UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 7, 2010

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127274.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127274.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127274-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127274-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127274-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127274-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127274-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127274-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127274-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127274.ris

Full Text

Array balls to the walls boys SINCE 1918
~p£lf*P nf Ctfl£lf*P I UBC astronomers have published photos depicting
A dVC UI d^/ClVC | jeep Space 12 billion years ago. See page 3.
THURSDAY ^\^_t
2010.01.07
WEATHER
08 RAINY
09 SHOWERS
10 SHOWERS
8:06
SUNRISE
4:31
SUNSET	
UBC BY NUMBERS
95 DAYS TIL END OF TERM
308 MPs TWIDDLING THEIR THUMBS
18 STUDENTS PER PROFESSOR
8 PROPOSED AMS REFERENDA &
10 PEOPLE WHO CARE ABOUT THEM
NEWS BRIEFS
PRES CONSIDERS CALLING
FOR RESIGNATION OF UNDERGRAD SOCIETY EXECS
AMS President Blake Frederick
has expressed interest in calling
for the resignations of the undergraduate society executives and
councilors who voted in favour of
the resignation of himself and VP
External Tim Chu.
In early December 2009, the
Arts, Science and Engineering
undergraduate societies passed
resolutions supporting the resignation of Chu and Frederick over
the filing of the complaint to the
United Nations.
Frederick sent an e-mail to the
presidents of the undergraduate
societies asking for the minutes of
the meetings at which these motions were passed, as well as a record of who voted for and against
the motions, an explanation of
why Frederick and Chu were not
allowed to speak at the meetings
and the most up-to-date codes of
the undergraduate societies.
In an e-mail reply to AUS President Guillaume Houle, Frederick
stated his desire to investigate the
role of constituencies in the AMS
He also said he wanted to "hold
those individuals accountable to
the electorate by publishing this
information during the next election cycle." Lastly, he wishes to
determine why he and Chu were
not consulted at the meetings.
Frederick told The Ubyssey
that he does not plan to take any
action at the moment. "I will
decide whether or not I want to
pursue it once my term is over,"
he said.
The undergraduate society
presidents declined comment.
CRIME WATCH
Police responded to five auto
thefts from December 28 to
30 in parkades across campus.
Police are reminding students to
not leave valuables such as GPS
units or cell phones visible inside
the vehicle, as this makes them a
target for thieves.
JANUARY1 Police responded to a
break and enter at the 6200 block
of Agricultural Rd that occurred
sometime over the holiday break.
At this time nothing appears to be
stolen, and there are currently no
suspects or witnesses.
JANUARY2 Mischief to vehicle.
Complainant reports that while
parked at the corner of University
Blvd and Wesbrook Mall, someone scratched and dented his vehicle. No suspects or witnesses.
JANUARY3 Police responded to a
break and enter at the 1900 block
of Mathematics Rd. It is unknown
when break and enter occurred,
and it appears nothing was stolen.
No suspects or witnesses. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.01.07
JANUARY 7, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XXX
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia. It is published every
Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications
Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey
staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff,
and do not necessarily reflect the views of The
Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of
British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The
Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey Publications
Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork
contained herein cannot be reproduced without the
expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding
principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification
will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion
pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will
be given to letters and perspectives over freestyles
unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces
will not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
submissions for length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published
in the following issue unless there is an urgent time
restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the
Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS will
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
I can't believe you're breaking up with me, Ashley
Whillans. When we first started to Anthony Goertz, I
really thought we had a good thing going, you know?
Very Brad S. Jen, very Kasha Chang S. Austin Holm
But I guess that just like Brad, you had a Michael
Fortnight on the side.  No, no, I'm not bitter or anything.  It's just, Nicole Gall, that if things weren't right,
you could have Keegan Bursaw'ed me or something.
You can't just pull a Siri Williams.  I admit we had
our Gerald Deo, and the Trevor Record wasn't always
the best.  Oh, and then there was that incident with
Katarina Grgic and Paul Bucci and the Slovakian twins
Yeah, that was a doozy of a Samantha Jung.  On
second thought, actually, our whole relationship was
kind of Justin McElroy. Tara Martellaro totally wouldn't
have approved. Really, when I Pierce Nettling about it,
it's all for the best, huh? Well, I guess I'll be seeing
you, then. Awww, no, don't go all Jonny Wakefield on
me.  No, no hugs.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeydedpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION* Come help us
create this baby! Learn about layout
and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
KOERNER'S NIGHT* Join us for open
mic night every Monday. Listen
to the different flavours of music,
all while enjoying a nice cold beer
or a competitive game of pool. •
Every Monday, 8:30pm onwards.
Koerner's Pub.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC &
MEAL* Like to play fun music? Just
want to listen? Looking for a sense
of community? This is for all members of the UBC community who
want to have a good meal and
great conversation. All meals are
home-cooked and are vegetarian-
friendly. • Every Monday, 6:30pm-
8:30pm, Chapel of the Epiphany
(6030 Chancellor Blvd), more info
revnathanwright@mac.com.
