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The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1966

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Array Yes, our
H reporters
THE UBYSSEY
are
H responsible
Vol. XLVIII, No. 46
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1966
CA 4-3916
UBC
responsi
for parties
UBC  president John Macdonald Monday  refused  to
commit the university to the responsibility for off-campus
student events involving liquor.
His   comment   followed   the
—dennls gans photo
IT'S VEIN DRAIN TIME AGAIN, and Eileen O'Donnel, arts I, gives her pint at the biennial
UBC blood drive in the armory. Daily quota is 300 pints. Red Cross nurse is Mrs. Arlke
Kievimaa.
Big three endorse brief
asking for re-appraisal
The AMS council Monday
night endorsed a Victoria College brief calling for universal
accessibility to post-secondary
institutes of education.
The brief, to be presented to
the provincial cabinet or a government committee within the
next two weeks, will be backed by UBC, Victoria College,
and Simon Fraser.
It recommends that the provincial goverment:
• Initiate a study of the
motivational, social, and environmental factors involved
in post secondary education.
• Provide the universities
with their requested operating
grants.
• Provide some form of
equalization grant to out-of-
town students.
President Mac mingles
with us students today
UBC president John Macdonald will speak to students
individually and en masse noon today in Brock lounge.
Macdonald arranged the coffee party and forum after
it was charged he was not having an effective dialogue with
students.
Macdonald was hissed and booed when he refused to
answer student questions at the Education and Beyond
Conference Jan. 22.
Macdonald had spoken to students at the conference
on the need for increased communication between undergraduates and administration because of campus unrest.
• Consider five year financing for universities.
The brief drawn up by the
Victoria College student council follows a one month fee
fight at Victoria in which 800
students withheld $56 of their
second term fees.
The fight closed Jan. 26 with
the students paying the fees
plus a $10 late fee fine.
The brief says the cost of
higher education in B.C. has
risen from $322 to $428 in the
last two years, a raise of 33
per cent.
The results of a student
means survey conducted at Victoria College in March IS.64
are included in an appendix to
the brief.
The survey shows 24.9 per
cent of students had to hold
part-time jobs during the academic year and 11 per cent had
their university education interrupted for at least one year
because of financial difficulties.
announcement Thursday by
Vancouver deputy chief constable John Fisk of a plan
which will require faculty
members to take out liquor permits for student functions.
The plan follows a police
raid on a student stag party
in January in which students
under 21 allegedly consumed
liquor.
'I have expressed the view
to the chief constable of Vancouver that the university cannot and will not take responsi-
biliy for policing events off
campus," Macdonald said.
"I do not know what evidence there is of violation of
liquor regulations by students
in connection with special permits."
Dr. Harold Copp, president
of the UBC faculty association, said last week the scheme
will have the effect of prohibition on student functions.
He said the scheme means
no permits will be issued for
casual student functions because no professors could take
the responsibility.
Fisk said the plan was suggested after two student stags
were held in East Vancouver
in which students under 21
allegedly consumed liquor and
reportedly watched indecent
exhibitions.
He said that sole responsibility for issuing liquor permits
is held by government liquor
vendors present in each liquor
store.
But, he added, the vendors
usually comply with police suggestions to determine the conditions under which liquor permits will not be issued.
Copp, also the head of UBC's
physiology department, said
the plan will be impossible to
implement.
"No professor will: apply unless it is an official university
function such as an undergraduates society annual ball."
AMS president Byron Hender said Monday he also did
not agree with Fisk's plan.
The AMS is working with
the RCMP and police to ascertain the legality of the problem," Hender said.
"But the present police regulation automatically assumes
all students are bad."
Asked if he approved of
present liquor laws, Hender
said: "I'd see the birth control
laws changed before the liquor
act."
BYRON HENDER
. . . illegal?
ft/S fails
to impeach
Hender
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
AMS council threw out
a petition to impeach president Byron Hender
Monday night.
The petition was presented to council by Engineering vice-president
Don Allen.
It said that as the sign-
ees considered Byron
Hender to be an inefficient student leader lacking the moral convictions
necessary for the office of
president, council should
hold a petition before
Feb. 11 for the impeachment of Hender.
Law president Peter
Hyndman said the petition was not legal.
"First it asks council
to present the referendum. To be legal it must
ask the AMS to present
it," he said.
Hyndman then asked
Allen to define impeach.
Allen couldn't.
Allen said he had originally planned the petition to serve three functions: to raise controversy, in order to publicize the AMS general
meeting; to let students
decide if Hender had done
his job; and to make the
president - elect think
about doing a good job.
"I think its an insult to
the dignity of the office
of president," said Hender, "I could get a petition to have you (Allen)
crucified." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1966
EVEN THE AUDIENCE
Potential brass
rap everything
Potential Brock brass criticized everything including the
audience at an all-candidate meeting in Brock Hall Monday.
Candidates were warming up
Latin cause
boosted
by UN club
— norm  betts photo
IT'S FIND THE SUBMARINE time. Legendary Spanish Banks races unfolded before Ubyssey
photographer's lens Saturday afternoon. This one is the U.S. Navy's Char.
Reid s submerged
with Homecoming
By STU GRAY
Student Union Building
assistant chairman Dick Reid,
arts II, will have his hands
full next year.
He was appointed Homecoming chairman for 1966-67
at student council meeting
Jan. 31, and Reid said Wednesday he was also being
groomed for the SUB chairmanship, now held by Roger
McAfee.
"My overall job in SUB is
to learn what Roger McAfee
has under his hat," he said.
"Roger wants me to have it
all in my brain in the next
two months."
McAfee    said    Wednesday
Reid was not due to replace
him as SUB chairman when
his term expires in April.
He said it was up to council to decide who is appointed
chairman next year.
"Reid is just a young, keen
guy who does specific jobs for
the SUB committee," he said.
He said Reid would probably be ready for the job of
chairman in 1967.
He named Reid as one of
the group of people who "in
varying degrees" are most
knowledgeable of SUB.
The others are AMS president Byron Hender, AMS coordinator     Graeme     Vance,
How they voted
Here's   the   way   the   polls voted in   Wednesday's
AMS presidential election, provided by The Ubyssey for
students who count.
The count on the final ballot was Peter Braund 3,322
and Gabor Mate 2,637.
Braund        Mate Wise        Spoils
Home Ec     83 19 7 -
Lib    181 174 41 3
Physics        91 77 38
Ponderosa    128 109 73 3
Gym     70 24 13 1
Wesbrook    130 72 21
Acadia        81 67 21
FortCamp 115 89 52 2
VGH         10 7 9 0
Lower Mall     95 114 54 1
Totem    128 100 31 0
Brock S. 452 214 40 5
Brock N. 189 176 48 10
Bu. No. 1 183 259 40 2
Bu. No. 2 138 142 51 2
Bio.  Sc.        60 82 21
Bus Stop 224 195 74 1
Coll. Lib. 243 209 48 2
Educ.     80 62 30 2
Eng.     94 45 108
H.Angus- 104 113 36 1
in work
SUB
AMS business manager, Pearson, and himself.
Reid said his appointment
as SUB assistant chairman
has only been in effect two
weeks, before which he was
informally connected with
SUB for a year and a half.
He spent most of 1965 in
hospital with infectious
hepatitis.
Referring to the latter
period, Reid said:
"I didn't do any work. I
just picked up facts and read
books."
At present, he puts in about
ten hours a week on SUB,
Reid added.
"Now I'm sort of involved.
But other things keep me
busy, too."
McAfee said he didn't think
Reid's position as Homecoming chairman next year would
reduce his effectiveness on the
SUB committee.
Asked if he would run for
SUB chairman again when his
term expires, McAfee replied:
"I imagine so. I haven't
really decided." McAffcs' has
been SUB chairman since
summer 1965.
for AMS second slate elections
Wednesday.
First vice-president candidate Charlie Boylan criticized
the audience of about 150 students as "a bunch of trained
seals who had come to cheer
for their favorites."
Co-ordinator candidate Jim
Lightfoot said the proposed student union building would increase the space for clubs.
Lightfoot, who is assistant to
co-ordinator Graeme Vance
this year, said: "I am familiar
with the\ problems of the coordinator."
The other candidate for the
position, defeated presidential
aspirant Don Wise, demanded
an immediate referendum on
the future of SUB.
He said he didn't think his
lack of administrative experience would hurt him as coordinator.
"Any idiot can handle the
administration of that job," he
said.
In the race for first vice-
president, candidates Boylan,
Bill Grant and Jim Taylor
sounded off on a variety of
topics.
Boylan said he wants the
students to have a voice on the
board of governors and a referendum to find out if the students want a student building.
Grant said he considered
SUB's future already decided.
"Let's get it built," he said.
Grant also proposed a program of civil disobedience if
there is a fee increase next
year.
Taylor criticized as irresponsible those who wanted the
SUB   question  reopened.
He said ending in camera
board of governors meetings
should be the first goal of students, rather than representation on the board.
During the question period,
Taylor criticized Grant's program for civil disobedience in
the face of a fee increase.
"We don't want a big stink,
we want good publicity and
good results," he said.
The UN club goes Latin this
week.
Every day at noon hour the
club is sponsoring a different
speaker on some aspect of
Latin America.
The seminar begins today at
International House when Dr.
Harold Livermore, head of the
Spanish department, speaks on
Latin America until Independence.
Wednesday John Murchison,
also of the Spanish department,
will talk about Argentina Since
Independence in Bu. 203.
Films about Mexico, and the
east and west coasts of South
America run in Bu. 100 Thursday noon.
The seminar ends February
14 with discussion by Latin
American students on the USA
in South America at International House at noon.
Well I'll be!
WEST POINT GREY (UNS)
•— Informed sources learned
Saturday there really is no
milk-supplying goat in the bureau. Illusions were shattered.
