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The Ubyssey Oct 15, 1965

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Array Byron beware
THE UBYSSEY
the ides of
march
Vol. XLVIII, No.  13
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  FRIDAY,  OCTOBER   15,   1965
CA 4-3916
PM pledges Bladen aid
'Gov't prepared
to do its part'
CHAMPEEN LOG-ROLLER Art Stevenson, EUS president, accepts adversary's congratulations in Buchanan pool Thursday. The Big Red Wheel out-spun other councillors in
Forestry-sponsored  birling contest, part of Forestry Week.
March cancellation
'not radical change
FOR SUB
PM named
sod-tosser
Prime Minister Lester Pearson will turn the sod for UBC's
new Student Union Building,
the Alma Mater Society announced Thursday.
Pearson will also address a
student gathering in the War
Memorial Gym prior to the
ceremony, which will take
place at noon, Oct. 29.
Construction on the $4 million student project is due to
starts in early 1966.
SFA rags merge,
now it's Name
Simon Fraser Academy's
two budding newssheets have
been merged into the Name, so-
called because it doesn't have
a name yet.
The Tartan, SF's first paper,
and its competitor, the SF
View, dissolved themselves at
separate meetings Oct. 6.
Staffs of the two papers
joined to work on the Name,
under elected editor Sam
Steenhuus.
The merger came when both
staffs realized there was not
enough advertising and talent
to support two papers on a
campus, of .2,000 students.
By JOAN FOGARTY
Alma Mater Society president Byron Hender said Thursday the cancellation of the
Oct. 27 protest march would
not radically change the aims
of Education Action Program.
Student council Tuesday
cancelled the protest march
after a number of protests
against it.
Hender said: "It is regret-
able that council had to interfere with the recommendations
presented by EAP. However,
it was the feeling of council
that the direction suggested by
EAP, with respect to a mass
march, was not appropriate."
EAP co - chairman Peter
Braund said: "I am happy the
EAP is still intact that it will
carry out the rest of the program as it now stands.
The trimmed-down program
for National Student Day, Oct.
27, calls for a mass rally on
campus at noon.
This rally will be attended
by Patrick Keniff, president of
Canadian Union of Students,
and representatives of the
major political parties.
A joint brief from UBC,
Simon Fraser Academy and
Victoria College will be presented to the provincial government the week of the protest.
EAP ACTION
REACTION
(SEE PAGES 2. 6)
La Pierre cancels
lunatic speech
Television inter viewer
Laurier LaPierre will not
speak at UBC today.
In a telegram Thursday to
special events chairman Murray Farr, LaPierre said he
cancelled the talk "owing to
his responsibilities to the
television show This Hour
has Seven Day".
He was scheduled to speak
on The Lunatic Fringe in
Canadian Politics.
Farr said LaPierre would
try and fulfill the speaking
engagement, possibly next
term.
By gordon Mclaughlin
The federal government is prepared to do its part in
implementing the Bladen report, Prime Minister Lester
Pearson said Thursday.
Pearson was replying to the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada brief to the
federal government on the Bladen report which was presented Thursday in Ottwa.
Pearson said he accepted as
realistic many portions of the
report and has no reservations
concerning the report.
The government is prepared
to do its part in implementing
the Bladen recommendations,
he said.
He told AUCC representatives he hopes his proposed
federal - provincial conference
to discuss higher education
financing can be held early
next year.
In a written statement Pearson said: "The federal government is prepared to contribute
to university financing in a
way, which in combination
with provincial action, will enable the country to meet university needs".
The AUCC brief endorsed to
the federal government the
Bladen report recommendations on proposed increases in
operating and capital grants,
and increased assistance to research.
The brief said: "There should
be no increase in student aid."
At a press conference Thursday concerning the brief, UBC
president John Macdonald said:
"The AUCC position is an
unequivocal 'yes' in support
of the Bladen report."
Macdonald intimated there
will be no increase in fees at
UBC next year.
"The $50 increase in fees at
UBC  is not an unchangeable
policy," Macdonald said.
"If we get the aid recommended by the Bladen report,
there is no need for a fee increase next year."
Victoria College president
Malcolm Taylor said there is
a strong case for students to
make contributions to universities.
"When a student pays his
fees, he has bought his chips
and is in the game," Taylor
said.
The Bladen recommendations will mean about $7.5 million more to UBC, if the form-
ula-financiqg policy is followed,
Macdonald said.
Both Macdonald and Taylor
agreed that private grants
should be directed to institutions and studies outside the
normal scope of university
financing.
*
Local Liberal
still in principle
The chairman of the B.C.
Liberal's campaign committee
said Thursday the Liberals
would implement the Bladen
•eport "in principle."
"We would use it as a basis
for legislation following the
election," said G. C. Van 'Rog-
gen.
Van Roggen said the Liberals
would not implement the report
word for word, but had embraced it in principle.
"There are undoubtedly little
things in it that we would not
agree with," he said. "iPerson-
illy, I haven't even read the
report."
SOD-TURNING CEREMONY
noon at corner of Universi
for $100,000 Lutheran campus centre will be held Monday
ty Boulevard and Wesbrook Crescent. (See story Page 3). Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15,  1965
HE'LL MARCH ANYWAY
Lavalle raps council
By DICK TAYLOR
The Canadian Union of Students' chairman at UBC is disappointed in student council's
rejection of a student march in
Vancouver.
Ed Lavalle said Thursday
the march to the Bayshore Inn
Oct. 27 was designed to serve
notice on the government and
public that students were concerned about increasing fees.
Lavalle said council had at
first informally agreed to give
the Education Action Program
committee a chance to sound
out student and faculty support
for a academic procession.
On Tuesday night they reversed this decision, he said.
"I think that is unfortunate
and regrettable."
Lavalle said some students
were determined to march on
the Bayshore despite council's
decision.
"The march is a voluntary
means whereby each student
can show his commitment to
educational reform and show
support for his colleagues
across the country."
"I will exercise any commitment to this issue by participating in any responsible procession whether or not sanctioned by student council or the
administration."
The number of students the
march will attract will be an
indication of whether council
was right or wrong, said
Lavalle.
He said UBC students are
not alone in their concern for
higher education.
"On National Student Day
thousands of students across
Canada will be demonstrating."
"Memorial University at St.
POETRY READING
with
Saturday,. October 16, 8:00 p.m.
1208 Granville St.
Collection proceeds to be used
for medical aid to bombing
victims in North Vietnam and
the national liberation front.
Milton Acorn
C. D. N. Elsted
Gerry Gilbert
Everyone Welcomel
Myra
McFarlane
Sponsored  by:  Vanguard   Books  |
THERE'S ONLY ONE
0£S£AT EOAT
Desert Boots and Desert Khan Oxfords
are available everywhere they sell only
good shoes. Ask for them.
$15.95
Suggested   Retail
by
CAjojJ<
5
of  England
MR. FLETCHER
in attendance at
4564 West 10th Avenue
224-7922
John's, Newfoundland, will demonstrate their support of their
colleagues across Canada," he
said.
Memorial already has a plan
for the complete elimination of
tuition fees.
"Students of St. Patrick's,
Carleton and the Eastern Ontario Institute of Technology
will march on Parliament Hill
on Oct. 27," said Lavalle.
"The four universities in the
Halifax area will hold a massive public rally in downtown
Halifax."
"McGill in Montreal will
march in protest against rising
student fees and submit a brief
to the provincial government."
"Prairie universities have developed similar projects and
Victoria college has planned a
combined march and public
forum."
Blood drive drops
The blood drive at UBC Oct.
5 to 9 collected only 1,705 pints
compared to last year's total
of 2,150 pints, a drop of almost
20 per cent.
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE  FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
I DARE YOU
To find a better car, at a better price, with  a better
reputation.
Vancouver Volvo Sales is now registered as the largest
Volvo dealer in Canada.
Ask the man who owns a Volvo. There are plenty on
the campus — every year and every model.
We finance directly through the bank. No hidden
charges! No extra interest rates. No kidding — we are
the greatest because we are the best.
Can't afford a Volvo? - - - Nuts!! We can arrange
it to suit your budget.
WANT ANOTHER TYPE OF CAR?
If we do not have the car of your choice, come to the
office, tell us what you want and your price range, and
we will guarantee your purchase. No Down Payment
required on good credit.
VANCOUVER VOLVO SALES
1090 W. Georgia  St. MU 2-4708
or 1080 Marine Dr., N. Van. YU 7-4458
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE Friday, October  15,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—don   kydd   photo
FROSH "FLOCKED" TO POLLS Thursday to elect council
for this year. Above, Vicki Smith (left), Karen McDowell,
and Joni Harrison fight off voting frosh horde. Below,
pollsters Tracy Kenmuir (left) and Margaret Taylor pack
light ballot  box to  counting   room.
(See Page 6 for more pretty girl pictures.)
Lutherans start
$100,000 centre
Frosh vote falls
to 14 per cent
Only 14 per cent  of the 3,500 member frosh  class
turned out Thursday to vote for their frosh council.
New frosh president John
Wheaton received 410 of 525
votes cast in the presidential
race.
Opponents Tom Mason picked up 37 and Derek Rendle
got 78.
It was a decrease of almost
50 per cent from last year's
voting turnout.
Douglas Day won the vice-
president's position by 35 votes
over Sue-Ann Sargent who received 241.
The treasurer's position was
won by John Kidder with 301
votes. James Good received
208.
The other five positions, won
by acclamation, were filled by:
Patricia Anderson, secretary;
Ann Bishop, executive member; Morris Harowitz, special
events chairman; Sheilah Bain,
Women's athletics; and Rick
Goepel, men's athletics.
In a poll conducted by The
Ubyssey, more than half the
frosh interviewed said they
hadn't voted.
"I haven't got much interest
and I don't know what the
candidates are proposing," said
one.
"We should be able to meet
the candidates and talk with
them," said Helen Anthony,
Arts I. "The engineers don't
help either."
Only 400 frosh attended that
meeting.
"I've got to study and I don't
believe in the democratic process" were other reasons given
by non-voting frosh.
One frosh had a unique excuse.
"I was on my way to vote in
Brock and didn't make it past
the Library pond," he said
drippingly.
Early offers
pay the least
-UBC job men
Arts graduates applying for
jobs should be careful not to
accept early offers too eagerly,
UBC employment officer J. C.
Craik said Thursday.
Speaking to a small group
of students, Craik said a civil
engineering study made last
year found employers offered
aplicants an average salary of
$450 in November, $475 in
December and $500 in April.
"The employer wants to
select the best person for the
job and pay them the least
amount possible," said Craik.
"Early offers may not be
the best ones."
He said company representatives would be on campus from
November to March to interview applicants.
A list of interview times will
be posted on bulletin boards
in Buchanan, he said.
Appointments can be made
10 days before the first date
given for an interview with a
certain company representative.
