 555 555555 555 555 555 555
WM W@)M@)MM<&W
Advertisement VOTE
PRIORITIES
SUB   PIT
LOUNGE   SPACE
FOOD SERVICE
IMIGHT USE SPACE
LISTENING ROOM
READING ROOMS
OUT DOOR   CLUBS
OFFICES
SERVICE   REVENUE
NO CHANCE  STILL $15.00
Advertisement REFERENDUM
TOMORROW
Advertisement o^
Advertisement Tuesday,  February  1,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Candidates7 statements
flEfcMM^CsSaffl^^MfeaBl mn>    write    "Young    Socialist"    "Come and join the Nazi Party."        IbaA^PAMIHSb^mI
WrW wSPIVICrHT across the ballot. Let's defend free        As secretary, I should like to        M WW9W HOI
Affairs
Doug
Aldridge
You are being asked to make a
choice on Wednesday. A choice
between a slate which uses a
"demand-pressure" approach to
campus problems, and a slate
which wishes to replace the
"demand" by "request" and the
"pressure" by "co-operation."
I will continue to work to
improve the quality of student
services on campus. The
groundwork has already been laid
for improving SUB and the food
services in SUB. The next target is
the bookstore, which can only be
improved with the help of the
administration.
I will try to ensure that the
first priority for funding AMS
programs will be the number of
students involved in those
programs, not the political
preference of the executive.
In short, we can't change the
world in one year but I believe we
can make substantial
improvements on our campus.
Joan
Campana
The key issue in this election is
the banning of the Young
Socialist slate.
The use of a totally
undemocratic constitutional
clause to bar us is scandalous, on
par with the administration's
arbitrary moves against
non-tenured faculty. Other
candidates, both Human
Government and Student
Coalition, have agreed the clause
is undemocratic. They want to
eliminate it. Yet their people in
the eligibility committee have
upheld it. Our names will not be
on the ballot. These students are
not fit to represent us.
We feel it is every student's
right to contest the election. We
oppose it going ahead with any
viewpoint excluded. We urge all
students to sign the petition to
eliminate the clause, and, in
protest against the exclusion,
write the words "Young Socialist"
across your ballot. If you agree
with any part of our program, this
is your chance to indicate it. If
you don't agree with our program,
but feel we should be allowed to
run, write "Young Socialist"
across the ballot. Let's defend free
and open elections on our
campus!
Fred
Ferdman
Canada is dominated
economically, politically and
culturally by U.S. imperialism.
Bennett sells out one resource
of this province after another. So
no fundamental problem can be
solved without first solving the
question of U.S. domination. The
AMS must take a stand against the
U.S. domination of Canada!
The National Petition for a
People's Canada gives concrete
steps to oppose U.S. domination
and should be supported!
Defend the democratic and
political rights of Canadian and
foreign students! Arbitrary rules
and regulations have been used
against the students. For example,
I was arrested and arbitrarily
labelled a "trespasser" for
distributing Student Front at
Totem Park residence. I was
convicted and now face political
deportation.
Reinstate and support the
Academic  Activities Committee!
Oppose the mercenary
bureaucrats! These hacks are only
interested in building their careers
by using the students as stepping
stones. They inevitably serve the
interests of the administration and
the large U.S. corporations that
dominate Canada. Therefore: no
fee increase; break the SUB
contract; voluntary AMS.
Vote for Fred Ferdman —
fighter for the people.
Sally
Clark
I am pleased to be running for
secretary on the Student Coalition
slate.
I should like to outline some of
our policies.
Firstly, there should be more
communication between the
students and the student council.
It is important for students to
know exactly who are the authors
of such classic phrases as: "Don't
be   stupid,   be   a   smarty,"  and
PROBATION
OFFICER
has a tough, challenging but rewarding career. He works
with the courts, with the offender and with the community
to help solve one of society's major social problems —
crime.
If you think you could measure up for training with the
B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for more details.
"Come and join the Nazi Party."
