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The Ubyssey Mar 15, 1983

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Array Multiple scandals sock filmsoc
By CARY RODIN
The UBC film society executive is
under attack from within as it struggles to maintain control of the
conflict-ridden club.
The club has split into two factions, one led by the five executives
(known as "big soc") and newer
members.
The division is destroying the
club, says nine-year member Dusan
Milatovic.
The conflict centres on several
issues:
• The executive is trying to amend
their constitution to give executive
and projectionists extra votes, in
contravention of Alma Mater
Society rules;
• The executive attempted to
allocate half of next years' production budget to the film Bond, which
is currently being shot;
• The  executive  is  accussed  of
tampering with the club's minutes
and posting them with sexist and
slanderous comments;
• The movie Bond has been called
degrading and discriminatory to
women.
Now the club is without a chair.
In a letter to the filmsoc executive, AMS administration director Alan Pinkney forced Peter
Leung's resignation.
Leung violated AMS By-laws by
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 44
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 15, 1983
228-2301
holding an executive position
without being a member of the
AMS. Leung has not enrolled at
UBC since April, 1982.
Leung misled society members by
claiming he was a student, said club
member Paul Guenette.
"When Leung realized he wasn't
going to register he should have
dropped his position," said
Milatovic, who admits knowing
Leung wasn't a student from the
start.
"Most of the executive knew I
wasn't a student," said Leung.
This has outraged many society
members. Leung was the writer and
producer behind filmsoc's controversial $3,300 movie production,
Bond.
Some club members are offended
by Bond and refuse to work on the
film. This leaves them with very few
options, said Guenette.
"Bond has no roles for women.
The only parts for women are as
whores and decorative objects,"
said club member Cathy Ord.
The Ubyssey obtained copies of
filmsoc's minutes that support
allegations of discrimination
against women in the club.
"Whitless Eric W. seconded this
incestuous motion by giving all the
females present a free lick between
the...uh.. .legs. Of course, strangely
enough, nobody really objected to
such a tasteless., or was it
tastey?...act," states the Feb. 11
club minutes.
The minutes are written by society secretary Tong Lung.
Filmsoc is operating under three
See page 3: BIG SOC
Feds create
summer jobs
— craig brooks photo
SPRING IS DEMONSTRATION time as latest protest against Red Hot Video took place Saturday. Protestors
are concerned about sexually explicit video tapes depicting violence against women. Latest anti-pornography
campaign has started on UBC bookstore, where Playboy and Penthouse magazines are sold as you trip over
them entering store. Information pamphlets on the get-pornography-out-of-the-bookstore campaign are now
being distributed, along with opinion survey.
OTTAWA (CUP) — With Canadian students facing a possible 25
per cent unemployment rate this
summer, the federal government
has decided to improve its job creation program.
Employment minister Lloyd Axworthy has announced summer
job programs will receive $170
million this year, up from $120
million last summer.
Axworthy's department expects
this funding to create 70,000 jobs
and to place another 328,000
students through hire-a-student
centres.
But Bruce Tate, a Canadian
Federation of Students researcher,
claims the program is less impressive than it sounds. He said the
extra 17,000 jobs the federal
government will create this summer
will do little for the more than
250,000 expected unemployed
students. Tate said the program has
been cut in recent years, and this
year's increase will only bring its
Council tries to block Women's issue
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) - The student newspaper at Memorial
University of Newfoundland, the
Muse, blocked a move by the student council president to prevent
the publication of an International
Women's Day edition.
Student council president Ed
Buckingham    told   a   Muse   staff
Protest!
The pickets were back at Red
Hot Video stores throughout
B.C. Saturday.
The largest demonstration
against the sale of what
organizers call hate literature
against women, happened at the
Main street location.
At the outlet, about 150
picketers formed a semi-circle in
front of the store and chanted,
"Red Hot Video, out of our
community," numerous times.
The Little Mountain Anti-
porn Group organized the hour-
long demonstration at the store.
Red Hot Video was recently
charged under the criminal code
for distribution of films which
show explicit scenes of violence
and sex.
The store remained open during the demonstation and Red
Hot employees took pictures of
people protesting.
member March 5 that the paper
would not be allowed to print its
planned special edition three days
later. The council executive endorsed Buckingham's move, although
the matter had not been brought to
council.
Three male presidential candidates had asked Buckingham to
stop the Women's Day issue
because they said the Muse is biased
in favor of women and supported
the only female candidate, Deb
Thiel.
"I don't think the Muse is
capable of putting out an unbiased
issue," said Buckingham.
Council had approved the special
issue March 1. But Buckingham
tried to stop it after the three male
candidates claimed the Muse's
March 4 election issue subtly supported TheH's campaign by allowing her more than the alloted 300
words for her election platform.
"We didn't support anyone's
candidacy in that paper," said
Muse co-editor Anne Evans. "The
extra space Deb Thiel had was
buried in the back of the paper,
which is what we traditionally do to
long platforms."
Co-editor Joan Sullivan was verbally harassed March 4 by one
presidential candidate, Roy
Rowsell, who yelled at her in the
middle of the student centre
cafeteria, calling her a "stupid
fucking bitch."
"I'm going to stop that women's
issue, I'm going to stop it," he said.
Rowsell is head of the student
security force on campus.
Over the March 5-6 weekend,
Buckingham's order to stop the
Women's Day issue was moderated
to first demand a review of the
copy, then to see a list of stories,
then to delay the issue, and finally
to have a written guarantee that no
political material would appear in
it.
The Muse staff rejected each demand.
By the evening of March 6, Buckingham stopped making demands
and agreed to "let" the issue come
out.
At a March 8 council meeting,
councillor Martha Muzychka, who
co-ordinated the women's issue and
moved a motion to reprimand
Buckingham, was accused by one
student of having, along with other
women on staff, a "feminist choke-
hold" on the editorial policy of the
Muse.
Meanwhile, the Muse has asked
university security to investigate the
theft of 1,500 copies of the March 4
election issue.
funding back to 1979 levels, considering inflation.
Last year, 216,000 of the more
than one million high school and
post-secondary students looking for
jobs were unemployed in July.
CFS-Ontario researcher Richard
Balnis predicts about 25 per cent of
students may be unemployed at this
summer's peak.
Tate said the government's
estimate that 328,000 students will
be placed through the more than
400 hire-a-student centres is deceptive because many of the jobs last
only a few days.
The government's claim the program will prepare students for the
job market is ironic, said Tate,
because unemployment and a series
of short-term jobs are indeed
preparation for today's job market.
He added surveys for the student
associations at the University of
Victoria and Queen's University
show 60 to 70 per cent of summer
jobs are unrelated to students' programs or career goals.
Tate said the funding increase
shows the government has recognized how serious youth unemployment has become, but their strategy
will not help most 18 to 24 year-old
unemployed people.
"On the one hand, they're at
least admitting there's a problem,"
said Tate. "On the other hand, one
has to question if this approach is
the answer."
CFS contends the only solution
to decrease summer unemployment
is reduced government military
spending, increased funding to the
more job-intensive social services,
an end to spending restraints and
larger short-term deficits. They
claim this will create jobs and in the
long-run wipe out the federal
deficit.
Liberals limit education funds
OTTAWA (CUP) — Two federal ministers confirmed March 8 the government will limit transfers to
the provinces for post-secondary education to the six
and five formula, but will spare transfers for health
care.
The announcement was widely expected, although
the manner and timing came as a surprise. Finance
minister Marc Lalonde broke the news during the
House of Commons' question period March 8.
Secretary of state Serge Joyal would ordinarily have
made the announcement. Reporters surrounded him in
a scrum outside the Commons after question period,
and Joyal confirmed Lalonde's statement.
