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The Ubyssey Sep 18, 1973

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Array t
f*
Workers form own union
By JAKE van der KAMP
Library and clerical workers at UBC are attempting to form their own
union.
The primary grievances oi organizers are low wages, discrimination
against women and unfair job classification and description.
To be called The Association of University and College Employees, it
will be an independent union acting on behalf of the more than 1,000 as
yet unorganized library and clerical workers on campus.
So far, only physical plant workers are organized.
Attempts were made to organize
library and clerical workers two
years ago by The Office and
Techical Employees Union.
However, the required 51 per cent
^ of signatures needed for certification by the Labour Relations
Act were not obtained.
The chief spokeswoman, who
wished to remain unidentified, told
The Ubyssey a similar attempt by
the sa me group to form a union last
year failed, but expressed confidence this year's attempt will
succeed due to better organization.
AUCE began its organizational
drive on Sept. 11 and it is to last till
Dec. 11. Due to the preference of
the labor relations board, membership drives for new unions
should not exceed three months.
Twenty employees are at present
working to sign up members.
Difficulties met
Organizers are meeting difficulties as they're only free  to
# organize at their lunchtime when
most prospective members are not
easily found.
The union wishes to include
permanent part-time workers but
casual labour, most students, will
be omitted
The organizers report no obstruction from the administration
so far. However, a recent circular
cautioned-workers that under
section 5(1) of the Labour
Relations Act employees are not
j allowed to canvass for a union
during working hours without the
permission of their employer and
that permission - had not been
requested.
The circular further stated the
library administration would not
interfere with the union's formation.
tAale dominance
Pamphlet     advertising     the
# union's formation states an
autonomous union is needed
because both OTEU and CUPE are
male-dominated and in past
contracts both at UBC and
elsewhere, have discriminated
against women workers.
Workers at UBC are on the
average paid lower wages than
workers; in comparative jobs under
union organization. An exact
^comparison is impossible because
of the varying nature of jobs at
UBC, but a person classified at
"clerk I" at UBC gets $2.60 an
hour, barely over the new
minimum wage which will go into
effect next year.
Provincial government employees received a raise of $75 a
month this year but office employees at UBC — financed by the
government received only $50, an
increase of 13 per cent.
* Women workers, despite the
report on the status of women at
UBC, which clearly revealed
discrimination against women,
still receive consistently less than
men. A stenographer, with typing
and shorthand skills, earns $100 a
month less than a stack attendant.
Other  grievances   concern   job
■^classification and description.
There are as many as seven salary
grades in some jobs at UBC. AUCE
wants these reduced and for all
workers; to be told their job
classification on being hired.
Descriptions vague
Job description  is also  vague.
*Some   stenographers,   claims   a
union spokeswoman, were recently
told to make coffee and went to
THS UBYSSEY
■*■      *   4 m*:
»■*■■!
some trouble before they learned
from the personnel office that this
was not required of their job.
The union further wants personnel reports made available to
employees. This is sometimes not
done, and employees have occasionally suffered when they tried
to find a new job.
For its organizational drive,
AUCE has requested an office in
SUB. Student council will discuss
the motion to allow AUCE an office
in their meeting Wednesday.
The administration will allow a
union in one of its offices only if it is
certified so AUCE has no other
place on campus for its office aside
from SUB. Union organizers claim
this is setting no real precedent for
giving unions offices because the
two other unions interested in
campus workers already have
offices on campus and downtown.
They also state that the union will
only want the office till January,
when it will either be certified or
disbanded.
So don't worry about the blorgs
and neb'ishes taking over our
student union, it's only your
friendly neighbourhood labour
society
• 1   litbois photos
Phantom
needs
doggies
APPARENTLY THE  PHANTOM
of the labs at UBC needs animals
like this for experiments. So
badly, in fact, UBC's animal care
co-ordinator, John Gregg, went
before Vancouver city council
during the summer asking council
if UBC could have the dogs before
they were sold to the public. It
appeared UBC wasn't getting
enough animals for experiments
because the public was buying the
dogs before UBC could get them
for the labs. City council refused
to consider UBC's request. Gregg
now says the matter is closed.
Until UBC needs dogs for its
experiments again.
Feminist no Shirley Temple
By LINDA HOSSIE
"I have woman pride. I have
woman pride in a society that is
dominated by men. That's a
besieged position."
Jill Johnston, by her own
description feminist, rumor,
lesbian, mother, mental case,
looked like she could handle the
battle.
In a rhinestone-studded denim
jacket, jeans tucked into work
socks and boots, with assorted belt
buckles, pendants and other
"gear", she hung onto the
microphone while talking to about
150 persons in the SUB art gallery
Monday because as she said: "I'm
a big person with a light voice."
It also gave her a nice measure
of control over the gathering.
"We live in a male homosexual
cock-sucking society in which men
suck each other off," she said.
"Personally, I'm all for men
becoming faggots and getting off
our back.
"I can understand straight men
more than faggots, if you know
what I mean."
Asked if she was setting up gay
men against gay women, Johnston
said no.
"I just don't think we have much
in common. I'm ... ah ... somewhat
contemptuous of boys."
Johnston, author of Lesbian
Nation and Marmalade Me, opened
the meeting by reading from an
upcoming work which she intends
to call My Father in America: A
Tour de Farce, in which she
described herself as a British
bastard like Lawrence of Arabia.
Reading that she had been
rumored to be Jill Johnston, a
lesbian and a mental case, she
added "actually I'm a terrorist."
"I'm a perpetual rumor ... a
mongrel wasp. That means we
were poor but we had a persian rug
on the floor."
Shifting from foot to foot while
she read, Johnston continued to
describe herself as a "normal,
healthy, American girl" with a
normal preoccupation with death.
She used to wonder if her
maternal grandmother with whom
she  lived  might  walk  down  the
stairs one morning and little Jill
would have to run for a neighbor to
pronounce her grandmother dead.
Johnston, who looked like she
might have roared up the steps of
SUB and into the gallery on a
customized chopper, informed the
gathering that as a child, she
"didn't want to be Shirley Temple".
Johnston was a "bastard" but
she didn't know it so it was all
right, she said. Besides, as she
pointed out, Jesus was a bastard.
"It was quite clear to those who
murdered him."
A woman in the audience said
she remembered an article
Johnston wrote for the Village
Voice, a New York magazine,
describing her trip to England to
search for her father.
