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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1963

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 $5 INCREASE GOES TO VOTE NOV. 22
Council approves fee boost
Student council has recommended a $5 increase in the
AMS fee to finance the proposed student union  building.
The proposal will be submitted to the student body in
referendum form for approval
Nov. 22.
If passed, the increase would
boost the compulsory student
activity fee from $24 to $29.
Monday night's motion was
worded by engineering president Peter Shepard and
seconded by science's Chuck
Rennie.
Intent of the motion is to
enable the building to be paid
off in 15 years, saving $1.5
million in interest charges.
The huge interest charges
would accrue if the financing
were to continue under the
present method, under which
$10 of the $24 AMS fee goes
to the SUB fund.
Present estimated cost of
the building is more than $3
million, but that figure would
be increased if present provi-
THS U8YSSEY
Vol.  XLVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,  1963
48
No. 24
sions for 30-year financing con-
tin <e.
Students are now committed
to paying $10 each per year
into the SUB fund, up to a
total of $880,000 (established
by  a 1961 referendum).
If at the Nov. 14 general
meting the concept of the
SUB is endorsed by more than
50 per cent of the students,
this $10 allocations will be extended beyond the $880,000
ceiling to cover entire costs of
the SUB.
But that method would take
30 years and cost the students
the extra money in interest.
This is the reason for the referendum.
The program for students
now is:
• On- Nov. 14, a general
meeting to consider the entire
concept of the SUB.
• If this vote does not
achieve a 50 per cent majority, it is likely the whole project will be scrapped.
• If the Nov. 14 vote passes,
students will have endorsed
not only the concept of the
building but the continuation
of the $10 fee for 30 years.
• Then, on Nov. 22, the
quicker metho'd (the $5 increase) will be voted on in referendum.
• If it does not achieve a
two-thirds majority, financing will continue on the 30-
year plan.
3 statues
smashed
by vandals
Vandals have smashed three campus statues and pushed
another off its base.   The statues are valued at $4,000.
RCMP and UBC security patrolmen are investigating
the incident.
—don hume photo
SMASHED CHEST and shoulders are examined by Ian McNairn of the fine arts department.
McNairn says the statue is worth $2,000.     Two others worth $2,000 were also damaged.
Police are looking for vandals.
Three of the statues were
damaged at the weekend, the
other Oct. 27.
Most extensively damaged
was "Configuration", by Gerhard Class. The $1,200 statue
was pushed off its base in the
Buchanan quad and smashed
into three pieces.
The chest and shoulder of
"Miner" a statue of a gold
miner, also located on the
Buchanan quad, were damaged.
UBC bought the statue from
artist Jack Harman for $600,
but Professor Ian McNairn of
the fine arts department said
is was worth  $2,000.
Two out of a group of foiir
figures called "Blown Figures"
were pushed over and split
Oct. 27. They are worth $100.
McNairn said all the statues
are probably insured.
"They are not really repairable but we'll have to consult
the artists,"  he said.
"Asiatic    Head",     by    Otto
Fischer-Credo,   located   behind
International House, was pushed off its stand but rolled on
(Continued  on  Page  5)
SEE:  VANDALS
A Quebec separatist speaks out
The next step is to gain power
By GRAEME MATHESON
Pierre Bourgault wants to
break Canada in two.
He does not care how he
does it.
He will do it by negotiation if possible.
He will do it by force, he
says, if he has to.
Bourgault is a Quebec nationalist and separatist. He is
here for French Canada Week,
as the top exponent of le sep-
aratisme.
"In   three   years   we   have
300,000 people in Quebec who
say they will vote for us," he
said.
Bourgault works with La
Presse in Montreal, is the editor of the separatist paper
L'Independance and an executive of the Assembly for National  Independance.
"Our next step is to come
to power in Quebec," he told
a faculty club press conference
Monday. "Next we will go to
Ottawa and say: 'The people of
Quebec want independence.'
"If Ottawa agrees, we will
negotiate for three or four
years like most emergent countries."
And if Ottawa does not
agree?
"We Will go, anyway."
If the federal government
decided to fight, to call in the
army, Quebec would, he said,
fight to the end, even if this
were  suicidal.
"The only thing worse than
death is indifference to life,"
said Bourgault.    "Our present
life  in  Quebec is  worse than
suicide."
Nothing can sway the separatists now, said the 29-year-old
Bourgault.
''I'm a complete separatist,"
he said. "How can you be a
moderate separatist?
"I want Quebec set up as a
sovereign country like Sweden, France and Mexico."
He gave reasons for his antipathy  towards   Confederation.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:   SEPARATISTS
Haar hits
Fort Camp
high jinks
By   TOM   WAYMAN
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Housing administrator John
Haar has threatened to crack
down on two fort camp huts.
As a result of last month's
panty raid on Acadia, the misuse of a borrowed public address speaker, a fracas with
Union college residents, and a
Hallowe'en night raid on Acadia, housing administrator John
Haar last Friday put pressure
on Fort Camp huts six and
seven.
Possible expulsion, a general
assessment on erring huts, an
increased curfew for Fort
Camp girls and cancellation of
social priviledges are being
considered by Haar, according
to Blair Peacock, Hut six, west
wing representative.
Along with the representative of Hut six, east wing, and
both wings of Hut seven, Peacock was called to a Friday
meeting with Haar and instructed to pass along Haar's
displeasure at the Fort Camp
situation. Fort Camp president
Hew Kidston was also called
to the Friday meeting.
"Haar said it'd be best if we
ironed it out ourselves," Peacock continued.
He said Huts six and seven
were blamed for the incidents
partly because certain residents of those huts had been
seen taking part in the events
and partly because the huts
have a tradition of trouble
making.
Haar himself refused to discuss the situation with The
Ubyssey. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,   1963
Should be changed'
One government
controls show
Quebec youth minster Paul Gerin-Lajoie Monday said
Canada's federal system is too much of a one-government
show.
He said the federal government makes too many decisions as to what, is best for the
provinces without consulting
them.
And he accused it of interfering too much in areas designated for provincial jurisdiction in the BNA Act.
In the keynote speech for
French Canada Week, Gerin-
Lajoie told 600 students in the
auditorium, the federal system
should be changed so that:
• Each province has a voice
in federal decisions that affect
it.
• And so each could "contract in" for as many or as few
federal programs as it wants.
MORE REVENUE
Gerin-Lajoie said new federal-provincial fiscal arrangements should then be made
giving more revenue to provincial governments which undertake social and economic programs on their own.
He said this theory is better
than the "contracting out"
theory proposed by the federal
liberal party because the latter is too negative.