Bruce Tate, a Canadian Federation of Students
researcher, said Joyal does not get along with Lalonde
and was apparently angry at him for pre-empting
Joyal's announcement. Tate said officials in Joyal's
department are unsure how the government will cap
education transfers because Lalonde's statement apparently surprised them.
Lalonde told the House that transfers for health care
will not be reduced below increases planned according
to the formula for Established Programs Financing.
But EPF transfers are a lump sum used for both health
care and education, and the federal government cannot currently tell provinces how to allocate that
money.
Joyal said it is up to the provinces to determine
whether cuts will be borne by universities or hospitals.
"They can do whatever they want," he told reporters.
Although the amount of money B.C. will receive
from the federal government will increase, B.C.
universities have been told by the provincial government to expect a zero per cent increase next year. EPF
funds are allocated by the province as they see fit.
Tate said it is unclear how the government will
resolve this apparent contradiction. He said they may
split EPF into health care and education components,
or simply ask the provinces to make the brunt of the
cuts in education. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 15, 1983
Labor faces elimination
Canadian    University     Press
Western Canada's only labor
studies program is scheduled for
elimination this September.
But Capilano College instructors
and outside participants in the program are fighting back. The Labor
Studies program advisory committee, which includes instructors and
unionists, is circulating letters calling for public support.
The college administration claims
the cut is the result of declining
enrolment. Registrar David Wooley
said only 96 students were enrolled
in the program, which has 297
seats.
But program co-ordinator Ed
Lavalle says the program is a cutback victim because it's an easy
target. "We used a lot of people
from outside the college," Lavalle
said. "They can be let go without
notice."
Labor studies instructors are not
the only angry people at Capilano
College. The college faces a 10 per
cent cut in next year's operating
budget, and despite principal Paul
Gallagher's claim Capilano is better
off than other colleges, instructors
are unhappy.
"We are really pissed off," said
English  instructor  Dorothy  Jant-
UVic investigates prof
zen, who claims the humanities
division is facing arbitrary cuts
without input.
Geography and English are slated
to lose six sections each, while
psychology will lose two sections.
Meanwhile, enrolment is expected
to continue its dramatic upward
trend.
PANGO PANGO (UNS)
Thousands of puce blorgs went wild
with excitement today upon the announcement that new editors had
been found for the beloved Island
paper, the Daily Blah. Before the
votes were even counted, the blorgs
knew the Blah would be led to new
hairy heights next year by Moral
Dogma, Bliss Wrong , Paira Cocks.
VICTORIA (CUP) — Public
pressure has finally forced the
University of Victoria administration to investigate the actions of an
economics professor accused of sexually harassing women students.
Economics department chair
Gerry Walter says the senior administration's investigation into
Ezra Mishan is now underway. The
announcement came one week after
the student newspaper, the Martlet,
ran its fourth story on Mishan's
conduct.
Mishan has been the centre of
controversy  since complaints sur-
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Several students who were interviewed by Mishan say the professor
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Last fall the administration instructed Mishan not to use his
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TODAY'S GUEST - DAVE BARRETT Tuesday, March 15, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CFS offers Link to student issues
By GLEN SANFORD
Canadian University Press
Interviewing Phil Link is distressing.
He seems to reflect the doom of post-
secondary education in his worried face and
frantic gestures. He speaks rapidly — like
someone trying to describe the assault on
education before the next cutback announcement comes — and it's hard to take
notes.
But worse, Link has the aura of someone
in the middle of a crisis — even when he's
joking.
Link is Canadian Federation of Students
— Pacific Region executive officer and he's
the ideal candidate for an ulcer.
"I don't know if any of this stuff is
newsworthy," he blurts out after a rapid-
fire list of education budget-cutting
casualties. "I'm just trying to give you the
big picture," he laughs nervously, "—the
grand plot to destroy education as we know
it."
Grand plot to destroy education. Ha ha.
I check the casualty list. Link's "big picture" ties in everything from the elimination of labor studies programs to changes in
student aid.
He talks about budget massacres like the
$20 million that was cut in mid-year from
B.C. universities and colleges, and the "op-
V.
timistic" projection of no increase to the
post-secondary budget next year.
And while entire campuses and programs
are eliminated, more students try to get into
school.
"People are desperate to get any education they can," Link says. "They figure
it's smarter to be learning something than
sitting around on unemployment, even if
they're not going to get a job afterward."
Meanwhile, another summer of high student unemployment and underemployment
is expected. Last summer, at least 20 per
cent of those seeking work could not find
any type of job and Link says this summer
will be worse. The kind of wages being offered are absurd. Every year they're further
eroded by inflation."
A 30 per cent increase in student aid applications is expected next year, but the
government plans to freeze its spending on
financial assistance. Universities minister
Pat McGeer has discussed the possibility of
turning student grants into loans, and of tying financial aid to academic standings.
"It's totally looney," Link sputters.
"The administrative costs of turning grants
into loans will eliminate any savings, and
tying aid to academic standings would be
completely inequitable.
"It's nuts, but they just might do it."
Meanwhile, several B.C. institutions have
imposed enrolment restrictions for next
year while others, such as the University of
Victoria, are raising academic requirements. Not only will there be more
financial barriers to education, admittance
will be tougher.
As Link spits fact after fact, a sly but
somewhat sad grin appears.
"You see, things look really bad."
He's not finished. Phone calls and
visitors to the cramped federation office interrupt his spiel, but he gets back to his point
— government and big business are interfering more and more with the shape of
education.
B.C.'s oldest and largest women studies
program, offered at New Westminster's
Douglas College, was completely axed. The
administration at Capilano College plans to
eliminate Western Canada's only labor
studies program. Meanwhile, the government is pumping funds into the establishment of engineering programs at University
of Victoria and Simon Fraser University.
Vocational training in B.C. was completely revolutionized in January, when the
new training access program was started.
Like the National Training Act, it's an attempt by the B.C. government to slot
students into specific job training based on
forecasts for future need.
Link's head bobs vigorously and he wrings his hands. "You see what I mean,
right? I mean, it's obvious, right? Like,
they're making all these changes and stupid
proposals without getting input from
anyone — it's kind of scary."
So what is Link and the federation doing?
"Well, CFS is a federation, you know.
It's up to the individual campuses to get
stuff going.
"Right now the government is putting up
a lot of trial balloons, and what happens
depends on the kind of activity that takes
place on campuses in the next few weeks. If
there's not a lot of activity, the government
will just continue doing what it's doing.
"I dunno. It's up to students."
Do we need
the CBC ?
Canada needs a strong national
broadcasting company to retain a
sense of national identity, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's
president said Saturday.
"We must ensure Canadian
voices are not artificially stifled by
economic circumstances," Pierre
Juneau told 400 people in IRC 2.
"We can't rely on market forces to
achieve our goals."
The U.S. can rely on market
forces because its population offers
a large economic base for advertisers, said Juneau. Canadian firms
spend only $36 per capita on advertising, compared to the $34 spent by
American firms, he said.
Most countries have a national
broadcasting corporation, said
Juneau, adding that the U.S. is the
exception and not the rule. The
CBC performs a much different
role than the U.S.'s Public Broadcasting System, he said. "PBS is a
showcase for the programs of the
world,"  said  Juneau,  while  the
— cary rodin photo
UBYSSEY STAFF AGAIN show famed fiscal mismanagement by spending thousands of dollars on billboard
campaign throughout city. Signs are attempt by staff to encourage students to have mind warped by traditional
campus rag, rather than new warped paper. Next sequence will say "FRED forgot" after vile rag staff produce
final paper of term. Ad campaign is financed by pay-offs staff receive from Moscow based group, funnelled
through Swiss credit union.