"Interviewing is a technique
at which one can become
skilled," said Craik.
• "Be friendly and tolerant
but don't talk too much," he
advised.
He quoted Dr. Dennis Healy,
dean of arts, as saying:: "I have
never known an Arts degree
to be a deterrent in getting a
job."
JOHN WHEATON
. . . heads frosh
Douglas ends
NDP week
Students will hear an address
by New Democratic Party
leader Tommy Douglas in
Brock Hall, noon Oct. 22.
Douglas' speech concerning
NDP educational policies will
come at the end of a week of
speeches and discussions by
NDP candidates and supporters.
Former CCF federal leader,
M. J. Caldwell will speak noon
Oct. 18 in Buchanan 104.
There will be a coffee hour
Oct. 19 in Brock which will be
attended by NDP candidates.
"Nearly all the Lower Mainland NDP candidates will mill
around," said UBC New Democrat vice-president, Colin
Gabelmann.
George Trasov, NDP candidate for Vancouver-Quadra,
will speak Oct. 21, in Bu. 104.
A 5,000 book library, study
be   features   of   the   planned
Centre.
A sod turning ceremony
Monday noon will be attended
by members of Lutheran
churches in Vancouver.
Site of the building is the
corner of University Boulevard
and Wesbrook Crescent.
Pastor Herbert Fox said
Thursday the building will not
just be for Lutheran students.
"We hope other students will
come to relax and enjoy the
facilities,"  he said.
Fox said although the building will not be a church, a
central alter will be an important feature.
— There are two Lutheran
groups On campus—the Gamma Deltas and the Lutheran
Student Movement.
These organizations, which
now have headquarters in
Brock, will have offices in the
new centre.
Construction will begin in
November.
booths and a coffee shop will
$100,000   Lutheran   Student
Berkeleycalls
for free sex
BERKELEY, Calif. (UNS) —
Students at the University of
California at Berkeley are organizing a Campus Sexual
Freedom Forum.
Larry Baldwin, leader of the
group, said it believes that there
should be no law restricting
freedom of the individual in
any act between consenting
adults and there should be laws
legalizing prostitution and
abortion.
Freedom of dress, or undress,
including nudity and trans-
vestitism, should be unrestricted.
Group activities may include
nude wade-ins such as the one
this last summer at Aquatic
Park in San Francisco.
CANADA
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
with the Government of Canada
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATORS
FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATORS
FOREIGN   SERVICE  OFFICERS
(DIPLOMATIC, TRADE,
IMMIGRATION)
ECONOMISTS
ARCHIVISTS
STATISTICAL ANALYSTS
INDUSTRIAL PROMOTION OFFICERS
These and many other similar careers are open to able graduates of all
faculties but will be of particular interest to those completing a degree in
ARTS, COMMERCE or LAW
Career development opportunities in 1966 will be excellent for those who
can measure up to the qualifications required.
ARE YOU A LEADER, an organizer able to get things done ? Have you a
good academic record and an appreciation of national and regional problems ?
If so, you owe it to yourself to explore these challenging opportunities.
Selections will be made through the annual programme for Junior Executive Officers and Foreign Service Officers, for which the qualifying examination
will be held
On Campus October 20 - 7:00 p.m.
Further details, booklets and applications are available at the Placement
Office on campus. mwmsr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the unrrerstty
year by the Alma Hater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office. CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding; member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
FRIDAY,  OCT.   15,   1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blake.
:r\.
zr* v-zwrntzzsz^ «i
Shhh!
If you go into Brock Hall on Monday nights, walk
very quietly.
Upstairs, in the AMS council chamber, some 20-odd
students are wrapped in a peaceful sleep.
It is very quiet in the council chambers, Not even
a gentle snore is heard. The only sound is deep, heavy
breathing.
And apart from that there is nothing, except . . .
Now and then, a sound drifts in, despite the windows
and doors closed against the outside. Sometimes it sounds
like the curses of a financially-hard-hit student, about
to go under.
Before he writes home to advise his younger brother
there is no use in even trying to come to UBC, the
student listens for some sign of action from his representatives.
But the sound of deep and heavy breathing does not
carry beyond the windows of the Brock chambers.
Sometimes the sleepers inside hear the sound of
far-away laughter. From the administration building.
And, stirring in his sleep, one councillor might hear
part of a muted speech. "Trouble ? There'll be no trouble
about. fees on this campus.
"We have a responsible student government."
Then laughter again.
And the sound of deep and heavy breathing.
Action, and now
If the ad hoc group meeting today adopts the march
idea laid down by the Education Action Program, then
we're going along.
How any council, in their right minds, could turn
down such a nampy-pampy safe-and-sure demonstration
as an academic procession to the Bayshore, we'll never
know.
As for their reasoning, that only council is responsible enough to go downtown — this must win the prize
for the most ludicrous suggestion ever.
Well, we think we're as responsible as council, and
we'll go down.
We'll go down because a long silent march from
Sunset Beach to the Bayshore is one hell of a dramatic
way to show that more than 26 reluctant councillors
care about the higher education of the province's less
affluent young people.
We'll go down because we will be rallying in front
of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
meeting — which makes B.C. the number two focus for
National Student Day.
So our appeairance in orderly numbers will provide
an effective underlining of the huge three-university
march and rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa the same
day.
We'll go down to back Victoria College's mass march
on B.C.'s parliament buildings, and their public forum.
We'll go down to equal University of Toronto's
march to their parliament buildings. And McGill's.
We'll go down to show we are part of a concerned
student community in Canada.
And we'll go down to demonstrate our deep disappointment in what even usually-conservative Brock
types are calling "the chicken council".
Arts, science, and frosh — the campus' three largest
faculties — voted in favor of the march turned down by
council.
Add to these the support of those on the campus
not 100 per cent behind the educational status quo, and
who are willing to show they mean it.
Toss in a responsible implementation of the EAP
committee's good idea by a truly concerned ad hoc march
committee.
And lookee, council, we ve got a marchT
pounail not £uypo*ftiW
education*  m%PCh...
— only &°u-fXCillonP$ jo $a
»     v/u. ■—o—    r—^
"Marchers? What marchers? I don't see any marchers. Do
you see any marchers?"
f CTTTDC
FREE,   FREE,  FREE
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I'd like to point out that
the territorial government of
the North West Territories
has a very comprehensive
plan dealing with higher education.
High school graduates of
the Territories, whose parents
remain in the NWT, receive
upon acceptance by a recognized Canadian university,
free tuition, a generous book
allowance, plus transportation costs from their homes in
the NWT to Edmonton, Alta.
(or to wherever the nearest
university happens to be).
This plan covers the four
undergraduate years — as
long as the student's parents
remain residents of the NWT.
On top of all this, an excellent loan plan is available
whereby a student can have a
loan erased by returning to
the NWT to work for three
years after graduation.
If the student does not wish
to return to the NWT the loan
must be paid off at a five per
cent interest rate.
BILL FRANZIN
(Inuvik, NWT)
Science III
•      •      •
TEACHOUT
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Ubyssey story on last
impression that the B.C. Uni-
the
EAR
I
versities Teach-in was a resounding failure, and quotes
me extensively to this end.
The quotations are accurate,
but selected.
While the meetings did not
live up entirely to expectations, they were certainly
more than "small and pink."
Some 600 students and faculty indicated their interest
and concern about world
events, and learned something
through presentations and debate on crucial issues facing
us today.
There were not "too many
left-wingers" as the Ubyssey
suggests.
Rather, there were too few
non-left-wingers. For them,
the teach-in could not compete with the gorgeous weekend weather, with the crowning of the Frosh Queen, and
with the Thunderbirds.
Even The Ubyssey found
the Roadrunner more important than the teach-in, to judge
from Friday's issue. Must we
conclude that those who feel
any commitment in the realm
of political ideas are necessarily radical?
A meeting to evaluate the
teach-in has been called in
Bu 221 next Tuesday noon-
hour, and I urge those who
have criticisms and "suggestions to attend.
PROF. W. E. WILLMOTT
Anthropology and Sociology
By IAN CAMERON
There is only one thing
worse than riding the bus, and
that's hitch-hiking.
I have been hitching for two
weeks now, and during that
time I have come to the following conclusion, (Cameron's
Law), to wit
"If there is
a nut driving a car,
and if I am
hitch-hiking,
we are going
to come together."
I am forced to reach cameron
this conclusion because I refuse to believe there are so
many weirdos driving around.
I must have met all of them.
"I'm terribly embarathed to
have to drife you in thrth
wreck, but my Thpitfire ith
having a lube job."
Or the guy who picked me
up in the pouring rain and
said, "Want a ride?"
Of course not, you stupid
bastard. My thumb is hot, so
I'm cooling it off.
Or the gink who drove me
for three blocks, asked me
where I was going, and had
apoplexy when I said UBC.
"Get out! Get out of my car!
I suppose his kid had been
refused admission.
Then there was the woman
who picked me up, on a rainy
day, and had me crouch over
the seat as though I was constipated because she didn't
want to get her seat wet.
Finally, however, I found
the piece de resistance. After
only twenty minutes I found
a mark and lept in. I then lept
out, after being goosed by an
errant spring in the seat.
Finally, I used a copy of the
Bladen Report to hold the
damn thing down, and we
started out.
Half way out Marine Drive
he informed me that all students were slackers..
Not only that, they were
drones. Also they were lazy,
underworked idiots, who have
never done a day's work in
their lives.
"Isn't that right?"
"Well, uh, uh, uh, . . . "
"ISN'T IT?"
"Well, uh, uh, uh, why are
you stopping?"
"WE'RE NOT MOVING
UNTIL YOU AGREE WITH
ME!"
God! Apoplexy! So I agreed
with him. And he drove me
the rest of the way out. And
next day I bought a pair of
running shoes.
Everyone's out of step but
me.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News Ron  Rlter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City Richard   Blair
Photo Bert   MacKinnon
Sports Ed Clark
Ass't News
Dan  Mullen
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
Asst City .  Al   Donald
Page Friday
Managing 	
Features 	
CUP  	
John  Kelsey
Norm   Betts
Mike  Bolton
 Don   Hull
Working types Thursday were
Fearon Whitney, Derek Blackie,
Ann Bishop, Anne Balfe, Ann
Ratel, Joan Fogarty, Pat Hrush-
owy, Rosemary Hyman, Dick Taylor, Jay Clarke, Gordon McLaughlin, Claudia Owinn, Kim Richards,
Qbi.B_-JiM.SseU, Jacfc__^ml
Margo Korsch, and Teri Brown. Friday, October  \5,   1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
rORECRO UND
UBC sports fading away
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey  Associate  Editor
UBC's extra-mural athletic
system   faces   it's   severest
challenge in the sports history of this university.
It is the challenge of survival.