"Contracting out is a federalist theory based on the following proposition: Too many
cooks spoil the pie.
"It is the theory of uni-
laterial cooking: Those who
like the menu or those who are
too hungry to fast just sit down
and join in for a family meal.
'FRENCH FRIES'
"Those who do not like the
menu, those who think it is
not time to eat, simply ask for
their pennies and go and eat
their french fries at the corner
restaurant.
Gerin-Lajoie said Quebec
has already taken the lead
in changing the system by establishing regular inter-provincial conferences and starting a
department   of  federal-provincial affairs.
He said, at present, Quebec
is undergoing a revolution in
which the people are finding
the provincial government
their best ally for ensuring
their existence as a distinct
culture.
"These people of Quebec
have evolved more during the
past five years than during the
previous twenty - five," he
said.
"They used to think that
their educational system could
prepare them for any and
every task that life might call
upon them to perform.
"Now they insist it be im-
poved to meet present requirements."
He said the people have become less isolationist and have
given up unbridled free enterprise for a measure of government planning of their economic life.
"This awakening is probably
the most significant single development in Canadian affairs
to the present day."
DISSATISFACTION
Gerin-Lajoie said Confederation as it presently functions is
not satisfactory to Quebec.
"In Quebec there are many
and varied expressions of
opinion on this subject and
very few fail to spell out a
certain dissatisfaction.
"The reason is that the
French-Canadians do not have
the impresion they belong to
Canada to the same extent as
their English-speaking fellow-
citizens."
1  was  lucky to  get
job  scrubbing  floors'
By RON RITER
Ubyssey Critics Editor
Twenty years ago James Baldwin found self-professing
liberals were prejudiced against Negroes.
That was when he discover
PAUL GERIN-LAJOIE
. . too many decisions
Dinner group
to hash out
SUB plans
Plans for the new student
union will be hashed out at a
dinner in Brock Thursday evening.
The dinner will start at 6
p.m. Chuck Owen, director of
the student union at Washington, will be guest speaker.
After the dinner students
will split up into discussion
groups and then reform in
Brock Lounge for general discussion.
John Deachman, banquet
chairman, said he has contacted representatives from all
campus  organizations.
He said any interested students who wish to attend
should apply to the receptionist in the AMS office.
"Anyone interested should
apply soon," he said, "because
we expect large numbers. It
will be first come first served."
He said the banquet is free.
ed his color blocked him from
being more than a messenger
boy on a New York daily newspaper that had hired him to
prove its liberal attitude.
"When I quit they told me I
should consider myself lucky
they'd let me scrub their floors.
"And nothing in the last 20
years has changed my mind
about people who call themselves liberals," the American
novelist told more than 300
people Saturday at a meeting
sponsored by the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association and the
B.C. Association for Advancement of Colored People.
The crowd jammed the Arlington Hall to hear Baldwin,
giving him a resounding ovation at the end of his hour-
long speech on racial problems
and  civil rights.
He told them most liberality
is based on the unconscious assumption   white   people   lead
more desirable lives than black
people.
"This," he said, "is a myth."
The irrelevence behind the
words black and white was another of several myths Baldwin
attacked.
"Nobody is really black and
nobody is really white," he
said.
"My skin is dusty brown,
like a potato," he said, and
drew laughter from the liberal
crowd when he described their
skin color as "not white but
sort of green or yellow.
Friday, Baldwin received an
honorary Doctor of Letters
degree at UBC fall convocation
ceremonies.
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SEPARATIST
(Continued from Page 1)
He said that economic, political, social and cultural reasons,
all bound up, make him separatist.
"Eighty-three per cent of the
Quebec economy is not controlled by us," Bourgault declared. "The Quebec living
standard is 5 per cent lower
than that of the United States."
The Assembly of National
Independence is socialist, he
said, and would nationalize
monopolies and industries "as
we got enough to pay for
them."
For the present, he thinks
Quebec should refuse all federal aid to education unless the
province has absolute control
of the money. And the rest
of the provinces should get
the same consideration.
States."
Bourgault travelled in
Europe, staying for long periods in Paris.
"I became a separatist while
in France," he said. "It is so
much easier to be French there
than at home."
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Without this label it is not a genuine Kitten   [/@fiuc??*J Tuesday, November 5, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Chancellor urges board
to prevent money hassles
—don hume photo
CHARGING RELENTLESSY through UBC rain, this umbrella
leads co-ed to class. Eager umbrellas have been major
traffic hazard in rainy weather during last month.
In first year
Brainy wealthy
fill dental gap
By JIM SMITH
Next year UBC will have a dental school and, if you are
. a wealthy genius, you can enrol.
You have to be wealthy be-
Curtain up
tonight
on Antigone
Antigone has come —
Sophocles' tragedy opens tonight at the New Freddy Wood
theatre at 8:30.
The annual department of
theatre student production will
run from Nov. 5 to 9. There
will be an additional performance Nov. 11 at 7:30 p.m.
Players include Patricia Wilson in the title role; Antigone's
sister Ismene—Nora Pruesse;
Creon, King of Thebes—Alan
Scarfe; and Scot Douglass as
the sentry.
The plot centres around—
Oedipus' daughter, Antigone,
who is determined to bury her
brother's body, despite Creon's
warning it will mean her
death.
Student tickets are 75 cents,
others are $2. They may be
obtained from the box office,
Room 207 of the theatre or at
the door.
caused the combined books
and fees will cost you about
$1,200 for first year.
You will have to be a genius
because the school will only accept eight applicants next year
on a basis of scholastic performance in the three years of
Arts and Science that make up
the pre-dental requirements.
The school will later expand
to 40 students.
Dr. S. Wah Leung, Dean of
the new faculty, said: "We
hope the school will be able to
expand to full capacity in
1965. It will depend on whether our new building is completed."
The building will cost about
$3 million, completely equipped. The money is to come
from the provincial government ,he said.
For the 1964-65 term the
Faculty will share facilities
with the School of Medicine.
Dr. Leung said that scholarships, loans and bursaries
would be available to needy
students.
Dr. Leung, who hopes to do
home of the instruction himself, said: "We have only the
nucleus of a staff so far, but
we will have a full staff by
Sept.   1965."
UBC Chancellor Dr. Phyllis
Ross Friday urged the provincial government take action to
prevent competition among
B.C.'s new  universities.
Dr. Ross, speaking at Fall
Congregation ceremonies, urged the government to establish
an academic and advisory
board as provided for in the
Universities' Act.