Executive impeached for anti-zionism
OTTAWA (CUP) — The University of Ottawa students' federation
executive has been impeached after
attempting to deny a Jewish student
club access to university facilities.
The Jewish Students' Union circulated a petition in September calling for the executive's impeachment
after the JSU was denied the use of
tables and meeting space in the
university centre. The executive had
passed a motion in July prohibiting
pro-Zionist   groups   from   using
university space after Israel's invasion of Lebanon.
The JSU struck back, with support from the local media and the
university's administration. Ottawa's daily newspaper denounced
the executive's actions as an infringement of freedom of speech.
The administration stepped in to
grant the JSU club status. The executive claimed it had no plans to
deny the JSU club status.
The   JSU  gathered   more  than
1,000 signatures on a petition, forcing the students' federation to call
together a body that had not met in
living memory: the student court.
The court convened Feb. 2, less
than two months before the end of
the executive's term of office. The
executive admitted to spending
thousands of dollars for two of Ottawa's most high-priced lawyers.
The JSU charged the executive
with blocking freedom of political
expression, holding secret meetings
Arts quotas necessary at UoA
EDMONTON (CUP) — The University of Alberta
must impose quotas in the arts faculty to maintain the
quality of education, the arts dean said recently.
"We have to take action. We require some means of
balancing the number of students and the available
facilities," said Terry White.
Quotas are needed to preserve the quality of education students now receive in the light of increasing
enrolment, he said.
"If we face the same kind of increase next year as we
have over the past two years, we will not be able to
cope," White said.
He wants the administration to introduce the
quotas, but said he will impose them himself if
necessary.
Federation of Alberta Students president Don Miller
disagrees with the use of quotas to protect the quality
of education.
"This is a typical trick of the administration. They
try to play off accessibility against quality," he said.
"Rather than working for increased funding the administration is simply saying they will limit admissions.
The issue has nothing to do with academic quality.
Rather it is one of inadequate funding."
to prevent press scrutiny, and abuse
of power.
The impeachment trial, believed
to be the first in Canadian student
history, ran for weeks, attracting
overflow crowds. The 1983-84 election campaign had meanwhile
begun — and two of the candidates,
Antoinette Layoun and Francine
Morel, were both facing impeachment.
The student court announced
March 8 its 4 to 3 vote to impeach
president Chantal Payant and social
activities commissioner James Bar-
dach, who publicly dissociated
themselves from the executive's actions during the controversy. The
vote to impeach academic affairs
commissioner Suzanne Bosse,
finance commissioner Layoun and
representation commissioner Morel
was unanimous.
Only Bardach has said for sure he
will not appeal the decision. Neither
Layoun nor Morel plan to withdraw
from the federation elections.
CBC's goal is to promote Canadian
culture.
"The CBC should be a service offered to the whole public in
Canada," Juneau said. "This
means both hockey and opera. We
must program with all people in
mind."
The CBC imports American programs to help its financial base, said
Juneau. While it costs about $1
million to produce an episode of
Dallas, it costs only $50,000 to buy
the Canadian rights, he said.
Big soc vote Thur.
From page 1
seperate constitutions which
has been the source of over half
their problems, said AMS finance
director James Hollis. Filmsoc has
submitted two constitutions for student administrative commission approval, one from each side of the
conflict.
The executive unsuccessfully por-
posed a weighted voting scheme
where executive members and people who work in the SUB theatre are
awarded points which increase
voting power in the club.
"Movie production is a privilege
earned by working shows which
gives us the money to do production. These people should have
more say in where that money
goes," said Leung.
But the executive wants weighted
voting so they can retain their
power base, said Ord.
"This gives the executive a hell of
a lot of power. We don't want this
to happen, it is not a democratic
way to run a club."
Milatovic agrees it is an
undemocratic process, but he still
supports the weighted voting
system. "Many members resent the
money they produce being parcelled
out on a democratic basis."
The two camps and SAC worked
out a compromise recently, but
weighted voting will be introduced
again as an amendment at Thursday's filmsoc general meeting and
elections, said Leung.
"Aside from being terribly
undemocratic I'm not sure that
weighted voting is legal under the
Society Act," said Pinkney. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 15, 1983
Joys of springtime
Vancouver is noted from coast to coast for its early
spring.
While other Canadians continue to bundle up in
winter clothing Vancouverites substitute raincoats
for wind breakers and tennis courts, and endure yet
another column by Vancouver writer Allan (Lotusland)
Fotheringham on how wonderful life is here.
But there is a new aspect of Vancouver's spring
which rarely gets national exposure — the growing
proliferation of protest marches.
In the last and next few weeks, Vancouver will
have seen and heard pickets against pornography and
the use of plastic bullets in Ireland; marches supporting women and the people struggling for freedom in
Latin America and protests against the cruise missle,
the arms race and the Socred attack on education.
There may be others.
Now protest marches are fine, and the climate certainly doesn't prohibit this form of political action, but
those who wish to achieve change are going to have
to use other methods to advance their causes.
Marches, rallies/ demonstrations and pickets only
serve to educate the public through exploitation of the
mass media. Already the warning signs are out that
protest marches are not big news.
Unfortunately the alternatives are few and probably
involve greater challenges to authority.
As a citizen, when was the last time someone came
to your door to talk about politics instead of relying on
the press? The only people on street corners are
religious fanatics.
If Vancouver's ripe political environment is going to
develop, fair-weather protestors are going to have to
get down to stormy work.
Unemployed punch back
Letters
Pretence revealed
Do the five deserve any political
recognition?
To the clear, logical mind of a rational person the answer is a
definite no. Their act was a crime as
any other crime and deserves to be
treated as such. Any pretence that it
was politically motivated is nothing
more than a ruse to lead us to
believe that they are idealists.
Philosophically there is no ideal
in initiating violence and impinging
on the rights of society. Such an attempt makes claim to our present
lack of morality with the logical
consequence a blow to individual
freedom.
The so called freedom from
violent oppression which they rally
around stinks of nothing more than
oppression itself. For to change the
concept of freedom from freedom
to to freedom from presents gross
injustices in that a dictatorial
minority is necessary to enforce
what they consider they should be
free from. Freedom to requires only
that justice be administered fairly to
individuals.
Red Hot Video outlets and Litton
industries are not the only victims
of this amorality and thoughtless
wasteland. The five were victim's of
this long before they had the idea to
perpetrate such a crime. We are not
victims for being deprived of more
smut or for being deprived of
security from the very real threat of
communism, but rather from
something far more subtle and just
as dangerous.
If the five are granted political
recognition of any sort for this
crime, undermining all individual
rights and the moral principles our
lives are supported by, we are sanctioning savage minds even more
detremental to your well being and
mine than the powers this misguided movement strikes out at.
Paul Walton
By KEVIN ANNETT
"The anger isn't there yet, things
are still manageable. I don't see any
fightback developing right now."
Gerry Kachmarski, a member of
the Organization of Unemployed
Workers (OUW) in Vancouver, was
referring to the defensive mood
among most jobless people he's met
through his efforts to organize the
unemployed.
perspectives
Since the summer of 1981,
unemployment has skyrocketed in
B.C. from 5.8 per cent to its present
level over 15 per cent, and by late
1982 annual wage increases were
depressed to a new low of barely 7
per cent. This double punch has
sent the labour movement reeling,
according  to  Kachmarski.
Nevertheless, the unemployed
have fought on.
Founded last August in
Nanaimo, the B.C. Coalition of the
Unemployed now includes seven
member groups: jobless committees
in Campbell River, Nanaimo, Port
Alberni, Vancouver, Victoria, Terrace and within the independent
union CAIMAW. These groups
have confined themselves to
counselling and service work and
struggling to maintain their
organization in a sea of frustrated,
hopeless people. The lack of serious
support given them by the labour
movement may be in part the result
of divided loyalties: the B.C.