DRIPPYTOWN: VANCOUVER'S COMIC
ARTISTS ON DISPLAY* Want a different take on Vancity? The collection
features contributions from six local
comic artists whose work provides
a look at life in Vancouver. • Continues until Jan 31, Rare Books and
Special Collections in IKE, more info
at puddingsock livejoumal. com.
AMS ELECTIONS NOMINATIONS
NOW OPEN! • Elections for AMS
Executive positions, International
Student Representative, Student
Legal Fund Society Board of Directors, Senate and Board of Governors of the university. • Until Jan 8,
3pm, download nomination forms
at ams.ubc.ca/elections or pick up
in SUB 238A.
ROMEO & JULIET • This production
of the Shakespearean classic will
feature live music with a cast of
21 UBC Theatre BFA Acting students. Expect a brave and twisted
approach to Shakespeare's iconic
story of lovers in a dangerous time.
• Jan 20-30, 7:30pm, Telus Studio.
Tickets at $15/$20/$25.
FRIDAY, JAN. 8
THE MALAYSIA SINGAPORE NIGHT
(MSN) 2010 KRISPY KREME FUNDRAISER • Buy some delicious doughnuts and help raise funds for their
annual event. • 8:30am-4:30pm,
SUB North Plaza 1.
SUNDAY JAN. 10
A BRIEF HISTORY OF POPULAR
REVOLUTIONARY ART • A look at artwork and artists directly related to
revolutionary ideals, with discussions
on how art and revolution work in context to each other. Learn the physical
"how-tos" of making resistance art
•lOam-lpm, Purple Thistle Centre
(260-975 Vernon St.), free
MONDAY JAN. 11
REC CENTRE SHOPPING WEEK* Have a
class you want to try out? Want to
see if you can endure an entire class
of pilates? This is the week to do
it! All instructional classes are free
this week! So just pop by and start
enriching your life! • Jan 11-17, REC
centre. For more details, go to rec.
ubc.ca.
FREE OMAR KHADR-Vigil and public fo-
rum for the release of Guantanamo
Bay prisoner Omar Khadr. • Vigil
begins at 5:45 pm at Victory Park followed by walk to the SFU Harbour
Centre for a public forum, contact
dwiight@amnesty.ca, free.
THURSDAY JAN. 14
BRANCHING OUT • The Foresty
Undergraduate Society (FUS)
and  the  Students  for   Forestry
SUSCOMIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
Awareness (SFA) are hosting a
symposium to provide insight into
the implications of current forestry
issues and perspective regarding how students can apply their
education to adapt to and initiate
changes in the sector. Listen on
to the panel discussion and get
an opportunity to voice your opinions. • 6pm-9pm, Lecture Theatre
1005, Forest Sciences Centre.
IAN FERGUSON • An award-winning
playwright and humourist whose
commentaries have been widely
broadcast on radio and television
speaks on being Canadian. • 2pm,
Lillooet Room (301) IKBLC.
ARTS AND MASS VIOLENCE: NEW FORMS
OF ENGAGEMENT* The Liu Institute's
Transitional Justice Network presents this dialogue about artistic
research and practices relating to
situations of mass atrocity, social
reconstruction and social change. •
Panel discussion at 4pm, reception
at 5:30pm, Liu Institute for Global Issues (6476 NW Marine Drive). Free
registration online at fluidsurveys.
com/surveys/liuinstitute/register-tjn-
arts-event/.
CONTINUING STUDIES WRITING CENTRE
USED BOOK SALE • The Writing Centre
will be holding its gigantic annual
booksale. There will be a wide variety of used books on a wide variety
of subjects, from cookery books to
classics of fiction, and lots more. All
proceeds go to awards and scholarships in the UBC Writing Centre. •
Jan 14-15, 10am-4pm, UBC Wning
Centre. All books are 50 cents each.
FRIDAY JAN. 15
A CONVERSATION WITH MICHAEL IGNATIEFF® UBC* Liberal leader Michael
Ignatieff is starting the New Year
with a cross-Canada campus tour
to meet young Canadians in the
lead-up to Canada at 150: Rising
to the Challenge—a non-partisan
conference being held in Montreal in
March 2010. • 3pm-4:30pm, Norm
Theatre.
CAMPUS & COMMUNITY PLANNING
www.planning.ubc.ca
Public Open House
Totem Park Residence Project
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on a development
proposal for a new 7 storey student residence at the northwest corner of West Mall
and Thunderbird Boulevard. Approximately, 180,000 sf of floor space and 530 units are
proposed within two buildings.
The applicants, project architects and UBC staff will be available to describe the project
and answer questions.