Interest in sports at UBC
is rapidly fading; a new and
firmer policy towards reconciling the English and American concepts of intercollegiate
athletics is needed, and,
thanks to the burden of supporting so many minor sports
the program has become financially impractical.
•     •     •
Faced by these demanding
problems UBC's Men's Athletic Committee (MAC) which
controls our extra-mural system has plunged this university back into the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Ath-
leic Association.
For one year UBC was happily independent of any conference—Canadian or American.
But it was only an exhilarating breather.
We pulled out because of
the heavy traveling expenses,
unbalanced competition and
lack of interest towards the
WCIAA on the part of UBC
students and alumni.
These reasons are even
more valid now.
We have rejoined on the
basis of a reduced schedule,
but only in football and basketball. Our athletic budget
is strained and UBC athletic
director Bus Phillips estimates we will need $30,000 more
to cover expenses for our first
year back in the WICAA.
•     •     •
The major sports are still
dominated by one school,
University of Alberta in Edmonton.
UBC won the basketball
championship each of the five
years it was in the WCIAA
and lost only five games in
that period.
In hockey and football its
only competition came from
the U. of Alberta, Edmonton,
which was the only school
other than UBC to win a
championship in these. sports
while we were in the Western
Conference.
It is not that Western Canadian competition is so bad—
but   rather   that   the   UBC's
REAMSBOTTOM
teams could be so much better.
No other Western Canadian
School has anywhere the enrolment of UBC from which
to draw student and financial
support.
But it is unlikely our teams
will improve as long as this
university's Men's Athletic
Committee offers its coaches
and athletes only the goal of
mediocrity.
•     •      •
And no one seems prepared
to institute the changes —
radical ones — "which are
needed to overcome these
flaws.
A survey taken among Canadian universities in January
this year showed UBC had
the most extensive program
in the country; one which includes 27 extra-mural sports.
The emphasis on participation means energy, attention
and finance are spread out
and dissipated on a astonishing number of sports.
At the root of this restricting problem is UBC's inability to reconcile the. conflict
between the contrasting philosophies of English and American sport.
•     •     •
UBC tries to follow the English "the game's the thing"
approach, while competing
with opponents who stress
victory as the all-important
goal.
Campus athletes, who are
awarded no concessions for
practice time or othewise, for
entertaining their fellow students in the UBC stadium,
gym or arena, compete
against opponents who are
helped to put every effort pos
sible into winning.
This is the principal problem, how to reconcile the
two concepts.
There are other problems
such as competition with highly publicized professional
teams for the attention of the
public.
•     •     •
There is the geography factor which leads UBC isolated
500 miles from the nearest
Canadian university.
Another problem is the declining interest in varsity
sports on the part of UBC
students, alumni and the
downtown public.
• In 1952, when enrolment was 5,000, home football attendance was 12,000.
Last season with enrolment at
15,000 it was down to 7,000.
• In 1952, basketball attendance was 8,400. Last season
it was down to 6,000.
The main reason UBC pulled out of the Evergreen conference six years ago was the
belief of athletic officials that
students are not interested in
games against small American schools.
But there was no improvement when we entered the
WCIAA. The won-lost record
improved but interest did not.
Hence it is obvious this university's athletic system is not
serving one of its prime pur-
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poses: to cultivate the interest
of the sudent body and serve
as a focal point for the creation of school spirit.
One of the blights on the
extra-mural athletic program
is the fantastic number of
minor sports such as bowling
and cycling that it has to support.
This does not mean UBC
should de-emphasize participation. Our school has a large
and well organized intramural system within which 6,000
students participated during
the past two terms.
Oxford has a fine rowing
crew and a rugby team; but
doesn't have to worry about
football or baseball. U. of
Washington supports football
and basketball; but frays little attention to soccer or field
hockey.
Greater advantage of the
intra-mural program should
be taken to lessen the load
on the extra-mural program.
Two more facts:
• The budgets of the six
priority sports — football,
basketball, rugby, rowing,
hockey and soccer — have, in
the last 12 years, increased
in total 225 per cent.
• The budget expenditures
of the extra-mural non-priority minor sports, over the
same period, have increased
in total 700 per cent.
UBC has a fine team of
coaches, which is being added
to all the time by outstanding
personel such as Lionel Pugh,
a top international track
coach.
•      •      •
But why bother, if people
like Pugh are to be crippled
in their efforts by an out of
date system which is burdened down by a fantastic number of minor sports all vying
for their place in the sun.
The independent schedule
UBC had last year provided
the ideal arrangement for an
extended interim period while
other B.C. universities such
as Simon Fraser Academy and
Victoria College are growing
to athletic maturity.
The decision to re-enter the
WCIAA means we have taken
a gigantic stride — backwards — and allowed Simon
Fraser to take the initiative
and become the leader in B.C.
amateur sports.
Don't Be Caught Short On Your
Beauty Needs
START AT THE TOP
LET THE EXPERTS SERVE YOU
MISS ANSELA
MISS EVANGELINE
LORNA
SEE THE NEW YOU COME ALIVE - SHORT, MEDIUM OR LONG
OR FOR HAIR NOT QUITE AT ITS BEST -
SEE WIGS & WIGLETS
A GALA COIF IS YOURS
CALL US NOW! — YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF
CA 4-4744
Jkack/i fisuwdy Salon
4447 WEST 10th AVE. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15,  1965
WHY WAIT FOR SPRING?
IDEAS at LARGE
By ANDREW HORVAT
Bryan Hender's concerned
face avoided my glance from
the front page of Wednesday's
Ubyssey.
He had reasons for looking
away from students like me
and worse off: he had just
killed the march to the Bay-
shore Inn.
Mr. Hender, the president
of my AMS decided that it
would be unsuitable to my
image as a university student
to be seen protesting (quietly)
against the injustices which
are perpetrated by the existence of fees at universities.
I myself think that Mr. Hender is concerned really with
the rising cost of education.
The only reason that he did
not support the protest march
was to protect my golden
image from tarnishing in the
eyes of all those people out
there, outside the university
gates.
And what makes me different from those people outside
of the university?
I am educated, or rather on
my way to receiving an education.
Those people out there for
the most part are not educated and yet, I am supposed
to fear their opinions.
No thanks, I don't want myself protected from their
thoughts. If they are intelligent  enOugh  to elect prime
ministers, I presume they are
intelligent enough to see inequality against which I and
4,000 other UBC students
protest.
And the image, Oh yes.
the image.
The image is one of long
cars, a soft life and rich parents.
The funny thing is that we
ourselves are beginning to believe this pretty picture of
luxury.
We believe that we are
spoiled wards of society who
have no rights — half-baked
until we receive that degree.
If we would not believe this
image,  we would be  out on
Oct. 27 in front of the Bay-
shore Inn shattering it.
This image shows how
clearly we have been alienated from our role in society.
We don't want to get involved in a fight which is basically our own because of what
those others are thinking.
We do not think of the University as a place of work.
We are not proud of our profession.
Under any circumstances,
on National Students Day
there'll be a march. Whether
it'll be a real march or a
funeral march in which the
dignity of the student as a
driving force in the intellectual life of our nation, will
depend on the ad hoc committee and its supporters.
*';**».'■•
lsWJBas# «*   '
BUT OPENS PARKING
Ouv blocks road
Students   using Univers'+v   Boulevard  throughout   the
day may find themselves halted by patrolmen.
UBC patrol director Sir
Ouvry Roberts said Thursday
traffic regulations prohibited
students from driving down
the Boulevard from Wesbrook
Crescent to East Mall before
5 p.m.
"We intend to enforce this
regulation from time to time,"
he said.
Traffic patrolmen Tuesday
morning diverted student cars
driving down the prohibited
stretch of the Boulevard.
"Illegal undergrad driving in
this area combined with ped-
estrial traffic congests the
area", said Sir Ouvry.
Sir Ouvry also said two rows
of A-lot and four rows of C-lot
are going to be given back to
undergraduate parking.
The rows had been amon?
those appropriated for the use
of faculty and graduate students.
The move came after a number of complaints about lack
of parking space in these lots
for undergraduate cars.
Book strips
Alma Mater
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
students' union of Laval University has published a book
entitled "Laval University Unmasked."
About 100 pages in length,
the book is aimed at lack oi
public discussion on the university caused by a completely
unjustifiable silence" on the
part of it's professors.
The book provides the background for the Laval student'
recent demand for abolition of
the royal and papal charters
of the university, and the modernization of its structures. c
fteafist
*<*      «\
freethought
criticism    satire
and damnation „.
■^m^m^^^0^^w^^^WfW^^^^^0^^^^^
Does the stickshift scare
soft-core pornography:
phallic symbolism dept.
How to
make a hard man
a softie.
Bonnie Fluff j
Fabric Softener
does it. _
What man alive      .
doesn't like soYt tee-shirts. Ip-'' U   ■
soft pajamas, and softl
everything he wears? I
Bonnie Fluff Fabric Softener i
does it. Makes a liard-to-please &f"
man a real aoftie
' Jij i'»i \j&Vi   JT*   4.Ui.i..,
.i.'iiw^ti'ili i
iiU  ^iUVl J.J  jjto'i I»
Oct. 8, 1965
ON THE COVER: Artist Jeff
Wall's impressions of the Realist magazine. Realist editor Paul
Krassner speaks on campus next
Wednesday, on Will Success
Spoil Pope Paul. That funny
little bird-thing in the corner is
Saint Realist, the magazine's
symbol.
Editor:  John Kelsey
Current affairs Steve Brown
Science, the art* Al Francis
Executive Rochelle Morinis
Drawings-
Arnold Saba, Brett Smaill
Jeff  Wall
Rain, man.
Rain and the mountains
you can't see for the mist
and the fog in the morning. Sometimes hard
pounding, puddle-waving
rain and often soggy drizzle, sun in summer and
spring.
The trees stay around
for a lot of! the year, too.
The grass is deep green
with rain, and those black
leaves in the gutter shine
with the stuff.
We think the rain makes
this town creative, makes
it the crazy place it is.
[Like, book publishers
say there are more writers
in B.C. than anywhere,
every housewife in Point
Grey has a children's
book or a novel done and
stuffed under the bed or
in the makings, between
babies, covered in peanut
butter.
We don't know about
this, but there seem to be
more painters here than
proper—nearly every student pad in Point Grey
has a few original oils
on the walls.
Jazz poet laureate Jon
Hendricks says Vancouver is like San Francisco.
He calls it a natural city,
which is a creative city.
Less cosmopolitan than,
say, Los Angeles. A little
more humlan.
Oh yeah, a lot don't believe a word of it. They
won't accept anything
they do see here as art —
and it takes a lot to register on them in the first
place.
But get out and walk in
the rain some night.
You can't feel draggy
in rain (climatologists tell
us our west-coast marine
climate is the most energetic in the world, dig?)
because it's simply such
great stuff.