Federation of Labour has its own
unemployed self-help centres scattered across B.C. thanks to a
$200,000 grant from the federal
government.
There has been some overlap in
the work of these two unemployed
movements, but little coordinated
activity. The B.C. Federation's
Unemployed Action Centre, run
out of Vancouver's Fishermens
Hall, held a demonstration of 400
laid off workers in February at a
downtown UIC office, and is hoping to build May Day as a day of action against unemployment.
This action, however, is not
building much steam because of
resistance from local labour councils.
Photo depicts cruel ideal
In last Tuesday's Ubyssey (March
8) there is a photo of a placard that
reads "Desegregate Child
Rapists/Murderers.''
Sexual offenders are segregated
from the regular prison population
because they are beaten, raped and
occassionally killed by regular inmates. The implication of the sign is
Church questions authority
Nudity vulgar
For a paper that will not fully
print an advertisement for the
film Porky's in its pages, you
made up for it on Tuesday. For
The Ubyssey to stoop so low as
to display a naked woman and
man to bolster its ratings or to
corrupt the mind of every first
year student is outright vulgarity.
Granted, The Tuesday
Ubyssey was a good satire on
English tabloids. But, no manner how you look at it, a naked
woman is a naked woman. Most
people can make the distinction
between a clothed woman arid a
naked woman with no trouble at
all. Either your anti-sexist editor
was out to lunch or the paper
has flauntingly displayed its la*
tent ideology.
Jim Davies
science!
Whether viewed as right or
wrong, the Maranathas (and others)
have stated "by what authority they
regard homosexual practices in the
church as unacceptable."
Perhaps, in this light, someone
should thirk to ask, "by what
authority do the gays demand
recognition of their practices within
the church"?
Is this issue really a simple case of
"Gays vs. Maranathas?" Or, do we
really have here, a much deeper
problem of "authority" within the
church(es)?
Certainly, it has been argued that
scholars differ over the bible's
silence on, or prohibition of,
homosexuality.
For some churches, where scripture is silent on a given matter, the
authority of the church fathers and
accepted tradition determine practice. For other churches, only the
authority of the scriptures prevail:
in these churches, where scripture is
silent, a consensus may be sought
(though only after careful prayer
and reflection upon Christ's
"model" for correct behaviour).
Today one hears the church
speaking of the need for "social
justice," "peace" and "religion."
These are, of course, quite correct
and commendable concerns. But,
"authority," whether applied to the
person of Christ or the scriptures,
has become a "dirty word," even in
some churches which are trying to
bring about social change in our
society.
The problems, then, are: "By
what authority do these churches
speak and act"? "By what authority do the gays demand their
religious rights in these churches?"
And, would it be very wrong for us
to assume that the "antithesis" of
"authority" is "anarchy"?
"By what authority . . ."? This
should be our first question!
Brian McGregor-Foxcroft
Theology-Regent college
obviously that sexual offenders
should be placed in a situation in
which they will be beaten, raped
and killed. An eye for eye, a tooth
for a tooth.
Three things disappoint me about
the use of the photograph. First, a
potentially interesting story about a
women's group (WARP, perhaps it
stands for women against rape and
pornography) that is so angry that
they advocate murder was ignored.
Secondly, women who participated in international women's
day who don't believe in that kind
of retributive justice were unfairly
associated with the view expressed
on the placard.
Thirdly, nobody on the editorial
staff of The Ubyssey even bothered
to figure out what the placard
meant before they published a
photo of it.
Charles Campbell
To Kachmarski and others in the
OUW, the answer to this crisis is to
build a fighting movement of the
unemployed that can actually win
jobs for people as well as provide
much-needed services.
"Every unemployed group has to
begin with the servicing end, sure,
but it has to also be organizing the
unemployed and holding public actions" said Kachmarksi. Few of the
jobless centres around B.C. are doing the latter, but are simply
counselling out of work people.
Kachmarksi hopes that the OUW's
new centre will act as a meeting
ground for jobless workers who
want to fight back.
Towards this end, the OUW has
produced a program committing
itself to:
1. Fighting for jobs and social
justice,
2. Promoting links between the
employed and unemployed,
3. Demanding welfare and
unemployment insurance reform,
including increases in GAIN rates
and an extension of UI to cover the
full term of unemployment,
4. Calling for a shorter work
week with no loss in pay,
5. Educating the unemployed as
to the real causes of unemployment,
and,
6. Championing the special
demands of women and minorities.
In the coming months, it hopes to
offer free legal and medical advice
to the jobless, establish a food bank
and affiliate more unions and community groups to its parent body,
the lower mainland coalition.
Most important, the OUW is
planning public actions to rally
more unemployed into a fighting
movement. But Kachmarksi is
under no illusions about the ease of
this task at a time when people are
on the defensive.
"We need more people to commit themselves," he says simply.
The OUW centre needs
volunteers between 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. For more information or to lend a hand, drop by
2214 Main St. or phone 876-5025.
Kevin Annett is an arts 4 student
who has infrequently been a
Ubyssey staffer. Perspectives is column of analysis, opinion, humor
open to members of the univeristy
community.
Letters should be triple-spaced,
typed on a 70-space line, as brief as
possible and addressed to The
Ubyssey editorial collective. There
is no editor and "dear sir" is not
appreciated, especially since the
person currently responsible for the
letters page is a woman.
Please bring I.D. when you bring
your letter to the office, SUB 241k.
I
THE UBYSSEY
March 15, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office in SUB 266. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising 228-3977.
Shaffin giggled. "Ha, ha-ha, if they come I'll kill. I will! I-I'll cut the first guardsmen over the top from
his navel to his breastbone." Brian looked at the ground, silent. In the intersection Peter was yelling,"
Damn itl Pile the barricade higherl" Cary muttered the militia's grapeshot's ricochets would cut them
down and coddled his musket. Craig and Arnold, heads bowed, whispered under the inn's creaking
sign. Victor, sitting atop a barrel, hummed a military air and Robert drank yet more wine. Monte and
Jean continued, methodically, to rip up the street's slimy black cobblestones. Everyone considered
their committment. "They're coming," Sarah said from the barricades top, and then turned and yelled,
"They're coming!" Tuesday, March 15, 1983
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 5
Help! Education in trouble!
By LISA HEBERT
We've heard rumblings that a
zero per cent increase or less will be
coming to UBC for the next five
years. This scenario will cripple our
existing post-secondary education
system. How will under funding affect you and future students? The
following is a survey of recent
budget reductions.
This year we have already seen
cuts to the library in terms of
reading rooms, hours, books and
journals. The computing centre has
been severely curtailed. Some of
our professional programs are
operating with '50s materials. The
funds don't exist to upgrade. There
perspectives
will not be enough to even maintain
existing quality.
You may have noticed larger
class sizes. There is a freeze on hiring. Anv faculty position that is
vacated will not be replaced. Forty-
four CUPE cleaning staff were laid
off last year. We have 74 less TAs
this year than than last year. Fewer
staff and teaching positions have
repercussions on more than just the
academic community. A recent
economic impact study says that for
every job lost at UBC, 1.9 other
jobs are lost in the community. Cutbacks increase unemployment.
Financial troubles have forced
the university to limit quality and
access. Some professional programs
which have been reduced to four
years compress information and exclude the necessary depth of a
university degree. This rapid production of graduates may increase
monetary efficiency, but at the
sacrifice of quality. Another solu
tion to limited resources is limiting
students. At UBC in the last year
three programs installed tighter
enrollment controls: architecture,
engineering and computer science.
Access to these programs, for
potential students, is curtailed.