Date: Tuesday, January 12, 2010 4 - 6 PM
Location: Commons Block Totem Res, 2525 West Mall
For directions visit: www.maps.ubc.ca. For more information on
this project, please visit the C&CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
■3="   a £
&
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, karen.russell@ubc.ca
This event is wheelchair accessible. For more information about assistance for persons
with disabilities, e-mail rachel.wiersma@ubc.ca
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
ARE FREE FOR
UBC STUDENTS
E-MAIL US AT
~.VENTS@UBYSSEY
CA. 2010.01.07/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
»    The    crime    rate    for     in 1993 to 84 in 2003, with a
perpetrators       under       18     decline in 2004 to 71 homicides
increased between 1999 and       » 20 per cent increase in
2003                                         drug- and gang-related killings
.   _  _. .                           » There were 622 homicides     in 2009
fZ A IVI fl _,                    in 2004; 71 were gang-related       » Since mid-January 2009,
" *■' ■ "                        (youth,  street and  organized     Vancouver  has   reported   50
QP|    liyrn           crime)   with   50   involving   a     gang-related shootings, 18 of
K[   L/\ 1       \j           firearm                                       them fatal
»The number of gang-related       » The number of homicides      *From    the    RCMP,    CBC,
lull 1 R ll F R ^       homicides     have     generally     dropped in Metro Vancouver   Vancouver Sun, The Independent
IllUnUtnO       increased from a low of 13     in 2009, from 58 in 2008 to 56              —Compiled by Larisa Karr
Images map galaxy formation
UBC researchers unveil 12 billion-year-old images
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakef ie ld@ubyssey.ca
Our understanding of how galaxies are formed is becoming clearer
thanks in part to the research of a
team of UBC astronomers.
Gaelen Marsden, a researcher
at UBC's Experimental Cosmology
Lab and a post-doctorate fellow in
astronomy, is being credited with
producing the most detailed images of deep space yet, revealing "tens
of thousands of newly discovered
galaxies at the early stages of formation," according to a press release
from Science Daily.
The UBC team is part of the
Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic
Survey (HerMES), a multi-national
research project that is attempting
to create a map of the universe
from 12 billion years ago. HerMES
is made up of more than a hundred astronomers hailing from six
countries. Besides Marsden, the
UBC team includes several other researchers and professors from the
Astronomy Department: professors
Douglas Scott and Mark Halpern, as
well as post-doctorate fellows Don
Wiebe, Elisabetta Valiante and Ed
Chapin.
Stars that are just
being formed are
essentially collapsing clouds of dust.
GAELEN MARSDEN,
RESEARCHER, UBC'S EXPERIMENTAL
COSMOLOGY LAB
The team used data from the
Herschel Space telescope to construct these images. Launched in
May 2009, Herschel is the world's
'largest and most expensive space
telescope," according to the release.
The image of deep space from 12 billion years ago that shows early galaxy formation. The SPIRE camera has three
arrays that operate at different wavelengths. The image taken from these wavelengths is rendered in red, green or blue
and combined to form a single image, seen here, photo courtesy of gaelen marsden
It differs from its more famous
cousin, the Hubble, in that it contains infrared instead of optical
cameras. One of these cameras,
called SPIRE, was key in constructing these images. SPIRE is a sub-
millimetre telescope that is capable
of picking up "warm" objects in
space. The team's research was
presented in December at the first
International Herschel Science
Meeting in Madrid, Spain.
"It is sensitive to objects that are
glowing, objects that are about 50
Kelvin," said Marsden, adding that
a "warm" object in space is around
minus 220 degrees Celsius.
The sub-millimetre
telescope s images
resemble "fuzzy
blots."
"Stars that are just being
formed are essentially collapsing clouds of dust. If you point
an optical telescope at a star that
is just being formed, you won't
see it because it has all this dust
around it. With a sub-millimetre
telescope, it glows. What you
see are very young stars that
you would not see with an
optical telescope."
The images produced by an optical telescope are a far higher resolution, though the sub-millimetre
telescope's images resemble "fuzzy
blots." The UBC team was in charge
of converting large scans of the sky
into actual images.
According to Marsden, the discovery doesn't change what we
know about the formation of the
universe.
"So far, [the findings] sort of fit
into the picture we already imagined. It's filling in the details of how
galaxies first formed." va
Referenda galore!
r
On Wednesday afternoon, Arts Councilor Matthew Naylor attempted to gather
1000 signatures in order to put a whopping six referendum questions on the ballot for this year's AMS elections.
1000 signatures are necessary for
receiving awareness funding for your
referenda. However, after gathering only
750 signatures, Naylor opted to bring the
questions to AMS Council for approval,
which would also allow him funding.
Three questions were approved: the removal of AMS President Blake Frederick
from office, the removal of VP External
Tim Chu, and the creation of a $5 engagement levy for students wishing to vote in
elections. A question regarding the return
of slates (which were de facto political
parties that were outlawed four years
ago) must wait for 1000 signatures in
order to be put on the ballot. The other
two questions were still being debated at
AMS Council by press time.
—Samantha Jung
GERALD DEO PH0T0S/THE UBYSSEY
Neuroscience
and beer
COURTESY OF STAN FLORESCO
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Dr Stan Floresco knows how to have
a good time. As a professor of Neuroscience and the principle investigator at the Neurocircuits and Cognition Psychology Laboratory at UBC,
the lab on campus that he claims
has the most fun and arguably the
highest number of endorphins, Ho-
resco lives by the motto, "Work hard,
play hard."