As secretary, I should like to
write a weekly column describing
the entertaining aspects. I will try
to make it as unbiased as possible
and not a propaganda column of
the Raging Rightists versus the
Pinko Commie Paper Tigers. I
should also like to rotate the
council meetings, visiting a faculty
or residence once every two
weeks.
Elections are in need of
reform. At present there are three
people manning a poll and ballots
can be easily lost. We propose to
use tickertape machines requiring
only one person to control the
poll.
A voter need only press Yes or
No. And for those of you who
like to spoil your ballots, why, we
might even have a Spoils button.
It is only through working
together that we can achieve our
aims. We trust you'll use your
voting power to its fullest extent.
Vote Student Coalition.
Andrew
Pavey
The Young Socialist slate
offers UBC an alternative to the.
gutless and demoralizing
vacillations of previous student
governments.
Armed with a program
revolving around key issues, we
envisage a strong student
movement capable not only of
solving on-campus disputes, but of
exploding the myth that the
university is an ivory tower cut
off from the larger problems of
society. One of these, too often
ignored, is Canada's tie to the war
economy, especially through the
Vietnam war. We suffer from it! -
from the inflation and the
incredible drain of capital (one
million dollars daily) into the U.S.
war machine.
This capital could alleviate the
economic crisis felt by our
universities — good teachers could
be hired, new courses instigated,
war research turned to saner
priorities, etc.
The Amchitka upsurge was just
a beginning of students
responding to these issues. Young
Socialists will not substitute for
your actions. We all must tackle
the causes of our problems on
campus, not their symptoms.
Write in Young Socialist!
Elizabeth
Davies
Even if a woman makes it into
university after 18 years of social
conditioning, her chances of
getting a decent job are appalling.
Only one-third of .Canadian
women receive university
education; only 20 per cent of
these go on to graduate studies.
Women everywhere are faced with
the insufferable problem of a
secondary role in the existing
society. We, the Young Socialists,
feel it is imperative to change the
negative attitudes of society
towards women. We are becoming
more aware of our rights and are
beginning to seize them.
The women's studies group is a
beginning, but we must go farther.
We need repeal of the existing
abortion laws especially — control
To page 8: AMS
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOR!
Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We
will finish:
• One 8" x  10" portrait in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One 8" x  10" portrait in
natural color (group)
$24.95
Ask about our special
reduced prices on additional
portraits ordered at the same
time.
• Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
«?
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.*
736-0261
 HELD OVER	
THE
BIRTHDAY
PARTY
by Harold Pinter
January 31-February 4
TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR
FRIDAY, FEB. 4,8:00 P.M.
Box Office Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
 HELD OVER	
REGULAR WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT I.H.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Every Wednesday at I.H.
8 p.m. in Lower Lounge
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE DANCE
Thin Red Line band
$2.00 ($1.75 for members of I.H.)
Friday, Feb. 4th—9 p.m.-1 a.m.
I.S.P.C. MEETING
Every Tuesday at 12:30 — Rm. 400
*v/ \       _
lnternatlonal=Between Nations
REIFEL BIRD SANCTUARY TRIP February 6th (Weather permitting)
MID-TERM BREAK TRIPS
SKI TRIP TO HOLLYBURN MOUNTAIN
WEEKEND IN VICTORIA
SIGN UP NOW FOR THESE TRIPS!
TRY OUR HOME-MADE SOUP AND SANDWICH BAR
DO SOMETHING
FOR SOMEONE
UBC BLOOD DRIVE - BROCK HALL
TODAY - to FRI., FEB. 4
9:30 - 4:30 p.m. Continuous Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   1,   1972
Hot flashes
AUCM talk
on Jesus
Vince Goring, who has spent
nine years working with student
groups ;n Japan, will speak on the
radicalism of jesus at 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, :n the Lutheran
Campus Centre.
He will speaK on student
movements in Japan Thursday
noon m the SuB student council
chamDers.
The UBC Anglican-United
campus ministrv s sponsoring the
talks.