"An advisory board, acting
in the role of a grants' committee, and having before it the
recommendations of an academic board, would ensure that
available moneys for higher
education are fairly allocated,"
she said.
"Autonomy and self-government for the various universities within the system of
higher education advocated for
the province does not mean
that each can go its own way
without regard for the needs of
the whole.
She said if universities competed, inefficiency, waste of
men, money, materials and
human talent would result.
Dr. Ross cited examples of
problems which could be investigated by the academic
board:
• If UBC's senate raises entrance standards to 60 per
cent what will the effects on
new universities be?
• Will funds for Simon
Fraser Academy be provided
at the expense of existing universities?
• Will there be duplication
of facilities at universities?
• What are the optimum
sizes for the various universities and where will staff come
from?
More than 750 students received degrees at the ceremony
in the armory.
Eighten doctorates were
awarded, while the rest were
masters  and bachelor degrees.
Iva Soreback
I keep my finances in good
shape with a growing
Savings Account at..,
10 J MUIO* CAMADIAK
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Bank of Montreal
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building:  MERLE C. K.IRBY, Manager
a big step on the road to success is an early banking connection THE UBYSSEY
Nothing Is so useless as a general maadm.
—Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout ths university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinion*
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242,  Loc.   26.   Member Canadian  University  Press.
Authorized   as   second-class    mail    by    Post   Office   Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,   1963
*«***
Get rid of  em
Well, kids, we've done it again.
We had our little homecoming football game again,
and again we drank in the stands, tore down the goalposts  and drove old cars around the field.
And, again, the pillars of the community harrumphed,
the freshettes' mothers squawked and our fearless daily
press scolded.
Trouble is, this sort of thing goes on all the time. It
is obvious that all UBC is doing is harboring hoodlums,
training thugs, and promoting punks.
When students aren't tearing down goalposts or boozing or carousing, they're smart-aleck, know-it-all show-
offs. Goddam university kids. Impudent, immature and
immoral.
Why, we had a perfect example of this last summer. We
sent a couple of allegedly clean-cut kids, alleged scholars,
alleged diplomats, to Pakistan for a goodwill tour.
What did they do? Read it in the paper. "Poisoned
the minds and morals of Pakistanis with a ring of espon-
age, corruption and moral degeneration."
They even know all about us 8,000 miles away and,,
boy, did the local press ever snap it up!
Pretty soon we'll be at Mardi Gras. Then the frats
will be exposed for what they really are—drunken, sexual
degenerates, as everybody knows.
Take that student newspaper, described so truly by
the Catholic Church as "a foul gutter rag." All they do
is spread malicious rumours and libel people.
This place is nothing but a pit of iniquity, a cesspool
of crime, a breeding ground for bad guys.
You know, it would save the hard-working taxpayers
of this province a lot of hard-earned money—and a lot
of bad publicity, too—if they'd just get rid of all the
students at UBC.
They're not wanted and, quite obviously, they're not
needed.
Hell's Gates
We've said it before, and we'll say it again.
Somebody's going to get killed if the gates on University boulevard aren't moved immediately.
Trouble is, no one seems to know who's responsible
for them.
TBe university say they aren't within their jurisdiction, and the endowment lands people say it's up to the
provincial government.
And the provincial government has refused to take
action, despite numerous complaints over the years.
We suggest it's time the government that gets things
done did so. Or loaned a few sticks of dynamite to the
engineers.
■BK.0CIC. HALL
AfcT   PUNO
Hw v? voi/n
•   "rvfSHV* &*%••"***$*• w
Good  riddance
Those ugly charity drives
By GRAEME MATHESON
Ubyssey  Staff  Reporter
There will be no more charity drives in UBC classrooms.
This intelligent decree from
the administration suffers
only from narrow application.
A wise move would be ban
all charities, funds and drives
from seeking money on this
campus.
The student is sufficiently
harrassed financially as it is.
He pays, on top of fees, books,
board and or transportation,
all the other expenses of normal existence.
• '"•    •
In summer he often pays
(while working, and that is
another story) for membership in unions. He often pays
into compulsory medical plans
he never uses. He generally
pays unemployment insurance
which he is not even eligible
to receive.
Expelling the professional
and amateur fund raisers
would set a good precedent in
the community.
Charity drives to aid genuinely-desperate people are
properly the province of the
government.
The crippled, the diseased,
the insane and the dying are
not best saved by furry ladies
losing their dignity and begging from door to door.
Their private agencies compete among themselves for
the generous citizen's attention.
• •    •
The inexorable result is unequal and inadequate spreading of the meagre monies
available.
Every charity has certain
expenses of its own to defray.
So thousands of contributions
per year are lost in operational "friction".
The biggest loser in the
charity rackets is not the
agency, which generally has
a lot of fun playing around
with the benefits it confers.
It is not the door-to-door
ladies, or even, although they
are big losers too, the afflicted
themselves.
The big loser is the poor
family man who gets badgered and pressured to give,
give, give, at home, at work,
in the church and on the
street.
The campaigns to extort
money earn the ill-will from
the public that they get.
They are ugly things; they
are the sick begging in the
street.
Let's not put divorce
before Descartes here
With remarkable inverted
vision the University of California, Santa Cruz, (see The
Ubyssey, Oct. 31, p. 7.) has
stumbled upon a method of
raising its academic standards
by proposing that worthwhile
goal as a means towards a lesser goal. That is, the university found itself plagued by
too many divorces among its
students and decided to eliminate the problem by upgrading its curriculum.
•    •    •
Never mind why an academic institution should concern itself with an essentially
religious matter (especially in
light of the Supreme Court's
recent decision disallowing
the admixture of religion and
education); besides, the problem in Canada is that we can't
get enough divorces and Parliament gets bogged down
even on those few that reach
it — what is interesting is the
back-door method of bringing
in the solution to a sticky
problem, and its application
potential in other fields.
Look    at    that    perennial
Gordian knot here in British
Columbia in trying to educate
(our way) the Doukhobors.
Its a bothersome problem
because we don't really want
to do it and they don't want
us to either.
• •    •
Why shouldn't our university propose to Mr. Bennett the
solution of cutting off all education and aid money to the
Douks and giving it to us inr
stead? In that manner, we will
have shown the University of
California how We have profited by their example of
sneaking in the achievement
of a greater end (more money
for UBC) by using it as a
means to gain the lesser goal
(ending friction with the
Doukhobors).
• •    •
Then, by rigorously applying other preposterous solutions to nutty paradoxes by
introduction of the illogical
inversion principle, we will
have solved all our problems
and non-problems, two by
two.