Working at the Pit Pub during
his undergraduate degree, Floresco
always made it a point to enjoy himself, and the party didn't stop after
graduation. Earning a PhD from
UBC and becoming an assistant
professor in 2003, Floresco continues to share his good-natured and
fun-loving spirit with students and
staff.
"In school, I had fun. There were
crap days, but ultimately I had a
good time and I try to make sure
[students] have some too. I'm not
like Michael Scott from The Office
or anything, but I like to let students
know that I'm there to support
them and that it is possible to have
fun at work," he said.
Known for his humorous and
entertaining lectures, Floresco
attempts to instill his passion for
neuroscience—the study of how the
brain and chemicals in the brain
affect behaviour—through laughter
and story-telling.
"When I lecture I like to have
fun. I use powerpoint and animate slides, but I also like to use
analogies and tell stories," Floresco
explained.
"Telling stories and teaching
how experiments map onto real
world processes helps students
realize why this work is important
and what is interesting about it."
Although Floresco may have
had the chops to be a stand-up
comedian, he loves what he does
and couldn't seem himself doing
anything else (aside from being a
rockstar or a superhero), and he
encourages students to find out not
only what they are good at, but what
they enjoy.
"Some things you may be good
at but don't enjoy doing, and other
things you may really want to do,
but you just don't have aknackfor,"
he said. "It's about finding out what
your particular skills, what parts of
your brain are working better than
average, that allow you to excel at
one profession over another."
It is obvious that Floresco has followed his own advice, and found a
profession that not only is he good
at, but that he enjoys. And the best
part?
"I still get excited when I get the
data. When the experiment is over
I can't wait to see what we've got.
The constant discovery that keeps
going for me is the part that I love
the most." tl UBYS SEY. C A/NEWS 12 010.01.07
! GRADUATE SCHOOL OF
IPUBLIC POLICY
wy Social Policy: Move to Change
EVELYN PETERS, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Identity and
Diversity: The Aboriginal Experience
Evelyn Peters is an internationally-renowned scholar who investigates the
identities of First Nations and Metis people in urban environments. While
nearly half of these populations live in cities, little is known about them,
leaving policy makers reliant on stereotypes or on theoretical conclusions.
Peters believes her research findings will assist governments on matters of
policy, and contribute to a better understanding of Aboriginal Peoples among
non-aboriginal residents.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE. APPLY NOW. The Johnson-Shoyama Graduate
School offers two thesis-based research degrees at the University of
Saskatchewan campus - a master's and a doctorate in public
policy - centred around contemporary topics of public policy.
Study alongside scholars such as Evelyn Peters to learn the
tools you'll require to contribute to new knowledge in the
areas of science, technology and innovation, health and social
policy, trade and transnational regulation, and governance and
leadership.
For more information, please visit:
www. schoolofpublicpolicy.sk.ca
University of
Saskatchewan
University
ofRegina
A Two Year Degree
for University Grads
achelor of Computer Science
APPLY NOW for Fall 201
www.bcs-ics.es. u
Department of Computer Science
bcs-info@cs.ubc.ca
Application Deadline: Feb. 28, 2010
Contact Giuliana: (604) 822-2213
INTRODUCING THE UBYSSEY'S
SEMINAR SERIES
In an effort to increase our institutional knowledge and
train new legions of student journalists, The Ubyssey
is starting a weekly seminar series. Have you always
wanted to write for us, but didn't know how? Now
you can learn! Don't care about us, but want to learn
the ropes anyway? Excellent! We'll teach you, too!
Basically, if you have an interest in any of the topics,
drop in. No registration required. We're in SUB 24. Call
604.822.2301, or e-mail feedback@ubysseyca with any
questions.
WEEK ONE 3:00 What is news design?
Friday, Jan 8 4:oo What is a news article?
Seventy per cent of youth who commit homicides do so for monetary gain. GERALD DEO PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THEUBYSSEY
UBC study explains differences
among types of homicide
But RCMP says each case is different
NICOLE GALL
ngall@ubyssey.ca
A new study from UBC Okanagan
(UBC-O) has found differences in
types of victims, motive, and methods between different types of homicides, in what researchers hope can
contribute to preventing crime.
The study Partners in Crime: A
Comparison of Individual and Multi-
Perpetrator Homicides, examined
the records of 124 homicides.
It suggests that individual and
multi-perpetrator homicides have
distinctive characteristics, and
can even be differentiated during
investigations.
Homicides committed by one
person tended to involve older
offenders, female victims, "hands-
on" strangulation or stabbing, and
motives were reactive, sexual or
sadistic. However, multi-perpetrator homicides (those committed
by two or more people) tended to
involve younger offenders, male
victims, the use of firearms and
instrumental motives, meaning
the crime was committed for the
purpose of monetary gain.
The team of researchers finished their data analysis in 2008.
They published their findings on
what crime scenes can reveal about
the nature of perpetrators and the
likelihood that a homicide involved
multiple perpetrators in the psychology journal Criminal Justice &
Behavior.
According to Michael Wood-
worth, associate professor of psychology at UBC-O and co-author
of the study the findings offer
practical applications for crime
investigators.