Women on tape
A tape documentary on the
history ot B.C jvomen in politics
since ihe 1920 s /vill be presented
Friday noon in SUB 205.
CBC freelancer Vera
Rosenbluth says the documentary
was put together through
interviews with the women and
througn newspaper clippings.
The women s studies program
is sponsoring the event.
Brock bleed
The Red Cross is sponsoring a
blood donor clinic this week in
the Brock Hall lounge.
The clinic will be open from
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
Third crossing     federal coffee
rhe first of two discussions on
the oroposed Burrard Inlet third
crossing will be held at Thursday
noon ,n Angus 110.
Alma Mater Society special
events committee and the
Environmental Crisis Operation
are the sponsors of the meeting
wnich will feature a talk between
Frank Leighton, planning
vice-president for Swan-Wooster
Ltd. and ' Norman Pearson,
assistant director of the Lower
Mainland Regional Planning
Board.
Swan-Wooster originated the
proposal being considered by
Vancouver city council.
A second meeting, the date to
be announced later, will feature a
discussion of the politics of the
crossing.
Vancouver talk
Vancouver's Re-development -
On Whose Terms? will be the
topic of discussion at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, in the Vancouver
main library auditorium, Burrard
and Robson.
Speakers will be Aid. Hugh
Bird, W. E. Graham, city planning
department director, and UBC
professor Robert Collier at the
discussion, sponsored by the
Citizen's Council for Civic
Development.
A Vancouver coffee house has
been set up with the help of a
federal government grant.
The coffee house, called Pulse,
is located at 525 East Forty-ninth
Avenue, and is open every day
except Monday from 3:30 p.m. to
11:30 p.m.
It will feature local nightly
entertainment.
Included with the coffee house
is a program of creative arts which
is free to the participants who
must supply the materials.
More information is available
from project co-ordinator Dave
Hull at 324-2513.
Troupe tirst
Troupe, a theatrical company
subsidized by the Canada Winter
Works program, will present its
first production at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday in the Intermedia Hall,
First and Semlin.
The play, titled Easter Mike
and His Wife, Agiluk, by
Vancouver playwright Herschel
Hardin, will run nightly until Feb.
13.
For further information,
contact Robert Graham, at
733-8983.
'Tween classes
TODAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Sallye    Davis   —    Angela's   mother
speaks     in     ner     behalf     in     SUB
auditorium at noon.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Film on Pain and its Alleviation in
Wesbrook 201 at noon.
MEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Meeting in SUB council chambers at
noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Singing    practice    at    noon    in   St.
Mark's music room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
What   is   Wrong   with   our   Student
Governments,  in SUB 111 at noon.
HILLEL
Bet  Cate,  hot lunches 12 p.m. to 2
p.m. at Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
GAY PEOPLES ALLIANCE
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
224.
ZOOLOGY
Seventh presentation of Noon Hour
Travels      with      Zoologists      in
Bio-science      2000      at      noon;
Mountains,  Maorles and  Manapouri
— Whither New Zealand?
VOC
General   meeting   at   noon   in  Ang.
104.
UBC TAEKWON-OO CLUB
-   Practice    and    new   members   class
begins 4:30 ■ 6 p.m. in Place Vanier
ballroom.
ITALIAN CLUB
Meeting at noon in IH stage.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian   poet Bill Bissett reads in
SUB art gallery at noon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Vince    Goring    on    Radicalism    of
Jesus   at   7   p.m.   in   the   Lutheran
campus centre.
ONTOLOGY
Sex — the one law at noon in Buch.
216.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Penny Ziegler will speak in the SUB
clubs lounge at noon on the recent
New    York    injunction    preventing
women from getting abortions.
HILLEL
Zoology prof H. E. Kasinsky will
speak on Science and Its Social
Impact at noon in Hillel House.
THURSDAY
UBC WARGAMERS
Three game extravaganza every
Thursday at noon in SUB 119.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting at 8 p.m. in Kingston
Hotel.