Shancrall
—from   the  Manitoban,   University   of   Manitoba Tuesday, November 5,  1963
THE       U BYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS   TO THE  EDITOR
Bad  Taste
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was among the fortunate
many who were able to hear
James Baldwin speak on racial problems in North America. Without a doubt he is
one of the most articulate and
most experienced spokesmen
for racial equality. The
Special Events Committee is
to be complimented for arranging his talk.
There are two things which
upset me about this, however.
1) Hundreds had to be turned away because of the feeble
capacity of the Auditorium.
2) Re: the $750 fee. Baldwin
was obviously here already
via UBC expense for fall convocation. Unless this money is
going towards NAACP work
or something similar I must
join forces with George
Boechler and say "This thing
leaves a bad taste in my
mouth."
KIM MORGAN
Arts III
Soapy Jim
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
The other day, I found myself locked in a Brock cafeteria. Rain poured down outside. The only exit lead into
that rain.
Finding the doors locked,
trapped students wandered
sheepishly out into the rain,
in search of another entrance
to their union building. In
the dietician's office I inquired into the reason for this
daily inconvenience.
"Oh, it's convenient for
us," the dietician replied.
(Damn ewe Joe Student!)
- "But surely students are not
going to put up with this in
their own building?"
"The arrangements have
been like this since the beginning of term and you are the
first to complain."
Campus of Sheep!
Then   there   are  those   frat
pledges.   Some  of   them   are
'»'- ,-v     . «        ...-■■■
EDITOR: Mike Hunter
Editors:
Associate Keith Bradbury
News   Dave Ablett
Managing  George Railton
• City   Mike Horsey
Photo   Don Hume
Critics     Ron Riter
Sports    Denis Stanley
Asst. City Richard Simeon
Asst. News   Tim Padmore
Senior Donna Morris
Senior Maureen Covell
REPORTERS AND DESK: Lorraine Shore, Don Hull, Joy Bradbury, Ron Riter, Terry Hilborn,
Tom Wayman, Steve Brown,
Stevie Dahl, Jim Smith, Mike
Vaux, St. George and his friend
the dragon, Joan Godsell.
SPORTS: Bill Willson, Janet
Currie, Dan Mullen, Joan Dub-
linski, Al Capp and Joe Kapp.
PHOTO: George Fielder, Stu
Clugston, Donald Kydd, Jan Weaver,   Gwen   Kingdon.
carrying rocks around for a
month. Others, not content
with pulling down goalposts
are insistent on hauling them
back to their fraternal abode
. . . (or is it commode?).
• •    •
When residence fees rocket-
into the five-star bracket last
spring, 25 students left the
fold to hand in letters of
complaint to the Board of
Governors. Twenty-five out
of 2100!
• • •
The engineers e p i t o m i ze
this flock phobia. Even their
Shepard is Indistinguishable
from his flocks ... in looks
and opinion.
• •    •
Do students always have to
sink into crowd anonymity before committing themselves to
destructive or constructive
activities? Is this campus another pasture for Reisman's
'Lonely Crowd' and its 'Other
Directed' conformists? Say,
why not change TUUM EST
to EORUM EST? (It's up to
them . . . whoever 'they' are).
JIM WARD
Aggie   IV
VANDALS
(Continued from Page 1)
the grass and was not damaged.
"Configuration" and the
"Blown Figures" are on loan
to UBC from artists.
"We can only guess who did
it," said Cece Paul, head of the
UBC security patrol.
He appealed for witnesses to
go to him or the RCMP if they
have any information about
the incident. "They can be sure
we will keep it confidential,"
he said.
Ken Leitch, co-ordinator of
activities also called for students to come forward.
McNairn, who is in charge of
campus art, said remaining art
work on campus will not be
moved under cover.
"This will not deter us," he
said "There has been little
vandalism so far".
Alvin Balkind, curator of the
Fine Arts gallery, who is
fighting his own battle against
critics of 'the painting Sun,
hanging in Brock, said the vandalism is criminal.
"It is synonomous with book-
burning," he said, "it makes me
sick.
"The damaged pieces are so
different and unrelated to each
other that is is impossible to
believe that it was someone
aking out his hate of one kind
of art," said McNairn.
New meaning
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
Thank you, Mr. Ornstein
for your opinion: it has (reasonably or unreasonably) served to strengthen my opinion
that there is a God and that
He is very much alive.
May I say that the only
conclusive proof that there is
God is highly personal. Reason alone will not get you to
God. You must ask God to reveal Himself to you, and then
be willing to accept His
revelation and all the responsibilities which go with it.
We don't gain responsibilities
alone but an entirely new
meaning  of  life.
DAVID HARRIS
Science I
Subsersive
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
After seeing last week's
showing of the World War II
propaganda film "Behind the
German Swastika," we were
shocked and disturbed. Cannot something be done about
the irresponsibilty of these
people who are allowed to
show their vile filth on campus?
As future mothers, we believe people should be protected from next week's showings of this Communist-inspired trash.
TWO FUTURE MOTHERS
Acadia  Camp
We hope your pregnancy
has nothing to do with the
complacent prosperity of the
West.   —   ed.
.
UBC DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
As its Annual Student Production
ANTIGONE
BY SOPHOCLES
NOVEMBER 5-9 - 8:30 P.M.
New Frederick Wood Theatre
Student Tickets 75c
Box Office opens October 28
New Frederick Wood Theatre:  Room 207
NEW FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
The word on SUB
food facilities
Student union building planning chairman Dean
Feltham will answer questions in The Ubyssey on the
proposed $3.5 million project. Here are today's questions:
Question:
Will the food service facilities in the Student Union
be of an easily accessible
sort, or will it be another
bottleneck . . . (unprintable
words) similar to the Pon-
derosa (Commissary)?
Answer:
The Union Building food
services will consist of two
types: "counter line service"
for students desiring a full
meal, and "shopping centre
service" for those who desire
' only a cup of coffee, sandwich, etc. A "shopping
centre" arrangement consists of several separate
units containing similar
products — i.e., beverages,
sandwiches, ice-cream, etc.—
which will allow the student
to obtain what he wants
from one or more of these
units and then check out at
one of the several cashiers.
This will result in a minimal amount of congestion,
the student only desiring a
coffee not being forced to
wait on the student purchasing sandwiches, etc., as is
the present case in the
Brock Hall.
Question:
What will be the charges
to students for the use of
the recreational and social
facilities in the Union Building?