Even    near    C-lot,    if
you're in the right mood.
We blame this whole
wild city on the rain.
Love that rain.
War games, tourism in Mao's China:
j)f 2wo
UBC student sees
trodden  hordes
of not-so-starving
By AL HARVEY
The first thing that struck
me in China was the many
large propaganda billboards.
These colorfully and imaginatively depicted the struggling masses throughout the
world unshackling their
chains and overthrowing imperialists.
In one, an old peasant
farmer and his daughter
stood in their rice paddy
shooting down their daily
quota of American planes.
Another showed the people
of Asia, Africa and Latin
America pointing bayonets at
a battered Lyndon Johnson
with an armful of bombs.
Other billboards lauded
the works of Mao Tse-Tung.
In the streets of large cities
throughout China are the inevitable plastic red stars and
red felt collar tags on the
baggy khaki fatigues of the
People's Army.
Many young children wear
the red neckerchiefs of the
Young Communist Pioneers.
The militant revolutionary
spirit of the new China is
everywhere and the unification of so many people under
a banner that completely opposes our social order is terrifying.
I imagined modern warfare against China — the
futility of the Bomb against
a spread-out rural population
well versed in guerilla tactics.
The Chinese are certain
war with America will come
in the near future and China
Al Harvey spent two
months in Mainland China
this summer as part of an
eight-month jaunt around the
Pacific Ocean and Asia.
He says he had no trouble
at all entering China — he
simply applied in Hong Kong,
boarded a train for the border, picked up his passport
there, and changed trains for
Canton.
Al's 21, back at UBC.
studying in Arts III.
will be the battleground.
The propaganda machine has
told the citizens about every
decadent part of Western
society.
Wordly discussions and arguments with them are abbreviated because they cannot compromise — their one
source of information does
not allow compromise. I
wondered about the nation's
intellectuals: do they keep
quiet, are they listened to,
or are they "corrected" at
an institution?
Foreign visitors to China
are supplied with ample
literature, courtesy of the
People's Republic. Most
lounges and waiting rooms
have pamphlets in half-a-
dozen languages. The propaganda is not as subtle as the
Western variety.
Movie and stage shows all
follow the revolutionary
theme. In Canton, I saw The
East is Red on stage, a dy-
namic, magnificent spectacle
of China's modern history
with a cast of nearly 800.
It was a color-blinding,
two - hour performance of
flags, guns, and acrobatics
supported by a chorus of 300.
The songs were loud and
rhythmic, easy tunes that I
still remember.
When the image of Chairman Mao flashed on the stage
the roar of 1000 spectators
filled the hall. Rousing polished shows as such account
for the new culture of China,
strongly based on revolution.
Hitch-hiking in China is
impossible because of an inadequate road network and
because foreigners are not
permitted to travel more
than 12 miles outside their
INSIDE
overseas
requested cities without special permission.
Therefore, I rode by third
class train coaches. Loudspeakers spewed intermittent
propaganda and revolutionary songs until dark. Cramped conditions made sleeping
a bad joke.
Individuality is non-existent in China. Work is almost
always done collectively,
men and women doing similar tasks and thus adding to
the society's sterility.
Dozens of workers ride to
the fields and factories in the
backs of trucks and on holidays are again taken with
their group to recreation
areas.
Swimming is the chosen
form of recreation this year;
Comrade Mao himself swam
the Yangtse seven times. The
People's Army also gets in
on the swim.
A peaceful park just outside Peking was over-run by
soldiers using the lake for a
beachhead exercise. Women
in rubber rafts were decked
out in rifles and grenades.
In another Peking park a
group of ten-year-olds played supervised war games.
The teacher seemed proud
of her soldiers as they dragged in more "captives" from
the bushes.
After visiting a large steel
mill in Wuhan I was given a
similar performance; this
time a class of kindergarten
boys and girls smartly stood
up in unison and belted out
The Children of the World
Stand Shoulder to Shoulder
Against   the   American   Imperialists.
They are soon taught to
put the state before anything
else. My friend Teng said
he places the state before
everything, including his
family. I suppose everyone
says that.
Marxism-Leninism has filled China's religious vacuum.
Chairman Mao is the saviour
and his works are the truth.
Although many know nothing of pre-liberation days,
all Chinese seem thankful for
Mao Tse-Tung and communism.
Communism has been beneficial for China in general;
it has unified the nation and
stabilized the government.
The economy is improved
and the working people are
no longer exploited by foreign landlords.
I saw no evidence of "the
starving Chinese", although
many wear little more than
rags. These people are poor
but not nearly so poor as before the revolution. They are
happy to work for the common cause even though they
have little personal freedom.
The new China is a country born in revolution and
obsessed by revolution. It
refuses to keep this militant
spirit confined within borders.
Since this will lead to
future world conflict one can
only hope this spirt is a temporary manifestation of growing pains.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October .15,   1965, crown
By GABOR MATE
Some ancient Greeks subscribed to a myth of creatures with animal bodies and
human heads.
In an age when our myths
tend to be of a more political nature, many Canadians
believe in an international
body of nations united under
a symbolic head, the British
Crown. Recent events make
one wonder which animal is
less real: the centaur, or the
British Commonwealth of
Nations.
For the past month two
larger Commonwealth members have been locked in
battle over the possession of
Kashmir. This violent conflict was brought to you
courtesy of the U.S., Russia
and Britain, who had spared
no effort in ensuring that the
belligerents would be capable of killing each other
with the utmost efficiency.
Thousands of dead and
wounded later, the Kashmir
problem is no closer to solution that it ever was, and the
Commonwealth faces its
greatest challenge in its short
history. Precisely what use
is a family whose children
are determined to maim each
other to death, and whose
mommy supplies them with
weapons for that purpose?
The cherished picture of
the Commonwealth as a
noble experiment in international and interracial co
operation can never again be
waved.
The tiny but extremely important British protectorate
of Aden has been shaken by
violence during the past two
weeks. Incorrigible agitators
among the Arab populace
have stirred up a demand for
an end to Aden's colonial
status.
Britain has promised independence for 1968, but the
nationalists cling to the as-
sinine idea that they have a
right to self-determination
now, on their own terms.
They have threatened more
bombing and assassinations
if their demands are not
granted.
Aden illustrates the failure
of the Commonwealth principle to grasp the imagination of a newly emerging
nation. Quite obviously,
many Adenis have no desire
to evolve slowly into a
"equal partner state" on British terms, which would include a forced federation
with fifteen feudal sheikdoms on the Arabian peninsula.
Also quite obviously, Britain herself has little regard
for Commonwealth ideals
when her strategic and economic interests are in jeopardy.
Meanwhile, the most immediate crisis is the discord
between the British and
Rhodesian governments on
an acceptable formula for
Rhodesian independence.
Unless such a formula is
discovered, the world will
soon have another South Africa. 220,000 whites threaten to set up a supremacist
state in the very heart of
Africa, subjecting about four
million blacks to Voerwoerd-
type apartheid policies.
If Britain  allows this to
happen the Afro-Asian members may leave the Commonwealth in protest. Realizing this, Prime Minister
Wilson has suggested a mission of Commonwealth leaders go to Salisbury, and attempt to solve the problem.
The suggestion is not likely to be accepted, and the
future of the Commonwealth remains precariously
in doubt.
But does anybody really
care?
What do most Commonwealth nations have in common but the fact that all, at
one time, were exploited by
Britain, and all now are determined to extract as much
economic assistance as possible from the wealthier
members?
And for Britain, the Commonwealth is too often a
facade which enables her tb
continue to act as a colonial
power. See the tragicomic
debacle in Malaysia.
And -what meaning has the
Commonwealth for Canadians as we continue to revolve merrily in the American orbit.
Most of our commerce is
with the US, and when we
seek to expand our markets, we look not to the
Commonwealth, but to Russia, China and Japan. On the
other hand, Canadians were
the first to scream when
Britain's application to join
the Common Market threatened a loss of certain Commonwealth trade privileges.
This week the Irish government denied reports that
Eire might apply to re-join
the Commonwealth, and
rightly so.
Who has ever heard of
rats begging to be allowed
aboard a sinking ship?
jazz
wtwrmy 3a«T*wic 3C"V*'
Jazzsoc—just south of fraud
By ANGUS RICKER
In assessing the current Vancouver jazz
scene one could conclude that it is like the
stereotype South Brock chick. It's broad—
but no depth, baby!
Sources of Vancouver jazz are many.
Clubs, concerts, television, AM and FM
radio, record stores and campus concerts
all contribute something.
First, clubs: The Blue Horn on west
Broadway is the only major jazz club in
town.
Its books name jazz groups and provides
the driving force in Vancouver jazz. Such
performers as John Handy, Harold Land,
Philly Joe Jones and, currently, Freddy
Redd have received wide exposure at the
Blue Horn.
Coffee houses such as The Bunkhouse
and The Sequel have featured jazz and
blues oriented groups as have nightclubs
like The Cave and Isy's.
IThe only other jazz club as such, The
Espresso on Howe Street, suffers from a
poor house, but its convenient location often results in excellent after-hours jamming.
Jazz is represented scantily in local
radio programming.
CBC-FM presents upwards of 12 jazz
hours a week, CBC-AM has somewhat less
and CHQM's jazz remains as pretentious
and affected as the station that presents it.
Jazz on campus reflects in a microcosm
the Vancouver scene. In a promising new
development, the Special Events' Committee has moved into jazz bookings with
handsomely produced, well-planned concerts and a master stroke—the February
presentation of Jon Hendricks and his
Evolution of the Blues Song.
Unfortunately, the vacuum that Special
Events has filled was created by the decay
of what used to be more vigorous clubs on
campus, the University Jazz Society.
Lately, jazzsoc has been reduced to a
moribund state, bleating aimlessly about a
lack of jazz interest. Perhaps it would be
more correct to suggest there is no interest
in jazzsoc as it is presently constituted.
Jazz musicians, and every increasingly
the jazz public, at UBC have shied away
from the narrow hipsterism and clique-
manship that has characterized jazzsoc
recently.
For example, the jazz musicians are now
organizing within the faculty of music
rather than with the jazzsoc band or the
memory that remains of it.
If jazzsoc wishes to become again a
viable medium for the presentation of jazz
it should recognize its obligation to promote campus talent. It also should become
aware of promotion techniques required
to make these events financially successful.
There is a highly promising jazz nonet
rehearsing under Brian Griffiths right
now. Jazzsoc should give interested students a chance to hear it.
If money is lost on this presentation,
why not promote rhythm and blues concerts to make up the difference? Is there
anything wrong with presenting the roots
of jazz?
Until jazzsoc repudiates its present
pseudo-hip image it is destined to remain* a
hollow caricature representing a virile
musical art form. And that, gentlemen, is
just a little south of outright fraud.