"We can learn more about
what's motivating people to commit [homicides] in the first place,"
said Woodworth. "Considering the
dynamics between independent or
multiple perpetrators, we think that
there's all sorts of implications for
investigation purposes, prevention
purposes, and unfortunately if one
of these events does occur, for treatment purposes."
Since publishing Partners in
Crime,   Woodworth  has  worked
alongside University of Saskatchewan clinical psychology PhD
candidate Ava Agar to compare
findings on the nature of adult male
perpetrators to the nature of youth
perpetrated homicides.
"We got access to a large data
set of youth-committed homicides
to compare with our adult results,"
Woodworth said. "It's the first in-
depth empirical scientific study we
know of anywhere on the planet
that's gone to this degree to look at
the characteristics and motivations
of youth homicide."
According to Woodworth, their
research into youth-committed homicides, which is being submitted
Each case is
specific to itself.
We're not going
to go down a
path where the
evidence is not
directly leading us
at all. We're led by
evidence and that's
how we get started.
CORPORAL DALECARR
HOMICIDE INVESTIGATION TEAM
to academic journals for publishing, produced surprising results.
"With the adults we found that
about 33 per cent of the homicides
were multiple perpetrated homicides, so there were two or more
perpetrated involved," he said, adding that sixty-seven per cent of the
youth homicides were actually committed in groups. Their research
also found that around 70 per cent
of youth perpetrated homicides had
an instrumental motive.
Woodworth added that his
and Agar's research into youth-
committed homicides may offer
crime investigators information
on the nature of perpetrators and
provide a piece to solve the investigative puzzle.
"All these different things, you
start putting them together in
terms of the amount of multiple
perpetrator homicides that youth
are committing, what the motivations might be, the dynamics, the
type of victim," said Woodworth.
"We're really happy with how we
think this might contribute to investigative strategies, as well as
understanding more about what
might motivate some of these
youth, and to hopefully get to
them before they commit one of
these serious acts."
But RCMP Corporal Dale Carr,
speaking for the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team, was
hesitant to focus on the nature
of perpetrators as opposed to the
evidence of each particular homicide investigation.
"Each case is specific to itself,"
said Carr. "We're not going to go
down a path where the evidence is
not directly leading us at all. We're
led by evidence and that's how we
get started."
According to Carr, a typical
RCMP homicide investigation focuses on the evidence at the crime
scene and information that can be
learned about the victim, and pursues leads until a suspect comes
into the picture.
"The first questions we generally
ask are who would want to do this
to [the deceased], and then we start
to learn more about the deceased
to see where that can lead us,"
Carr said. "If we find out that [the
deceased] has been a long-term
drug dealer then we need to look in
the area of the drug field, find out
who they hang out with and start
talking to those individuals. We talk
to people, and what other people
tell us, which is evidence, starts to
direct us.
"It's not a case of sitting around
trying to sort out what kind of individual would want to do this to [the
deceased] and trying to create a
profile on that individual." U  6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.01.07
CENTRE FOR MILITARY
AND STRATEGIC STUDIES
UNIVEKSrTY OF
CALGARY
WHY CHOOSE THE CENTRE FOR MILITARY
AND STRATEGIC STUDIES?
Leading, world-renowned experts
Flexible program framework
Engaging, relevant courses and innovative research1
Generous funding opportunities
Numerous events and conferences open to participation
nternational networking opportunities
Team that truly cares about the students
Contact us today
Centre for Military and Strategic Studies
MacKimmie Library Tower 701 - 2500 University Drive
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
403-220-4038
crnss@ucalgary.ca
www.cmss.ucalgary.ca
Application Deadline: February 15, 2010
Teach English
Abroad
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
* Detailed Lesson Planning
* ESL Skills Development
* Comprehensive Teaching Materials
* Interactive Teaching Practicum
* Internationally Recognized Certificate
* Teacher Placement Service
* Money-Back Guarantee Included
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfoidseminars.ca
UBC Campus Map Jbr iPhone
Now Available @ iTuues
Just $0.99 helps you or others.
Anybody is able to
work for The
Ubyssey and weZe
always looking for
new talent to join
our team.
Contact us at
feed back® ubyssey.ca 2010.01.07/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/7
ID
EAS
YOU SAID IT
In response to UBC to test revolutionary method of treating MS:
It's great that you are covering the research    incidence rate in the MS and non-MS popula-    not in response to anythingfrom the MS Soci-
into this new way of looking at multiple scle-    tions remain unknown. We also don't know    ety of Canada, which is pursuing its own line
rosis. However, you have a few nuances of    when CCSVI begins in affected individuals,    of CCSVI research funding
the article wrong. For example, the condition    Second, Zamboni, and others, have not stated        Thanks again for letting the UBC cam-
of blocked or narrowed veins that drain the    MS is a vascular disease and that CCSVI    pus know the news about this exciting new
brain (termed CCSVI by Zamboni), has never    causes MS — all they have done is proposed    research!
been touted as a diagnostic tool because its    MS and CCSVI are related. Next, this study is                                                   —Sandra
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE USA LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
^ItJilljIMJJHjISMJjIlffl   ^_W_
MARIA CIRSTEA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
PROROGUE LEADS IGNATIEFF TO VISIT UBC
Next Friday, Leader ofthe Opposition Michael Ignatieff will be gracing UBC with
his wisdom and eyebrows when he holds a "conversation" with students at the
Norm Theatre. Despite the former professor and journalist's impressive intellect, we can't help thinking it won't be so much a conversation as a collection
of talking points and liberal platitudes. Then again, he'd probably prefer to be
in Parliament right now too—but that won't be happening for quite some time.