Another source of revenue has
always been to increase the
student's portion. Tuition fees at
UBC are the highest in the province
and were increased by 32.8% last
academic  year.   At   Langara  fees
has not been keeping up its side of
the bargain.
Our most recent information indicates that the federal government
will attach a 10 per cent increase to
EPF when they send this to our provincial government. However, the
provincial government, which controls the total amount that post-
secondary institutes receive, will
allocate only a zero per cent maximum increase.
The provincial government will
sitting on the university minister
Dr. Pat McGeer's desk.
Another method of financing
your education also looks bleak.
Student unemployment increased
by 134 per cent last summer —
twice the total national average.
The provincial government has
just announced that they will spend
$10 million on their summer youth
employment program. This amount
compares to $13.8 million last summer and $21.4 million in 1979. Our-
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BUT TWAY, SIMPSON, TOPAY WE
UYB IN AN ERA OF LIMITS. WHAT
KIND OF EDUCATION CAN WE AFFORD
TO GIVE THESE MPS? WHAT ARE
WE SETTLING FOR-' /
for arts and science just went up by
50%. This is one of the most visible
barriers to attendance, particularly
if the student assistance program is
not also increased.
Where does our funding come
from? Government grants made up
86.9% of UBC's operating revenue
in 1981-82. The federal government
channels their contribution to the
province through the Established
Programmes Financing (EFP), and
accounted for 67.3 per cent of post-
secondary education last year. Simple mathematics (86.9-67.3 = 19.6)
shows that the province's share was
only 19.6 per cent. The
federal/provincial cost sharing
agreement stipulates 50/50 funding,
so it is easy to see that the province
also be holding student aid to a 0
per cent increase. In search of
methods to limit the money that
goes out, three proposals have surfaced: 1) The initial loan portion
will increase. 2) The grant system
will be cancelled and replaced with
a loan program. 3) Money will be
allocated for marks, so that needy
students will only be aided if there is
adequate scholarship. The first two
proposals will increase the debt-
load which has been proven to
reduce participation. The third
possibility is supposedly the most
likely 'solution'. Academic restrictions should, however, affect all
students equally because it is unfair
to single our certain socio-economic
groups. Those three proposals are
present situation is compounded by
the fact that jobs were reduced
from $800 for four months to $600
for two. Hopefully the Socreds can
be encouraged to create more student jobs.
The levels of quality and accessibility that we once accepted
will no longer exist if we do not
move now to increase public
awareness about the value of education. We have to sell the idea that
post-secondary education is a long-
term job creation program, and one
way out of this recession. It is my
hope that you have asked yourself:
What can I do? The answer is: a
great deal, with only a few hours of
your time.
All of the other campuses in B.C.
are in the same boat. Representatives got together at a provincial
Canadian Federation of Students
general meeting and organized an
education campaign strategy. One
of the major events that all of the
lower mainland campuses are
focusing on is neighborhood
leafleting. There is a strong need to
gather community support for
education. That is why, during the
week of March 20 to 26, UBC
students, along with other lower
mainland students, are planning to
reach out to the general public.
If you can spare just a few hours
during this week, we will be
organizing groups of students to go
door to door. In this way we can
gain positive public concern about
education funding. We can influence public opinion about the
Socred government's educational
priorization and get the public to
question the NDP on their views
about post-secondary education.
The electorate can pressure both
parties to make education an issue
— this is an excellent opportunity,
particularly if an election may be
called this spring. By reaching out
to the community we can encourage
more active opposition to education
cutbacks, and have a stronger voice
in Victoria.
It is time we took our cause to the
streets. An information table will be
in SUB concourse today and each
day this week from noon to 1:30.
Please come and sign up, and join
us! .
Lisa Hebert is an arts student and
AMS external affairs coordinator.
She is also rumored to be connected
to a loosely knit organization called
CFS, which informed sources claim
stands for Canadian Federation of
Students.
'Studies more important than GSS squabbles'
I wish to reassure many graduate
students who telephoned me to express their indignation and disgust
at the rather desperate, personal,
manipulatory and obviously
defamatory write-ups in The
Ubyssey on March 4 titled "Grads
emBoyled in Controvery" and on
March 8 under the caption: "Eni
Cheats Grads."
I have taken legal action against
the persons responsible and I do not
wish to lower my standard by
engaging  in  acrimonious  diatribe
with persons desperate enough for
power that they are willing to
wallow in mud. My academic
studies are much too important to
me that I should be dragged away
from the very objective of being a
graduate student.
The facts are as follows:
As electoral officer appointed by
council, I called for nominations in
The Ubyssey Jan. 28, 1983.1 subsequently resigned as president of the
G.S.S. in order to give more time to
my studies. In ensuing unsettled
conditions, the council appointed
Boyle as electoral officer without
the receipt of my formal resignation
as electoral officer. Because both
Mennell's and Gordon's forms were
brought to me, late on the date
nominations were to close, Mennell
and Gordon authorized me by
telephone to sign their nomination
forms since I live on campus and
could deliver the forms on time.
Gordon's form was earlier and I in-
More thoughts on the GSS affair
As a representative in attendance
at the graduate student society's
council meeting of March 3rd, I
would like to clarify some
misconceptions J. Hernandez has
about that meeting as stated in his
letter of March 11.
The nomination forms required a
signature of the candidate and that
of three nominees. On each of the
nomination forms presented on
behalf of the two candidates there
was no indication that the signature
was not their own.
I would hope that Hernandez
agrees that certain rules are required for a fair election and that
they must be obeyed. In this case it
would eliminate the possible doubt
that the candidate was pressured into running after the nomination
deadline.
It was to this that the council had
to address itself. The returning officer felt that the candidates should
be disqualified but left it to council
to decide what to do.
Council agreed that these
signatures were a breach of the rules
and finally came down to four
possibilities to settle the issue:
1. Note the breach but allow the
elections to continue.
2. Disqualify the candidates and let
their opponents win by acclamation.
3. Void the elections for those positions and hold by-elections.
4. Void the whole election.
Option 3 was finally chosen. It
must also be noted that one can
didate (Don Holubitsky) stated that
if option 2 was chosen he would
step down and force a by-election,
and J. Davies said he would abide
by any decision taken at the upcoming annual general meeting.
I am sure the The Ubyssey
reporter present, being a neutral
observer, can verify the above. It is
unfortunate that Hernandez cannot
as he wasn't even in attendance at
that meeting.
R. Sodhi
Grad Studies, Chemistry
V
Slow down for kids
Come on, motorists, slow up on University boulevard! Surely you
are aware of the number of students crossing this narrow, winding
road. This morning one motorist went right through the red light —
too fast for me to get the license.
We would do well to copy the Americans so far as road rules are
concerned. School zones there are marked fifteen miles an hour and
that ruling is taken quite seriously. I am quite convinced many
motorists travelling in this area think SO and 60 kilometers mean
miles - not so! Marjorie Allen
itialled it to indicate I had signed
for him. This can hardly be called
forgery! Since Mennell's form was
received one hour before nominations closed, I was primarily interested in ensuring that the form
was submitted on time and, in
haste, neglected to initial it. Both
candidates told Boyle that I had
their permission to sign for them. In
fact, on Monday, just before the
commencement of polling, I went
to Boyle in the company of Gordon
to inform him that I signed the
forms with the permission of the
condidates. Boyle never mentioned
these facts. Why did he accept them
prior to polling and only reacted
when it seemed likely that Davies
was loosing at the polls?
The purpose of the March 4 article is certainly questionable, particularly during an election in progress. Davies' letter to The Ubyssey
(March 8) was timed to coincide with
a council meeting at which nomination was made to appoint Davies as
acting president. This nomination
was challenged and subsequently
withdrawn.