UBC BICYCLE CLUB
Meeting  about trip to Gulf  Islands
•  at noon in SUB 215.
CCF
Meaning of Life in University by Dr.
Rennie at noon in SUB ballroom.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Discussion of third crossing with
Frank Leighton of Swan Wooster
Engineering   and   Norman   Pearson,
planning consultant at noon in Ang.
110.
NDP CLUB
Project   meeting   at   noon   in   SUB
130.
LIBERALS
General   meeting   at   noon   in SUB
115.
ANTI-WAR CLUB
Barry     Weisberg     will     speak     on
Nixon's   at   2:30   p.m.  in  the  SUB
auditorium.
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Student    movements    in    Japan   at
noon in SUB council chambers.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Coffee  in the orange room of New
Arts I  bldg. from  7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
cvc
Dance with Ram, full facilities, 8:30
p.m. - 1 a.m. in SUB ballroom.
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
SUMMER COURSES
in NICE, FRANCE
In addition to the regular Summer Session, the University of Toronto is
offering Degree Courses in Nice, July 6-August 18. Credit courses in
English, Fine Art, French, History and Political Economy will be given
by professors from the Universities of Toronto and Nice. Classes will be
held    each   weekday   at   the   Faculte   des   Lettres   and   the   Ecole
internationale d'Art de Nice.
Accommodation   will   be   provided   in   university   residences,  private
homes, and pensions.
Cost?  Approximately $750.00  (includes round  trip,  tuition for one
course, room and board).
Further information:
TORONTO-NICE SUMMER PROGRAMME
Division of University Extension
119 St. George Street, Toronto 181, Ontario
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Disco Office Equipment
Pick Up & Delivery
253-2513
1928 Commercial Dr.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
THIN
RED
LINE
FRI. FEB. 4
AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
9 p.m. to 1  a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Campus — 3 Utmt, 1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
C«tnm«rckii - 3 lines,  1   day $1.25;  additional
Biro 30cj 4 days pries of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline in 11:30 m.m., the day before publication.
Publications OSiee, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dan c*t
11
DANCE TO CARIB 71. SAT.. FEB.
5, 9-1, Grad Student Centre.
Tickets $1.00 each at the centre
office, everyone welcome!	
HAVE PUN WITH THE OPPOSITE
sex! DANCE with SPIRIT! RAM
—IN SUB ballroom, Feb. 5th.
Greetings
12
RICK: IF YOU STAND ME UP
one more time, you can forget
everything!    Sally   B.
Lost & Found
13
LOST THURSDAY NOON IN BTJ-
chanan. One brown leather shoulder strap purse, phone Eileen 261-
5226,   reward   offered.	
PERSON WHO RIPPED OFF
brown bag, B-lot, Jan. 24th, please
return even just notes, reward,
277-4284.	
FOUND: 35 mm. CAMERA ON MA-
rine Drive, claim by identification,
266-9846.
Special Notices
15
BIG BLOCK SUDS NITE MON.
Jan. 31st 8 p.m., in SUB. Varsity
& Big Block.  Members welcome.
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,  B.C.
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent furnished condominium op-
posite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE SKI
trip, Feb. 12-15. $30 includes ac-
comm., food & tows. Sign up at
I.H.	
AN EXPERIENCE IN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
Travel Opportunities
16
SPRING QUARTER, SUMMER
Session, or Junior Year in Mexico?
Write Dr. H. B. Benedict PNW
Rep University of the Americas
3253 Robertson, Bellinghajn, Wash.
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment services etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St, Ventor
T.W.,   England.	
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
budget? Then visit your youth
hostels information desk which is
open every Wednesday from 12:30-
1:30 p.m. opposite the concession
stand in the Student Union Building. Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9, B.C., Phone 738-3128.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'62 FORD ECONOLINE WINDOW
van. Has rebuilt motor, new
brakes, good rubber. Phone Ron,
522-5527.	