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST"
—N. Y. Times
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4375 >t)tf 10th
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wide wale corduroy in classic 3 button sports coat styl-
Pat pockets ■ 9.95
Come in and Choose Yours
from
'     DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STOKES
4445 W. 10th Ave.
near Sasamat
2906 Weil Broadway
At. Mackenzie Tuesday,  Febraury 8,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
No defense for residences
—McGregor getting fussy
Only speaks
to Ubyssey's
Hrushowy
— norm betts photo
WHAT'S CHEERLESS, sweaterless, shivers, and runs from
photographers? A cheerleader whose sweater has been
stolen. The Ubyssey caught up to Elaine Maclnnes long
enough to discover she is offering a reward and can be
contacted through The Ubyssey.
$100,000 for new
UBC health centre
A donation of $100,000 has been made to the UBC health
sciences centre.
The gift, in memory of the
late Alan H. Williamson, was
dedicated by his wife to 'research and support, particularly in the early detection and
prevention of mental deficiency in children."
The Williamsons shared a
long-standing interest in work
in the field of mental retardation among children.
UBC President John Macdonald said: "This is an important gift and will enable
the University to accelerate its
progress, particularly in relation to the problems of the detection and prevention of mental deficiency in  children."
Dean of medicine John F.
McCreary commented: "Mrs.
Williamson's gift will encourage and strengthen the research which is already underway in this field at the medical
school of UBC."
By PAT HRUSHOWY
Ubyssey Responsible Reporter
UBC housing director Malcolm McGregor Monday refused to defend the residence
administration against criticism
from the AMS residences survey.
The results of the survey conducted last winter by AMS coordinator Graeme Vance and
student union building chairman Roger McAfee, were printed in the last issue of The
Ubyssey.
"I won't defend our operation to The Ubyssey. It doesn't
have to be defended," said McGregor.
He named The Ubyssey as
the instigator of the present
outcry over residences.
He referred in particular to
the editorials of Feb. 3 and 4.
"We have a very large operation and our first concern is
the   student,"   said  McGregor.
"The Ubyssey normally gets
the facts wrong and if the
facts are right, The Ubyssey
distorts them."
The Ubyssey has attacked
the conditions at Acadia Camp,
he said.
'The Ubyssey is constantly
referring to Acadia Camp as
the slums of the campus," said
McGregor.
'The students in Acadia certainly do not think they live
in the slums, in fact they are
very proud of their home."
After several contradicting
statements were made by officials concerning residences,
McGregor made a move to prevent any further occurences.
"From this date forward I
am the only spokesman for the
residences," said McGregor.
And your reporter is the
only Ubyssey staffer McGregor
will talk to on residence
matters.
"The Ubyssey staff is generally irresponsible but you
strike me as being a little more
responsible. So if they send
you, I will talk to you," McGregor told me.
NORA PRUESSE, ED. Ill, AND RTTY
. . . you can teletype miles away
World-wide typists at UBC
with Radsoc s new RTTY
By CHRIS BROCKHURST
With the aid of a newly acquired radio teletype unit
RTTY), UBC amateur radio society can "type" to anyone in
the world.
The RTTY, bought from a commercial firm for an
almost nominal sum enables communication by way of
printed messages to any country in the world with a similar
set up.
The message is printed on our teletype machine, then
changed into radio waves and reconverted into type at the
receiving end.
"Contacts Monday morning, included Czeckoslovakia,
Guadaloupe, Puerto Rico, Australia, Angola, and France,
to name only a few," said' Hamsoc president, Dave Powell-
Williams.
"There are only two or three hundred similar units
outside North America and only four other universities in
Canada own RTTY," he said.
ADMIRABLY FITTED'
Young, Dusing
named reformers
Two newly-appointed arts faculty assistants have been
appointed to gather information  about  curriculum  reform
in the first two years of the arts faculty.
The  third  and fourth  year
arts curriculum was radically
changed in January.
UBC president John Macdonald has appointed Walter D.
Young, assistant professor of
political science, and William
J. Dusing instructor in the classics department.
SEMINAR COMING
ON WEEKEND
Quakers will probe revolt
UBC's Quaker club has
organized a seminar on revolution — campus revolution — this weekend.
The seminar, Feb. 11-13,
will explore student involvement in university, community, and world.
•     •     •
Dr. Benson Brown of UBC
— a former member of the
steering committee of Berkeley's Free Speech Movement, speaks on FCM Friday
at 9 p.m. in Bu. 258.
Saul Landau of San Fran-
BENSON  BROWN
. . speaks on revolt
cisco who has written a ibook
on the new radicals speaks
Saturday at 9 a.m. in International House.
Representatives of the administrations of UBC and
University   of    Washington
• • •
will discuss the role of the
student with students and
faculty of the two universities at 2 p.m. Saturday in
International House.
Registration for the seminar is $1, students, and $2.50
for others.
They were chosen as representatives of the two main
areas of study in the arts faculty. Dusing represents the humanities and Young the social
sciences.
Arts dean Dennis Healy said
there is widespread feeling in
the faculty that curriculum reform is necessary.
An advisory board has been
set up, with one facutly member from each of the 18 departments, and the appointees will
make their reports to the
board.
The board will prepare draft
proposals to be taken before
full meetings of the arts faculty for debate.
If passed, the proposals will
be forwarded to the UBC Senate for final approval.
Dusing said he and Young
hope to have some information
by April.
"Both assistants are young,
energetic members of the UBC
teaching staff and admirably
fitted to take an active part in
the affairs of the arts faculty,"
said Dean Healy. mnrsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater S' 'Jiety, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loo. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
60 per cent?
We're glad the union building chairman and his
friends have come out of hiding to begin to explain the
fine points of the deals they've been making.
But the more we hear, the more we're convinced
that the Great Mistake has really reached fantastic
proportions.
Just consider one aspect of it, again — the $500,000-
odd the administration is taking off the top of the 35
years pre-paid rent the Bank of Montreal is to pay to
the AMS for its space in SUB.
This money, the union building chairman informs
us blithely, is paid to the administration as "the student
contribution to the administration building."
Now this is very fine.
Students have a long history of contributing to
various building projects around campus: the armory,
the gym, the winter sports arena.
But one funny thing — before we ever gave a red
cent on any of these projects, the students as a whole
made some kind of a decision on the matter.
Usually it was by (gasp!) referendum.
But in any case, we heard arguments for and
arguments against student contribution to a particular
building.
Now in the present case, the $500,000 gift is part of
a big wheeler-deal with the administration.
We've yet to hear one argument why students
should pay for part of a new fancy-dan administration
building, especially while about 1,000 of their fellows
are still living in "temporary" army huts.
In fact, it looks more and more that this $500,000
contribution to the new administration is NOT the students' contribution.
It's a wheeler-dealer union building committee's contribution to the new administration building.
By concentrating membership on the union building
wheeler-dealer committee to just a few of the AMS in-in
group, the present student government probably had
the intention of speeding up progress on the Great
Mistake.
But we don't really feel the union building committee appointments were appointments to wheel and
deal with a sum equal to about 60 per cent of a usual
year's AMS budget.
'        EDITOR: Tom Wayman __ „                    _.             , _    _
u_.                                              B D._„ Anne Balf was part-time assistant
"ew*.       -                 Ron niter clty   editor     stu   Gray   was   liauor
Associate     __ _ George Ream-bottom editor,   Ann  Bishop was  council  re-
City  Al Donald porter for a night.  The rest of the
pl,-^-                                     »!«.«. H-M. irresponsible group included intrepid
Photo    Norm Bom reporters   Bert   Hlu    Anne   Bishop,
Sports Ed Clark Carol-Anne Baker,  Doug Halverson,
Ast't Naws Dan Mullen Doug     Bruce,      Chris     Brockhurst,
Richard Blair, Robbi West Katny   Kyie,    Mary    Ussner    (who
.    .. „ ■.»__» came   with   Stu),   Val   Zuker,   Bruce
Asst City _ Danny Stoffman Benton,  Dick  Taylor,  Kris Emmott,
Page Friday   John Kelsey Carol   Wilson,   and   Hrushowy   who
Managing Ian Cameron wa"   responsible.   Helping  the   types
Feature,   Mike Bolton penwarde-_nterS   Was   '°vely   GiU,an
CUP ....     _.     .    Don Hull
'System now confirmed
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: ing year both the system and
Congratulations to Canada's Mr. Braund lose their virgin-
greatest college paper on their ity.
fair coverage of the election GABOR MATE
campaign. Ex-presidential   candidate
I want to thank everyone »        .        .
who worked on my campaign
and also all those who voted 'PERVERT AND FABRICATE'
for me. Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Now   that   the  system   has May l clarify,
been   confirmed   a   virgin   I Your heavy  investment in
hope  that I will  not be  ac- effort entitles you to distort
cused of abusing this body. lacts or select quotes to satisfy
PETER BRAUND y°ur biases.
AMS president-elect However when you pervert
, and fabricate, your silly little
*      *      * beard dips low over a  glue
'LOSE VIRGINITY' pot.
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir: Last  week  you  misquoted
I hope that during the com- me three times:    1) The cam-
"Well, 111 be doggoned I Aces and eights, the dead man's hand."
Jelly Ian not so jolly
When I was young I used to
read about a fellow called
'Bad King James,' whose only
desire in life
was a 'big red
India - rubber
■ball.'
I   used   to
think he was
a  bit  of  an
idiot, because
if anyone had
cameron     asked   me
what I wanted, the list would
have run  into more pages
than our house had paper.
In the past little while,
however, I have discovered
what the poem is all about.
I don't want much out of
life. I don't ask for Rolls
Royces, mansions, or like
that.
All I want is some jelly in
my donuts.
Every day I go into the
cafe and ask for a jelly do-
nut. I get my jelly donut.