That's because late last month, the Harper government prorogued parliament, shutting down the legislative branch for two months during its busiest
time of year because...um...you've got us there. It would be nice to give a balanced, neutral reason why parliament is shut down. The truth is that Harper
wanted to put an end to annoying questions about Afghan detainee abuses
and gain control of the Senate, and this was the best way to do that. Wouldn't
it be nice if you could get a two-month extension on your papers until conditions were better for you to do well?
This is bad for our political culture. It says parliament doesn't matter. If
a government can shut down committees and bill-passing for two months,
why not make it three or four? If a government can prorogue twice in a
12-month time span, why not do it every month?
Moreover, proroguing doesn't put a pause on parliament in the same way
a summer break does—it rewinds the tape, killing all non-private members'
bills, all committee work and putting thousands of hours and millions of
dollars of legislative affairs to waste.
Whatever your thoughts are on Ignatieff or his policies, it will be amusing
to see him answer questions in the Norm and down a drink at MahoneVs.
All things considered though, we'd rather see him in Ottawa on C-SPAN. \3
WE'LL ALL FLY NAKED, CHAINED TO OUR SEAT
Merry Christmas, frequent fliers! Flying is more right-depriving than ever
now, thanks to Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab's attempt to detonate a bomb
hidden in his underwear on Christmas Day. But are we any safer?
Airports across Canada and the USA have begun to conduct invasive
searches for bombs hidden underneath clothing. They've also begun to target
individuals from a list of 14 countries deemed "state sponsors of terrorism."
These new security measures are merely soothers, pacifying the frazzled
nerves of paranoid consumers who see death signs in eveiything. Or, if
you're less generous, they perpetuate a culture of fear, the price of which is
rights violations, complacency and massive inconvenience. Mr Abdulmutal-
lab proves that these expensive gestures are just that—gestures.
The new security measures at airports may be put in place to lessen the
likelihood of terrorist attacks, but at best it's making people feel that they're
a bit safer for hundreds of millions of dollars. At worst it inconveniences
passengers and violates personal rights.
Today, the Canadian government is installing full-body scanners in some
airports, including YVR. According to CTV, the scanners, which are already
in place in many American airports, show detailed images of passengers,
including surgical implants, genitals and cosmetic enhancements. This scanner itself grossly violates our privacy.
Everyone acknowledges the need to make flights are safe and secure. But
all too often, airport security does nothing except create layers and layers of
bureaucracy and hassle for customers, while still leaving plenty of loopholes
for potential terrorists. And that's never going to change, no matter how
many people we racially profile or strip-search.
What can change is what we as citizens expect and demand in our concept
of airline safety. Putting up more walls does nothing if you don't watch the
gates. If we have to have new and improved security measures, why not emphasize consciousness, awareness and vigilance rather than invasiveness?
Why not take these measures to their logical end? We all fly naked and
chained to our seats, spend a day in containment before flying, take drug
tests and do full-body scans? At least then we'd know where we stand, vl
TOO SEXY
AUSTIN HOLM
& KASHA CHANG
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Dearest Readership,
How long has it been since we last
talked? Days? Months? Years? You
don't write, you don't calL.Jt seems
it is in these shortest days that our
yearning for the continuation of our
correspondence is longest. Did you
miss us as we missed you? Or did
your winter absence lead you into
the arms of other, more widely syndicated sex columns? Fretting over
the fickle flame of your affection
kept us awake on more than one
chilly night.
Did you miss us
as we missed you?
Or did your winter absence lead
you into the arms
of other, more
widely syndicated
sex columns?
But of course, you've returned,
and we forgive you for your absence. After all, we didn't call or
write you during the holidays. We
were too busy going on trips to
Turkey and passing out in semi-
frozen gutters.
What's that you say? While distracted by world travel and near-
death experiences, we missed a
letter from you? Nonsense! That
could never hap... ah.
Ahem...
Without further ado, this
week's letter:
Dear Too Sexy,
There's this guy I've been dating for about four months and
things have been pretty good
except for one little thing. About
two months ago, things got a
little out of hand moved a little
faster and farther than I would
have liked. We talked about it
and he agreed that we would
slow things down. In the two
months since then, he's acted
like a total gentleman and now
I feel comfortable enough with
him to turn things up a bit. The
thing is, I don't want to seem
like some crazy girl who doesn't
know what she wants. How can I
get things speeding along again
without seeming... demanding?