Johnston passed over the
reminiscence lightly, saying she
was "into thinking about mothers
and daughters now."
She described the internal
feminist struggle as one between a
"strong, vindictive" mother
cultural    image   and    a    "weak.
apologetic" daughter cultural
image.
"We're not too far along until the
unformed daughter become more
formed. The more self-affirmed we
become the more we affirm others.
Feminism is about women affirming other women.
I see cock, man, civilization as
all synonymous. If we came back
to a nation (of women) it is inconceivable what we would have."
Johnston said she came to this
revelation about women affirming
women while taking part in a
television talk show in which she
felt it was her intended role to
cross-examine a happy housewife
and mother.
She told the woman she was also
once happily married and had
children.
"And then 1 told her 'And you too
might be a lesbian in another 10
years'," said Johnston, doubling
over with laughter
Johnston said she hasn't lived
with her children since they were
six and seven. A few years ago.
See page 2. 'Lesbians' Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Septmeber  18,   1973
Saskatchewan, Ontario
student housing tight
CANADIAN
UNIVERSITY PRESS
The University of Saskatchewan
student union says between 200 and
500 students will not find places to
live in Saskatoon.
And at the University of
Waterloo in Waterloo, Ont., the
housing situation with on-campus
housing fully occupied has  been
aggravated by a general shortage
of available housing close to the
university.
A number of apartment
buildings previously open to
students no longer accept students
as tenants. Some new apartment
buildings will not rent to students.
In Saskatoon, the student union
Broad board
publishes paper
DOWNSVIEW, Ont. (CUP) —
The student newspaper at York
University, in danger of being
suspended by student council, will
be published by an 11-member
board following an agreement with
council.
The Excalibur's board will
consist of students, Excalibur staff
members, representatives from
the student council and one
member of the teaching staff.
The council's bylaw establishing
the board followed an attempt by
council's executive to suspend the
paper's operations for the year.
The council executive
unanimously approved motions
July 12 to suspend the paper's
publication this fall, fire its staff
and seize its property.
An ad hoc committee, composed
of two council members, two
Excalibur staff members and a
representative of the university
administration formulated the
board proposal during August.
Police
seek
identity
RCMP are looking for information on the activities of a
former student who police say died
Sept. 11.
The body of George Hashizume,
24, was found Wednesday on
Towers beach.
An autopsy determined
Hashizume, a graduate of the
University   of   Windsor   and   a
HASHIZUME...
body found on Towers beach.
student at Simon Fraser
University in 1971-72 drowned, and
dated his death a day before.
However, severe bruises were
found on his face and police say
they have not ruled out foul play.
Anyone with information on his
activities before his death are
asked to contact the university
RCMP -at 224-1322.
The Excalibur called for an
independent board of publications
last March and had made similar
requests in earlier years to
maintain its position as a
politically independent newspaper.
Following assurances that a
board could be established by
September, the executive's
motions were tabled at the July 24
meeting and the committee
established.
estimates between 500 and 1,000
students will be forced to accept
sub-standard housing.
The student union has met civic
officials, media and community
groups in an effort to alleviate the
housing situation.
Emergency housing for 500
students have been established.
Student union president Mel
McCorriston said Monday students
may not attend University of
Saskatchewan campus in1
Saskatoon this year because of the
housing situation.
"I think there are people who
will not come to university this
year because they came looking
for a suitable place to live, couldn't
find it, said to hell with it and
decided to do something else for
the year," said McCorriston.
Landlords in Saskatoon have
complained students only take
apartments for seven months. At
the end of their stay, the apartments are damaged, says landlords.
At Waterloo, Keith Dewar, a
student federation housing official
has indicated students may erect
tents on campus to relieve the
housing problem.
'Lesbians' hate son
From page 1
however, her son, Richard, came
to live with her which did not go
over well with her "lesbian,
feminist, militant friends."
"I didn't want him lying around
my house smoking and fantasizing
or whatever," she said. Richard
went to the local school.
Johnston was called to the school
by the vice-principal who she
described as having a fat neck with
broken veins.
She went to meet him dressed up
in her "gear" and was told he was
using foul language around the
girls.
Johnston said she issued forth a
string of abuse and withdrew her
son from the school.
"And that was the end of his
formal schooling," she said.
"He kissed his girlfriend
goodbye and I blew a kiss to a few
girls myself."
Johnston described the mother
as a maintainer conditioned to
favoring sons.
"The son becomes the project of
the mother because she doesn't
have anything else to do.
"Mothers are strong women who
are frustrated women who must of
necessity put their daughters
down."
Asked about the meaning of the
term lesbian nation, Johnston
said: "If you're together with
another woman, or two other
women, or three or 10 that you feel
good with, that's lesbian nation.
"A woman-woman-woman-
woman is a lesbian. Anyone else is
a man-identified woman."
Audience reaction from the few
men present began to get a little
too much air time at this point,
judging from the complaints of the
majority of women.
"I think it's time for the men to
go," Johnston ordered into her
microphone.
"Leave. Go. Split. Leave. Leave.
Leave."
Obediently men rose and left,
some expressing the hope that the
two sexes wouldn't come to shoot
at each other.
The only man left was Tom the
Resistor.
One woman stood up.
"I want Tom to leave. Do you?"
she asked Johnston.
Johnston, of course, did.
So Tom left, physically propelled
by a half-dozen angry women.
"Far fucking out," Johnston
mumbled into her mike.
"In Canada. In British Columbia."
"American women are flashier,
but Canadian women get the work
done," one woman shouted over
the chorus of cheers.
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Try us — you'll like us! Tuesday, September 18,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Unclear rules screw students
ini mcdonald photo
NEW UNIVERSITY PHALLIC SYMBOL wends its way skyward
will be equally blown out of proportion. Edifice was erected by
same people who brought you British Properties.
behind the village. Rumor has it prices
Grosvenor International Development,
Exposure-
By ART SMOLENSKY
"A museum should be like a pretty girl, attractive at
all times, well dressed, with a changing wardrobe,
smart, intelligent (but not too intelligent), with
something worthwhile to say, with changing moods,
sensitive to good music and art and able to live on a
limited budget."
An even sadder aspect of the tribute to the late fine
arts professor Ian McNairn in Wednesday's senate
meeting is that the above passage described as sexist by
many senators, was left in the official senate records
and not deleted as previously reported in Thursday's
Ubyssey.