Rustle, rattle, twang:
its sweet sound, man
By ALLAN MARTIN
Keys rattle, cellophane
rustles, rubber bands twang
—to UBC music professor
Cortland Hultberg it's sweet
sound.
He records all these and
myriad other ordinary but
non-musical sounds on magnetic tape and electronically
alters them into music.
He starts by
recording at a
relatively high
speed and playing back at
a lower speed, producing a
deeper, fuller sound.
He's got the freedom of a
film editor. He can cut and
splice tapes at will and can
even gain an extra degree
of freedom by filtering out
some of the sound frequencies to completely change
the original sound.
The equipment is simple
—a tape recorder and microphone, electronic oscillators
and amplifiers are sufficient
to produce quite elaborate
effects. The oscillators generate either sine or square
waves of any audio frequency and this sound
source alone is the basis of
many modern compositions
such as Poeme Electrique
by Edgar Varese.
Prof. Hultberg's music is
far more general than this,
since he applies no real limitations to the sources of
sound he uses. It's called
musique concrete and an interesting example is Concerto for Twelve Radios.
Hultberg argues that the
basis of music is sound and
restricting these sounds to
orchestral instruments greatly inhibits the composer.
Classical composers have
progressively demanded
greater ranges from the instruments at their disposal
and some felt the age they
music
lived in was not adequately
expressed by then-existing
orchestral instruments.
Electronic music, or more
generally, musique concrete,
is an extension of this idea.
Hultberg feels the future
of   music   lies   along   these
lines and classical music we
now know will decrease in
popularity   until   eventually
• it will be heard
only   in   places
like universities.
This,    of   course    may    take
many hundreds of years.
This music demands to be
heard and some of the
sounds are most unusual.
For instance, a combination
of three people talking
simultaneously holds attention because the mind tries
to pick one voice out of the
three.
This, however, is direct
association of sound with
source. In the case of cellophane rustling, the result
can sound like thunder and
produce a completely different mental image. It is because the mind tries to picture the sound that the
music is so interesting.
What effect does this
music have on people? Many
have not heard a piece played through, but for those
who have, the reactions vary
from Call that music? to enthusiastic appreciation, but
many now accepted ideas in
music were condemned
when first introduced.
Hultberg is satisfied if his
music produces some emotion in the listener, whether
it be pleasure or apprehension.
pf 3hree
Fridoy,. October .15,   1965
T H E      U B Y S S E Y
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INANE: Sponsors of the
Pique graft fund Roadrunner cartoons lifted their
eyebrows when they saw
a group of five old fuddy-
duddies walk in to the auditorium. Must be professors, they thought, taking
50 cents from each.
Profs settled down in a
middle row, but appeared
to be disturbed when the
lights went out. Soon as
the coyote made his first
entrance, five very annoyed profs got up, stalked to
the back door, and demanded their money back.
"We thought this was
Linus Pauling's speech,"
they blushed.
•     •     •
INCEST: Rumor of the
week (watch out, Roger
McAfee): Ex-B.C. Stud Fed
festerchief Hardial Bains
is on his way to UBC to
save us from tuition fees.
INTWINED: This Week
Has Seven Days whiz Lau-
ier Lapierre won't be able
to make it to his scheduled
appearance here today, after a nasty newspaper columnist stepped on his ego.
He was going to appear at
the allegedly non-partisan
(three weeks from a federal election) rally for
Tommy Douglas. He was
going to speak here on —
yup — The Lunatic Fringe
in Canadian politics.
•      •     •
INVIGILATION: Professors and student gov't,
wheels are buzzing about
the report that President
John Macdonald's longtime personal secretary
and office watchdog is leaving next month. She's the
voice that says "Miss
FRANKlin" very tersely
and very Bostonly, usually followed by "He's
BUSY"—click. Things just
won't be the same when
she's gone. No sir.
Outside the pink-in, a
group of delegates, also apparently straight-faced, set
up a bookstand and dished
out Mao, Marx and Lenin
at people's rates. "Get your
revolutionary material
here," they chanted. Wonder if they were the ones
who printed Communist
candidate Jerry LeBour-
dais' campaign posters, the
ones which they say he's
|)f 4our
the leader of the laborer.
There wasn't a union bug
to be seen on them.
• •     •
INDIGESTION: Registrar John Parnall, terribly
upset by reports of slight
elasticity in entrance requirements, has purged the
administration founding
staff in search of two secretaries who allegedly tipped off the press. Keep
looking, fellas.
• •     •
IN THE PINK: The hilarious teach-in fiasco, in
which the weirdie-beardie
peacenik set held a three-
day fester session, was
summed up by sociology
prof William Willmott. After relating that "the socialist sympathizers" monopolized the discussion (they
were the only ones there)
and that any non-pink
speakers "came in for a lot
of comments from the floor," he said, apparently
straight-faced: "It is a
shame that so many students missed a unique opportunity to LEARN."
• •      •
ILLEGAL: Taxpayers in
the Law Undergraduate
Society are almost as upset about a recent little executive splurge as they
were when hooty-flooty
Tory tiger Petey Hyndman
got up and told the first-
year class how to dress.
The 15 Frosh Queen candidates got engraved invitations to a private splash
with several self-appointed
lawyer wheels, at one of
the wheels' home. The
queens thought it was an
official function that they
were supposed to go to.
"No wonder they were
such a bunch of dirty old
men," said one queen. Who
paid for it all, fellas?
• •     •
INTRIGUING: AMS
wheels have put a big padlock on the College Shop
doors because records from
last year show nearly $2,-
500 worth of goods disappeared under mysterious
circumstances. Like, somebody who shouldn't had a
master key to the back
door of Brock and the
front door of the shop.
• •     •
INCOMPETENT: Dormitory barons are all set to
ban the booze sessions called mixers held in the common block. Last one left so
much debris all over the
washrooms and corners of
the halls that the word has
gone out: Dry up or pull
out.
HARV: It's quite a thrill to have
fewer cavities.
JOY: The way you look in that
Byford sweater is more thrilling
to me.
HARV: I rather like the wide ribbing in this soft wool.
JOY: You know, when a top
British designer like Hardy
Amies interprets a sweater, his
knowledge of cut and styling
show in details like the fully-
fashioned sleeves that emphasize
your manly chest.
HARV: What do you think of the
green briar colour?
JOY: Oh, doll, it makes a perfect
contrast with your gorgeous
teeth! ,. .
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Dolores Hart, Hugh O'Brian
Plus:
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Saturday, Oct. 16, 1-3 p.m.
YTC Recreation Hall
Acadia Camp
Better used clothing and
household articles
VARIETY  RENTALS
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OCT. 27 to NOV. 6
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MON. THRU. THURS. - Tickets $2.50
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THE CAVE
theatre   restaurant
626 hornby 682-3677
Page  16'
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1965 argument
Dangerous man
lashes Canada
By   KARL  H.   BURAU
Ten years ago I came to
Canada fed up with too much
corruption in Germany and
too many Nazis back in office, and full of enthusiasm
for this so-called young and
democratic country.
Now I am rather disillusioned and know that here
exists very little in the way
of democracy or fairness or
efficiency
For Canadian universities
have become—or remained
places of primitive indoctrination with wrong or outdated slogans or prejudices
rather than places of spiritual communication and honest research. Re the humanities, the establishment certainly is most anxious to
prevent anybody from getting a foothold who might
know something and who
might infect students with
new ideas—and who might
show that the official luminaries are not half as wonderful as they like to pretend.
•     •     •
Even worse, students as
a whole seem to be interested only in their material
careers and not at all in
truth.
Before I came to this country I was very ashamed as
a German for what had
been possible under Hitler—
but now I am convinced
that given the same circumstances Canadians would behave even more cowardly
than we were.
Only the late Dr. Naegele
was to a certain degree capable of non-conformity and
once invited me to speak to
the political science department. I explained why the
Canadian Bill of Rights
hardly worth the paper it is
written on.
Students came to me privately and explained that
they had learned more about
law and government from
this one lecture than during
all their years at school and
university.
to the German department. I
was told they are interested
only in their own students.
Three years ago I was advised that the department of
history is interested only in
Canadians or in somebody
from England.
When Naegele later suggested they invited me for
discussions with the history
or political science departments I was refused: "We
are interested only in our
own students."
The same closed shop at
the extension department.
Only one professor emeritus
suggested that I give a lecture at International House
but it turned out the students were afraid of losing
their scholarships by sponsoring such a lecture.
There is not much democracy here, neither formally — one man, one vote —
nor in spirit — really free
discussion and protection of
minorities at our universities a solid knowledge bar
prevents Canadians from understanding their real position in the world.
All feel so extremely wonderful and superior to any
other people, bul; one hardly
can be so stupid not to know
how to manage through in
a country as rich and as void
of any real problem as Canada.
When the learned Societies met at UBC this summer I interviewed the leading Canadian historians.
Their ignorance of anything beyond a very limited
view of Canadian affairs
was shocking. They even
never heard of such a simple
device as the constructive
vote of no confidence which
obviously would be the basic
answer to the problems of
Canadian parliamentarianism.
If I'm invited I shall give
a provocative lecture on how
to introduce in Canada some
democracy, some fairness and
some efficiency to cause a
good discussion afterwards.
The parties are not interested in ideas and a genuine civil rights program but
rather prefer only to hunt
votes with the most primitive
type of propaganda possible.
•     •     •
I hope that there will be
at least a few interested in
new ideas at this university,
that not all are as primitively self conceited as the superintendent of schools from
whom I—as a former teacher
—had to take a course on
B.C. school administration.
One highlight: "Nowhere
in the world are educational
standards as high as in Canada and particularly in B.C."
"How do you know?" "Because nowhere as many reach
grade twelve, thirteen, and
even university as in B.C."
"Beg your pardon, sir, but
that could prove the opposite, it is inflation of standards. Anyhow, what are these
figures? I think they are
even higher in the USA."
"How can you dare say
this? And we need not have
the figures because there is a
direct, biological proof that
it cannot be otherwise. You
see, originally the most intelligent people used to live
in Europe. But always the
very best emigrated.
"And the very best first.
Well, where did they go?
Naturally to North America.
Now the best of them, those
of highest intelligence and
energy, they kept moving on
until they finally reached
the shores of the Pacific
somewhere in California.
"Now they could not go on
west, so they turned north."
No wonder we are — with
some conspicuous exceptions
—the smartest people of the
world.
pf 5ive
You can't beat
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GENTLEMEN'S APPAREL
545 GRANVILLE   MU 1-9831
A
Friday, October  15,   1965
THE     U BYSS E Y
Page 11 THIS CITY HAS MORE
QUARTERS THAN FOUR
ueigiiuui
nostalgia
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
Once upon a time there
was a city. It was a big city,
in which lived many assorted people all intent upon
different goals and all living by fairly diversified
rules, a few of which were
held in common.