I come down to the Ubyssey office to eat my jelly donut.
And I see other people eating jelly donuts. And these
people all have jelly running
down their faces, and over
their hands, and onto their
desks.
My mouth waters in antici-
a virgin—Pete Braund
paign was well fought and
clean; 2) I had a lot of fun
(in the campaign); and 3) "1
Column" stated: I suggested
the position of co-ordinator be
abolished,   Not, quite.
I DID say:
1) The campaign was so
clean that it was insipid.
2) The most significant outcome of the election was that
I won the engineering building poll: I suggested that it
takes men to know one.
3) The writer(s) of 2 Columns should have the front
of his head abolished by having it ground into his typewriter keys.
Incidentally the outcome of
the presidential election also
brought into sharp focus a
solution to the acute problems
of insipid residence food,
drab common room furnishings, athletic scholarships, and
crowded  cafes.
Pickle the first rats in
Brock South, serve them as
delicacies in Fort Camp,
spread their hides on the engineering common room floor,
and cash their gold pins in on
a rodeo scholarship.
DON WISE.
Ex-presidential candidate,
now co-ordinator candidate.
pation. I bite into the donut,
and quickly bring my napkin
up to catch the excess jelly
before it drips onto my copy.
And      what      happens?
Nothing, that's what.
No excess jell. Usually, no
jelly at all.
Nothing but a big, empty
space where the jelly is supposed to go. I don't ask much.
But I would like some jelly
in my donuts.
Another thing springs lightly to mind. Sometimes, at the
same time I am buying jelly
donuts, I buy a hamburger.
Then I have exactly the opposite trouble from the donuts,
Instead of their being a
lack, there is a surfeit. This
surfeit consists of the goo they
put on their burgers, presumably to cover up the quality
of the meat that they use;
It is a sort of evil-appearing, evil smelling, mucos-like
fluid tfiat is slapped in the
buns that are used for the
hamburgers at Brock.
It seems to be something
left over from the age of reptiles, when the earth was covered with putrescent slime
that later became coal and
what have you.
Apparently not all of it was
changed to coal.
They must have found a
mother-lode of the remainder
under Brock.
I don't ask for much. Just
a little jelly in my donuts. Tuesday,  Febraury 8,  1966
UBYSSEY      BRIDAL      ISSUE
Page 5
SPECIAL
BRIDAL
ISSUE
Editors: Joan Godsell,  Musa
Lincke
First doubt,
then rings,
then bells
By MUSA LINCKE
This is the time of year
when you notice a rash of
after-Christmas-engagement-
rings twinkling on the fingers of your feminine classmates.
This isn't an isolated phenomenon. It has an inevitable
aftermath — usually marriage.
The guys and girls who
are the marrying kind are
found in greatest numbers in
grad studies, architecture,
education, law and medicine,
where they make up roughly
30 per cent of the students.
Let's face it, there's pressure to this thing.
It starts in the latter half
of third year. Suddenly the
world is getting married.
That's the key. The co-ed
is now thinking in terms of
becoming part of the working world. There's fear involved.
How will she face the
working world?
She's sure she'll be cut
off, and part of her knows
she    doesn't    want    to    be.
•      •      •
Campus is no longer a place
she goes for classes and coffee dates.
At this point she realizes
that she is at the source of
supply (of marriage material,
that is).
She is faced with a choice
—does she really want that
career she's been talking
about, and is it really even
feasible?
The rational issue, once
charged with uncertainty, is
now vulnerable to all the
emotional influences. At this
point, enter "the male" and
the   decision  is   made.
But what about the male?
Continued on Page 9
SEE: WHY NOT?
% Page 6
UBYSSEY       BRIDAL       ISSUE
Tuesday, February 8,  1966
flatieJiL
on Granville
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Law prof's wife goes mod
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If you're an average wedding-bound college girl,
you'll want to add the latest
a-go-go T-shirt dress to your
trousseau.
Looking like an elongated
T-shirt, these Pop Art beach
dresses   are   made  of  white
terry cloth and trimmed with
red, blue, or yellow.
But that's not all — emblazoned across the front, in
a strategic place, are shiny
plastic traffic signs such as
Yield, Merge Slowly, Curved
Highway and Soft Shoulders.
KOOKY  DRESSES
Where   did   these   kooky
dresses come from?
From the fertile mind of
23-year-old Frances Hooper,
wife of UBC law professor
Anthony Hooper, that's
where.
Mrs. Hooper and her husband are fresh from Newcastle, England, because, as
she puts it: "You can't live
on an academic salary in
England".
In Newcastle, Mrs. Hooper
worked as a fashion journalist on the Newcastle Journal
("one of those terrible Thomson papers").
She also studied and has
her BA in english and philosophy.
But designing is something
new for this attractive housewife.
"It's really all my husband's fault," she said.
"He had all these way-out
ideas about fashion, particularly men's fashions, and he
wanted me to do some so he
could try them out."
GO WILD
Mrs. Hooper said T-shirt
dresses, like the ones she has
introduced in Vancouver,
were popular in London and
New York last year.
"People in Vancouver
don't dress as way-out as
they do in England," said
Mrs. Hooper.
"People go wild in London."
For example, skirts are
worn a full six inches above
the knee, she said.
But designing clothes and
finding markets for them are
two different things.
"I made a sample dress,"
MARILYN MacDONELL
MODEL AND T-SHIRT DRESS
. . zap, zam — curves ahead
said Mrs. Hooper, "Then I
wore out shoe leather looking for a factory to buy it."
"But I was lucky and these
dresses are now being sold
exclusively at Woodwards
and soon, I'm hoping, in
San Francisco."
Mrs. Hooper has also sold
her designs for men's robes.
They're terry cloth inside,
Madras cloth outside and
they're on sale at The Bay
right now.
Future plans?
"I want to put more
sports shifts with matching
floppy,   wide-brimmed   hats
on the market," said Mrs.
Hooper.
"And I want to do ties
with flowers or spots or Batman words such as Blam,
Zap, and Pow, on them."
"Eventually, I hope to do
more serious suits for both
men and women,"   she said,
"but  it's  easier to  start off
with sporty clothes."
Meanwhile, about that
trousseau — you can buy
that off-beat beach dress at
all Woodward stores right
now for only $7.95.
It's washable and best of
all, easy to pack.
RECIPES
Don't sear with sarcasm
HUSBAND CONSERVE
Select the best man you
can find and brush him carefully to rid him of an indifference.
Be careful not to beat him
as you would an egg or
cream, for ibeating will make
him tough and apt to froth
at the mouth.
Lift him gently into the
home-preserving kettle and
tie him with strong cords of
affection which are not easily broken.
Do not sear him with sar
casm, for that causes sput-
terings which may ultimately result in spontaneous combustion. Scramble when difficulties arise.
Do not soak him in liquor,
for excessive draughts will
make him mushy and spongy
with your friends.
It is best to let him simmer
tenderly at will, to blend
tactfully with dressing and
seasoning. Stuff him one
hour before taking him out
or before asking a favor of
him.
Flavor him with oil of
happiness, an ounce of understanding and a bushel of fun
and laughter.
Should he seem weak or
troubled with feminine infatuations, smother him in
onions and double your
charm.
Do not spoil him by overindulgence, but serve him
daily on a platter of strength
and courage, garnished with
clean shirts and collars.
Anonymous
**fft!-.Tfci13»-^i^,^^_)ejs«__r^(*-jp1*1ar jrjr-jrjr-^_r-ir jr-»-*_<? Tuesday,  Febraury 8,  1966
UBYSSEY       BRIDAL       ISSUE
Page 7
WHAT THE '66 BRIDES WILL LOOK LIKE
HER CROWNING GLORY — a beautiful bridal head- magnificent   gown   with   its   romantic   medieval the mother  of the  bride  in  a  truly avant-garde
dress. This year runs the gamut from traditionally silhouette (below right). A waterfall of nylon neg- feather headdress (bottow centre).  Lacy stockings
romantic blossoms to metal bands and baby-doll ligee, absolutely delectable (below  left). The  last are what the best-turned legs are wearing (bottom
bonnets (above). Happiness is saying "I do" in a word in going away suits (below centre). Starring left).
drawings by
Miriam Wosk Page 8
UBYSSEY      BRIDAL      ISSUE
Tuesday, February 8, 1966
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Feb. 22 - 28. Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Students 75c. (Adults $1.75)
NOTE — Univeristy students are advised to secure
tickets early as High School group bookings
are already coming in.
BOX OFFICE - ROOM 207 - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
TO MAKE THAT
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AYRAB
Lebanon weds a la western
By JACK KHOURY
BEIRUT, Lebanon (UNS)
—The surprising thing about
a typical Lebanese wedding
ceremony today is that there
is no such thing.
Depending on the social,
educational and religious
status of the family, a wedding ceremony may be anything from conventional
Western to traditional Lebanese—with its quaint customs and elaborate rites.
Mostly weddings are a
blend of West and East to
please both old-fashioned
parents and modern couples.
EXOTIC EAST
But even in the very westernized Lebanese marriages
there is one basic difference
revealing the deep-rooted
ideas of the East: a reverent
approach to matrimony.
The reason for this attitude
is simple: civil marriages
don't exist here. Since divorce is not allowed for
Catholics (including Maron-
ites) and is extremely difficult for the Greek Orthodox, marriage is a one - way
step.
Parents generally believe
love is all that matters—as
long as their offspring falls
in love with someone of the
same class and religion. In
other words, good match is
the goal.
Consequently, while a girl
is usually just out of her
teens when she marries, the
average age for a groom is
thirty.
No bachelor is considered
eligible until he has established himself financially
and can support a family.
WORK  SHOCKING
In fact, the idea of having
one's wife work to help with
the family burden appears
shocking to many a modern
Lebanese male, for a married woman's role is at home.