In contempt of senate's normal committee procedure,
classics head Malcolm McGregor admitted on
questioning that the drafting of the tribute had been his
doi ng and he had not sought the approval of the tributes
committee before bringing it to senate.
Even more curious was McGregor's statement that he
had seen this passage a few years ago, printed in the
Vancouver Sun; "I think". For those suspicious that this
quote never really existed but was put in by McGregor to
create yet another confrontation with the more sensitive
elements in the senate, we have McGregor's final
statement on the subject: "I liked it, I thought it was
charming."
As English professor Roy Daniels pointed out in
seriate, if you substitute the words Malcolm McGregor
for "pretty girl" it makes perfect sense.
* *      *
A seemingly inconsequential exchange in the senate
meeting with regard to the appointment of acting
commerce head Colin Gourlay to the committee on
student membership in faculties also bears repeating.
Situdent senator Peter Insley: "It was intimated to me
when I was active in the commerce undergraduate
society some years ago that we were fortunate dean
(Philip) White was at the helm rather than you
(Gourlay) as you held the belief that students has little
or no role to play in decision making in the faculty. Mr.
Gourlay do you still subscribe to this philosophy?"
Colin Gourlay: "I have never made that statement in
your presence^ aStf I doft'l feel I have to answer that
allegation here."
(Notice that there was no denial of the thrust in Insley's question.)
Now wasn't it inter eating that of all the committees
Gourlay (as nevpsenate njember)could have been put
on, the nomiriatfrig committee with Gourlay's acceptance put him on student membership in faculties —
something administration president Walter Gage once
described as not legal according to the Universities act.
* *      *
For those Canadians cra2y enough to watch America
goes Public on NBC Saturday it was a mind blowing
experience. In a beautiful political coup the Democratic
party put on a four-hour prime time national fund
raising telethon.
Many students entering the honors history program this session
have found themselves victims of a little known and vaguely explained
arts faculty rule.
Students entering third-year honors history or English have been
told by department advisors that if they didn't fulfil their literature-or
science requirement in their first two years they now cannot do so
during regular session.
Students in the history or English honors program must take 15
units of history or English respectively. As well they must take three
units of elective courses. These units cannot be used to fulfil faculty
requirements.
The student complaint has been the rules aren't explained clearly
enough and are unfair.
At least three students have been forced to drop from the programs
because of the mix-up. The others have found they will need to attend
comparatively expensive and inconvenient courses in summer or inter-
session before they're able to graduate.
"All of a sudden, in September, I find this out," said one student. "I
asked my history advisor in the summer whether it was feasible to
combine department and faculty requirements and he told me there
would be no problem.
"Then, at registration, he throws it at me."
Katherine Brearley, senior arts advisor admitted: "there's nothing
specific in the calendar about the rule but the faculty knows it."
Brearley said in an interview Monday a fairly specific note was
mailed to returning students-along with registration materials.
Many affected students, however, were away for the summer or
received registration materials in late August. One of the students affected, Laurel Vallely, said Monday: "I'm afraid this kind of think
results in a lowering of standards. It seems foolish to discourage
students from entering the honors program for such an absurd and
minor reason."
The rule is based on the philosophy a course cannot count for two
purposes. It might be compared to the writing of one cheque to pay two
different bills to different companies.
Brearley said the problem seems particularly serious this year.
"I've encountered this four times in my career. Three of the times were
this Monday," she said.
"The problems might be occuring because of changes in the English
200 course within the past few years. We've been pointing out the many
different alternatives to the old course and many more students are
taking the opportunity to defer their literature requirement."
Vallely agreed.
"Everyone says we can defer the literature requirement until the
third year. It's emphasized in the calendar and faculty advisors in
junior years discuss the alternatives willingly. Yet, they don't warn us
about the dangers involved," she said.
The problem is less serious for English students because they are
likely to fulfil their literature requirements early.
SMOLENSKY.. .the pizza pie man.
Only in America could you sit at home, phone a
number and have your political contribution charged on
Master Charge, Diner's Club or Bank Americard
(Chargex).
Broadcast from Los Angeles, the telecast was careful
not to use the Democratic party name excessively. The
production was well polished and orchestrated, kept to a
fast moving tempo.
Celebrities included Canadian Paul Anka who sang a
song glorifying the two-party system, life, liberty and
democracy — that incidentally rhymes with Ed Muskie,
John Lindsay, and Edward Kennedy but not Hubert
Humphrey.
Only in America!!
* *      *
One effect of the recent regulations governing open
dating of certain dairy products is that consumers are
now able to glean some idea of the freshness of the
product they're purchasing.
However, a few unscrupulous merchants, possibly
unhappy with this policy, have taken to little tricks in
order to hide manufacturer's printed dates.
A case in point occurs at the Old Cheese Shop on
Robson where a number of cartons of yogurt were
examined Friday for dating. Those where the date was
visible bore the stamps either Sept. 9 or 10. Usually this
date is the one after which the product should not be sold.
A number of cartons did not have any visible date
stamp, but contained a carefully attached price sticker
where the date should have been.
On peeling back the price sticker, voila, Aug. 21. Incidentally, the price on all cartons was the same unlike
day-old bread which usually sells at a marked reduction.
* *      *
Coke freak that I am, when I heard of a complaint
against Olympia Pizza's fluid sizes, I grabbed my trusty
measuring cylinder and rushed right down.
Results:
Size: Vol. Price   Price per oz.
large     10.0 oz. 40c 4c
small      8.0 oz. 25c 3.1c
The lesson of this little experiment and a number that
The Ubyssey has conducted over the years is that the
biggest size in prepared foods may not always be the
best bargain.
In this case one pays about 30 per cent more per ounce
for the privilege of having two extra ounces of Coke.
While at Olympia I couldn't help observing that from
the stated sizes of the pizzas sold there, in the case of
most inexpensive pizzas the medium size is the worst
bargain of all compared to either a small or a large (a
large isn't really any bargain either). It's only when you
buy an expensive type that any saving with size occurs.
Price per square inch
small   med.   large
cheese 2.2c    2.6c      2.5c
mushroom 2.5c     2.7c      2.6c
salami and
bacon 3.6c     3.5c      3.4c A Page  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ssptmeber   18,  1973
Mystery man
Who is John Bremer?