'60 RAMBLER AMER. STAND. 6,
4 dr. Good cond. 1 owner, reg.
gas gives good mil. Good rubber,
snows, city tested. '73. Conv. to
bed, extras $400.  266-2446.	
1959 PONTIAC PARISIENNE V-8
P.B., P.S., radio, etc., $225,00 or
offers, all accessories, phone Jack
732-8536. 	
Automobiles—Parts
23
WRECKING 1954 MORRIS MINOR
1000. Take any part you need,
very   cheap   price,   Jack   732-8536.
Auto Repairs
24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Duplicating 8c Copying
33
BOYS' CLUB WOULD LIKE INFO
about young or starting band,
which would be willing to play for
small  remuneration,  leave  No.   at
228-4557.
Photography
SB
tile Hen* anb gutter
^i,i, j       Cameras
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto at Denman  Place
"At last we are able
to recommend a moderately priced zoom lens
in this range which has passed
our optical test with flying corrected colors . . . Certainly
among the medium priced zoom
lenses the LENTAR must be
classed as a best, buy."
—February Modern Photography
LENTAR    ZOOM     LENS r SIM).95
80-200  mm  f3.5 103
Scandals
37
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.	
SALLY B. GIVE ME ONE MORE
chance! Next time I'll be sure
you get my note, I'll leave it in
the Drop-a-note next to the black-
board  in  SUB.   Love Rick.	
START YOUR OWN SCANDAL,
have a ball. Ram in ballroom, Feb.
5.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates. Phone 263-5317.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick ser-
vice  on   short essays.	
HOME TYPING, EXPERT WORK.
All theses, reports, essays. Quick
service,   call   Dari,    738-6498.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
41
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — —
Agricultural Field — Niagara
Chemicals — For interviews call
Peter Waterman collect 763-2904
before Feb. 14.
PART TIME TYPIST FOR W.
Bdwy. Law Office. Must be accurate. Evenings & weekends,
Call Kathy 9-10 a.m. at 738-6345.
"GUARANTEED SUMMER JOBS
in Europe for students. Program
fee, including reception and orientation $99.00. Jobs in several
categories all over Europe. Openings now. Send $1.00 for application forms and details to Dr.
F.V. Tonge, French Dept., Queen's
University,   Kingston,   Ont."
INSTRUCTION 8t SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT A COURSE?
The U.B.C. Tutoring Centre reopens Monday, Jan. 31, SUB 228,
12:30-2:30 Tutoring available in
almost every subject.
Tutors—Wanted 64
MXPHRIENCiD, CHINESE-
speaking lady to teach couple beginner's English, Mon.-Fri. 8:00-
10:00  p.m.   Good  hourly pay.   Tel.
688-3312.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
TI
MUST SELL — 190 CM OLYMPIC
skiis — brand new, $30. Call 596-
0680.
ROSIGNOL STRATO 190 CM MAR-
ker rotomat bindings $75. Hes-
ehung boots ($185 new, used twice)
size 6 narrow $145. Joan 926-4789.
ROBERTS STEREO CASSETTE
recorder system, one year old,
good condition with speakers,
mikes, $135. Phone 224-9065 ask
for G.  Ratzlaff.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
SI
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM, QUIET,
comfortable. Private entr., neear
gates—ready      now—no      cooking.
224-7623.
BED-SITTING ROOM ON CAMPUS
furnihed, frig., hot plate, sep. entrance.   Share  bath,  $60 mo.   Call
224-3440.   .         	
QUIET PRIVATE ROOM IN UP-
stairs of home. House privileges.
Dunbar.   Phone   224-6129.
Room fc Board
82
IT'S NEW—STAY AT THE D.K.E.
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.,
224-9691.
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share house with five others. 20th
and Arbutus.  738-3815, $75 month.
Furnished Apts.
83
COMFORTABLE BASEMENT
suite, 2 bedrooms, newly constructed. Near university. Very reasonable.  263-8441
Unfurnished Apts.
84
DUPLEX FURNISHED 10th &
Alma. 2 bedrooms, living room,
kitchen. Fridge, stove, heat included. 2-3 students or couple. Tel.