Not necessarily barefoot,
pregnant and in the kitchen
—rather well heeled, elegant
and a good mother.
Despite these obstacles, or
as a result of them, there are
numerous elopements each
year, happening when the
parents objects to either partner and the couple goes on
without consent.
Elopements are called
"khateefa" — literally, the
word means to grab, as the
man has grabbed the daughter right from under her
parents' nose and married
her.
Ordinarily, the wedding
day is four to six months
after the engagement to give
enough time for the various
preparations, and is invariably a Sunday.
CROSSED COUPLE
During the ceremony, the
priest blesses the two rings
lying on a table close to the
couple. He makes a sign of
the cross on the couple's
forehead with each ring in
turn.
~ The priest puts the
groom's ring on the bride's
finger, her ring on the
groom's finger; then both
rings are exchanged.
Two white wreaths are
now blesse^,, heJUjl oyej the
The ceremony
head of both arees and arous,
exchanged, and set on their
respective heads.
SEVEN TIMES
At this point, the "shbeen"
and "shbeenie" (best man
and maid of honor) and the
two priests join hands and
march around the table seven
times.
Then the arees and arous
are each- given three sips of
wine by the priest.
This concludes the religious ceremony, so a babble
which quickly rises to a roar
erupts from the crowd, as
everyone presses forward to
congratulate.
'Mbarak! Inshallah Btith-
annou! May your lives be
happy, God willing," they
warmly wish the couple.
LOUD CRIES
The bride now begins to
cry. From then on, she is
considered a daughter of her
husband's family.
Her family has lost a
daughter.
There's a great deal of
kissing and embracing between the relatives, both
men and women.
On the way out, each guest
gets an individually cut silver box containing "mlab-
bas," or sugar almonds.
Sometimes the mlabbas is
served on a gold box or a
wood mosaic inlaid with
mother-of-pearl.
BOX RETAINED
The mlabbas is to be eaten
immediately, and the box
retained as a souvenir.
The whole group then
boards cars (usually decorated with bouquets of flowers) for the reception, held
either in the groom's house
or in a big hotel.
On the way, the cars make
a great deal of noise with
their horns to announce the
wedding to the bystanders.
The reception reflects the
taste of the family.
,i,i,,-,::l,'.».Ki,:,l,l.)(liV1inA AW -VA A A  A .1
BELLY DANCER
Some may prefer it quite
Oriental, with a popular
belly dancer like Kawakeb
for entertainment, and the
guests dancing the dabbke
keeping time with the dir-
bakke.
The dinner will consist of
kibbeh, baklawa and araq.
among other delicacies.
But most families resort to
western food and entertainment, with the wedding layer
cake flown in from, say,
Milano.
After the reception, the
couple go directly on their
honeymoon to Rome, Paris,
Antnens and London.
Soijie even honeymoon
here in Lebanon.
For the photographic record of yoar
wedding, the services of a qualified
professional photographer are essential. Call us today, won't you?
Call us today won't you?
Or come in and see the
COLOR  CANDID   ALBUM
for only $65.00
DE HAAS
STUBI0
4439 West 10th Ave.
at 10th and Trimble
in the University District Tuesday,  Febraury 8,  1966
UBYSSEY      BRIDAL      ISSUE
Page 9
i.-, s ^\cr„'^uv«'*^
DIRTY OLD
MEN
The weddings not for lovers
By DAN MULLEN
Weddings have got to go.
Marriage, children, domestic boondoggling — all these are fine.
But The Wedding as an institution of
Western civilization must be abolished.
For the fact is that The Wedding, whatever it was originally, does not exist for
the sake of bride and groom.
No, no. It is a means to harrass, embarrass, and generally discomfort the
principals.
Consider the normal sequence of
events after The Happy Couple announce
their engagement.
Parents swallow hard. Their job is just
about over, and they aren't sure they
like 'being expendable.
"We've got to give the kids a decent
wedding," they decide, and begin laying
plans to ruin what is supposed to be the
happiest day of their son's or daughter's
life.
The bride-to-be's cronies conspire
among themselves to bother her with
showers, teas, receptions, and a good old-
fashioned party or two.
Meanwhile, the prospective groom's
buddies pin him to walls all over the
city with insight into the weaknesses
which led him to abandon bachelorhood,
then shoot him down with predicitions of
wedded misery.
Maternal wisdom churns out guest
lists, paying no attention to their coincidence with persons whom the bride
and groom hope to see at the ceremony.
'Xz.«z%&ir' v^r'!; '."yr.:'
The bride's gown is by turns argued
over, gloated over, fussed over, made
over, and cried over.
And the groom had ibetter be renting
a properly-fitting tuxedo: neither prin
cipal has a chance of being comfortable
on the grand occasion.
The groom's friends do their best to
make him sick the night before the
wedding, and failing to induce nausea,
leave him chained to a lamp post or
dangling from a bridge girder.
Very senior womenfolk scurry around
the bride, readying her for the march up
the aisle, An early-rising photographer
may even happen by to record her distress before she leaves for the ceremony.
Finally comes the reception. Decrepit
old men snuff out pipes and cigars and
advance on the brave- little bride for
"their" kiss. Traditional, y'know.
An inebriated gentleman slurs a partially obscene toast to the bride, and the
groom controls his rage well enough to
reply civilly.
Through it all, people who can not
stand the sight of one another stand or
sit and talk jovially, because if they stop,
the bridge and groom may leave.
When the couple finally do escape,
they are likely to be pursued by adolescent boys ranging in age from 15 to 35.
All this ganging-up points out that the
Wedding is designed to disrupt as much
as possible the first day of a couple's
life together. It is not a glorious, "we-
love-ya-both" send-off.
It is rather a mean, merciless contrivance for venting envy, resentment,
jealousy, and frustration (sexual and
otherwise) upon two persons whose only
offence against parents and friends is
that they prefer each other.
He looked dahling,
clad in sexy black
By BOB GRANT
True Magazine
Leland was beautiful in a
black suit of wool with
matching lapels pressed
down sharply against the
chest.
Peering out of the left
breast pocket were four tips
of a cleverly folded white
linen handkerchief, while on
the left lapel, quaintly held
by placing the stem through
an unusual buttonhole and
securing it with a small silver hat pin, was a white
carnation.
He wore a shirt of white
nylon, severely plain, which
was held together at the
front by little buttons of
plastic.
Around his neck and
under the shirt collar was a
tie of black jersey, knotted
in decorative style, and held
to the shirt front with a
clamping device of gold-
plated brass.
The cuffs of the shirt
sleeves were closed with
links of the same plated
metal ....
The bride wore the customary white.
Let Us  Handle
Your Wedding Flower Needs
Specializing  in  artificial  flowers,  candleabras and
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WELL WHY NOT?
Continued from Page 5
His life really doesn't
change that much. Why does
he get married?
We've been told it's a combination of love, habit and
pressure.
Apparently, the natural
development goes something
like this: the blissful couple
has been together for some
time and, in the process, has
built a mountain of happy
memories.
By the time marriage becomes a serious topic of discussion, these memories have
become a mountain too difficult to climb to reach the
green pastures of freedom on
the other side.
Several of the gentlemen
(■well, they were gentlemen!)
I interviewed seemed to feel
that an important factor in
student marriages was a
feeling of obligation on the
part of the male. Horrors!
The majority felt they
would spend more time than
they could afford on a special girl-friend and that, if
it were financially feasible,
the ideal arrangement would
be to combine resources and
cut travelling time by getting hitched.
But what does the student
wife gain?
Well, she's got "him" how,
and security in the future.
Whether that's wonderful
depends  ...  to each his
own, as the saying goes.
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CERTIFIED WATCHMAKER
GRADUATE   JEWELLER
Connections
Is there any connection between the Women's page bridal
theme and one of its two editors planning her own nuptials
in the immediate future?
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UBYSSEY       BRIDAL       ISSUE
Tuesday, February 8,  1966
HELPFUL  HINTS
What to do when
the posies wilt
Groomal   stag   parties
involving the fall of man.
Experienced brides say it
should be at least a week before the wedding to allow
recovery  time.
Experienced stags say it
should be the night before,
to ensure temporary crippling and impotency.
Saltpetre has been a staple
at stags.
All say it should be in a
place where nobody cares
about two inches of beer and
floating butts awash the rug.
If. your groom is only three
foot two but you're seven
feet six and can't afford an
operation, wear flatties or
running shoes under your
wedding gown.
Or find a taller groom.
Pre-cut the wedding cake
before hauling it out to the
head table.
After a eulogy on working
together through life's
cheery times, it's a little in-
congrous to see bride and
groom wishing for a hacksaw to get through the
dense mass most wedding
cakes are.
Believe it or not: adultery,
a homewrecker since Biblical
times, still exists.
Guard against it.
Lock your new wife in a
closet before going off to
work in the morning.
Should the best man lose
the ring, you can fake it.
Just remember your back
is to the audience and caution the minister not to
giggle if the groom has best
friends   so   stupid.
A bridal garter tends to
ride up or down, depending
on the configuration of .the
bridal leg.
Scotch tape is appropriate.
To ensure a jolly start on
matrimonial bliss, ushers and
their evil friends can make a
few preparations.
Herring in the exhaust
pipe.
Whitewash on the car.
Pebbles in the hubcaps.
Spiked punch — very
spiked punch.
Confetti in the defroster
blower, leave it turned on.
Remove and scramble
seven of eight spark plug
leads.
Distributor   rotor   in t he
glove compartment.
Soap on the windshield.
Oh, wicked, wicked.
Take the wedding pictures
in the reception hall before
dinner, but after the guests
have arrived.
are   a   customary    ritual
Everyone loves to stand
around and watch the photographer fumble for bulbs
while their collective stomach grumbles.