Many people have been asking that question and his
Friday visit to UBC campus didn't do much to dispell the
mystery surrounding him.
Technically, Bremer is head of two commissions — one
on public schools the other on post-secondary education —
set up in February by education minister Eileen Dailly.
He is also a teacher with a long history of
progressiveness, typical of the left-liberal academics B.C.'s
New Democratic Party government is calling in as advisers.
But we are still in the dark as to what he thinks, what he
plans to do, what he will recommend in his presumably
powerful advisory capacity.
. Bremer   says   he   wants   public   accountability   in   the
education system.
Why then, his refusal to meet with students noon Friday,
his retreat to morning meetings in SUB 207 to which
incidentally, he tried to limit the student accessibility?
Bremer says he's taking input, yet there is no indication
that he is doing anything other than simply listening (and
ignoring), rather than taking policy formulating advice
(input).
Bremer hints changes in the make-up of the board of
governors.
This is hardly a major concession to radical reform. The
board of governors has been anachronism, and realized as
such, since the Great Trek.
He says the role of the university is pursuit of truth, then
qualifies by saying in any form a university will compromise
this search.
Fabulous, marvellous, super!
Now could we trouble you to take a quick look at high
book prices, residence rents, neanderthal professors, student
loans, student unemployment, relevant course material,
with such a discriminating eye?
He says a university, must of course be permitted to
determine its own function, though if they don't decide
correctly then the public might cut off the gravy train.
May we ask if the commissions' report (due next year
says Bremer) might contain some hint as to what this
('correct') function is, or shall it remain a mystery for all
time?
In fact then, Bremer has said nothing.
It is the NDP government's policy to carefully guard all
their plans until they can be dumped on the public in one
bombshell package thus ensuring their weekly quota of
publicity.
We hope this silly headline-seeking on the government's
part does not mean that on some fine day in 1974 students
and public concerned with reform at the university will be
presented with a fait accompli in the form of legislation.
It is also the stated policy of the government to give the
opposition first look at planned reforms but we'd like to
think students have at least as big an interest in university
reform as Pat Jordan.
Already some of the students most closely associated
with Bremer's commission are indicating their
dissatisfaction with his plan to keep public debate low until
a preliminary guideline is ready.
Again, this sounds like the government, regardless of
good intentions, telling us what we want instead of the
other way around.
Essentially we don't want the Bremer commission to fall
into the old commission game where important issues are
neutralized by an endless series of hearings, advisory
feedback and eventual emasculated legislation.
Nor the new commission's game where a quickie series of
input sessions are called with commissioners politely
listening then going ahead and drafting the legislation they
planned anyway.
If, as some expect, Bremer is going to backtrack on some
reform issues then we'd like to hear about it right now,
from the lips of the mysterious Mr. Bremer, rather than
some September day on the lips of Lt.-Gov. Walter Owen.
THEVmSfY
SEPTEMBER 18, 1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
Led by frosh news desk head Kent Spencer the eager crew waited in
suspense.
On the collective edge of their seats sat Jake van der Kemp, Rick Lymer,
Don Peterson, Marise Savaria, Nick Scott, Michael Sasges, Pat Kenopsky,
Vaughn Palmer, Dru Spencer, Ed Dubois, Ken Dodd, Robin Burgess, Jan
Westerback, Ron Konkin, Forrest Field, Mark Buckshon and Art Smolensky
waiting for Linda Hossie to phone in her bra-burner.
Four horsemen of the apocalypse.
/&#<Ls.7'3
Hremer
If one happened to miss the
seminar on higher level education
commissioner, one did not indeed
miss an education. Smiling and
obliging, with the manner of the
good natured academic. Bremer
even qualified his qualifications.
He responded to questions from the
floor in the flowery jargon that
made one appreciate how much
easier it is to "beat around the
bush" with a university education
than without it. Indeed, the last
vestiges of UBC student activism
assembled in SUB 209, bedraggled
and weary after the fight for
student representation, wondered
whether they had mistakenly
wandered into linguistics 452.
What Bremer essentially said
was that he couldn't say anything
until he had more to say; meaning
essentially that he isn't going to let
the cat out of the bag concerning
what will happen to universities as
to who runs them and what their
function should be until he has
heard all the evidence. This is
certainly a reasonable approach,
though not particularly informative.
Of particular interest was
Bremer's statement that he would
not support the idea of providing
free university education since
university graduates are on the
average better paid than non-
university graduates. What this
seems to amount to is a refusal to
support a principle which would
make university education more
accessible to people of less fortunate economic backgrounds
because our economic system is
unjust.
Bremer however, reserved
comment on Alma Mater Society
president Brian Loomes' verdict
that our only choice is to smash
capitalism.
One somehow doubts that Mr.
Bremer's commission will come to
the same conclusion.
Graham Burns,
arts 1
Letters
but due to academic pressures,
now wish to continue on a more
casual basis.
As to whether "the program has
attracted about 1,000 persons",
would it not be more accurate to
say that several thousand others
will be discouraged from using the
UBC facilities? It seems strange
that we are forced to pay $4.50 to
support extramural sports and
then have the option of paying $5
for the privilege of using the
facilities ourselves. It would seem
more reasonable that we should
pay $5 initially in order to use the
facilities of the university and then
have the option of supporting
extramural sports either by direct
donation, or payment of admission
charges to games.
How this form of control (the $5
fee) will prevent the loss of
equipment and damage to the
facilities is hard to comprehend.
Further, what does a virtually
powerless Rec. UBC tag have over
a UBC student card as a tool for
policing the use of facilities by non-
students?
The program appears to be a
method of restricting UBC's
recreational facilities for the use of
"serious" athletes, and at the
same time to provide jobs for those
same "serious" athletes.
R. Carruthers,
science 3
G. Flynn,
science 3
D. Lindsay,
science 2
Bruce Gillespe,
commerce 2
Jamie Ramsay,
science 3
Jim Brander,
arts 3
Rec 1
Plug
j
With regard to Mr. Gautschi's
comment in the Sept. 13 issue of
The Ubyssey: we question Mr.
Gautschi's right and rationale in
directing a program designed to
"encourage those who are serious
about sports". Who is to decide
which students are "serious"
about sports? Many students have
been "serious" athletes in the past,
The following is an unpaid, non-
political plug.