—Feels A Sudden Thirst
Hello FAST,
We've got some good news and
some bad news for you. The
good news is that your lad has
probably been chomping at the
bit to get the back in the race. As
long as you don't present your
renewed interest as an ultimatum threatening the destruction
of the boy and his kin if he does
not comply, we find it unlikely
that he will feel like you are
making unreasonable demands
here. Not knowing what you
mean by "a little out of hand," we
can't say much for sure, but we
assume that if he was into it the
first time, he'll be alright with a
second helping.
The bad news is that most
insidious of social ills: inertia.
Human behaviour is prone to
settling into patterns. Even if you
and your boy both want to switch
gears, you might have trouble
jostling the stick shift if you've
been driving automatic for the
last two months. When we act in
certain ways without any overt
negative repercussions (or even
just repercussions we feel we
can bear) we're inclined to continue that behaviour in order to
reinforce the security of our daily
lives—even when the outcome
isn't positive.
So, FAST, what's a girl to do? Although you may be inclined to try
to change things slowly in order
to be subtle about your change of
heart (and not seem like a "crazy
girl"), we're inclined to tell you
not to. After all, sex and relationships should never be about hiding things, but rather about being
open. Don't hide your intentions;
celebrate them.
Even if you and
your boy both
want to switch
gears, you might
have trouble jos-
tiing the stick
shift if you ve been
driving automatic
for the last two
months.
You might as well start the new
year off with a bang. Get some
sexy underwear, play your Barry
White records and jump-start
the V8 engine of your affection.
Never forget the wisdom of sport
equipment manufacturers: the
easiest way to do anything is to
JUST DO IT.
Anyways, readership, that's it
for this week. Keep on sending
in your letters to toosexy@ubys-
sey.ca or to our anonymous web
form at ubyssey.ca/ideas. tl
You might as well
start the new year
off with a bang.
Get some sexy
underwear, play
your Barry White
records and jump-
start the V8 engine
of your affection.
STREETERS
WHAT ARE YOUR
GOALS, PLANS OR
RESOLUTIONS FOR
THE NEW YEAR?
KARA SERENIUS
Master's of Engineering
For the new year I plan on getting a
job because I'm out of money.
MENGMENG FENG
Master's of Civil Engineering
want to get high scores in my master's studies...I hope every friend
and family member will be happy
and everything will go well in the
new year.
JOHN DE VERA
Electrical Engineering 3
My plan for 2010 is to eat [and] drink
less Starbucks, and study more and
play less games.
TITISSA RAHIM
Chemistry 2
My new year's resolution is to learn
how to handle stress better in the
faculty I'm in.
JOSHUA SUNGA
Arts 2
My resolution is to manage my time
better. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.01.07
MEN VS. REGINA:
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, 7:30
WOMEN @ REGINA:
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, 7:00
WOMEN VS. REGINA: FRIDAY, 6:00 WOMEN @ REGINA:
WOMEN VS. BRANDON: SATURDAY, 6:00      FRIDAY 6:00, SATURDAY 8:00
MEN VS. REGINA: FRIDAY, 8:00
MEN VS. BRANDON: SATURDAY, 8:00
MEN ©REGINA:
FRIDAY 8:00, SATURDAY 6:00
Who's the new football boss?
After months of waiting, UBC to name new coach in two weeks
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubyssey.ca
Two months after firing Ted Goveia,
UBC still does not have a permanent
head coach for its football team. But
this will soon change.
The Thunderbirds are scheduled
to hold a press conference on January 19 or 20 to announce the hiring
of a head coach that they hope will,
in the words of Associate Athletic
Director Theresa Hanson, "turn the
program around." With only one
playoff win this decade, and three
consecutive losing seasons, the task
might be harder than eliminating
UBC's $25 million deficit. Changing the culture, engaging alumni
and recruiting new players all takes
time.
"Any prospective coach that
takes a look at the campus, and the
facilities UBC has...will realize that
this will take at least three years,"
said Jim Mullin, CKNW Sports Director. "The UBC football program
has a great brand, and it's got a
good engine block, but the cylinders
are flooded right now."
It's a common charge—minus
the metaphors—levied at the Thunderbirds program, and it's one that
Athletics seems to understand has
at least a kernel of truth to it.
"We realize that we need a successful program, not just a team.
And there's a difference," said
Hanson.
"It takes time to build this up,
and we're looking at this in a three-,
five-year time period, and we're
prepared to give the new coach
that amount of time," she continued—though skeptics will note that
The Thunderbird players will find out soon who the new football head coach will be. ANTHONYGOERTZGRAPHIC/THEUBYSSEY
the last three UBC football coaches
were all fired after four years on the
job.
But enough with the small talk.
Who is going to be the new head
coach?
Well, it depends on who you
talk to—and with it being the most
buzzed-about question so far during the CIS offseason, there's plenty
of people to talk to. Athletics has
received applications from around
25 different candidates from across
the country. But the three most
talked about candidates are all currently coaching for UBC or SFU.
Their names?
DINO GEREMIA
The interim head coach, Geremia was the defensive coordinator
for UBC under Goveia. He's very
well-liked by players, has been a
steady hand as interim coach, and
wouldn't rock the boat.