Oh, Yes—wedding invitations.
Don't forget to send them
—at least four weeks in advance of the wedding.
Engraved invitations should
be ordered approximately
six weeks before they are to
be sent out.
• •      •
Postscript for grooms —
secluded honeymoon cottages
can be dangerous.
What you really need is a
modern resort where you can
eat meals out.
Your new wife probably
isn't the accomplished cook
she would like you to think.
And the everyday world of
fixing your own breakfast
and savoring the aroma
(aroma?) of TV dinners will
begin soon enough.
• •      •
Due to a belated but brilliant innovation in marriage
laws, the Ibride can request
that the "promise to obey"
be removed from her wifely
vows.
Do it. (Ed's note: Don't.)
Wedding  gift suggestions:
a weiner rotisserie that roasts
80 weinies, an unhouse-
breken puppy, a bassinet,
twin electric blankets, two
and a half dozen pyjama bottoms, a sturdy rolling pin,
His and Hers chamber pots,
an autographed picture of
your mother-in-law, a year's
free rent in the in-law's basement.
In the old walk up the
aisle, while the wedding
march drones, and you're too
nervous to hear it properly,
count softly to yourself "one
one-thousand hippopotamuses, two one-thousand hippopotamuses, three ..."
On each digit, take a step,
right in time with the organ.
Don't bite the little silver
balls they put in wedding
cake icing. You'll break your
newly-wed jaw.
By all means tell people
where you're honeymooning.
They'll be there with beer,
waiting for you to drive up.
If you're a women's page
editor, like Joanie Godsell,
don't get engaged to a newspaperman — all his friends
do things like this to your
bridal page.
■Qjc^
YOUR WEDDING
Will be a complete success when you hold your
reception at The Bi It-
more. You can't beat experience and that is what
our friendly, well trained
staff has in catering to
numerous successful receptions. Contact us now
for a chat about your
plans.
T-JttZY0tf
12tfa Avenue & Kingsway
TEL TR 2-5252
MODERN RIN6S
FOR
MODERN BRIDES
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call RE 1-1131
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■ Tuesday,  Febraury 8,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
FOR ECR O UND
Here's  the  text
of residence survey:
The survey was conducted
in 1965 and results were put
on punch cards and then programmed and run off at the
computer centre.
Ninety-five per cent of the
residence students replied to
the questionnaire' and a random sample of 20 per cent
was selected.
The appendix contains the
percentage breakdown o f
opinion correlated with particular residences.
It is interesting to note, at
the outset, that 94 per cent of
the residence students are
from out-of-town. About one-
half live in single rooms, one-
half in double rooms and one-
MALCOLM McGregor
... his baby
half are staying in the university residences for the first
time.
Areas of major complaint
are:
(1) Nearly everyone complains of insufficient closet
space.
(2) One-half of Acadia,
three-quarters of Fort and
two-thirds of Lower Mall and
Totem residents feel insufficient variety in bag lunches.
Over one-half of the residence population say the food
is not sufficiently well-prepared.
(3) For most areas of the
survey dealing with "conditions", 80 to 90 per cent of
Lower Mall and Totem is satisfied while at Fort and Acadia about two-thirds are dissatisfied with one-half of the
conditions sampled.
(4) Two-thirds feel they
are not getting their money's
worth. Over one-half are opposed to the policy of self-
financing residences.
(5) All residences complain of inadequate laundry
facilities.
On the whole, Fort and
Acadia have undoubtedly the
short end of the stick.
It must be stressed, however, that this survey only
deals with "conditions" and
such intangibles as "atmosphere" and "residences-personality" have not been analyzed.
SAMPLE QUESTIONS
What is Your Opinion of Room Conditions and Facilities?
YES%
Fort        Fort    Lower
Acadia (Men) (Wom'n) Mall
Room kept clean:
Lighting satisfactory:
Sufficient desk space:
Sufficient book space:
Sufficient closet space:
Too noisy:
Adequate drawer space:
Sufficient electrical outlets:
Room large enough:
Room warm enough:
85
27
68
42
34
55
59
40
62
93
79
23
53
55
33
56
51
35
51
84
61
52
97
55
90
35
68
87
74
90
85
91
89
66
51
36
77
99
78
92
What is Your Opinion of the Washroom Facilities?
Adequate lighting: 79      80      94      96
Sufficient facilities: 58      47      94      87
Sufficient hot water: 88      91      97      97
Sufficient electrical outlets: 51      45      87      80
Plumbing in good condition: 70      49      84      86
What is Your Opinion of the Laundry Facilities?
55
86
86
84
85
62
70
80
80
87
5
Sufficient washing facilities: 15 53 19
Sufficient ironing facilities: 42 27 58
Facilities kept in good order: 45 57 74
Facilities kept clean: 67 65 94
Facilities large enough: 25 51 74
Facilities too expensive: 33 32 77
What is Your Opinion of Lounge Facilities?
Sufficient facilities:
Facilities large enough:
Sufficient furnishing:
Facilities kept clean:
Furnishings too old:
49
62
53
86
30
65
53
70
88
20
74
81
81
77
42
What is Your Opinion of the Recreational Facilities?
Sufficient facilities: 52      27      45
Facilities in good repair: 55      24      68
Playing field needed: 14      28      16
What is Your Opinion of Study Facilities?
Sufficient lighting:
Sufficient space:
Sufficient desk space:
Too noisy:
Typing facilities:
33
62
62
53
26
15
63
59
49
53
55
74
84
29
29
70
66
43
89
73
75
33
46
Totem
87
98
99
98
59
31
91
94
89
97
100
93
100
82
98
90
94
98
86
94
49
93
97
94
94
4
59
90
75
78
80
85
24
38
— powell  hargrave photos
CHEERFUL  INHABITANT  of  women's   huts   i n   Acadia,   student   studies   amid   baroque
splendor   of  ornaments   which   partly   conceal   paper-thin   walls,   pipes.
What is Your Opinion of the Food?
Sufficient food:
Sufficient variety in meals:
Sufficient variety in bag lunches
Do you think you are getting
your money's worth?
Do you feel that the present policy
of self-financing is a good one?
AVOIDS SEMINAR
South Africans
fear reprisals
By AL DONALD
Ubyssey City Editor
A South African woman who
turned down an offer to speak
at the Canadian Union of Students seminar on South Africa
told The Ubyssey Saturday she
did so because she feared reprisals against relatives at
home.
Seminar chairman Peter Shapiro said Thursday several
South Africans had rejected the
same offer because they feared
reprisal or passport revocation.
• •      •
The woman said anything
she might have said at the
seminar today would reach the
South African government via
the embassy in Ottawa.
The woman,  who requested
she   remain   anonymous,   said
any     criticism     she     levelled
might well result  in  persecu
tion for her relatives.
Under an act passed in 1960,
security police may arrest any
person and hold them without
trial for 90 days. The detention may be renewed indefinitely.
• •      •
"South    Africans    are    ex-
tremly sensitive to foreign
criticism," she said, 'they go
absolutely berserk."
She said a person who applies for a passport has to be
interviewed by the security
police before the application
is approved.
However, persons leaving
the country are not forced to
sign an agreement that they
will not criticism the government policy.
South Africa sees itself as a
persons on the banned list."
She said she left the country
with her family because her
children were getting a warped
view of life while they lived
in South Africa.
•      •      •
The CUS seminar to be held
at International House at 7:45
p.m. today will feature two
films on South Africa. Alfred
Adams, former member of the
Natal provincial legislature,
and Solly Essop, a South
African student, will speak,
bastion against communism,
the woman said.
She said persons believed
by the minister of justice to be
participating in subversive or
communist activities were put
on a banned list.
Persons on the banned list
are not permitted to attend
gatherings.
"Two people constitute a
gathering."
In addition they must report
to the police weekly, inform
the police if they change their
address or job, and are not allowed to leave the district in
which they live without a
permit.
"There  are  now about  500
Duncan  speaks,
then,  Erotica
San Francisco poet Robert
Duncan will be guest speaker Tuesday evening at the
second lecture of a nine-
week extension department
course on Poetry in Profile.
Duncan will speak on
imagism and projective
verse, at Lassere 102, 8 p.m.
Also, local poet Seymour
Mayne asks all UBC types
willing to give readings of
their own, or anybody's,
erotic or amorous verse in
Brock on St. Valentine's Day
Feb. 14 to sign up now on
the door of Bu. 167.
All in vein
Casting a shoe after the
bride signifies her father's
transfer of authority to her
husband.
Graduation - What Then?
A challengng profession?
A role in rehabilitation
The Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists offers an accelerated course in Occupational
Therapy to candidates of advanced
educatonal standing. For full information —
Enquire:
Miss  Muriel  F.   Driver,  O.  T.  Reg.,
Director,
School   of   Occupational   Therapy,
166  University  Ave.,
Kingston,    Ontario.
60
81
53
68
77
68
65
65
38
73
DON'T FORGET YOUR SWEETHEART
37
12
19
24
27
ON VALENTINE'S DAY FEB. 14
10%   Student Discount
32
17
13
14
46
Vogue Flower Shop
19
32
19
33
41
2197  W.   Broadway             736-7344
Caribbean  Students  Association
ANNUAL
'Tropical Carnival"
Costume prizes for 2 best dressed individuals
Best Dressed Couple and Best Dressed Group
HALLMARK   HALL
5550 Fraser (Just off 41st Ave.)
Friday, February 18th, 9 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Trinidad Moonlighters Steel Band & Floor Show (10 p.m.). Ticket* $1.50
per   person at AMS (Brock Hall),  International House, and at th* door. Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1966
SITE
PROGRAM
SUB REPORTS
This is the first in a series of SUB reports to bring students up to date on
project progress. It has been necessary to purchase this space because ot
the problem in getting adequate, tac
tual information to the student body.