Two senate committees the ad
hoc committee on interdisciplinary
courses and programmes and the
ad hoc committee on student
membership in faculties, on both of
which I sit, are currently working
on issues which will extensively
effect students' experience of the
university. This letter is to introduce these topics to students
and to request ideas and direction
from you.
The former committee was
appointed "to prepare the ground
for establishing a single
organization designed to coordinate existing interdisciplinary
courses   and   programmes,   to
facilitate further development of
interdisciplinary studies, and to
formulate the intellectual principles and goals that may arise
from such studies". I would like to
know of problems and advantages
students have recognized with
already existing interdisciplinary
courses and programmes and any
recommendations respecting the
development of this type of study.
The latter committee has partially completed its work by
establishing the principle of
student representation with vote at
faculty, division, departmental,
schools and teaching institute
meetings and on their committees
except with respect to: budget,
salaries and other financial
business; scholarships and other
student awards; adjudication of
marks and academic standing;
and appointments, tenure and
promotion. For the faculty level,
senate has approved that "the total
number of student representatives
eligible to attend a faculty meeting
be not less than 5 per cent and not
more than 25 per cent of the
number of members of the
teaching staff eligible to vote at
faculty meetings" and that "where
student representatives serve on
faculty committees the faculty
members eligible to vote at faculty
meetings be in the majority and .
the number of students form up to
one-third of the membership of the
committee."
Guidelines        for student
representation at the departmental
level have yet to be established.
Anyone having recommendations
to be put forward should do so in
writing to me by Oct. 1, since this
committee intends to proceed to a
rapid completion of this work.
Ideas   and   recommendations
should be sent to me at 4420 West*
12th; for more information on any
of this phone me at 228-8143.
Also, positions are open for six
more student senators.
Nominations close noon, Sept. 26.
Contact the AMS offices for details.
Val Embree
student senator-at-large
The     Ubyssey     welcomes
letters from all readers.
Letters should be signed and,
if possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid*
reasons for anonymity are
given. Tuesday, September  18,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Hard Times
Lifesaver 73 lists The Ubyssey
as the campus newspaper which
has fallen on hard times. Your
article, "student senator says
tribute sexist," shows the extent of
the hardship.
Surely the activities of this
provides scope for more
enlightened material than the
above mentioned article. The
subject matter is irrelevant to the
majority of students. But
monjover it shows the reporter,
and particularly the editor in a
revolting light.
If this article is representative of
the paper's journalistic responsibility, I can readily see why it has
fallen on hard times.
M.Harris
education
Rec 2
Upon reading the Sept. 14th issue
of The Ubyssey, I noticed an
editorial: Wreck II: half as bad.
I feel strongly opposed to its
slanderous content concerning the
most glorious and patriotic move
by our beloved Recreation UBC
which is to levy a fee of $5 for all
recreation facilities.
This fee includes, among other
things, the right to swim, lift
weights, run the circuit, play
volleyball, basketball and other
sports within the War Memorial
gym.
Truly, this is to our benefit and
we should consider the expense of
running these programs, if we feel
it is too much to pay per individual.
Let's be thankful that they, Rec
UBC, have seen fit to recognize
that each student works within a
limited budget; and therefore kept
the fee at a minimum.
One could ask why we should pay
another $5 when we already pay a
$5 athletic fee? I would say to him
that the $5 athletic fee goes
towards extramurals for the UBC
football, hockey and rugby teams
for which we should be duly proud
(exactly $1.20 to women and $3.80
to men per $5) and that another $5
is a small price to pay to keep
physically able.
So in closing I would say thank -
you to Rec UBC for giving us more
rights than we deserve.
John G. Shlugum
true believer in
monopoly capitalism
Rec 3
It disturbs me to see the P:E. —
Recreation types at UBC taking
themselves so seriously. Athletics
should retain some sense of
frivolity and spontaneity, and
bureaucratic empire building, (i.e.
Recreation UBC) which caters to
"serious" and "organized"
athletics, stifles both.
Additionally, the inference that
university facilities be more or less
reserved for student (read here
"serious and organized student
use") use, with the larger community excluded, is inimical to the
idea of close community-university
relations.
UECs jock bureaucrats seem to
have discovered several centuries
late!, the ivory tower mentality.
Ah well, at least it's a mentality —
a step in the right direction to be
sure.
Ron Rothwell
grad studies
GSA
been circulating on the subject of
the forthcoming graduate student
poll concerning the Alma Mater
Society fee levy expresses a
narrow and unobjective point of
view.
You say that a united student
front is needed in the fact of the
governing bodies of this university.
Agreed, but what has this to do
with our membership in AMS?
Surely solidarity with the AMS
does not imply membership in that
body!
And you claim that it would be to
the financial detriment of graduate
students to withdraw from the
AMS. Shades of Cece Bennett! Our
own treasury is short of funds and
you try to tell us we ought to kick
an extra $24 apiece into the AMS
coffers! Only a Socred finance
minister could see the sense in
that. Shaking me down personally
is bad enough. But $24 multiplied
by the total number of grad
students is a lot of wampum.
Finally, you fearless defenders
of democracy, you threaten to
resign if the graduate students vote
to resist this rip-off. Whom do you
represent, us or the AMS? If you
propose to show yourselves to be
running-dogs of the AMS
bureaucracy, perhaps you ought to
resign right now. If the people who
elected you wish it, your duty is to
put pressure on the AMS to use
part of that $24 per graduate
student to relieve our financial
distress.
Assuredly, no one wants to pull
GSA out of AMS, and there will be
not need to do so since AMS will
certainly come to terms under the
credible threat of losing so much
extra revenue. If you on the
executive cannot see your way
clear to putting on the pressure,
your integrity is certainly open to
question.
Dan Emanuel
Donald Baronowski
Joe Liberty
grad studies classic
Action
best chance of improving our
status at UBC and of restructuring
it to serve our needs if we work
together. Come join the wonien's
action group. Our first
organizational meeting this year
will be on Friday, Sept. 21 at 12:30
in SUB 205.
The women's grievance commission exists to deal confidentially with cases of sex
discrimination. Representatives of
the action group and the grievance
commission are in the SUB
women's office on Mondays from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
women's action group
An open letter to the executive
committee, grad student
association:
The statement which you have
The report on the status of
women at UBC clearly showed the
most exploited workers at this
university are women.
Most women on staff are vastly
underpaid in relation to the value
of their work, and women are
denied the opportunity to engage in
the higher-paid work that men do.