However, UBC had the worst defence in the league lastyear (though
that was partly due to injuries), and
if the T-Birds are really going to
change their culture, it would reason that they need to have a coach
who isn't connected with the previous program.
SHAWN OLSON
Called "a leading candidate for
the position" by The Province's
Howard Tsumura after Goveia was
fired, 12 years ago Olson was UBC's
star quarterback as the T-Birds won
the 1997 Vanier Cup.
After a number of years playing
and coaching in Europe, he returned to the Lower Mainland three
years ago to be offensive coordinator at SFU. He has head coaching
experience, alumni support, and if
you had to pick a safe choice to get
the job, it's probably him.
DAVE JOHNSON
The current head coach at SFU,
former head coach at UBC, and
longtime favourite of Athletic Director Bob Philip, Johnson led SFU
to the Canada West finals in 2008
after two straight winless seasons,
which is nothing to sneeze at. However, it's unclear whether he's quietly applied for the job. Rumours
have circulated for weeks on the
internet—which, as we all know, is
the source of absolute trufhiness—
that Johnson is a shoe-in for the job,
while others have claimed that he's
already signed a new five-year contract with the Clan.
SFU has declined to directly
comment, but have said that they
"don't foresee a head coaching
change at SFU." Whatever the case,
Johnson is definitely the wild card
right now.
Of course, with the dozens of
names floating out there, a surprise
candidate could be chosen by the
selection committee, comprised
of Hanson, Athletic Director Bob
Philip, a current player, and three
alumni (including Doug Mitchell,
namesake ofthe UBC Winter Sports
Centre).
In less than two weeks, they'll be
choosing who will be the next coach
to try and bring UBC back to success in the most popular university
sport in Canada, and the one sport
that UBC has struggled at this past
decade.
"We know it will take a lot of
work over many years, but we feel
this program can return to prominence," said Hanson, vl
WEEKEND PREVIEW
CAN THE MEN STOP THE
BLEEDING?
VOLLEYBALL | The men's volleyball
team looks to turn around what
has been a dismal season this
weekend, as they travel to Saskatchewan to face the Regina
Rams in a two-game series.
The T-Birds are 1-7, while the
Rams are 0-8. Both teams are
well out of the playoff hunt, needing victories this weekend to have
any chance of getting back into the
race.
Ranked in the top ten to begin
the year, head coach Richard
Schick knows his team has to do
much better in the second half.
"The motivation is definintely
there. We know what we have
to do to make the playoffs,
but we can't be caught up in
it. When you're too desperate, you usually don't win," he
said. "We know the deck is
stacked against us, and that's a
motivator."
Despite his optimism, Schick
showed frustration.
"It's hard to build on something,
because we don't have much...I'm
not used to grasping for every
point we can get."
Meanwhile, the women look
to continue their perfect season
(9-0) as they face off against the
No. 4 ranked Rams (6-2).
BIRDS HEAD BACK NORTH
BASKETBALL | Both basketball
teams return from home tanned
and ready to begin the second
half of the season at home, as
they face the Regina Rams on
Friday and the Brandon Bobcats
on Saturday.
The women (5-3) returned
home from Cuba earlier this week,
and will have a tough first game
against Regina (7-1), as they battle
both the Rams and jet lag.
"It's only a three-hour time lag,
but traveling through the night is
tough," said head coach Deb Huband. "They're younger than I am
though, so hopefully they deal with
it well."
Their second game, against the
Brandon Bobcats (1-9), should
prove to be an easier test for the
Thunderbirds, which has surprised
many this year with its strong play,
but Huband isn't looking at it that
way.
"We don't want to worry about
who we're playing, but rather
focus on how we play as a team,
and how we improve."
The men's and women's teams kick off the second half of their season this weekend. KEEGAN BURSAWFILE PHOTOS/THEUBYSSEY
As for the men (7-0), coach
Kevin Hanson thinks the trip to
Hawaii has strengthened the
team, as they enter the second
half ranked No. 1 in the nation,
and looking to return the CIS
Championships in Ottawa.
"There's a lot of distractions,
from the sun to the mopeds to
everything else. And everyone
says 'you're going to Hawaii, nice
holiday,'" he said.
"But it's not a holiday. It's a
great environment to be in, because you can wear shorts and
t-shirts, but the reality is we're
training and playing nearly every
game."
Brandon is 5-5 on the season,
while Regina is 4-6.
TWO GAME WINNING STREAK?
HOCKEY | Looking to build off of
momentum from a competitive
two-game series against McGill, the
men's hockey team take on the last
place Regina Rams in a two-game
series at Father Bauer Arena.
The   Thunderbirds   (5-10-1)
struggled at times in the first
half of the season, finishing
sixth in the seven team conference, but split their series with
the No. 5 ranked McGill last
weekend, losing Saturday's
game 6-4 before coming back
to win on Sunday 3-2 with two
goals from Brandon Campos in
the final ten minutes.
The women (5-6-1), currently
holding the fourth and final playoff
spot in the Canada West Conference, face fifth place Regina
(3-5-4) on the road. U

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127274/manifest

Comment

Related Items