Answer:
For the Games room faci
lities — bowling, billiards,
and table tennis—the policy
will be to have prices lower
than comparable competitive prices in Greater Vancouver. For the social facilities, the student organizations will pay only the janitorial and set-up expenses—
a saving of over 50 per cent,
as compared to competitive
prices.
Question:
Will    the    students'    fees
have to be increased to pay
for the Union Building?
Answer:
This will be decided by
the students. It is presently
planned to ask the students,
firstly, whether or not they
desire to construct the student union as envisioned,
and, if so, secondly, how
they want to finance the
construction. If the fees
are not increased, the loan
for the construction will
take 30 years to pay off. If
the fees are increased by
five dollars, it will only take
15 years, saving $1,500,000
in interest.
Further questions:
Please forward any questions that you have on the
proposed .Student Union
Building to the Chairman,
SUB, c/o. Receptionist,
Alma Mater Society Offices,
Brock Hall.
CAREERS  FOR  MEN
IN
SPECIALTY   STEELMAKING
With The North American Division of a Company That:
•   Has annual sales of over $60,000,000  and  is the  largest in  the  field   in
Canada.
0   Has  pioneered  manufacturing  processes  for the  industry on this continent
. . . hot planetary rolling, continuous casting ...
0   Has a  full-scale marketing  division  with  six warehouses  in   key  locations
across Canada.
0   Has an international division with representation, or facilities, in most countries of the free world.
0   Has  plants in  Welland,  Ontario,  and  Tracy,   Quebec,   employing   approximately 3,000.
AT
ATLAS STEELS LIMITED
A management team from Atlas will visit your campus November 7, 8 and 9
seeking candidates in careers in :
MARKETING AND SALES
MILL AND SERVICE METTALLURGY
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
LIMITED OPENINGS FOR 3rd YEAR SUMMER STUDENTS
See your Personnel Services Office or contact At las directly for complete details.   The Salaried
Personnel Manager, Atlas Steels Company Limited, Welland, Ontario. Page 6
THE       U BYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,  1963
Gently and scholastically
Art director will strive
to rise above criticism'
By MIKE VAUX
Everyone   is  criticizing   it.
Someone even stole it for
15 minutes.
But the controvensial painting, Sun, hanging in Brock
will continue to hang.
Co-ordinator of activities
Ken Leitch said anyone else
who tries to steal the $1,500
painting will be prosecuted.
And the director of UBC's
fine arts gallery is going to
continue to educate students.
"I will continue to show
modern and controversial
painting in an effort to educate the students of this university," said Alvin Balkind,
curator of the Fine Arts Gallery.
Balkind is also a member
of the Brock Art committee,
WORK IN EUROPE
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg Nov. 6
Summer jobs are available for
students desiring to spend a summer in Europe but who could
otherwise not afford to do so.
Among available jobs are office
and sales work, tutoring, lifeguard and high paying (to $400
a month) resort and factory work.
The American Student Information Service also awards
$200 travel grants to students.
Interested students may obtain
the asis 24 page prospectus listing all jobs, and a travel grant
and job application by writing
to Dept. N, ASIS, 22 Ave. de
la Liberte, Luxembourg City,
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Send $1 for the prospectus and
airmail postage. The first 8000
inquiries receive a $1 credit towards the book, "Earn, Learn
&  Travel in Europe."
the attic
Coffee House
Final Night
JUBILATION SINGERS
coming attraction
Direct  from the
Ash Grove in L.A.
BARBARA   DANE
Nov. 7 -Nov. 16
9:30 — 10:45 — 12:15
3607 West Broadway
RE 8-0410
Why Women
love a liar
Flattery may be only skin
deep but a big rose colored
fib can work wonders, says
November Reader's Digest.
It seems women like most
being fibbed to about their
weakest points! Read how to
do it properly in "I Love a
Nice Liar", in November
Reader's Digest.
Students
Your Formal
and
Semi-Formal
Clothing: Needs
Can be Met Best at:
McCUISH *"$?•*
2046 W. 41st — Ph. 263-3610
Mon.-Sat.  9:30 to 5:30
Ail. HEW GASmSTS
Special Blacount to Studaata
Made-to-Measure
Suits, Jackets and
Slacks Styled for
The Young- Man
responsible for paintings
hung in the Brock.
"I will try in a gentle and
scholarly way to rise above
criticism and show what it is
all about," he said.
Friday, several critiques by
fine arts students describing
why Sun is a good painting
were pinned to the wall beside it.
The painting was stolen
Friday, in front of scores of
students. They did nothing
as the painting was removed.
The thieves brought the
painting back to Brock basements a few minutes later.
Balkind   said   critical   stu
dents should try to paint
their own pictures. "They
might find some hidden
talent," he said.
TB or not TB?
asks registrar
HALIFAX (CUP) — There
are 541 students attending Dalhousie University who aren't
registered there.
The students didn't complete
a tuberculosis testing procedure during registration.
The registrar says this means
they aren't registered.
Library gets 3,500
rare books, papers
UBC has received a donation of an outstanding collection of books and manuscripts on the history of medicine and
science.
The collection, which contains 3,500 items, was presented by the Mr. and Mrs. P.
A. Woodward Foundation and
will be housed in the new
Woodward Biomedical Library, now under construction.
Rare volumes dating back to
1496 are included in the collection, which is considered to
be one of the greatest literary
treasures in Canada.
Among the unique books are
first editions of Vesalius' "Fabric of the Human Body"
(1543); Newton's "Optics"
(1704) and William Harvey's
"De  Generetione"   (1651)   and
an early paper by Dr. Frederick Banting announcing his
discovery of insulin.
Dr. James Ranz, head libari-
an, said the Woodward collection would be in use continuously by local students and
students from other parts of
the world coming to carry on
historical research.
Cozy three-room suite.
Clean, bright, nicely furnished. 1 block from shops
& bus, $65.00. 2328 Balaclava Street, RE 3-1907.
**">
A special message
*-**\*k JR ..
TO THOSE
ENGINEERS
WHO WILL
GRADUATE
IN EITHER
1965 OR 1966
HAVE YOU DECIDED in which industry you wish to make your career?
DO YOU KNOW what opportunities are offered by the pulp and paper industry?
DON'T WAIT until you graduate to find out.
Columbia Cellulose Company, Limited offers you a planned programme that
enables you to put theory into practice. This is not just a summer job but an
OPPORTUNITY to learn while you earn. Columbia Cellulose operates two pulp
mills in British Columbia. Our dissolving grade pulp mill at Prince Rupert, produces
acetate viscose and specialty sulphite paper pulp for the manufacture of textiles,
plastics, chemicals and specialty papers. The other, a sulphate (kraft) mill at
Castlegar, is probably the most modern bleached kraft paper pulp mill in the world
today. Equipment such as a Flakt airborne drier, two Kamyr continuous digesters,
a two-stage chlorine dioxide bleaching plant, and other equipment of advanced
design, offers experience to engineering graduates obtainable in few other Canadian
pulp mills.