UBC does little or nothing to serve
their needs, even their educational
needs.
The institution's effort to serve
the needs of its students is also
very minimal. Virtually every
student-oriented change we have
witnessed has been the valiant
effort of individuals either bucking
the power of the institution or
getting around it. The absence of a
concerted effort to find out what
students want to learn and how
best to teach them has had its
worst effects on women. UBC
simply perpetuates the situations it
finds, because it has no committment to helping women
overcome the effects of their past
and present oppression.
If UBC accommodates anyone, it
is a select group of faculty
members, almost all of them men.
It bothers us that women faculty
are paid less than men, but mostly
because it is a symptom that the
university, with the complicity of
its faculty, has systematically
excluded women from positions
where they could make valuable
contributions to education and
from just recognition of their work.
We don't think men will give up
their undue privilege and their
stifling power without a struggle.
Clearly we women will have the
Rec 4
Recently there's been a lot of
ruckus going around campus
concerning the payment of the $5
athletic fee. I'd like to give some
reasons why students should feel
proud to support our fine teams by
paying this small levy.
First you, by paying this miserly
sum, support a great bunch of
athletes who spend hours practicing their sports for the glory of
UBC.
Second — your money helps to
buy equipment for the use of our
teams as well as sending our fine
fellows (and gals) to far off
horizons thus spreading the fame
of the UBC Thunderbirds.
Third — the alumni, who take
sports very seriously, like to see
the Thunderbirds playing and
winning, and if the alumni are
happy then perhaps they'll contribute more money for sports.
So I urge all of you to continue
your support so you can be proud
of us and we can be proud of you.
a coach
ALL STUDENT, FACULTY AND STAFF WOMEN
Women's Night—Tonight
SEPTEMBER 18
7:30-11 P.
SUB BALLROOM
FOR THE ABSOLUTE LATEST
IN EYEWEAR
LOOK TO . . .
Prescription Optical
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
We have an office near you!
r
EYEWEAR FASHIONS WITH A FLAIR
•   «. •
OFFICIAL NOTICES
GRADUATE
STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
A. REFERENDUM
September 19-20, 10:30-4:30
1. Are you in favor of continuing to belong to the Alma Mater
Society?
2. Are you in favor of paying the $29 Alma Mater Society fee?
Polling    Stations:    GSC,   SUB,    Buchanan,   Bookstore,    Barn.
All voters must have valid
1973-74 AMS Cards
B. GRADUATE REPRESENTATIVE
ASSEMBLY MEETING
ACT — ACT — ACT
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE ALCHEMIST
by Ben Jonson
to be presented October 31-November 10
will be held on
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
In Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
- Auditions Open to All UBC Faculty, Staff and Students - Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  18,  1973
Hot flashes
Copyrunner
needed
The Ubyssey needs a person
with a car to deliver copy three
times a week to our printers.
The pay is $2 a run.
The copy runner would make
two runs each Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday to
College Printers, Twelfth and
Maple.
See Lesley Krueger or Michael
Sasges in the Ubyssey newsroom,
SUB 241K.
Women's night
The women's office is holding
a women's night at 7:30 - 11 p.m.
today in the SUB ballroom.
All students, staff and faculty
are invited.
Chile talk
Anne Marie Morell, a Chilean
native, anthropology professor
Blanca Muratoria of Argentina
and Gary Cristall of the Chilean
solidarity committee will take
part today in a panel discussion of
Chile.
Tween
classes
TODAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, IH 402.
HILLEL
Free   lunch,    open    house,   student
elections, noon, Hillel house.
KAYAK, CANOE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
SWIM TEAM
Meeting   for   swimmers  and   divers,
noon, gym 213.
MEN'S TENNIS
Tryouts  today  and  all   week, 4:30
p.m., * courts    behind    the    winter
sports centre.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Women's   night,   all   students,  staff
and  faculty invited, free, 7:30 p.m.
to 11 p.m., SUB ballroom.
AQUASOC
Slide show of Truk Lagoon, 7 p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
Tryouts, 7 p.m.. Memorial gym.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S BADMINTON
Tryouts, 6:30 p.m., gym A, physed
unit 1.
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
Tryouts,     5     p.m.    south    campus
fields.
WAA
Basketball   tryouts   (3  teams), 4:30
p.m., memorial gym.
KUNG-FU
Kung-fu      demonstration      anc
registration,   noon,   SUB   ballroom.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Meeting  and   slide   show on  Mount
Victoria, noon, Angus 104.
UBC SAILING CLUB
MeetUJg, noon, SUB 205.
ONTOLOGY
Michael Cecil on Return to Beauty,
noon, Buchanan 216.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Wine,    dessert    and    coffee    party,
speaker   Helen   McCrae   on   China,
7:30    p.m.   to    10   p.m.,    graduate
students centre garden room.
IL CAFFE
Meeting    and   elections,   noon,    IH
stage. .
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting and elections, noon, SUB
211.
HISPANIC ITALIAN STUDIES
Prof esscM-^ Han na    Kassis    on    The
Marco   .fltrto     Golden      Road     to
Samartfin'il    8:30   p.m.,   Buchanan
penth'mgjjfc** •
WOMEN'SWlXtYBALL
Tryouts, 4:30 p.m., memorial gym.
WOMEN'SlMSLO HOCKEY
TryoUfS/'5 p.m. south campus
fields. , .
THURst$ȣ': '
AIESEC   £ %<&}•-
Meeting, noon," Angus 406.
CURLING CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 209.
KARATE CLUB
Practice,   7:30   p.m.   to  9:30   p.m.,
gym E.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting,    all    staff,    students    and
faculty  welcome,   noon,   SUB   205.
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
Chile — The military coup, why it
happened, what next?, free public
forum, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
Topics of the discussion will
include imperialist intervention in
Chile, political history of the
Chilean working class and an
analysis of the recent military
coup.
The discussion at noon in SUB
212 is sponsored by the Alma
Mater Society speakers and
education committee.
lost and found
The lost and found office will
be opening in SUB this week.
The office, located in SUB
105A on the north side of the
cafeteria, will be open Monday,
Thursday and Friday from noon
to 2:30 p.m. and Tuesday and
Wednesday from noon to 1:30
p.m.