Davies has, in a series of publications, accused many people of
financial mismanagement. In fact,
Davies has received a total of $7,748
since May 1982, for services to the
Graduate Student Society. This was
paid to him under the threat of legal
action against the society. He even
insisted on and received interest on
delayed payments. In addition, he
received free meals at the centre
from May to August 1982.
These matters perhaps should not
be of concern now but for the fact
that the impression has been given
by Davies that I cheated the society.
What would one say about someone
who had agreed to work full time if
paid and to produce a certain service but had not delivered? In
Davies' case, he held a job at Housing Office while getting paid for full
time job by the society throughout
the period. The council asked him
for a written report which has not
been delivered. Nevertheless the
society paid interest on delayed
wages at a time of deficit financial
situation. I pride myself in selfless
voluntary service to the society.
Many other graduate students have
equally contributed without wanting to be paid for their effort.
I only bring up some of these
observations out of many in order
to illustrate the misrepresentation
of facts and totally false impression
created by Davies. I have resigned
from the council as president eight
weeks ago and I see no reason to be
maligned by anyone for any reason
at this time.
In spite of this experience, I
sincerely hope that all councilors
can get together, forget their differences and work cooperatively to
return the society to credibility and
sound financial base. One way to
begin is to involve a totally new
team in an election for all executive
positions. It is time to pull
yourselves together. My task was to
negotiate autonomy for the society
and commence programmes. I am
satisfied with these achievements,
and I have no desire to sacrifice my
studies in any ongoing effort
beyond my original contribution.
Godwin Eni
past president
graduate student society Page 6
TH E    UBYSS EY
Tuesday, March 15, 1983
TODAY
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Floor hockey team meeting, 1 p.m., SUB 206.
Executive meeting for outgoing  and  new executives, noon, SUB 206.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Not a Love Story, 7 p.m., IRC 2.
POLITICAL SCIENCE/ INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS GRAD CLASS
Complimentary tickets still available for wine and
cheese on Friday, March 18. Deadline Wednesday. Guests $2, all day, political science department office.
ACT
Information table. Come and peruse the pamphlet and participate in the neighborhood leaflet-
ting, noon-2 p.m., SUB concourse. Continues to
Friday.
STUDENT PUGWASH ASSOCIATION
Setting of standards lecture series: Values and
assumptions in cost benefit analysis, noon, IRC
3.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Annual general meeting. Elections and end of
year reports, all members must attend, noon,
SUB 215.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, 7:30 p.m., SUB 119.
ACT
General meeting, please attend, noon, SUB 260.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Women only pub night, 8 p.m., info in SUB
237B,
ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Open meeting to discuss policies and goals for
the new art gallery, 11:30 a.m., SUB 260.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Chehar-shanbeg-soori: Ancient traditional Persian festival on the eve of the last Wednesday of
year in Persian calendar (which ends March 21),
6-9 p.m., Ambleside park beach. West Vancouver.
CUSO UBC
Development education series — a weekly series
exploring international development issues —
this week's topic: Any Answers — shifting the
balance: Canada's role in the global community,
7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus centre, conference room.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Hinduism, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Public reading by Audrey Thomas, free, noon,
Buchan penthouse.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE SERIES
Final lecture, James Charles, vice-president administration. Shopper's Drug Mart, on Oral and
Written Expression Throughout a Career, all
welcome, noon. Computer Science 201.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
207.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Women only pub night, 8 p.m., info in SUB 239.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Literature table, drop by for Marxist literature
and discussion, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., SUB
concourse.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Native Indian speaker series — Verna Kirkness:
Supervisor of Native Indian Teacher Education
program on Cultural messages: do you receive
them? noon, Scarfe 100.
Native Indian films: Four short films, 1:30 - 3:30
p.m., Hut 26 (behind Scarfe).
NEWMAN CLUB
Fantastic fabulous soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's
lunchroom.
WEDNESDAY
POLITICAL   SCIENCE   STUDENTS   ASSOCIA
TION
General meeting for the 1983-84 executive election. Nominations taken from floor. All members
please, noon, Buch. B316.
^ cairns ^
T*»2
from
3 to4
CAKE & COFFEE'
(per person)
MUFFIN & COFFEE'
(per person)
* or tea of course!
$2.50
$1.25
MONDAY - FRIDAY
(at the back of the uillage)
A
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Special steering committee meeting, anyone
wishing to volunteer to help out at a Ellsberg lecture please attend, noon, Angus 214.
PHYSICS GRADUATE STUDENTS
Meeting to elect two representatives to the GSS
council and consider the possible formation of a
departmental organization for graduate
students, noon, Henning 202.
UBC NDP
Annual general meeting, election of executive,
constitutional amendments. Important that all
members attend, noon, SUB 205.
MUSSOC
Performance of Trial by Jury by music education, all Mussocers invited, noon, Scarfe 100.
COOPERATIVE      CHRISTIAN     CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Dinner followed by spontaneous anything, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Information and book table, 11:30 a.m. onwards,
SUB.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Informal "home" meeting with praise, sharing
and teaching, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Four short Native Indian films, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.,
Hut 26 (behind Scarfe).
SUB information booth, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., SUB
lobby.
Marie Smalrface Marule on The World Council of
Indigenous People: Global issues, noon - 1:30
p.m., Scarfe 209.
PACIFIC    REFORESTATION    WORKERS
ASSOCATION
Dance with the Enigmas and Beverly Sisters, $4,
8 p.m.. Oddfellows hall. Commercial and Gravely.
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Not a Love Story, a film about pornography, 5
p.m., IRC 2. Showing for women, noon, IRC 6.
FILM SOCIETY
General meeting and elections, noon, SUB 247.
FLYING CLUB
General meeting, elections and airplane purchase, noon, Henning 302.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Poetry reading in Arabic and Hebrew, original
and translations, noon, Buch. penthouse.
CYCLING CLUB
Presentation on nutrition and cycling, noon,
Buch. A203.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, come and practise your
spoken French, 1:30 p.m.. International House
main lounge.
Meeting with executive, elections and registration for final dinner, 1:30 p.m.. International
House main lounge.
Theatre excursion to L'effet des rayons gammas
aux vieux garcons, 8 p.m., firehall theatre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Film presentation Disappearances, noon, IRC 5.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General meeting, executive elections, noon,
Angus 225.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
The resurrection of Jesus Christ, noon, SUB
119.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Annual general meeting, noon, SUB 212.
NEWMAN CLUB
St. Patrick's day picnic and sports day, wear
something green!, noon. Meet at Mark's college
music room.
FILM SOCIETY
General elections, noon, SUB 247.
CUSO UBC
Information session - slide show on CUSO in
Sierra Leone, recruitment information will be
available, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper
lounge.
PACIFIC REFORESTATION
WORKERS ASSOCIATION
A talk and slide show about reforestation industry: what kind of conditions you can expect,
noon, SUB 207/209.
HNE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Slide show Land Above the Clouds — Peru, synchronized with South American music. Produced by Juan Enrique Merkt, noon, Lasserre 102.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting,  everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
212A.
ISMAILI STUDENT ASSOCIATION
General meeting and general elections for '83-84,
noon, SUB 211.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Islam, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Reading  from   Semetic  poetry:   Hebrew  and
Arabic, noon, Buch. penthouse.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMENT
Janice Bulman, empowering ourselves through
collective action, noon. Computer Science 100.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Honorary chief Simon Baker on Coast Salish
tradition and culture, noon, Scarfe 100.
FRIDAY
INTRAMURALS
Bookstore   team   tug   of   war,   noon,   outside
bookstore.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Hiroshima: a discussion of Hiroshima survivor
Kinoko Laskey, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Squash night, 8:45 - 11:45 p.m., Winter sports
centre.