The Company is a medium-sized producer of forest products employing
about 2,200 persons. Capital investment in all divisions totals some $120 million.
Future progress will depend upon the successful development of a growing
team of people with technical and managerial skills in many fields. The Company
is continually expanding and is in an excellent position to take advantage of new
opportunities as they arise.
FOR INTERVIEWS: Graduating students wishing to discuss employment
will be interviewed on campus by senior company personnel on Nov. 13, 14 ft 15th
&
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED Tuesday,  November 5,   1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
WCIAA ti
Alberta sinks  UBC
with  decisive 29-2
By DAN MULLEN
The UBC Thunderbirds lost their last chance for the
WCIAA championship by dropping a 29-2 decision to the
University of Alberta in Edmonton Saturday.
It was the Birds' second loss in conference play in this
their last year in the Canadian league.
On their home field the
Golden Bears put on a decisive
display of superiority. Their
defense kept the pressure on
passers Roger Hardy and Dick
Gibbons.
UBC strategy of short
passes to combat the big Bear
rush failed as Alberta's linemen stifled the Bird backfield.
"They were chasing our passers  all  over  the  field,"   said
Frank Gnup, UBC coach.
LONG BURSTS
Most of Alberta's scoring
came on long bursts by speedy
Bear backs, led by all-star Ken
Nielsen.
The Birds were still very
much in the game as the second half opened. Alberta led
7-0 after a pass interference
penalty had given them a first
down on the UBC one yard
line.
The T-birds received the
kickoff and promptly fumbled
the ball away on their own
25.
Alberta went on to take a
commanding lead, holding UBC
to a pair of singles.
BRIGHT SPOTS
Bright spots in an otherwise dreary afternoon were
halfbacks Bob Sweet and Vic
Iwata, and end Tom Thomson.
Thomson again provided a
bullseye target for Bird passes. Iwata, up from the Jayvees,
showed well despite his small
size.
Sweet turned in another
solid ball-carying performance.
SPORTS
EDITOR: Denis Stanley
Defeat
a password
for golfers
Defeat is becoming a familiar word to the UBC golf
team.
Despite the fine efforts of
John Morgan, Ian Muter,
Rusty Goepel, Don Cannon,
and John Kavalec, the team
could muster only 13 points
out of a possible 36 playing
in mild weather at Fraser-
view, Sunday,
•    •    •
Fraserview's pro Doug Mc-
Alpine and Peter Gill scored
in the low 70's.
Ian Muter shot 73 in vain
while his partner Morgan
saw his 76 eclipsed by Gill's
73.
Rusty Goepel and Don
Cannon chopped 77's to nip
Len Dodson and Len Johnston but their few points
were not enough.
John Kavalec proved to be
a better putter than his opponent but was edged in a
close match. Jim Seed and
Jim Stevens lost every possible point.
Next week's match against
Pitt Meadows will be the
final contest of the season
for the UBC golfers.
Thunderettes   play
UBC basketball Thunderettes play their third game of
the season against the Senior
A Orphans this Wednesday
night.
It will be the second meeting between the Thunderettes
and the Orphans. The Orphans
composed of ex-UBC players,
beat the Thunderttes in the
opening game of the season.
The game starts at 8:45 at
King Edward Gym.
SCOREBOARD
SOCCER
Varsity   4—I/abatt's   1
Braves   0—Park   Royal   0
Juniors   2—Firefighters   1
FOOTBAIL
Junior's 18—Sattle Cavaliers 45.
&UQBT
Frosh     1     0—West    Vancouver,
Barbarians  0.
Frosh 11 3—West Vancouver 111
21.
FIIUU)    HOCKEY
Varsity   5—Blues  0
Golds   2—Blackbirds   0
Advocates    0—Hoper's    "B"    2
Pedagogues 2—North Shore "B"
2.
Manitoba outpaces Birds
in cross-country test
University   of  Manitoba   beat   defending   WCIAA
champions, University of British Columbia in a weekend cross-country meet in Calgary.
The win gives the University of Manitoba sole
rights to represent the west in Guelph November 23
in the Canadian  Championships.
Top scorer in the individual race went to John
Eocelston of the University of Alberta at Edmonton.
Eccelston's time for the four and one-half mile jaunt
was 24 minutes, 1.6 seconds.
UBC's Rod Constable placed third with 24 minutes,
38 seconds.
Four other UBC runners were in the point making
catagory. Malcolm McGawn placed ninth, George Mur-
guly, 15th; Jim McKay, 20th; and John Prior, 22nd.
elud
Birds
VIC IWATA
OUTSTANDING in the Golden
Bear game over the weekend were Vic Iwata and Bob
Sweet who turned in another fine carrying performance.
UBC drivers
top car rally
Off campus rallyists should
start taking lessons from teams
entered by UBC enthusiasts.
Tom Burgess and Bill Fane,
in a 1500 series MGA, added
to campus fame by winning
the sixth annual Fraser Valley
Rally.
Ten UBC cars entered; the
electrical engineers and the
UBC sports car club each entered a team of three cars.
The 160 mile rally was spon-
sorel by the Volkswagen Owners Club and took about six
hours to complete.
Olympics change
as night and day
What a difference a day made.
At least to Canada's national hockey team.
Saturday night the team, minus five of its top men,
including net-minder Ken Broderick and forward Gary
Dineen, walloped the Flin-Flon Warriors 13-1.
Sunday afternoon the same
team, playing the same team,
lost 4-3.
Biggest reason for the Sunday defeat, according to national manager Bob Hindmarch, was the outstanding
work of Warrior goal keeper
George AUard.
Allard stopped 38 drives
compared to 16 by national
alternate net minder Rick
Broadbelt.
Saturday night Allard
handled 47 shots compared
with 18 for Broadbelt.
Sunday the Warriors led the
Olympians 3-0 going into the
final period, but the nationals
tied it up on three quick goals
by Roger Bourbonnais, Brian
Conacher and Al McLean.
The winning Warrior goal
was scored by Lyle Willey
when he slashed home a loose
puck from a pile-up in front
of the nationals' net near the
10-minute mark of the third
period.