732-6449   evenings.   $170/month.
Halls For Rent
85
FOR    YOUR    CATERING    NEEDS
phone  THE  NORMANDY
738-7231 or 738-1110
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.       86 Tuesday,  February  1,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Volleyball
women win
The Thunderette volleyball
team has regained the sports
spotlight at UBC as they returned
victoriously from the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate
tournament in Edmonton.
Playing 21 games in one day as
the result of their late arrival due
to the airline strike, the
Thunderettes proved they will be
the team to beat when they host
the second round of tournament
FAYE HUDSON
. .. playing or praying?
here at UBC on Feb. 18 and 19.
The women defeated the
Universities of Alberta, Victoria
and Lethbridge and lost to
Calgary in round robin play
advancing to the finals against
Calgary.
The best three-out-of-five final
went to five full games to decide
the winner. UBC won the first
game 15-12, lost the next two,
11-15  and 6-15, but came back
CATHY TUPPER
. . . will she reach it?
and took the last two  15-8 and
15-12.
With Calgary, Edmonton and
UBC battling for top honours, the
February tournament should
provide good women's collegiate
volleyball action. The top two
teams in overall standing will then
proceed to the WCIAA finals
against the top teams from the
Saskatchewan and Manitoba
league.
Soccer 'Birds upset
After a winter's layoff of two
months the UBC Thunderbird
soccer team met Pauls of the
Pacific Coast Soccer League on
the astro-turf of Empire Stadium
Sunday.
The game was scoreless for the
first 70 minutes, UBC goalkeeper
Greg Webber managing to keep
the ball out of the net. The 'Bird
defence was sloppy clearing the
ball from in front of their net and
it was only a matter of time
before the inevitable happened.
Two goals scored by Harold
Hansen and Ronnie MacDonald in
the last 20 minutes gave Pauls the
win.
The next 'Bird game will be on
Sunday at 2 p.m. at Empire
Stadium.
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
PHOENIX 72
presents
The First Student
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
ART SHOW
IN
THE SUB GALLERY
Feb. 1 to 4th
4397 W. 10th                       224-0034
11:30 to 5:30 Daily
PHOENIX 72   presents
A Night at the Ponderosa
Only Advance Tickets                        Wed.   Feb.  2
50c in SUB Concourse                                  8-00-1 -00
REFRESHMENTS-3/$1
There's Something for Everyone
All Star Entertainment — Games — Films
And More
Hoop 'Birds
barely win
The UBC Thunderbird
basketball team underestimated
the University of Victoria Vikings
Saturday night and narrowly
squeaked out a 71-70 victory.
The 'Birds had managed a
relatively easy victory (75-63)
Friday night over the Vikings in
their first game in 12 days.
Saturday, it was a different
story.
Victoria outgunned the 'Birds
to a 35-29 half-time lead and
looked forward to their first win
over the slumping UBC team.
The 'Birds rallied, with Jack
Hoy dropping two foul shots in
the last minute to put the 'Birds
out front 71-68. Victoria scored
with six seconds remaining to pull
within one point' but UBC hung
on for the win.
Thunderettes
suffer loss
The UBC women's basketball
team has lost their first collegiate
league game of the season.
Saturday the University of
Victoria launched a strong second
half attack and held on to beat
UBC 56-50.
UBC led 34-30 at the half, but
were unable to contain the
Victoria team. This came in
contrast to Friday's game, which
saw the Thunderettes lead 21-17
at the half, and 54^12 at the end.
In that game, Terri McGovern
and Debbie Phelan of UBC lead
the team with 12 points each.
Victoria's Lorna McHattie topped
all scorers with 16 points.
Victoria clinched second place
in the Western division of the
Collegiate League, with a 9-3
record, which UBC still leads with
a 7-1 record.
Sunday the Thunderettes
returned to City League play and
stomped Seattle's Sandpipers
48-42 behind the 14 point
performance of McGovern. They
are now 11 and 1 in City League
play.