The strange
thing about this
city is that during a single year many,
many people come to visit
it. Some of them fly through
—literally, for there are
three major ceppaercial air'
ports surroim«&4&e city-
some remain in,one quarter
or another as long as their
purses or sensibilities permit.
Then they go "back home"
taking pictures both mental
and malleable to their dear
friends and families — and
they take back exactly the
same     impressions     they'd
Ex-New Yorker Claire
Weintraub, Arts III. wrote
this in a rapturous fit upon
reading Miriam Wosk's Tuesday Ubyssey tale of a summer in New York.
have had i£ they'd stayed at
home and looked at their
own cities with the same
"refreshed" eye.
Well, what is it about New
York that makes anyone
who goes there see himself
more clearly?
First of all, it's big. Not
big physically—a mere 24
square miles, longer than
it is wide, hot jiggle-me-up
packed with enough people,
buildings of uncultivated
uniformity, noise, dirt,
speed, excitement to make
practically any place on
earth seem like a "small
town".
The rate of expenditure is
matched only by the rate of
income. More money changes
hands than practically anywhere in the world.
The standard of living? It
depends where you are and
who you are and what you
consider worth spending
your earnings on. You can
shop on the lower east side
(or the upper west side, or
the upper east side or the
lower west side) for a few
pennies or dollars—or more.
You can share a $25-a-
month apartment, or you can
blow in a couple of thousand
for a luxury penthouse flat.
There are living lofts, basements, storefronts — houses
—and all within 15 cents
worth of underground tunnel trains to anywhere you
want to go.
Haircuts range from two-
bits or less to a three-figure
number for the works at one
of the midtown salons.
Entertainment? From the
Metropolitan (free to all
comers) to a multi-dollared
night on the town, at el
Stork, elles jazz spots.
I don't know—I didn't
make the scene, I'm afraid.
You see, I had friends who
lived in the Village—rather
good people, some of them
—but they were working,
you see, at one thing or another, and they just didn't
neighborhood of $45 a point.
That's somewhere around
$150 a course, in case you
don't multiply very well.
Doesn't count books.
And I had friends who
lived uptown—way uptown,
in the heights, where the
neighborhoods are identifiable as middle-
class family-
things, and you
can walk in the morning to
the subway for at least two
blocks without seeing fifty
people.
And my father worked in
the very middle of the thing,
the smackdab million-dollar
Madison Ave. middle.
In order to have lunch
with him (a free meal for
me while I was struggling
on five dollars a week over
and above the rent) I'd have
to walk a scant five blocks
from the IND subway line.
Six million New Yorkers
are always oh the streets,
and I'd run into at least 500
of them. That doesn't count
the ones you don't see, hiding inside the monolith
building behind you, before
you beside you.
At night Seymour and I
went t<&t walks. We lived on
the upper west side, 12
blocks from each other, he
on one side of the Harlem
divide and I on the other.
Si'\mour finally landed a
job running copy for a socialist magazine* downtown
which meant our walks
could be supplemented by an
eggroll.
what does that matter?
What mattered were those
walks at two and three
in the morning singing madrigals into the courtyards of
the west end apartment
houses so your voice would
echo—when will, it end Seymour, how can you know this
city if you don't get out to see
what you're looking at, running down the street in an
endless midnight game of
tag—oh yeah, that was part
of it.
(Take a long pause.)
But don't you see, friend,
that was only part of it?
How about Central Park,
watching kids watch animals in the zoo. How about
the job in the Museum of
Natural History, in a room
filled with dusty relics?
Oh yeah, there's a city in
there somewhere. Every
person living in that city
knows at least one of them.
You live there for a few
months, you see a few things.
A few years, you see a little
more or less. A lifetime,
and either you're blind or
you have more visions than
Christ Jesus himself. You
walk from Seventh avenue
and Twelfth street to Fifth
avenue at Fifteenth. You do
it how many times in a
week, a month, a year —
and every time you go you
see something different.
Oh, I don't mean a new
face, or a new tree, or even
a new leaf on the same tree,
but something you just
hadn't noticed before — a
sign, a window, a door.
Look: one time I was
hitching to Arizona. I got a
ride to the Manhattan side of
the midtown tunnel (coming
from the Island) and walked
down First Avenue south
towards the Battery, rucksack on my back, and there
To pf 8
See: MORE JIGGLE
 books	
No diquery claquery
in Touchstone mag
By ANDREW HORVAT
Touchstone . . . Touchstone . . . Touchstone . . . the
purple and white posters flicked past on the other side of
the bus windows on a rainy eight a.m.
And that's how I first made my acquaintance with
this little magazine. In a sense Touchstone is like all those
other little magazines which spring up only to die after
a few issues. I certainly hope this will not be Touchstone's
fate.
In this second issue there is an interview with Larry
Kent and one with Phil Ochs, a protest singer who says
that even rich, white kids can sincerely sing the songs of
poor black folk. There follows a short story entitled
"Feathers For Breakfast", by Keith Winter, an ex-UBC
student with a pleasantly avant garde style like Aud. Caf.
conversation.
I found a report examining the lack of erudition of
President Johnson's image-makers that was at the expense
of the images of both of the above. Each edition contains
a selection of one poet's works "on the theory that it is
more interesting to consider various' aspects of one poet
than on aspect of various poets".
Possibly the most appealing aspect of this magazine
is its obviously earnest attempt to correlate Canadian art.
Music, films, poetry, and fiction are divergent enough to
justify editor-publisher Peter Cameron's claim that there
is no cliquery claquery. No one group of barefoot anarchists in dirty sweatshirts crouch about in an attic to produce
a mag everybody else is ashamed of. Rather, coverage
exists from Toronto to Vancouver. And even if Touchstone
has a university-coffee-house flavor, the combination is
definitely not unappetizing. So don't let Touchstone pass
you by.
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
Level   -   Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Recltalist. 682-1096
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction  Paper  Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
SPECIAL
EVENTS
"Will Success
Spoil Pope Paul"
Wed., Oct 20, 12.30
Aud. - 25c
CANCELLATION FOR TODAY
LAURIER LAPIERRE will not be able to fulfill his speaking
engagement at UBC this Friday, Oct. 15. Watch The
Ubyssey for  his  rescheduled  appearance next  term.
things gO
better.v
wwitn
Coke
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The world's a stage, the thirst's assuaged! Take time
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Page 12
THE.    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15{ 1965 war
Yank ideal
is victory
By DR. BENSON BROWN
From 1914 to 136* the
main goal of American policy
in South Vietnam was to
create a viable nationalist
anti-communist government.
This policy is generally conceded to have failed.
One symptom of this failure was the total demoralization of the South Vietnamese
Army. By December 1964
the South Vietnamese Army
was no longer fighting. Some
units went over to the Viet
Cong. The rate of desertion
was far higher than the rate
of recruitment. Local commanders made deals with the
Viet Cong and stashed money
in Swiss banks.
At the beginning of February 1965 the Americans
initiated a new policy:
• bombing North Vietnam
• American occupation of
the coastal areas of South
Vietnam
• intensive bombing of the
rural areas in South Vietnam.
Goals of this policy appear
to be:
• to boost morale in the
South Vietnamese Army
by clarifying the American commitment
• to creat a refugee population which would migrate
to the American zone (the
only area free from bombing) and which would be
depedent upon the Americans for food and shelter.
These refugees will presumably be demoralized
enough to make feasible
the task of converting
their politics from pro-
Viet Cong to simple
apathy. This migration
would also serve to separate the population from
the guerillas (some 600,-
000 have moved out of
the rural areas since last
February).
• the presence of a large
number of American
troops makes the present
Saigon government dependent only on American good-will, and independent of any economc,
religious, or social group
in South Vietnam. ■ Thus
the Saigon government
can pursue any policy
(except anti-Americanism
and accommodation with
the National Liberation
Front) which may gain
some support—or at least
neutralize NLF support.
That is, the U.S. government is now trying to
create a military government in South Vietnam—
independent of any Vietnamese group though dependent on the U.S. —
which will rule over a
decimated and demoralized refugee population.
The inhumanity of this
policy cannot be overstated. What are the
short-range prospects?
It is political very difficult for an American government to carry on a limited
war which does not lead to
a quick and decisive "victory". The new American
policy, while it may have
long-range prospects, will not
lead to a quick "victory",
and by next summer at the
latest the Johnson administration will be faced by
withdrawal from Vietnam or
escalation of the war.
Before us is the political
task to make the choice of
the first alternative somewhat more likely.
Morally the imperative is
to protest the inhumanity of
the present American policy.
cinema
race
bogs down
By WARD FLETCHER
Full of sparkle and snap,
Blake Edward's The Great
Race tries to combine the
American Western, Jules
Verne and the horror film to
convince his audience that
there is something besides
Jack Lemmon.
The film deals with an auto
race from New York to Paris.
Tony Curtis and Natalie
Wood try hard to make pie
throwing interesting. However Professor Fate (Jack
Lemmon) gives an excellent
performance that leaves the
Great Leslie (Tony Curtis)
and his female reporter
standing in a pile of comic
cliches.
Blake Edward's direction
often seemed to underestimate the intelligence of his
audience. Some scenes such
as the bar room fighting are
tiresome.
I had the feeling the
director must have taken
everyone connected with the
film into a dark room and
convinced them they were to
bubble over with enthusiasm.
Jack Lemmon probably refused to go and instead carried the film from New York
to Paris on his shoulders.
dissent
Sex
laid
low
i
By DISTRESSED STUDENT
It's been a long time since
I have read such a disgusting article as "Why use the
pill? Try older women."
Let me tell you, Massimto
Verdicchio, the author of this
tripe, is mentally sick and I
sincerely hope his ideas are
not representative of this
generation's thinking.
The older woman is not an
answer to overpopulation.
The answer is less men as
corrupt, immoral and filthy
as this Massimo Verdichio,
whose only drive in life is
sexual.
He and people who agree
with his type of thinking are
the ones who are causing the
population explosion.
But this isn't the main problem he's causing. He's corrupting the very name of sex
and degrading society itself.
We're heading for a lot of
trouble in this world morally
and spiritually.
This article has been a
small contribution.
Print this (the truth) if you
have a conscience.
press
MY DEAR
MR. DALY
We couldn't help noticing
Thursday that another week
had slipped through our fingers, and that somehow or
other you seem to have
neglected your contribution
to Page Friday.
Of course, we are aware
you have had a busy week
buzzing back to Ottawa with
the president, but even so, a
short correction would have
kept up the continuity so important in a weekly supplement such as ours.
Also, in perusing the university's Financial Statement
late one night (having finished reading our other joke-
books), we noticed you are
raking in about $12,500.
This, as far as we can tell,
makes your salary as a
Ubyssey contributor about
$240 a letter, (only one a
week, after all).