So if you want to take the one
in 50 chance that your umbrella
was lost, not stolen, you know
where to go.
question   of   membership   in  the
AMS.
The graduate student
association is holding a
referendum on these questions
Wednesday and Thursday in the
graduate student centre.
Archaeology
Classics professors James
Russell and Hector Williams will
discuss Friday their part in the
archaeological excavation of a
Roman city, Anamurim, in
Turkey.
The discussion, the first in a
series of arts faculty presentations
on classical and medieval art, will
be televised on Cable 10, the
community cable station.
WAC meet
The women's action group is
holding its first general meeting of
the year noon Friday in SUB 205.
All students, staff, faculty and
alumni are welcome.
The group published a report
last year on women at UBC which
showed women staff and students
on campus are discriminated
against.
GSA meeting
There will be a meeting to
discuss what the Alma Mater
Society does for graduate students
at noon today in the garden room
of the graduate student centre.
Other issues to be discussed
will be the $29 fee increase for
graduate      students     and     the
s
u
B
F
I
L
M
S
O
c
p
R
E
S
E
N
Thurs.-7:00       T
& Sat-7 & 9:30 A
Sun.-7:00        T
|C /""HgfflHS^ O
MO ADWTTANCt TO ttRJONS UHDfK l|   |\j
"Everything You
Always Wanted To
Know About SEX"
— but were afraid to
ask —
AUD.
Clubs day
Are you an eco-freak? a junior
politico? a film nut?
Whatever your fetish there's
bound to be a UBC club that suits
you.
Clubs Day Thursday will be
your chance to shop around.
Some 20 to 30 clubs will be
competing for new members with
flashy displays and
demonstrations in and around
SUB.
Come and take in the sights.
The show lasts all day.
?rmm*invmvm.i p
l.m. ■,W|i"*myjlW),*HJl,*»HIW*»i,>,,Tg!»,'*yry
n
BRITISH
SPORTS CARS
The 1973 Midget is all sports
car. From its sporty bucket seats
to its mag type wheels and radial
ply tires! You simply can't buy
more sports car for the money!
AVAILABLE RIGHT NOW
$3025
GORDON IMPORT
Authorized
Dealer
3695W. 10th
AT ALMA
733-8105
SALES - SERVICE - PARTS
Dealer lie. no. D1943
JH^IWHjNm ■^"W ■ ■»»* ■ ^m^t^Lmmmm****.***.*** —H^ I^HMM
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
OPEN MEETING
What does the AMS do for us?
JOHN WILSON, AMS Treasurer
GSA EXECUTIVE MEMBERS
Today, 12:30 p.m. Garden Room, GSC
In any life you choose, even the worldly one, Yoga can benefit
you. through Yoga you will relax more. Through a more tranquil
mind you will be healthier, if you are healthier, you will be
happier more able to accomplish all you set out to do.
—Satchidananda
Yoga pose — Leg Split
also called Half Moon
The Vancouver Yoga Center
10 Week Course starting October 15
102 - 1684 West 8th Avenue
For information call 929-4406 or 987-4807-
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:
Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
13
LOST — LADY'S GOLD WRIS'T-
watch, Birks make. Please return
Bank of Montreal, S.U.B. Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM LADNER IN-
to UBC for 8:30 every morning.
Please phone Jacqui, :M6-6254.
Special Notices
IS
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, 1 st $200. Your cost
$125.     2-year     parts     guarantee.
Call   325-0366   for   savings.	
REGISTER   NOW"   AT   THE
TUTORIAL. CENTRE.
Speakesy—SUB—12:30  to  2:30 or
call   228-4557   anytime.	
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP (NEAR
Campus). Open 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
5736   University Blvd.	
GRATEFUL TO HAVE I.D. BACK.
Great to know there are people
who still care. Thanks. Linda
Toyoda.
Help Wanted
51
DRIVER NEEDED TO RUN COPY
from SUB to Maple and W. 12th,
12:30, 4 and 6 p.m. Mondays,
"Wednesdays and Thursdays. $2.00
per run. Apply Publications Of-
fice,   SUB,   Rm.   241J.	
FLUTE TEACHER FOR 12-YEAR-
old  boy   at   home   or   nearby,   4th
_&  Sasamat.   224-5816.	
PART TIME LEGAL SECRFTARY
for 6 hours a week in Lawyers'
home, 4th & Blanca. Flexible
hours.   224-5056.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. AH
grade   levels   welcome.   731-0601.
Special Classes
62
"POT" AT POTTER'S CENTRE.
Wheel-work instruction at all
levels starting Sept. 17. Limited
enrollment.  Phone G. Alfred 261-
Special Events
15A
ALL STUDENT FACULTY STAFF
women. Come to Campui Women's night, Tuesday, 18 September, 7:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m. S.U.B.
Ballroom,  mixer,   get  together.
Travel Opportunities
16
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON   A
LIMITED BUDGET?
— then attend a special travel
evening sponsored by the Canadian Youth Hostels Assoc'ation
to be held at the Vancouver
Youth Hostel at the foot of Discovery Street on Tuesday, September 25th at S p.m. Advice
will be given on all aspects of
low budget travel and free che^k
lists will be available to all potential travellers. Those requiring
more details of the meeting or
its location should phone 738-
S128. .
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
FOR SALE, '71 GREMLIN. POWER
steering, a/cond., autom., $2300
cash.   Ph.   688-2959   after   six.
Motorcycles
25
1971 YAMAHA 650cc. LITTLE OL"
lady condition. 8000 miles. Ph.
731-3409.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
ANY WITNESS TO A HIT-AND-
r.un in Lot B Wesnesday, Sent.
12 involving a yellow MGB
please leave message with
UBYSSEY.
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.
4764.
Tutoring
64
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-4557 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NEW LAB COATS, ALL SIZES,
$6.50, on sale from 12:30-1:30
in  Brock Hall's  BUD Lounge.
Rooms
81
FURN. ROOM SHARED KITCHEN
priv., ent. Oak at 18th. Rides
avail, to U.B.C. 738-4062 eves.,
685-0725   day. ___^_
FURN. BASEMT. ROOM. PRIV.
bath & ent., 2 blks. U.B.C. gates,
$50 mo; or room with supper,
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USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, September 18,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Death by a field goal
A field goal in the dying minutes gave the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs a 9-6 victory over the UBC Thunderbirds football team in
Calgary Saturday.