It is apparently not in keeping with
present Ubyssey editorial policy that
students be informed on this project.
Program
The student union building, SUB, is the
answer to a campus need for a shell for an
ever-increasing program. Two years ago student voted overwhelmingly in favor of a project containing facilities which they themselves
indicated they wished. They indicated their
wishes in a survey circulated to a sample of
the campus selected at random by the university computer. These students said they would
use certain facilities, facilities they either felt
did not exist on the campus or were inadequate.
From  this  survey   the   present   SUB   has
grown. The facilities were dictated by students
and not by a bureaucratic committee composed
of ex-student councillors or fraternity men as
some recent critics would have one believe.
Once the facilities were in students were
told that such a project would cost approximately $3 million and voted to pay for it.
The entire philosophy behind the building
is that it will provide the shell for a program.
To that extent the building houses more than
40 rooms suitable for meetings, seminars and
forums, seating from a dozen to 1,500 students.
It provides for a facility which includes permanent projection and theatrical equipment.
It provides for recreational facilities including
bowling, billiards and ping-pong. It provides
lounges, reading rooms and music rooms,
work rooms, banner-painting facilities. It provides club and committee space equal to almost
five times the present footage. It will provide
a college shop, barber shop and beauty salon.
It will provide facilities for a larger social
functions which now have  to be taken  off
campus.
In short the building will provide a shell
for a program — a shell which will not be outdated by the time it is built. It will provide
the facilities that will insure the continued
growth of autonamous student action.
Food Services
The new student union building will contain
a food service area seating 1,200 students. It
will be broken into two areas, a full hot-meal
cafeteria and snack bar. The philosophy behind
this is that students who bring their own
bag lunches and wish only a beverage should
not have to stand in line while students wishing a full meal file slowly past a hot food installation. As it is now planned each area will
be served with two complete installations
thereby assuring almost no line-up-and-wait
situation.
The question of food quality has always
been a problem and source of annoyance to
many students and this committee has discovered that this concern is also shared by the
university food service department. Miss Blair,
food service head, has therefore asked that
and operation of the new facility. She has
agreed, indeed, it was her early suggestion,
that full discussion with students would bring
about better service in the cafeteria.
The effect of a joint student-food services
committee on food services has been felt in
the graduate student centre and it is the hope
of the committee that the quality and atmosphere of the grad centre food service area can
be a guide-line for the new SUB.
Site
The student union building will be built
on the site of the present stadium along East
Mall. The stadium is being replaced by a new
one now under construction. The building will
be within a three-minute walk of classroom
complexes seating 14,000 students, located at
the academic core of campus at Main Mall
and University Boulevard. These buildings,
and their seating capacities aire as follows:
Education 3,000, Angus 3,000, Bi-Sciences
5,000 (when completed) Physics-Chemistry
3,000.
Bio-Sciences 5,000 ("current additions are
completed)
Physics-Chemistry 3,000
This does not take into account the huge
medical block now going in across the road
from the building site, students in Wesbrook,
the Gym ot" Home Ec. It does not take into
account the large number of students using
the library facilities or the number of students
using the Buchanan building, which are less
than a five minute walk from the site.
The present master plan includes a residence
complex slated to be built on the site now
occupied by the University Patrol. When
these will be built is uncertain, butr the plan
calls for them to be built in that location.
The present union building site will be the
terminus of the major public rapid transit
service to the campus. The major campus bus
loading zone will be at the corner of the building site on University Boulevard just east of
the East Mall.
Parking for more than 500 cars will be provided in the lot adjacent to the north-west of
the building. This lot will be free to student
cars in the evening hours.
I
5>
r  CONFESSIONS
of o
SUB CHAIRMAN
or
How I (GASP) Sold Out
A Full Discussion - Questions and Answers on SUB
Council Chambers
Brock Lounge—Thursday Noon
V1LLIANS ON HAND: Hender, Vance, McAfee
-•WM*
(Advertisement) Tuesday,   Febraury 8,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
MORE FOREGROUND
From sandbox to soapbox,
(or) second slaters appeals
WASTE OF MONEY'
First Vice-
President
CHARLIE BOYLAN
Student council is meaningless to the majority of students. It plays within a limited area of administrative
activities without relating itself to real student problems.
When a real issue arises,
like the fee increase this fall,
most councillors are totally
incapable of communicating
with students, let alone leading them in action.
The era of the great Blunder must come to an end.
Students concerned with
real problems are demanding
a radical voice on council.
Significantly those who are
least concerned with the day
to day living problems of students are the most insistent
on building a $5% million
SUB. It fits into their whole
concept of student- government.
I say let students have one
last chance to debate without
Madison Avenue.
Help elect one radical voice
on council. Vote Charlie Boylan for first-vice.
BILL GRANT
The duties of the first vice-
president, as outlined by the
constitution of the AMS, are
to assist the president in the
duties of his office, to act as
liaison officer for committees
which the president designates and to represent their
interest to council.
Working within this constitutional framework, I pledge
myself to this program:
1. To insure that student
opinions have a strong voice
on council.
2. To promote student interest in, and awareness of,
AMS council activities by
conducting monthly forums
between the office of the vice-
president and the student
body.
3. To advocate student
representation in the senate
and on the board of governors.
"THE"  PLACE
to meet
your   friends
is  at  the
iDo-Nut Diner]
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak  $1.35
If* Really Goodl
Full course meals
within your  income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
4. To direct a responsible
campaign against any fee increase.
5. To favor the student
union building as proposed
and work vigorouly for the
beginning of construction and
final completion of the complex.
6. To support increased
financial assistance to athletics
at UBC — especially in the
areas of internal programs
and team transportation costs.
7. To help bring residence
conditions up to required
standards and at the same
time, investigate co-operative
housing.
8. To assist the presidentelect and support him fully
in any movement against administrative barriers to student autonomy.
JIM TAYLOR
There are three major aspects in this campaign — experience, program, and the
ability to progress.
I believe that my work on
the arts executive, the debating union executive, and as
the AMS returning officer has
given me the necessary experience for the position of
first   vice-president.
I believe my program is a
solid one — one possible of
success I am:
FOR SUB with all the
facts;
FOR student representation
on the Senate.
FOR grants-in-aid   for  out-
of-town    students    to
help    cover    cost    of
room  and board  and
transportation.
FOR the transformation of
the  office  of the first
vice-president into an
office of concern.
I believe finally that I will
press firmly for implementation of my program. Furthermore, though not in complete
agreement   with   his   philosophy, I am confident that,  if
elected, I will be able to work
with the president-elect.
Co-ordinator
DON WISE
I was clobbered in the
presidential race because the
few people who did vote were
obsessed with either blind
allegiance to the status quo or
the destruction of it; only 855
people considered the relative
merit of the candidates. (They
voted for me).
There are two issues in this
campaign — expedience and
platitudes.
It is expedient for candidates in AMS elections to
prove their humility by going
slumming once a year. (They
eat residence food.) Unfortunately they do not return until
the next campaign.
Next, platitudes. Constructive action, dedicated performance, immediate disclosure of facts, all melt at 4 p.m.
on election day. I have none
to offer.
JIM LIGHTFOOT
During the recent presidential campaign, two important
issues have been brought forward.
These are SUB and student
council revisions.
My stand on these matters
is: :
Fordward with SUB. This
building is an essential part
of the campus and must be
completed as soon as possible.
Full newspaper coverage of
the SUB facts will remove
much of the confusion presently surrounding the issue.
The position of student ombudsman is unnecessary. Both
the first vice-president and the
co-ordinator should be available at all times to assist with
any student problems.
I believe I have the experience and ability to cope with
the problems of the coordinator's office. I therefore ask for
your support in tomorrow's
voting.
UBC students
speak down SUB
By KRIS EMMOTT
Many UBC students are against the idea of a student-
financed Student Union Building.
Opinions   gathered   in   the
in
Ponderosa Cafeteria varied
from "not necessary, but nice"
to "ridiculous" and "stupid
idea".
Lome Malo, arts II, agreed
students need more space, saying, "I like the idea."
But Peter Calverley, forestry IV, called SUB "a waste of
money."
He said, "There is no one
focal point in this university.
There will eventually be complexes all over the area and I
would not walk half a mile to
such a place."
"I think we need more common rooms and small food-
service spots, not a big SUB,"
said Theo Kellner, a fourth-
year engineer.
Other engineers interviewed
were strongly in favour of beer
parlors and card rooms, rather
than bowling alleys and a ballroom which SUB will provide.
"Since SUB will have no
liquor license, the groups that
now hold dances in places like
the Commodore will not want
to use the ballroom," they
pointed out.
John Worobec, ed. Ill, said,
"We could use some recreation
—we are like a city and we
need many services, but not
both Brock and SUB."
"I wouldn't use it, but I
guess it would be nice for the
other kids," said a first-year
coed.
"I guess the club space will
be useful, but we shouldn't
spend student money on more
bowling alleys," said Rod Mc
Cloy, commerce II.
Fourth-year forester Gordon Plester disagreed, saying
that SUB would become a cen
tre of student life, enabling
different faculties to mingle,
Another forester thought it
was a good idea, but not at
$4.5 million. "It will probably
be $6 million by the time it is
built — and we won't even be
here when it is finished."
Others echoed the sentiment
that those who would graduate
this year or next should not be
asked to help pay for it.
The $4.5 million estimated
cost of construction will come
out of AMS fees over the years.
When told that after 50 years
the administration will own
the building, one girl exclaimed, "That's not fair! We lose all
that money."
Engineer Kellner and others
felt that after 50 years SUB
would be ramshackle and
worthless anyway.
"After all that time you
might as well give it away,"
said Kellner.
UL/teateae'r££c0c
M  O N  D
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RINGS
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Ask about your student
Discount
THE UBC MUSICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS
TAKE MOS
ONG!