MUSSOC
Performance of Trial by Jury by music education, all Mussocers invited, noon, Scarfe 100.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, come and practise your
spoken French, noon. International House main
lounge.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Interviewing students for volunteer jobs, ongoing. Brock hall 200. Call 228-3811 for more info.
Valuable for gaining job experience or just enjoying yourself.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting to elect executive and register
for final dinner, noon. International House main
lounge.
Games night, 7 p.m., Chez Rosie.
NEWMAN CLUB
Fantabulous super-cala-fraja-listic soup lunch,
noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
Twilight retreat, 4-9 p.m., St. Mark's college.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Potluck supper — international cuisine will be
featured, bring a main course dish. For reservations call 228-5021. Folk night will follow dinner,
6:30 p.m.. International House lower lounge.
SATURDAY
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
New year's party, 7 p.m. -1 a.m., SUB 207/209.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie rugby games against Vancouver
Island Crimson tide, 2:30 p.m., Thunderbird
stadium.
SQUASH TEAM
Three wall nick celebration, 9 p.m. onwards,
1956 W 2nd Ave.
B.C. intercollegiate squash championships, even
racquetball players welcome, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.,
winter sports squash courts.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
CSA annual variety show and dance: Kung Fu
demonstration, choir, solo, piano, fashion, beauty pageant and dance, 7 p.m.. International
House. Late comers will not be seated.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Lecture, 8 p.m., Hebb theatre. Child care
available.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise, worship and teaching, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
SQUASH TEAM
B.C. intercollegiate squash championships, 10
a.m.-2 p.m., Winter sports centre squash courts.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride,  meet between SUB and aquatic centre,
noon.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Workshop/jam, noon, SUB 119 and 125.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practise and demolition derby, 10 p.m.. Aquatic
centre.
Custom
Sexy/\Suits
(on sale)
2 pes. $349.00
reg $450.00     consulted, designed, cut &
fitted by Steve Samson
STEVE SAMSON
718 Robson till 2 p.m. %
2934 W. Broadway 3-6 p.m.
669-7848/733-6711 Alterations Welcome.
\ik
ty®S> ©DP QaDDD[g)GDg
OPTICAL SERVICES LTD.
VUARNETS
for Spring
ON SALE CHEAP
SUB Bldg., Main Floor    222-2254
THIS WEEK AT
HILLEL
Tues., March 15
Shefa Dairy Lunch 12:30 P.M.
Wed., March 16
"Rap with the Rabbi"-12:30 P.M.
(Lunch Available)
Hillel Annual General Meeting—5:00 P.M.
Mexican Dinner—6:00 P.M.
Thurs., March 17
Network Seminar —Media update and Law of Return
with guest speaker,  Professor Alan Zysblatt,  visiting
Law   Professor  from   Israel.   12:30-2:30   p.m.   (lunch
available).
NEED A JOB
THIS SUA/VMER?
LET US HELP
List your name and job preference with
JOB-LINK — an A.M.S. newspaper
distributed to thousands of potential
employers in the lower mainland.
3 LINES - $1.75 (Deadline March 31)
For more info:
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE SUB
or call 228-3971, 3977
■.Your Alma Mater Society,
r-THE CLASSIFIEDS*
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 — Coming Events
65 — Scandals
EXPERIENCING year end stress? Can I
help you? Geraldine Fordyce, M.S. W., experienced counsellor and member of the
Chaplaincy. For appointment 325-8291. No
charge.
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR   SALE:   1980   Yamaha   100   Endore.
Street & dirt motorcycle. Pat Cook222-9189.
$800o.b.o.
If you have a case of the hiccups or a fetish
for thrills and kills with gore galore, then
THE THING is for you! Showtimes are
Thurs. and Sun. at 7:00 and Fri. and Sat. at
7:00 and 9:30. Be there and be scared.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
15 — Found
20 — Housing
NONSMOKER to share beautiful hilltop
house, with view of city, mountains.
Shared cooking. $225. 734-4691.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
SET YOUR OWN HOURS!
Students  needed
who would  like to  lose weight,
feel great, and make money too.
Wed. March 16th
SUB Rm. 213
7:30 p.m.
CRUISE SHIP JOBSI $14-28,000. Caribbean, Hawaii, World. Call for Guide, Directory, Newsletter. 916-722-1111. Ext.
BritishColumbia.
35 - Lost
LEFT ON PHOTOCOPIER textbook by Hall,
would the person who picked it up in Sub
Fri. aft. please call 738-6279.
40 — Messages
The Star and Crescent — "a society of a
higher nature and more comprehensive and
higher principle" (Eells) Schlong
ST. MARY'S Ukrainian Catholic Young
Adults Club. Monthly meetings. For more
information please call either 256-0841 or
433-8627.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further, resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual, Word Processor, Clemy,
266-6641.
YEAR-ROUND expert typing, essays,
theses. Phone 738-6829 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
On King Edward bus route.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 on
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING: Fast, reliable service. Pick-up.
435-8976. Mrs. B. Munro, 5560 Tyne St.,
Vancouver, B.C. V5R 4L4.
NORTH SHORE STUDENTS: We can do
your typing or word processing professionally for at home prices. Call Jessie
922-0135.
90-WANTED Tuesday, March 15, 1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
We are the volleyball champions
By MONTE STEWART
The one thing which is missing
among UBC athletic teams is the
traditional theme song. The Vancouver Canucks have "Sha na na
na" and the Vancouver Whitecaps
have "White is the Colour" but
Thunderbird teams have no such
tune. After last weekend a fitting
melody might be "We are the
Champions."
The Thunderbird men's and
women's volleyball teams capped
off their seasons in dramatic
fashion last Saturday. The men's
squad won the 1982-83 Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
championships by defeating
Manitoba Bisons 3-1 in a best of
five game match. The women were
outstanding as they battled back to
defeat Laval Rouge at Ore three
games to two for the consolation
trophy.
Both teams finished one position
higher than their national rankings.
Going into the tournament, the
men were ranked second while the
women were ranked fourth.
The women's team proved that
winners never quit and quitters
never win, as they had shown in
Thursday's encounter. Laval
jumped out to a quick two game
lead and it looked like the women
would justify their fourth place
ranking. However, in the third
game UBC took an early lead and
never relinquished it. They easily
won the fourth and fifth games.
Tara Senft, Ermina Rousseau,
Lorna MacDonald and Alana Kurz
played extremely well as the
Thunderbirds boomed spike after
spike at the stunned Laval women.
Although the Thunderbirds were
down 2-0 in games, they clearly
dominated the remaining contests.
Apathy clearly took a day off as
nearly 2,000 fans squeezed into War
Memorial gym to see the men win
their third CIAU championship.
The 'Birds won their first Canadian
title in 1966 when present coach
Dale Ohman was a team member.
They also won in 1975.
Women gymnasts
national victor
By JEAN MUSTARD
The winning of the women's national gymnastics championship by
the Thunderbirds Friday night set
the tone for the most successful
weekend the 'Birds have seen this
term.
Patti Sakaki led the contingent
competing at York University as she
captured the individual title for the
fourth year in a row to help the
team to narrowly squeak by the
University of Alberta (99.42 to
98.11). Manitoba followed in third
with 95.50 points.
Sakaki finished on top in the
vault, balance beam and uneven
bars, efforts which gave her a winning point total of 33.86. Thunderbird Anne Muscat finished fifth
overall with 31.43 points.
Coach Alena Branda was
understandably proud of her team
and happy to have at last taken the
title after three years of narrow
misses. (Last year U.M. defeated
UBC by less than one point). The
entire team put in a strong performance with rookie Hallie Lecker
placing eighth (31.36), Lani Wong
taking ninth (31.30), Alisa Kage
eleventh (31.20) and Michelle Sirett
twenty-first (29.26).