However, the Birds were definitely in the hard-fought affair on a
wind swept McMahon Stadium field 'til the finish.
Bird head coach Norm Thomas said he felt inexperience, poor
timing, and a poor kicking game were responsible for the loss.
He said he was generally pleased with the performance of the
defensive team, however.
Defensive coaches Bob Laycoe and Michel Leveille, a fifth year
Simon Fraser University education major and late B.C. Lion's cut, have
done a good job with the defence, which allowed only nine points and no
touchdowns.
The defence was led by defensive back Ten Hon Choo, who grabbed
two interceptions and Sal Giacomazza and Doug Young who knocked
down many key passes. The secondary was backed up by the hitting of
middle linebacker Joe Gluska.
Thomas said offensive guards Mike Cleaver and Derek Lacroix
with tackles John Marquart and Mark Spurr also played well. Miscues
between the backs and confused blocking assignments caused by the
frequently shifting Calgary defensive line caused the offense to sputter
until the third quarter when running back Scott Embleton went over
from the nine yard line.
Poor snaps from centre on the punts, two of which sailed over the
punter's head, missed field goals, and the lack of co-ordination on
execution are still preventing the development of the team.
While execution may improve Saturday's game against Manitoba
at Thunderbird Stadium at 2 p.m., the kicking game may be a chronic
weak spot this season.
«-        ■*      :»■
3+.1- ■■?"
i. t i
mmWiWLLi
-don peterson photo
THUNDERBIRD     QUARTERBACK     Jim    Tarves    practises    the
sprint-out play at the 'Birds football workout Monday.
Intramurals
are growing
By RON KONKIN
The first annual unit managers meeting for intramurals was held
last week.
A system where more people could get involved in running the
program this year was discussed.
Intramural participation is growing every year. Because of this unit
managers are finding organization of activities too much to handle.
Team captains will have more responsibility this year. Each leader
will be on a standing sports committee.
This committee will control player eligibility, protests and rules.
Entry deadlines are Friday for these men's intramural events:
1) Turkey Trot — A 3-1/2-mile race. Prizes are a turkey, goose,
chicken and one dozen eggs. With the price of food, it's worth the effort.
2) Bowling — Last year, there was an entry of 50 teams with a high
level of competition.
3) Badminton — There were 160 entrants last year.
4) Golf — A competition for the great "Gnup Cup".
The golf competition will be divided into two stages:
1) Two rounds of medal play at either McCleery golf course or
Langara golf course or one round at each course. Rounds must be
played! between Sunday and September 30, unless of course, the weather
is bad. After completing each round, turn your scorecard into the pro
shop.
2) The lowest eight scores will advance into match play. The
matches may be played at any course, but must be within 10 days. It is
up to toe top man on the draw to arrange the match. The draws will be
posted in Memorial gym 308.
Unfortunately, men's intramurals cannot pay for these rounds so
each round will cost $3.50 on a weekday, and $4 on a weekend.
Anyone interested in taking pictures for the program, please come
to the war memorial gym 308.
Referees are needed for all sports. Sign up in War Memorial gym
308.
SPORTS
Sports help
You've probably noticed what a sad mess the sports page is in this
year.
There's no sports editor, sports writers or sports photographers,
which usually tends to give the page a somewhat blank look. The UBC
football team has, happily, received some coverage but even those
meagre pickens won't last long without a staff.
The page will die if some of its readers — yes, you! — don't take the
time to come in and work a few hours a week covering events. It won't
die because the so-called radicals on the rest of the The Ubyssey staff
don't want it.
There is usually one page — in an eight-page paper — reserved for
sports. But with nothing but blank spaces to run even this offering will
soon go to news events.
It's up to you. Yes, you! If this campus wants sports news someone
will have to get up off their ass and do it.
Press days are Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays — the paper
comes out Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays.
Work usually starts about noon; the Ubyssey office is in SUB 241K.
In addition to football, soccer is starting up, intramurals and
various other goodies. Basketball and hockey, usually covered quite
closely by sports, will start in a few weeks.
So please, if you've got any interest at all in sports come out on a
press day and do some writing.
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
In your own way.
In your own time.
Onyourown terms.
You'll take to the
taste of Player^ Filter.
/tio^f0
^cfiHr*"^
Warning: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked. Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ssptmeber   18,   1973
AMS group seeks student reps
LADNER
Skylights
BELL TOWER is
for underground Ii
—peter cummings photo
reflected in multi-faceted "cones" above new Sedgewick library on Main Mall,
brary were sheathed with bronze-tinted reflective glass during the summer.
UBC Students: Bring this ad and your student card for extra $10 off!
By ROBIN BURGESS
Student representation on all university committees will be a
primary goal of the Alma Mater Society education committee this year,
chairman Gerald de Montigny said Monday.
This time, however, he said there will be more analysis of the
broader implications of student participation.
"We feel student representation is not an end in itself. Our ultimate
aim is the democratization of the university."
The organization of department unions, begun at the end of last year
and scheduled to get underway again this week will be the first step, he
said.
"Student unions are designed to get students involved in what's
happening in their own department — tenure, prerequisite courses —
the things that affect them" de Montigny said.
Later this week committee members will be distributing pamphlets
to students in history, psychology, philosophy, political science and
hispanic studies explaining the idea behind unions, outlining the
structure of different departments and specifying a meeting time for
students interested in organizing.
Students from other departments interested in organizing unions
are urged to see de Montigny in room 234 SUB.
De Montigny said he sees student unions primarily as a mechanism
"with a certain amount of power" for the expression of students'
grievances.
"The university structure tends to alienate students. They're lost
and uninvolved. But in unity there's strength."
"Department unions are a way of breaking down elitism between
grads, honors and majors — they make them realize they have common
grievances."
Equally important, he said, are department unions which ensure
that student representatives chosen to sit on faculty and department
committees are selected democratically by the students.
De Montigny said he has little doubt the long-awaited senate report
on student representation scheduled to come out this fall will recommend "token student representation."
He added however that this is a compromise the education committee has no intention of accepting.
"We are waiting for the senate report to come out before we take
direct action because we need to have a base, some definition to work
from.
"But we won't accept a report that will compromise the students."
The committee wants "meaningful representation" and will fight
for it, said de Montigny.
As the primary co-ordinating body of student activity on campus the
committee also has plans to restructure the AMS "to eliminate some of
the bureaucracy.
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