So we are a little disappointed, sir, in not receiving
your letter this week.
To console ourselves, we
have been looking over some
of your former epistles — all
carefully preserved in our
scrapbooks.
And let us say, sir, the
quality and tone of your corrections have somewhat
changed.
Take for example, your
latest to one of the downtown
papers: (We are hurt, sir,
hurt that you would write
them this week and neglect
us.)
We note you no longer begin "May we correct." Very
good. But we also note that
you have begun to quote the
Gospel according to Saint
John to back up your arguments.
We would ask you, sir, to
please quote chapter and
verse in using this unimpeachable source. Just the
phrase "as the president
stated in his welcoming address to students" is hardly
adequate: the thing is six
legal-sized pages long.
However, we plan to correct the situation. Effective
immediately, we plan to begin each Ubyssey press day
with a reading of The Word
to our staff.
iNo, no need to thank us
especially. Just send along
your contributions, and all
will be well.
Looking forward to next
week, we remain,
TOM WAYMAN
Editor-in-chief
The Ubyssey
Coming Soon!
THE    UNIVERSITY    OT
BRITISH    COLUMBIA
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
1965 - 1966
Know "Who's Who"
-where they live
— their phone number
- faculty, year, etc.
Only 75c per Copy
All the information you need about
UBC Students
RESERVE YOUR COPY TODAY
J)f /even
V/live Branch,
Shmolive Branch.
Don't You Know Ivy
When You See It?
Our winter sports jackets and suits are authentically and
definitely  IVY  .  . . truly traditional  from  collar  to cuff.
Suits $69.95 - $100.
Mnrrag Goldman
'Granville
774
p  Up Half a Modi from Nrk'« Clock
£>*,   \*   *SM''?£Jvr'>       -    *Vl    tf',^   *'
Friday, October  15,   1965
THE      UBYSS E Y
Pa«e.l3 UBC's   unborn   thespians
buried in equity womb
theatre
By ELLIS PRYCE-JONES
Lately, there have been
many questions concerning
the elimination of student
productions at the Frederick
Wood Theatre.
The recent production of
The Cocktail Party was regarded as the latest step in
cutting student participation.
The obvious reason for the
large number of equity actors appearing was that there
were not students available
since casting
and   rehear-
sal    took
place before UBC opened for
the fall terms.
Only the last play will use
so many professionals because it is performed around
exam time. Apart from those
two productions, the theatre
department would be happy
to use as much student talent
as possible. It has been suggested those in command
have little or no use for these
youthful aspirants. Dr. Klaus
Strassman says nothing is
further from the truth.
•     •     •
The main problem is
theatre students have little
to offer for leading roles. For
the majority, it would be
taking on a part clearly beyond reach.
When auditions are called,
few have sufficient talent,
experience or time. They are
unprepared for demanding
roles. It would be hard to
see amateurs idiotically wading through The Cocktail
Party, which so obviously
troubled professionals.
Young actors have lots to
learn, more than the general
public realizes. Besides, who
is enthusiastic about watching amateurs mutilate a
$2.50 seat production?
Mr.    Stanley    Weese    of
UBC's theatre department is
very much in favor of all-
student performances. But
he would like to know where
these non-professionals will
find the training they lack.
The answer does not lie in
thrusting major production
lead roles upon them.
There are a number of
amateur acting groups in this
city. A student could learn
from an association with
them. UBC maintains a summer stock company at the old
Freddy Wood
which is all-student. The
directing and advanced acting classes put on a play
every year.
• •      •
When roles are to be cast
for major productions, auditions are publicly announced
through The Ubyssey.
Backstage help at the
Frederic Wood is needed and
encouraged. A list of jobs is
posted in the theatre, a small
gratuity goes with them.
Just watching a performance can be of great value
to the student.
Equity actors should be
given every opportunity to
perform on our stage, because they have the talent
necessary to save even the
dregs of play writing.
And if there are any promising young actors or actresses enrolled here they
haven't shown themselves.
Perhaps they could turn up
to the frequent audition calls.
If they have the talent and
there is a part which fits
them, they will be given it.
The same goes for other
areas of theatrical production.
• •     •
The department might investigate the possibility of
presenting    all-student    pro
ductions in addition to the
usual major ones. Linked as
labs to various courses in the
division, students would receive part of their grade for
these performances.
It would be Impossible, because of operating costs, to
do this at the new Frederic
Wood. Ticket, money from
major productions helps the
theatre to just break even.
For a paying audience, the
performance must be good.
A season of poor plays resulting in bad attendance
could force the theatre to
cease production.
•      •      •
Equity actors have provided many evenings of fine entertainment for people who
might not otherwise be exposed to good theatre.
At present an all-student
company for a major production would be painful to
watch. Applause would be
reduced to general outbursts
of sniggering.
Rather than unenlightened
criticism, the Frederic Wood
Theatre deserves our enthusiastic support. Its successes
and failures are part of our
reputation, our history.
More jiggle
from pf 6
was a city I just hadn't seen
before. I mean in all the
time I had passed through
those streets — junking on
Third avenue, visiting Peter
Stuyvesant — I'd never seen
anything before.
It was all there, before I
walked through and after I
passed by, and I hadn't ever
seen it before. A city like
some sort of magical cave
that once opened is always
closed and always open, not
even depending on the magic
words after a while, but on
you, on you yourself and
what city you care to see
when you care to see at all.
|)f 8ight
HOME OF  INTERNATIONAL  AWARD  WINNERS
FIRST  LADY
COIFFURES
- FEATURES THE A-GO-GO LOOK
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3 Locations - Ample Free Parking
4554 YV.   10th —" Mr.  Dino, Mr. Elio of Rome, Miss Evaline, and
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224-5636 and  pedicure).
2625 Granville
RE 1-4901
2028 W. 41st
261-9394-5
LOOK YOUR BEST - For This Year's Homecoming
- VISIT FIRST LADY COIFFURES
COMING I
LONDON: THE NEW SCENE
an exhibition of contemporary British  art
November 3 - November 28
The Vancouver Art Gallery
1145 West Georgia Street
Now if you will place
the apple on your
head . . . But before
you do see the . . .
largest selection of
Paper Back Books in
Western Canada at
DUTHIE
BOOKS
TWO LOCATIONS:
m^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^m
4560 W. 10th Ave.
901   Robson  Street
Paper Back Cellar
Phone CA 4-7012
Phone 684-4496
Phone 681-8713
Open Friday Till 9 p.m.
THE GREATEST SELECTION
OF FOLK, JAZZ AND
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FOUND AT THE
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Robson, opposite Library
some doift
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THE     UBYSSEY
. ^vf «i4tfff Oewtrati 4&t**9eB< Friday, October   15,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
HALF VOTE
SF elects
first reps
Half of Simon Fraser Academy's student body turned
out Wednesday to elect their
first student government.
Over 1,000 voters passed
through the single polling
booth between 9 a.m. and 5:30
p.m.
There were no hostile incidents during the polling, although there had been rumors
of vote fixing and irregularity
in the preparation of ballots.
Seven councillors were elected on Wednesday, and four
more took their positions by
acclamation.
Elected president was Tony
Buzan; vice-president, Csaba
Hajdu; secretary, Sharon Cutting; and athletic director, Bo
Shapski.
John Mynott was chosen for
the unique office of ombudsman. He will handle students'
complaints.
James Rutter will represent
the science faculty, and John
Kenward the arts.
Elected by acclamation were
treasurer, Bob Penny, PRO,
Don Pulsford; club director,
Larry McDermid; and cultural
director, Art Tomlinson.
The elections mark the end
of a month of organization and
confusion.
A voluntary students' steering committee was formed at
the beginning of the year to
draft a constitution.
After three weeks of daily
meetings the committee presented its rough constitution to
the student body.
It was passed by a 39-vote
majority.
Carpools fixed
Do you need to get into a
carpool or out of one?
The Circle K helps drivers
who need carpools or poolers
who need drivers.
Anyone interested can get
information at Brock 156 between 11:30 a.m. and 2:30
p.m. daily.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE  DINNER  JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE     COSTUMES
Special Student
Rates
4397 W. 10th AVE.
CA  44034
FREE
Transportation
From   Campus  to
College  Bible  Class
at
Broadway
Tabernacle
each Sunday AM.
Please contact the
Pentacostal Chaplain
Miss Bernice Gerard
or Ken Gaglardi
266-9275
Room 118, Physics Bldg.
Campus A - Go - Go   Campus A - Go - Go   Campus A - Go - Go   Campus A - Go - Go
THIS SAT. HI
* The Armouries
• Time - 8.30 -12.30
• Tickets - AMS
or at Door
TO THE
# Nightrains
• Shockers
# Toggeries
• A-60-Go Girls
Campus A - Go - Go   Campus A - Go - Go    Campus A - Go - Go   Campus A - Go - Go
AN OPPORTUNITY TO HEAR
The Hon.
Paul Martin
The LIBERAL PARTY OF B.C.
invites you to come and hear
The Hon. Paul Martin newly elected
President of N.A.T.O. and Canada's
External Affairs Minister—
Biscuss Important and Controversial
International issues.
The Hon.
J.R. (Jack) Nicholson
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration
will chair the meeting
Other Lower Mainland Candidates
will be on the speaker's platform.
Bare Robbins and his Rig Rand trill entertain you
ORPHEUM THEATRE
FKIDA Y. OCTOBER 15th, 8 P.M.
-;..=, . Publishedby the Vancouver-Centre Liberal Association,,, Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,  1965
FROM UBC
African project
needs workers
Operation Crossroads is looking for students to spend
two months in Africa next summer.
Crossroads  is  a  work-camp
project concerned with good
will and public relations between African and North American students.
Every summer since 1958, a
group of students from this
continent has travelled to Africa to study and work in
underdeveloped African countries.
Gary Mullins, a graduate
geology student at UBC who
made the trip in 1964, said his
group spent two weeks in
Kenya and Tanzania, and six
weeks in Malawi.
The North American group
taught Malawi youths English
and held seminars on current
topics with their leaders.
Mullins said that more than
one-third of all Crossroaders
return to Africa in some professional   capacity.
Project organizer is Dr.
James H. Robinson, a New
York minister. Robinson will
be in Vancouver this coming
Sunday and Monday.
Mullins said the only personal expense for a B.C. student is the trip to New York
city.
Recruiting will begin with a
general meeting Monday in Bu.
100, sponsored by the Canadian
committee of Operation Crossroads.
Since the program began,
100 Canadians and 1,400 Americans have travelled to Africa.
Reverend to speak
The Reverend D. R. G. Owen,
Ph.D., D.D. will speak at noon
Oct. 25 in Buchanan 100 on
"The Recent History of God."
Sponsor is Reverend J. Blewett, Principal of the Anglical
Theological College.