In men's competition the 'Birds
did not fare so well. Coach Arno
Lascari's team finished eighth with
77.80 points, well behind first place
Yorks total of 165.95. Individually,
Frank Nutzenberger of York
University finished in first place collecting 55.85 points in the six event
competition.
UBC's best competitor was Mark
Byrne with a ninth place finish
overall (51.25 points). None the less
the UBC men will continue their
hard work in anticipation of better
results next season.
Prospects for the women's team
next year look very good as many of
the gymnasts are eligible to return
for another year of competition.
'Bird Droppings
TRACK AND FIELD
UBC athletes turned in some very
fine individual performances at the
Canadian Interuniversity Athletics
Union championships in Toronto
on Saturday and Sunday.
Dave Parker cleared 4.9 metres in
the pole vault to win by twenty centimetres over Toronto's Ross
Gievan. It was Parker's third consecutive championship and marks a
fitting climax to last year as a
Thunderbird. Mike Bobick also
jumped 4.7 metres and finished
third.
Tracy Smith, who has almost all
her UBC athletics career ahead of
her, took the women's long jump
with a leap of 5.44 metres.
But the weekend's highlight was
another victory for the middle
distance relay team. The UBC
quartet of Simon Hoogerwerf,
Hugh MacLeod, Tom Girand and
Jason Gray won the four by 800
metres relay and shattered the
CIAU record.
Other points were contributed by
Warren Lee, third in the 60 metre
hurdles, Jason Grey, third in the
1,000 metres and Tom Stubbs, fifth
in the 5,000 metres.
Overall, the UBC men finished
fifth and the women eighth in team
competitions. But York and Toronto, who finished in first and second
places, showed great depth.
Western Ontario took the women's
crown.
WRESTLING
Another Thunderbird grabbed a
national championship this
weekend. Martin Gleave took the
65 kilogram class in the CIAU
wrestling championships which
were held Saturday in London, Ontario. Guelph won the team championship.
This is the third consecutive year
that Manitoba has finished second
in the national finals.
It appeared that UBC might
sweep their best of five match. The
'Birds won the first two games 15-9,
15-11, and were leading the third
game 14-10 before Manitoba rallied
and won 16-14. The 'Birds then
won the fourth and, subsequently,
deciding game 15-11.
After the final point, the mild-
mannered Ohman leaped to his feet
and raced on to the court to con
gratulate his players. The players on
the bench followed and the near
capacity crowd cheered thunderous-
During the women's match in the
afternoon, about six or seven gym-
strip clad supporters arrived during
the third game. They beat sticks
against garbage cans lids and the
wooden barricades which cover the
top two rows of seats in the gym. In
the evening, there were twice as
many supporters and they were
twice as loud.
Portions of the men's match will
be shown on the wide screen in the
Pit at 8 p.m. tonight. The women's
match will be shown a week from
today at the same time.
By winning the, title, the men's
team became the fourth UBC team
to win a national championship in
1982-83 and the second in the same
day. The women's gymnastics team
won the national championships in
Toronto Saturday afternoon (see
article below).
We should be hearing renditions
of "We are . . . We are . . ."any
time now.
— brlan groos photo
LATEST IN VOLLEYBALL techniques is displayed by UBC team member during weekend tournament at UBC.
It is not known whether technique, rumored to be pioneered right here at our fair campus, worked. However,
UBC team worked, as they went on to become national champions. Who ever said these outlines never say what
really happened?
UBC crews surprise islanders
The University of British Columbia Thunderbirds came up with big
results over the weekend as they
competed in the Elk Lake Regatta
on Vancouver Island on Sunday.
Rowing crews from the University of Victoria have typically
dominated meets between the two
schools but the Thunderbirds produced some super efforts that surprised the powerful Vikings.
Notice was served on Victoria in
the very first race of the day when
UBC's novice eights, having fallen
behind quickly in the long race,
recovered to pass the Vikes and win
by a full boat length.
"They're a hard working and
tough bunch," said Jeff Allester,
UBC novice/first year coach, after
the race. "Equipment problems
made it tough to keep the crew
together over the winter but now
that they'll be on the water regularly from now on, their enthusiasm
should get even better."
UBC/VRC men's coach Boris
Klavora agrees. "Traditionally,
winter training is always hard on the
beginners but I was very impressed
with their effort on the weekend."
The next two races involving
UBC and UVic continued the trend.
In single sculls UBC's Lisa Roy, a
bronze medalist at the World
Championship, won the 1,000
metre race in a time of 4:15.11
finishing ahead of number two
Janice Mason and Victoria's Andrea Schreiner. Schreiner, incidentally, has rowed single sculls for
Canada for the past three years and
so is usually expected to win these
races.
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Thunder struck again in the
women's Varsity eights where the
Thunderbirds, once again, were
very much the underdogs to a Victoria crew absolutely loaded with
national team rowers. The 1,000
metre race was a see-saw battle all
the way until UBC pulled ahead by
5 feet right at the finish line. The
time difference between the two
boats: a mere half a second.
Victoria won its share of glory
taking the women's novice cox four
and eight and men's novice cox
four, Junior Varsity and Varsity
eights.
Next regatta up for UBC's crews
will be the UBC Invitational which
will be held on March 26 at Burnaby Lake.
CHEERLEADERS...at volleyball tourney.
-brian groos photo
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 15, 1983
The OLD FORT BREWING CO. reminds you to not miss seeing the group Buick
Mackane this Thursday and Friday.
IN THE PIT
A.M.S. UBC OPEN
FOOSBALL
TOURNAMENT
Saturday, March 26 at 2:00 p.m.
in the PIT
Total of $370 in prizes—
$140 Top Prize
Entry Fees—$10/Team Open Doubles
$4/Team UBC Doubles
The first round consists of two
separate double knockouts, UBC and
OPEN with the top two teams in each
division advancing to the round robin
final round. UBC teams will be given
a one goal per game advantage
against OPEN teams. Yes, you are
good enough to play!!!
For further info, contact ERIK LIN-
DHOLM 224-6552 or REID ABEL
224-9776.
There are lots of placement prizes ($$)
as well as T-Shirts, etc.
A.M.S.
BOX OFFICE
Psychology & Economics
Graduation Banquet     March 18
Chinese Student's Association
Variety Show
and Dance March 19
Mary Daly March 19
Intramural Recreational
Banquet & Dance March 25
Daniel Ellsberg March 26
Rational Youth April 15
VTC-The Spoons
The Kinks
Queen Ida
March 18
April 22
March 19
Other Ticket-
Whistler Ski Passes
Western Professional
Photofinishing Special! Vz off
coupon for reprints with each
roll of C-41 for develop & print.
Prints & enlargements from
slides.
31/2x5,59c-5x7, $2.25-8x10, $4.95
(8x10 not available from 110)
CLUB-SUB
GAMES ROOM
This week's Royal
Excursion Package:
TRON - 5 Men -
50c
CENTIPEDE -
5 Beetles — 50c
ALSO - The Challenge of Joust is
Here.
Compete and enter your name and
high score to be eligible for the Bimonthly Draw of "THE JOUST
POSTER" on display in the new
high-score board sign.
OPEN -
Monday to Saturday
8:00 a. m. -12:45 p. m.
Sunday 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
THE SPOONS
Their Only Vancouver Appearance,
with  Maurice and the Cliches
Doors open 8 p.m.  Show at 8:30
$7 00 A.M.S.  $8 °° Non-A.M.S.
U.B.C. Armouries
Tickets Available at the AMS Box Office, VTC/CBO,
Zulu Records, Odyssey Imports
For Information call 228-2711
Produced by AMS
SHOWCASE
no.5
April
15
RATIONAL YOUTH
from Montreal
ANNOUNCING—
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