The Smasl
Starring:   Jerry Cook
Jan Rae
Dave Overtg
ted by: JAMES JOHNSTON
"Music Conducted by: BEV. FYFE
Choreography: GRACE MacDONALD
UBC
TICKETS:
Auditorium Box Office -    -    228-3176
AMS Box Office -    -    -    -    224-3242
M~ February 7-12
Special Student Prices
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Noon 75c or 2/$1.25
Wednesday Night -    •    -    $1.00 rush Page  14
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,  1966
BRIAN CASSIDY
MEETS THE MITE
Small Bird stays alive on ice
By BRIAN CASSIDY
Look! Out there on the ice!
Who's that little barnstormer?
If it's the Thunderbirds hockey team you are looking at,
it is undoubtedly Wayne
Hunter, Ed. II, who plays center for the 'Birds, and hits the
big guys like he was 6'2V2"
and 250 lbs.
But he's not. He is 5*2V_"
and 150 lbs!
Wayne, who hustles and
hits like both were going out
of style, is 22 years old and
started playing hockey in
Powell River, when he was
14. That was the beginning of
his hockey and one must think
the end of his growth.
He used to play left wing
there but was switched to center last year by 'Birds coach
Bob Hindmarch.
Wayne credits his progress
and knowledge in hockey almost entirely to Hindmarch
and well-known Father David
Bauer.
How does such a little guy
avoid getting clobered out of
hockey? "I like to skate," explains Wayne. "My legs are
strong and I just keep moving
and ducking to avoid the forest of elbows that are just my
height.
"As a matter of fact, my
size sometimes helps the team.
If I hit some guy hard the rest
of our team starts doing it too.
'After all,' they say, 'if little
Wayne can do it, let's go!' "
Wayne is full of compliments for the rest of the team
and also for 2nd-year coach,
Bob Hindmarch, who, according to Wayne, "is experimenting a lot and is really able to
sense what is toest for every
body and for the team."
As for his teammates.Wayne
runs through a list of every
one of them and compliments
all. He feels that Ken Broderick is a real key to the 'Birds
success and says of Ken,
"Much depends on Broderick.
Just having him in the nets is
great for morale."
Last year's road trip to Denver, Colorado and Provo,
Utah, stands as a highlight in
Wayne's hockey career so far.
This is understandable, because it was not only a great
trip to take but was the trip
on which he got three of his
four goals last season.
"This year," he states, "I'm
hoping for a lot more success
After 'Birds exciting 6-3
win over University of Saskatchewan Huskies Jan. 29,
Wayne felt that the team
would clean up in their return two-game series in Saskatoon this past weekend.
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"But mention the Hamber
Cup games here against Edmonton Feb. 11-12," pleads
Wayne. "Edmonton is tough
around that darned net.''
but I think we will beat them
by one goal in the two-game
total point series.
Give us a plug because it's
going to be great!"
Okay, Wayne. It's just been
done.
Netters  lead
volley tourney
Thunderbirds' volleyball
team wound up leading in
the first leg of the Canadian-
American Intercollegiate Volleyball tournament Saturday.
Playing in Seattle, 'Birds
deafted University of Victoria 3-0 and then lost 3-2 to
the University of Washington Huskies.
The tournament resumes
Saturday in the American
city.
HOCKEY
In intercollegiate ice hockey
in Saskatoon, Thunderbirds
lost to University of Saskatchewan Huskies 4-3 Friday and 5-3
Saturday.
SOCCER
UBC Thunderbirds contined
their winning ways Saturday
defeating North Shore United
2-0 in a Pacific Coast League
soccer game.
The TBirds dominated the
game but did not score until
early in the second half when
substitute Russ Hillman banged the ball into the net from
eighteen yards out.
Immediately after the kick-
off, Kirby Carter got the 'Birds
second goal on a pass from
Dick Mosher.
Birds drop
15-0 loss
on Huskies
University of Washington
Huskies were no match for
captain T. K. Kariya and his
Mgger Birds on Saturday at
Varsity Stadium, going under
15-0.
Diminutives Bob Sandilands
and Tom Fraine tackled like
terriers, and the Huskies were
unable to penetrate the UBC
defense.
Dave Murphy, playing one
of his best games, scored three
tries, one of them a spectacular
50 yard effort.
Bill Black and Sandilands
scored a try each to complete
the scoring.
Meanwhile at Gordon Field
the Braves were beaten by
Trojans 13-0.
In earlier games at Wolfson
Field, Totems coasted by Mera-
lomas III 26-0, Tomahawks
downed BCIT 8-3, and University of Washington II defeated the Papooses 6-0.
Engineers and Scientists:
Let's talk about a career at Boeing...
50-year leader in aerospace technology
Campus Interviews, Monday and Tuesday, February   14 and 15
The most effective way to evaluate a company in terms of its potential for dynamic
career growth is to examine its past record, its current status, and its prospects
and planning for the future, together with
the professional climate it offers for the
development of your individual capabilities.
Boeing, which in 1966 completes 50 years
of unmatched aircraft innovation and production, offers you career opportunities as
diverse as its extensive and varied backlog. Whether your interests lie in the field
of commercial jet airliners of the future or
in space-flight technology, you can find at
Boeing an opening which combines professional challenge and long-range stability.
The men of Boeing are today pioneering
evolutionary advances in both civilian and
military aircraft, as well as in space programs of such historic importance as
America's first moon landing. Missiles,
space vehicles, gas turbine engines, transport helicopters, marine vehicles and basic
research are other areas of Boeing activity.
There's a spot where your talents can
mature and grow at Boeing, in research,
design, test, manufacturing or administration. The company's position as world
leader in jet transportation provides a
measure of. the calibre of people with
whom you would work. In addition, Boeing
people work in small groups, where initiative and ability get maximum exposure.
Boeing encourages participation in the
company-paid Graduate Study Program at
leading colleges and universities near
company installations.
We're looking forward to meeting engineering, mathematics and science seniors
and graduate students during our visit to
your campus. Make an appointment now
at your placement office. Boeing is an
equal opportunity employer.
(1) Boeing's new short-range 737 jetliner. (2)
Variable-sweep wing design for the nation's
first supersonic commercial jet transport.
(3) NASA's Saturn V launch vehicle will power
orbital and deep-space flights. (4) Model of
Lunar Orbiter Boeing is building for NASA.
(5) Boeing-Vertol 107 transport helicopter
shown with Boeing 707 jetliner.
Divisions:. Commercial Airplane  .• -Military Airplane   •   Missile   •   Space   •   Turbine  •   Vertol   •   Also, Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories Tuesday,   Febraury 8,   1966
THE
U BYSSEY
Page  15
HAPPY ENDING
Hockey Braves
salvage PCL tie
Coach  Harvey   Scott's  UBC   Braves scared  the   New
Westminster Royals for two periods Saturday.
Scott's Braves, led by an out-
SPORTS
— powell hargrave photos
THUNDERBIRD WRESTLER Ken Kerluke, left, uses the evil eye on Seattle Pacific College's
Bill Lemm during match Saturday in Women's Gym. UBC outpointed SPC's grapplers
for third  time this season.
BIRDS  WIN, TOO
Hot-shooting Bob
scores record
The man with the radar shot wrote a UBC  all-time
basketball record over the weekend.
Thunderbirds'    Bob    Baraz
zuol broke a five-year-old all-
time season scoring record
when he sunk his fourteenth
point Friday in leading UBC
to an 80-76 overtime victory
over Northwest Nazarene College Crusaders in the War
Memorial Gym before over
1200 fans.
Barazzuol, who bagged 28
points for the game, broke the
record of 412 set by Ken Win-
slade in 1960.
Saturday, when the Thunderbirds cut down the Crusaders 89-70, Barazzuol pumped
in 27 points. He now has a
total 454 points for the season
with eight games remaining.
Friday, Barazzuol and the
'Birds had trouble finding the
basket in the first three quarters. Then when Barazzuol
sunk his record breaking points
with 5:57 left in the game the
'Birds came to life.
John Olsen tied the score
66-66 with just over a minute
left to send the contest into
overtime.
Barazzuol then sunk 10
straight points in the five minute overtime period to clinch
the victory.
The following night it was
a different story. Thunderbirds
playing before a crowd of
1,197 dropped behind 12-5
after five minutes of play and
were trailing 26-20 after the
first quarter.
But then they put on a devastating second quarter attack
and led 48-37 at half-time.
'Birds pulled away in the
second half to preserve their
11th victory in 21 games this
season.
Hoop title
at stake
The final game of the 1965-
66 Intramural Basketball schedule will be played noon Wednesday in War Memorial gym.
An underdog team from the
Ramblers Athletic club will
battle last year's champs physical education team, for the Zeta
Beta Tau trophy.
To date, Phys. Ed. leads the
Intramural standings, followed
by the engineers, Phi Gamma
Delta and the Alpha Delts.
A reminder that co-ed badminton doubles starts Friday
and any groups wishing to enter are to get their entires in
immediately.
standing performance from
goalie Rick Bardal, tied New
Westminster Junior Royals 4-
4 in a Pacific Coast Junior
Hockey League game at the
Winter Sports Centre.
Braves, playing with only
two forward lines led 4-1 going
into the final"period but ran
out of steam and gave up three
unanswered goals.
Bardal was the key to UBC's
moral victory.
The ve r s a t i 1 e netminder
kicked out 60 shots while
Royals' goalie handled 20.
Bardal has been wooed by
Montreal Canadiens' junior
farm team, Regina Pats. But
he has elected to concentrate
on his studies at UBC.
Jim Strothers with two, Morris Lambert and Dave Simp-
kinson scored goals for the
Braves.