Intramurals
UNIT MANAGERS: Don't
forget the important meeting
tonight at 7 p.m. in the SUB
council chambers. Discussion will
involve the elections and the
Awards Banquet.
GRADS!
FREE
4X5 Color Portrait
Moke your appointment now
and avoid the big rush
CANDID STUDIOS
3343 West Broadway — 732-7446
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
GET OUT AND VOTE!
There will be elections for the following positions
tomorrow, Feb. 2, 1972.
AMS PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
At the same time, students will be asked to vote on two
referendums, one on S.U.B. Expansion and one on Food
Services.
Polls will be open as follows:
Tomorrow 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Angus               MacMillan SUB South
Buchanan         Main Library SUB North
Civil Sedgewick Library Woodward Library
Law
Advance Polls Are Open Today—
J 1:30-3:30 p.m.
SUB
Education
Cafeteria (old auditorium)
Gym (War Memorial)
. . . and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.:
Fort Camp    Place Vanier     Totem Park
Take an interest
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL
STARTING THURSDAY
MUSSOC PRESENTS
Live on Stage I
Tiddler
ontheRpof
February 3rd-12th—8:30 p.m.
OLD AUDITORIUM
If
Tickets $2.50, $3.00
at Vancouver Ticket Centre and Outlets
Special Student Rates: $1.50
February 7 & 8 and
Matinee Thursday February 10th — 12:30
Tickets available Main Floor of S.U.B. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 1, 1972
From page 5
of our bodies means the beginning
of control of our lives. We must
fight the present vicious attack on
women's right to legal abortion,
and go on to tackle questions of
day care, equal pay with men, etc.
Only when united can we make
effective change!
Give yourself a chance; write in
Young Socialist!
Lynne
Phillips
There are basically five major
projects which I wish to promote.
The proposed UBC Day Care
Centre is an essential development
for this campus; it will be
beneficial to students, faculty and
staff members. I would like to
continue in its organization by
assisting in the allocation of
money and general co-ordination
of the program.
As they will both be under my
jurisdiction, Open House which
happens again next year and the
high school visitations program
are two important functions
which I plan to work on.
I feel it would be a great asset
to the university curriculum to
have the current women's studies
program accredited. With the fact
in mind that the existing course
would necessarily be revised, it
could conceivably become an area
where important research on the
status of women could be
undertaken.
Lastly, I would like to
co-operate with the committee
which plans to actively study
women on this campus. A study
of the kind has long been needed
to investigate exactly what does
happen to women at UBC.
Svend
Robinson
Garth
Sundeen
Penny
Newman
Keith
Richardson
Human Government candidates
Svend, Penny, Garth and Keith
have decided to write a collective
statement on what they see as the
issues in the upcoming election.
Svend has been a science rep
on council for the past two years,
a member of SUB management
committee, and has worked as
deputy co-ordinator of activities
and assistant external affairs
officer. All four have energy,
enthusiasm and willingness to
work their asses off if elected to
make the AMS more relevant to
all students on this campus.
•
Running as Human
Government is our expression of
if   !3AJ
—kini mcdonald photo
WHILE UBC PIGEONS and seagulls have cleanest assholes in town,
it's clear that engineers are biggest assholes, muses student walking
under toilet paper-laden trees. T.P. trick marks engineering week start.
continuing faith in the system of
change initiated last year. As a
new slate, aligning ourselves with
the old, we must critically present
our particular potential not only
as new individuals but also in
opposition to the Student
Coalition.
While the latter consideration
is of immediate concern regarding
tomorrow's election, we can only
declare the bankruptcy of their
collective platform and assert our
own ideas.
The time has again come for
human government. The time has
come for students to throw out
the  worn-out Student Coalition.
Why Human Government? The
reasons are many — just look
around the campus, in your
classroom, in the bookstore, in
the closed-door senior faculty and
administration meetings.