George    Swarbrick    missed
subs
in nets
the Sunday game due to illness while forwards Gary Dineen, Marshall Johnston, and
Mickey McDowell, defencemen
Terry O'Malley and Don Rod-
gers, and goal keeper Ken
Broderick did not make the
trip.
for
that
smart
look
in
glasses
look to
*2\
H*?**1™
Pfieichlftlon Optical
"ASK YOUR DOCTOR"
SPECIAL DISCOUNTS
TO UNDERGRADUATES
USE YOUR CREDIT
Sp&riaL fv&nJtA.
* presents ^^
# In conjunction with Jeunesses Musicales
AUDREY JOHANNSEN
NOON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 — FREDDIE WOOD THEATER
• FREE — Two Ski Movies — FREE
• Ski Trails of Lake Louise
and
• Ski Ascent of Mt. Logan
with Hans Gmoser
NOON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 — BU. 100
# In conjunction with French Canada Week
PERE BERNARD
"THE FOLK SINGING MONK".
NOON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 — BROCK HALL Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,   1963
'tween classes
Liberals probe policy
on French, Confederation
The UBC Liberal Club will
hold a policy discussion on
"French Canada and Confederation" today in Bu. 214.
French-Canadian students will
be guests.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events presents Pere
Bernard, "the guitar-playing
monk", Thursday noon, Brock
Hall.
In co-operation with Jeunes-
ses Musicales, Audrey Johan-
nsen appears today noon in the
Freddie Wood Theater.
Two ski movies: "Ski Trails
of Lake Louise" and "Ski Ascent of Mout Logan" with Hans
Gmoser. today noon in Bu. 100.
Admission is free.
• •    •
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
General meeting today noon
in Bu. 225.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
Anesthesiology film Wednesday noon in Wes. 100. UBC
Medical    School    Field    Trip,
Thursday noon. Members only.
• •    •
ARTS  US
No Last Lecture this week
due to French-Canada Week.
Dr. Divinsky speaks on Nov.
12.
• •    •
FINE ARTS CLUB
Two films: "Thorvaldsen"
and "Four Vancouver
Painters", Wednesday noon in
Lasserre 104.
• •    •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m., Brock TV lounge.
• •    •
NEW DEMOCRATS
Banned WW II film "The
Battle of Russia!" noon today
in the Auditorium. Admission
is 25 cents.
• •    •
NGF
Executive meeting Wednesday noon in Bu 203.
• *    •
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
"Breakdown"    will   be   re-
Missionary recruits
to  see  real missionary
Budding missionaries can find out what it's like to
be a missionary this week.
Varsity Christian Fellowship is sponsoring a series of
films and speakers on the significance and challenge of
the world-wide missionary field.
Today three foreign students will speak on the missionary needs of their countries in Bu. 102. Wednesday
in Bu. 100 medical missionary Dr. Ben Gullison will
speak.
Another film will be shown Thursday noon in Bu. 106
and Friday Anglican missionary to India the Rev. Robert
Brown will describe his experiences.
shown today noon in Bu. 204.
We apologize for Friday's difficulties.
• •    •
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Caribbean students who
want to send Christmas greet-;
ings, report to CBC studios today.
• •    •
UNITARIAN CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon in
Bu. 3252, Bob Gregory will
lead a discussion on censorship.
• •    •
EAST ASIA SOC
Professor R. Goldman speaks
on "Student Life in Peking"
Wednesday noon, Bu. 203.
• •    •
CUSO
General meeting today noon
in Bu. 217.
• •    •
CHORAL SOC
Rehearsal Wednesday 6 p.m.
in Bu. 104.
• •    •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Meeting today noon in Room
861 of library. Topic: The Importance of a School Librarian.
• •    •
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Music of Charles Ives: Trio
for violin, cello & piano, played by Joseph Bach, violin,
Ernst Friedlander, cello, and
Robert Rogers, piano, Wednesday noon in Bu. 106.
• •    •
NEWMAN CLUB
Father William Collins,
OSM, speaks on "Evolution of
the Church in Quebec", Brock
Hall at 8:30 p.m.
UBC  CLASSIFIED
LOST: Red wallet containing
identification cards, faculty club
and library membership, and
Spanish identification card. Please
return   to   BU.   253.
FOR SALE: Complete, new set of
Encyclopedia Britannica with
year books up to date. All for
one low price. Phone Lynne after
6:45,   431-2580.
THREE GIRLS1 want fourth to
share apartment on campus. $60
mo.  Phone   224-1241   after   5:00.
RIDE WANTED: Mon. to Fri.,
8:30-5:30 general vicinity Grand-
view Hwy. and Edmonds. Phone
Phillip,   LA   2-7397.	
RIDERS WANTED: Don't ride the
bus! Room for four living west
of Fraser, South of 41st in Dunbar, or near gates. Large, warm
car. Campus centre drop-off.
8:30-5   every   day.   Call   876-2315.
LOST: Or possibly taken by mistake, girl's camel hair coat Saturday night at the Zete House.
Reward.   Phone   AM   6-9875.
RIDE WANTED: For three girls
Monday to Friday 8:30. Vicinity
Fourth and Larch. Phone evenings,  738-2204.
RIDE WANTED: From E. 50th and
Nanaimo Mon. to Fri. Approx.
8:30-5:30. Needed by Nov. 3.
Phone  Ken  at   327-7264   after   6.
FOR SALE: New California hard
top for all Austin Healey 4-
seater models. Now! painted in
Healey red with white interior.
Buy now for Xmas only $210.00.
Hank,   AM  1-5750.	
WANTED: Tutor for Math 120
student who urgently requires
help. Call Barri, 224-9910. RM.
15   (on   campus)   after  5:30  p.m.
PERSONAL: Congratulations to
Bill and Jill on their weekend
fishing trip. Confucius say: Woman who uses bait to lure fish
often   ends  up  with   her-ring.
WOULD the person who removed
my briefcase from College library please return to same or to
Lost and Found, or phone TR 6-
7643.   Reward.
LOST: Watch, Roamer, Swiss made,
17 jewels on Wednesday. If
found, please phone R. Usmani,
local   696.   CA   4-1111.
FOUND: Near library small gold
pin. Call Heather, RE 1-1432 and
idntify.	
LOST>: Blue paisly silk scarf. Vicinity of Auditorium- Sentimental value. See Joan in Ubyssey
office.
LOST: Gold ring with initial in
blue stone, Oct. 23. Finder please
phone   Gary  at  CA   4-9910.	
FOR SALE: Vespa Allstate scooter, new paint, reconditioned mo-
tor,   $150.  RE 1-3228.	