Braves play their final game
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Richmond Arena against Vancouver Juniors.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
i> TRADES
ft RENTALS
ft TERMS
ft REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
THE HAGUE (UNS) —
Sources here say the International Court has been adjourned for lunch since 1957.
BAY
A STITCH IN TIME
Norman Wisdom, Edward Chapman
plus
CAPT. NEWMAN, M.D.
(Adult)
G. Peck, T. Curtis &
Angle   Dickinson
Students  - 75c
DELTA
FEB.   11   &  12
HORROR OF DRUCULA
(Adult)
Peter Cushing
plus
plus
CURSE  OF THE
MUMMY'S TOMB
THE GORGON
P. Cushing, B. Shelley
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
ENGINEER
1966 Graduate Engineer required for permanent position in Gas Department for Home Oil Company
Limited, Calgary. May be graduate in either chemical,
electrical or mechanical engineering. Interviews to
be held A.M., February 15 at the University Placement Office.
ENGINEER
1966 Graduate Engineer required for permanent position in Production, Pipeline or Reservoir Enginereing
departments for Home Oil Company Limited, Calgary. May be graduate in either civil, electrical or
mechanical engineering. Placement will toe in the
career preference of the candidate and the needs of the
various departments after training period. Interviews
to be held A.M., February 15 at the University Placement Office.
TECHNICAL PROGRAMMER
1966 Graduate in Mathematics with Geological background preferred for permanent position with Home
Oil Company Limited, Calgary. Interviews to be held
A.M., February 15 at the University Placement Office.
HOME OIL COMPAMV LTD.
304 SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH WEST
CALGARY, ALBERTA
For the Person Who Reads and Uses
BIFOCAL LENSES
These can now be obtained at a price within everyone's
reach. Before you decide, compare the price anywhere.
Then check with London Drug Ltd. Optical Dept. You will
receive QUALITY and SERVICE at a saving.
BIFOCALS
$1T95
Complete with optical prescription
Lenses   frames    (597   to   choose
from)  case incl. from  	
For the person who uses SINGLE VISION a real Saving of up to $20.00
12
Prescription Lenses $0.95
Frames and case included   From     W
Contact Lenses    $40-50
Guaranteed quality, any color  Only       ■ W
Emergency Prescription Service Available
Bring your optical prescription to us and really save!
QUALITY IS NEVER SACRIFICED
AT LONDON DRUG OPTICAL DEPT.
ONE LOCATION ONLY
iihtei
OPTICAL DEPARTMENT
677 Granville, opposite the Bay
Phone 681-6174
OPEN MONDAY TO SATURDAY 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
FRIDAY NIGHTS TIL 9 P.M.
Mail Orders Receive Our Prompt and Careful Attention
■MH_-__-B_-___-___-__ai. Budget Terms , AvpilabU _aH___ppaM_pBI-l_ia_l Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February 4,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Mussoc takes you along
Hit Broadway musical, Take
Me Along, playing nightly in
Aud. at 8:30 p.m. Student
tickets available at Aud. box
office and AMS.
WEDNESDAY NOON HOUR
CONCERTS
In Ed. 100, CBC string orchestra, John Avison conducting playing works by Hovha-
ness, Berg, Mayuzumi and
Copland.
IL CAFFEE
Italian Day Wednesday
11:00-3:00.   IH.   Films at noon.
• •      •
FROSH U.S.
Annual Frosh Rag Odyssey
calling for comics, cartoonists, reporters and spastic typists. See Chris Brochhurst or
Doug Bruce in Bu. Ext. 157.
• *      *
CONTEMPORARY  ARTS
FESTIVAL
Jazz and Poetry—Les Puces
Jazz Trio has been rescheduled for Wednesday at 3:30 in
Bu. 104.
PRE-MED.
A lecture by Dr. Morton on
Pulmonary Function Wednesday noon in Wes.201.
• •      •
CUS
Tonight at 7:45 p.m. in IH.
South African movies, speakers,  discussions  and  coffee.
• •      •
VIETNAM  COMMITTEE
Dr. Wm. Wilmott speaks on
"Nationalism in South -East
Asia" noon Wednesday in
Eu. 102.
• •      •
ACE
Wednesday noon in Ed. 204.
Panel discussion on impressions   of  First  Year teaching.
• •      •
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC
Capt. O. French speaks Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
• •      •
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting   noon   in   Bu.   204.
Student Mike Wells speaks.
• •      •
UN CLUB
Latin America week. Noon
today in IH, Mr. Livermore.
Noon Wednesday in Bu. 203,
Mr. Murchison speaks.
• •      •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Merce Cunningham Dance
Co. with composer John Cage
st 3:30 in Aud.    70 cents.
The  modern  way  to  lee  i» with
Contact Lenses
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
MU 3-1816 705 Birkt Bldg.
"VROUR
JERKINS"
&
LEATHER
RINGS
"HOLY VALENTINE'S" FROM THE
BAD BOYS
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
315 SEYMOUR
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
What's Going On in South Africa?? Movies, Speakers,
discussion, coffee all at International House, 7:45 p.m.
tonight. Sponsored by C.U.S.
COORDINATOR NEEDED
C.U.S. Student co-ordinator needed to organize study
group to prepare for the seminar "Identity and Anxiety: crisis of a student generation" in Waterloo, Ontario, Sept. '66. Apply C.U.S. Office, B.E. 258.
I III rr
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAN \C  n T
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste
Ri j J (. an  I M.
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings
SHAKEY'S
PIZZA  PARLOUR
1026   GRANVILLE ST.
The $NAk £ctferJ
FEB. 7-19
A VALENTINE OFFER...
Bring in Your Sweetheart (opposite sex)
and this coupon and receive
Two Sundaes of Your Choice
for the Price of One
PETERS ICE CREAM
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
OFFER GOOD THROUGH FEBRUARY 15, 1966
Also get a Free Sundae on Your Birthday
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
ONE MAN'S RING FOUND IN
washroom opposite Chem. 25Q.Thur.
I AM GOING STRAIGHT. HE WHO
had sombrero stolen at Mardi Gfras
may pick it up from Brian Dorward
at Fiji House.
WHERE IS C.M.I. ? PHONE HUGO
Depsix — 922-6908. Ask about pur
Batmobile layaway plan.	
LOST:    ANTIQUE    GREEN
ring:.     Much     sentimental
Please phone Denise, 261-8066.
JADE
value.
Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL,! SEND VALENTINE
and Birthday Greetings to your
friends with a Classified ad.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAT HIGH AUTO INSTJR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-6T07.
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.
DANCE TO THE GREAT SOUNDS
of the Seattle "Sonics" and the
Shantelles, 9-1, Friday, Feb. 11' in
the Armories. $1.60 each. It's gotta
be great!	
NEWMAN CENTRE, MONDAY TO
Friday, 12:30-1:30 p.m., 10:00-11:00
p. mi Sandwiches and hamburgers,
free coffee.
FANTASTIC OFFER! I WILL PAY
real money for hats stolen from
Friday's Mardi Gars. Hurry, offer
limited! Phone Don, 224-0055.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM 29TH &
Balaclava to 9:30's in Buch. RE 3-
5892.
HELP! TWO OF US NEED A RIDE
from Grandview Hwy. area of
Burnaby South for 8:30 classes.
Phone Phil, LA 2-7397.
DESPERATELY NEEDED: RIDE
from New West. (Sapperton) Mqn.-
Fri., 8:30 classes. Phone Ina, "LA
6-5712.
Wanted
15
MISCROSCOPE WANTED. Prefer
Japanese model. Phone George at
LA   2-0209.
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE: 1955 PLYMOUTH, CITY
tested, radio, runs well, $175".00.
Call John, 733-2205.
'53    CHEV.    2-DCOR,    EXCELLENT
running cond., 2 snow tires, $80 or
offer. Phone Janet, RE 3-2687 after
6:00 p.m.
Motorcycles
27
305   CC   HONDA,    CHEAP.   PHONE
Dave at 224-0467 evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs 42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $10
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Grjui-
ville,   263-4530.
TYPING: 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
WEstland 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & deliverey 224-6341 (John)
leave tel. no.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West  Van.
PS:    New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE: ONE PAIR KASTLE
slalom skis with marker bindings.
Doug, rm. 249 Salish, Totem Park,
phone 224-9906.	
FOR SALE: 2 PAIR MEN'S METAL
skis with safety harness, 210 & 215
CM, Allais & Kastle, $80 each. 2
pair boots, 10-11, $50 each. Phone
261-3986 between  6 & 9 p.m.	
FOR SALE SONY TAPE RECORD-
er, TR-210, four mths. old. New
$140.00, asking $90.00. Ph. 224-4181.
Rooms
81
WANTED: SIZE 10% OR 11 SKI
Hoots (Double) and two pair of
skjis. One pair for man 6'1", one
pair for woman 5'4". Must have
safety harnesses. Phone AM1-7Y79
after 5 p.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
FARAWAY PLACES WITH
strange sounding names — I nfeed
a girl companion to go with hie,
leaving May 25, '66, taking the
summer to travel to Europe "via
Japan, Thailand, India, Greece,
cost low for such an experience.
More details if you phone Susanrie,
UBC 288-2636, home 987-0079.
STUDENT (MALE) SINGLE,
furnished room, kitchen privileges;
one sharing frig., washroom, entrance — 1 block to shops, buses,
non-smoker.  RE 3-8778.
Room fc Board
82
YOUNG FRENCHMAN WOULD
like room and board in English
speaking family in exchange for
French tutoring, near university.
325-8466.
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
WANTED — BY MARRIED STU-
dent (2 children) to buy or r«nt,
on or near campus, 3 bedroom '(or
more) house, living room, dining
room, etc., (basement preferred).
Occupancy May or June 1966. Send
particulars   to   1011   Gordon    Rd.,
Nelson,  B.C.

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