"You have no rights. You have
no voice. Change is not up to
you," echoes from an academic
pedestal high in the sky. But we
do have rights, we do have a voice
and we will speak loudly and
clearly. It is up to us to bring
about change.
Human Government,
ultimately, is only as strong as the
students that support it. We
believe that the time has come for
fundamental changes for a human
university and we ask for your
support tomorrow.
External
Affairs
Teri Ball
As well as being the
undergrad Aggie rep to the AMS
council, I have been working with
Adrian Belshaw, the present
external affairs officer, on the
University Endowment Lands
Committee.
It is in this area that my
primary interest lies as a
candidate. Closely associated with
the Endowment Lands program
are Opportunities For Youth,
rapid transit for Vancouver, and
the development of a
student-controlled housing
complex and community on the
UBC campus.
These projects would be
benefitted by having students sit
on all university planning
committees. An increase in
conference grants will permit the
exchange of ideas between our
university and others in Canada.
Other areas which I plan to
study include a campus-wide
course evaluation program, and
the acquiring of a broadcasting
licence for CYVR. I feel it is
extremely important for students
to become involved in the
workings of the university, and to
realize that a world exists beyond
Blanca.
Dan K.
McLeod
One of our main points is
student-faculty control.
What does that mean?
Basically, we do not now have any
meaningful control over our lives
on campus. An aging group of
"outside agitators", businessmen
on the board of governors, make
most of the key decisions: What
we learn, how we learn it, who
teaches us. This must stop.
The university must become a
place where learning is
meaningful, taking on social issues
like unemployment, pollution,
women's rights, etc. Our
alienation and apathy is enforced
by the present structures.
Learning must become action —
the university must become an
organizing centre for social
change.
Allied with junior faculty who
now have few rights, as the
administration is making clear, we
must take control of our lives on
campus. Write-in Young Socialist.
End personality contest and
play-pen politics at UBC.
STUDENT
FOOD!
On Wednesday, Feb. 2nd you will
be asked to approve in principle
student control of Food Services
in SUB.
THIS DOES NOT MEAN
PURCHASE AT THIS TIME
What it does do is allow Council to negotiate with the
administration for some form of control. If the only
way to gain control over prices and quality is to buy the
operation, then you will be asked later to approve the
purchase price.
We Must Start Now
If there is to be a marked improvement in food by next year, we
must negotiate now!
Vote Yes
on Food Services
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
The following referendums will be voted on in conjunction with
the SECOND SLATE of AMS elections, on WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 9, 1972.
7.    Fee Referendum
Whereas the AMS fee is currently divided into a
non-discretionary $15.00 Building Fee and $9.00 Student
Activity Operating Fund levy;
and whereas the Student Council of the AMS recommends
an increase of the Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
ARE you in favour of increasing the Operating Fund levy
from $9.00 to $14.00?
2.    Constitutional Amendment
Referendum
Whereas the Student Council has recommended that certain
procedural sections of the Alma Mater Society By-Laws be
removed and placed into the Alma Mater Society Code:
ARE you in favour of the following sections being removed
from the By-Laws and placed into the Code?
By-Law 4 (2), a section dealing with the appointment of
honorary members of Student Council;
By-Law 4 (4), a section dealing with the appointment of
an Honorary President and his/her duties;
By-Law 10 (2) to 10 (7) and that is sections dealing
with the procedure for the levying of a fee upon each
member of an undergraduate society;
By-Law 11 (9) and 11 (10), that is sections dealing with
the procedure by which the Alma Mater Society Budget
shall be accepted and by which the A.M.S. Treasurer
shall deal with fees levied by Undergraduate Societies
upon their members;
By-Law 12 (1) to 12 (3), that is sections dealing with
prohibition of gambling, the drinking of intoxicating
liquors and the approval of advertising and distribution
of materials on campus.
By-Law 14, that is a By-Law setting out the procedure
for dealing with subsidiary clubs and organizations;
And all other changes necessarily incidental to the
foregoing amendments.
Read and consider
the above referendums!

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