I LOST: BroWn briefcase with black
strip on lock flap, outside Brock
caf. on Tuesday; finder please
phone YU 7-7651 or deposit at
Lost   and   Found.	
WANTED: Used books. Vogel's
Text book of Inorganic Quantitative Analysis; Sverdr.up's The
Oceans. Phone 731-6239, evenings.
FOR SALE:   '57 Zephyr  6  cyl. $650
or   ?.   Excellent   cond.  Must sell.
Gone  to  Europe.  FA 1-1307, 7826
Oak   St.
LOST: One brown briefcase, picked
up by mistake or on purpose from
College library on Friday afternoon about 4 p.m. Alec, LA 1-
0504.
FOR     SALE:     A     real     deal—6-
string   guitar,   $15.   RE   3-7948.
LOST:   Brown   purse   on   city   bus
Wed.,   Oct.   23.   Need  papers  and
keys.   Reward.   Phone   RE   8-7517.
RIDE WANTED: From 45th and
Windsor for 8:30's. Phone Bob,
FA   7-3170.
RIDE: From W. 58th, two blocks
off Marine Drive. Phone AM 1-
5614.
LOST: Would the person who took
my Chem. and Physics texts
from the College library return
thm to the Lost and Found or
phone   CA   4-0506. 	
FOR SALE: 1960 Renault. Superb
condition—best offer, must sell
quickly. Phone Tom at CA 4-
4052 or see it at 2260 Wesbrook
Cres.
FOUND: Man's ring with Gladstone High emblem; 2 lady's
compacts; Brock Proctor's office.
FOUND: Silver medallion in Acadia Camp. Phon CA 4-6861 after
6    p.m.	
RIDERS WAJSTTED: To Trail this
weekend. Leave Friday p.m. and
return Sunday. Phone Gerry at
CA  4-7421  after  6  p.m.	
LOST: German literature since
Goethe. Friday in Buchanan.
Phone   Art,   731-8308.	
WANTED: Ride to Banff for Nov.
11 weekend. Will help with expenses. Phone 733-2504.
FOR SALE: Car-top ski-rack in
excellent condition. Fits any car,
shis attach quickly and easily.
Phone   Ron   Hatch,   RE   1-7540.
REWARD: For sweater lost between Empire pool and "C" lot
scooter shed. Blue, with fleu-
de-lis pattern and white arms.
Call  Bill  Lake at AM  6-9450.
LOST:    White    raincoat   with    red
lining a month ago. Pair of black
gloves in   pockets.  Finder  please
$2   reward.
phone C. V., 228-8974 after 6 p.m
LOST: One lady's cream-colored
wallet—if AMS cards, etc. ar.e
returned finder may keep the
money. Phone Elizabeth, RE 8-
1124.
FOR SALE: '59 TR-3 electric overdrive, new w.w. racing tires,
radio, heater. Phone Bill after
6   p.m.   HE   3-2300.	
LOST: Imitation leather (plastic)
ring binder with three or four
key tabs in Bu. 3201 or College
library. Call Victor at LA 2-0226.
WANTED: Somone to (ind the
three blondes of the Ubyssey
office lost in Sociology 200 since
last   September.	
LOST: Brown brief case containing all my notes plus two texts,
Psychoology 100 and Chemistry
101. Keep the case but please
return the notes and glasses.
Phone   Gordon  at  RE  8-1879.
LOST: Black leather key case with
two keys, near West Mall and
A-Lot on Friday, October 25.
Finder phone Stu after 10 p.m.
at   298-8096.
LOST: One volume of Grolier's
Encyclopedia in Hut L3 at 2:30
p.m., Monday, October 21. Finder phone Stu after 10 p.m. at
298-8096.
WANTED: Riders to Prince George
or Kitimat on the long weekend. Leaving Thursday, Nov. 7
in the afternoon. Phone Denny
at   CA   4-5397,   evenings.
LOST: During chariot race, Washington wrist watch with expansion bracelet. Please phone Mike
Belev   at  CA   8-8901.	
LOST: Black cardboard binder containing Bi. 105 notes. Likely left
in Buchanan Biological Sciences
2000, or in Auditorium. Finder
please call Anita Bowman, CA
4-9976.
LOST: Would the person wiho acci-
dently took my black leather
handled manual umbrella from
Brock, Monday afternoon put it
in the bookstore Lost and Found.
It   was   a   friend's.
LOST: A green "Parker.-51 Special"
pen with silver cap. Finder
please call Rod at 921-7276. It
was  a gift.
French Week Calendar
TODAY:
12:30,   Brock  Lounge   —
Speech: Religion in Quebec.
3:30, Brock Lounge—Seminar — Religion in Quebec.
3:30, Chem 250 — Film—
"Seul ou avec d'autres."
7:30, Fine Arts Gallery —
Opening of French Canadian
art exhibit.
WEDNESDAY:
12:30,   Brock   Lounge   —
Speech:    French    Canadian
Culture.
3:30, Brock Lounge—Seminar—French Canadian Culture.
THURSDAY:
12:30,   Brock   Lounge   —
Pere    Bernard,    Folksinger.
12:30, Auditorium—Speech
Separatism.
3:30, Brock Lounge—Seminar — Separatism.
8:00,   International   House
—"La Lecon,"
1964    GRADUATES
CANADA'S LARGEST EMPLOYER
requires
Federal Civil Service
CIVIL-ELECTRICAL-MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS
An interesting and rewarding career may await you in
the Federal Civil Service if you are graduating in Civil,
Electrical or Mechanical Engineering in 1964. New graduates in these fields will be employed at various Canadian centre on vital and challenging projects involving
design, development, construction, research application
and contracts engineering.
STARTING SALARY APPROXIMATELY $5,200 —
allowances will be made for those completing relevant
post-graduate training.
CANDIDATES MUST WRITE A GENERAL OBJECTIVE TEST AT 7:00 P.M., ON THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 14, ROOM 2225, BUCHANAN BLDG.
Details regarding the examination, application forms and
the booklet "Opportunities for Graduates in Engineering" are available from
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
The California Standard Company
Calgary, Alberta
offering careers  in
Petroleum Exploration and
Production
will conduct campus interviews on
November 7, 8, and 8
for
Post Graduates - Graduates
Undergraduates
in
HONORS GEOLOGY
- Permanent  and  summer  employment
PHYSICS AND GEOLOGY
- Permanent  and  summer  employment
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
-. Permanent   and  summer   employment
MINING ENGINEERING
- Permanent  and  summer  employment
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
- Permanent  and  summer  employment
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
MAY BE MADE THROUGH
THE UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE

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