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.  81h  (at Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Fearn,
Minister
LAYMAN'S SUNDAY
11 a.m.—
Speaker: Mr. C. Harker
(Operations Crossroads
Africa—Nigeria)
7:30 p.m.—
Speaker: Dr. Jack Sibley
(Chrm.—Can. Coram.
Operations Crossroads
Africa)
8:30 p.m.—
KAIROS. Young Adults
Rev. A. Jackson, Anglican
Chaplain for UBC, and Rev.
M. J. V. Shaver, United
Church Chaplain—on The
Principles of Church Union.
Malaysia talk
first in series
The Vancouver Institute begins a new season Saturday
when UBC political science
head R- S. Milne speaks on The
Future of Malaysia.
The lecture series will continue through the university
year Saturdays at 8:15 p.m. in
Buchanan 106.
Speakers this year include
Jaques Simard, former general
director of the Community
Planning Association, and Dr.
Owen Wagsteen of the University of Minnesota surgery department.
Topics will range from "The
Academic Surgical Arena" to
"The Elimination of Poverty in
Canada".
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Exciting styles of all popular makes.
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Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at Max
Dexall's. A huge new Fall stock of campus-styled shoes
for College Men and Women.
Also hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and umbrellas.
Better Shoes for Less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - RE 8-9833
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
MAA meets
Meeting noon today in War
Memorial Gym, room 211.
Managers and captains of all
extramural teams must attend.
Those interested in becoming
managers are asked to attend.
TEACUP TEMPEST
Girls tackle game,
field rugged teams
By JOAN FOGARTY
Tempest in a teacup hits UBC again this week.
The brute forces of Nursing
meet the rugged ranks of Home
Economics noon Oct. 21 in the
stadium.
Mike Robertson, Teacup
chairman, said the game will be
"a unique experience in football" and "show the girls at
their rugged best."
Attempting ito bring order
out of chaos, will be Frank
Gnup, Thunderbird coach, and
Bob Hindmarch, assistant phy>-
sical education director.
For those not fully able to
grasp the obscure points and
broad plays of football the Engineers Undergraduate Society
and the Sciencemen stage a
wild, dung-flinging chariot race
at half time.
Those who feel bent towards
the physical can enter the crosscountry race sponsored by the
Inter ^Fraternity Council. Those
who wish to enter just have to
show up at the Stadium at
12:30. The
The whole program is sponsored by the Engineers.
Donations will be accepted at
the gate and forwarded to the
Crippled Children's Hospital.
YOUNG MEN
THE WHEELERS
SALES AND   SERVICE
4395 W. 10th Ave.   224-4914
HONDA SPECIALISTS
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RAIN SUITS . . . $2.99
HELMETS .... $10.95
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SPECIAL
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CBC will probe
university life
The Bladen Report on
higher education will be discussed on a new radio series.
The series, "The Canadian
University" will report on all
aspects of campus life from
British Columbia to the Mari-
times.
The first program on CBU
Oct. 11 at 7:30 p.m. will investigate the possibility of
greater number of students
lowering the university standard.
MNRAM INSURANCE LIMITED
SPECIALIZING IN REDUCING
SURCHARGED AUTO PREMIUMS
RE 1-5328
1678 West Broadway
FOR THE FINEST
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Call ...
Strathcona Floral Co.
5555 West Blvd.
AM 1-7271
Ltd.
Ryerson United Church
KAIROS
7:30 p.m., Sunday
All Welcome!
2195 West 45th
LUTHERANS BREAK
GROUND
for NEW CAMPUS
CENTRE
University Blvd. and Wesbrook Crescent,
12:35, Monday, Oct. 18th.
— an open invitation —
50c
AMS CARDS ONLY
Friday, Oct.  15
9:00 - 1:00
DANCE
to
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TOTEM     PARK
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549   Gra
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FIRST TO COMINCO
For Careers in Engineering and Research
Undergraduates, graduates and postgraduates in engineering are invited to examine a future with Cominco,
a Canadian enterprise aggresively moving ahead among the world's leaders in the mining, metallurgical and
heavy chemical industries. Cominco offers excellent career opportunities in almost every branch of engineering
and for science graduates — particularly in honours chemistry and geology. There are opportunities for the
following:
MINING' engineers for modern mining and mineral
dressing operations. Research opportunities in
rock mechanics.
METALLURGICAL engineers for non-ferrous and
ferrous extractive and physical metallurgy in
plant operations, process development, and
research.
GEOLOGICAL engineers and geologists for mining
operations and for Cominco's active exploration
programs throughout Canada and in other
countries.
CHEMICAL engineers for chemical and metallurgical
plant operations, process development and
research.
CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL engineers in
engineering design, construction, maintenance,
technical services and in the generation, transmission, conversion and distribution of electrical
power.
COMINCO LOCATIONS
Plants — (Chemical and Metallurgical) — Trail, B.C.;
Kimberley, B.C.; Calgary, Alberta; Regina,
Saskatchewan.
Mines — Kimberley, B.C.; Salmo, B.C.; Riondel, B.C.;
Benson Lake, B.C.; Yellowknife, N.W.T.; Pine
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Research — Central Research Laboratory, iTrail, B.C.
Product Research Centre, Sheridan Park, Ontario.
Market Research Sales Development, Montreal,
Quebec.
Look first to Cominco for challenging assignments, professional development and promotion opportunities when
planning your career.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND
SMELTING COMPANY OF CANADA
LIMITED Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1965
If you run out of ink with
the new Scripto Wordmaster,
it's your own fault.
See!
We've done everything we can to prevent such a thing. Inside this
Wordmaster, with its newly-designed chrome cap, there's an exclusive
Telegauge refill. It lets you see when you'll need another refill*, long
before you'll need it! And its tungsten carbide ball never skips.
Never clogs. Price? Just $1.29 with new chrome cap. Not bad for a
ball pen that you'll never run dry with! That's the long-writing Scripto
Wordmaster.
'Scripto Telegauge refills are available
everywhere at only 59^.
designed, manufactured and guaranteed by Scripto of Canada Limited
161 Bartley Drive, Toronto 16, Ontario
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Grad Class
Membership All students in the winter session who
are registered in the final year of a course leading
to a Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members
of the Grad Class.
Election of Executive positions (President, Vice-
President, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convenor,
Public Relations Officer) will take place FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 15, at 12 30 in the HEBB THEATRE.
Nominators of President will have one minute to
speak for their candidate, and all candidates will
have two minutes to speak if desired.
Nominations are now open for executive positions
and will remain open until 4 p.m., Thursday, October
14. Put nominations in Mailbox 54, Brock Hall.
Nominations to date are:
President: Keith Brimacombe; Vice-president: Robert
B. Harris; Treasurer: Jack Kreut; Secretary: Jill
Eades; Social Convenor: Fred Nazaroff, Judy Gaudin,
Frank Harris; Public Relations Officer: Reg Hand-
ford, Diane Ulrich.
Proposed Constitution Revisions
By-law 3 — Grad Class Council section (c) - (i) to
read: Executive
A. President
B. Vice President
C. Treasurer
D. Secretary
E. Social Convenor
F. Public Relations Officer
G. A Fourth year representative appointed by  the
Editor of Totem
<G. has been added).
By-law  3 — section  (d)   add  sub-section <vii)
to read: The Totem representative shall work with
the other members of the Council to insure
that   the   graduate edition   of  the   Totem
adequately covers all activities of the Grad
. Class.
By-law 4 — Executive of the Grad Class Council.
to read: (a) The Executive of the Grad Class shall be:
(i)     The President
(ii)   The Vice-President
(iii)   The Secretary
(iv) The Social Convenor
(v)    The Public Relations Officer
(vi)  The Treasurer
(vii) The  representative  appointed by
the Editor of Totem,
(section vii has been added).
JARRING SPORT
Frequent falls
for 65 judokas
By SUSAN GRANSBY
Judo is a  sport growing in popularity  at
UBC  and
throughout the province,
UBC Judo Club treasurer
Doug Maclean said Wednesday
that spectators are welcome to
the club's workouts.
The club meets Monday and
Wednesday nights at 6 p.m. in
the apparatus gym of Memorial
Gym.
Those interested can watch
beginners under the instruction
of Bob Fedoruk. They can also
see 25 seniors practising all
stages of the art.
The novices number 45, eight
of whom are girls.
Different members of the
club are there for different
reasons.
They may be there to learn
judo as a competitive sport, as
a method of self-defense, as a
way to keep fit, or just to gain
self-confidence.
Judo is a fine combat sport,
considered as an art by its
practitioners. It combines skill
with strength to form an effective method of offense and defense with little risk of injury
to those with the necessary
training.
For students interested in
judo as a competitive sport
there are a number of tournaments held during the year.
The first of these will be held
at the University Nov. 20.
Other tournaments in which
the UBC Judo Club enters a
five-man team are — the Vancouver    championships,    B. C.
championships, Steveston Judo
Club, Y.M.C.A., New Westminster Judo Club, and Victoria
College.
The UBC Club started six
years ago.
Each year in March there is
a grading tournament within
the club at which most of those
who have practised throughout
the year are advanced to a
higher kyu or position on the
basis of their individual performance.
Students can continue from
this stage at any club they may
to join.
Come and watch the club in
action.
If you have any experience
or can learn the fundamentals
from a senior, it's not too late
to join.
Curling
Ten rinks needed to reach 24
limit for inter-residence draws
which begin Sunday morning
(10:30 and 12:45) in Winter
Sports Centre. 1964 champions,
Acadia rink, awaiting tough
competition. Call Phil Meister
224-9834.
Swimming
Officials, timers, judges and
typists needed for Vancouver
Invitational School Swim meet
to be held at Percy Norman
Pool, Nov. 12 (6-9 p.m.) and
13th 9-1 p.m., 7-10:30 p.m. Contact Mike Taylor 581-5000.
Missionaries
to attack
lame Birds
By DAN MULLEN
UBC's grid Birds will be limping when they clash with
Whitman College Missionaries
2 p.m. Saturday at Varsity Stadium.
Both of UBC's corner-linebackers are out of action with
injuries. Barry Callaghan has
strained knee ligaments and
Bernie Fandrich suffered a
concussion when he fell during a gymnastic class this
week.
Glen Brandt and Bill
O'Brien will fill in for Callaghan and Fandrich.
Completing the juggling Larry Oldham will take Brandt's
vacant safety post.
UBC has yet to win in four
starts losing two and tying two.
The Missionaries from Walla
Walla, Wash., have played
Birds eight times since 1946,
winning six, losing one and
tying one.
Whitman last season won
one game while dropping seven.
The Birds will run more
plays from the T formation
they unveiled last week.
In this formation the backs
line up one behind the other
directly behind the quarterback.
UBC's head coach Frank
Gnup promises a variety of
plays this week from the 'I'.
Quarterback Dick Gibbons
will be looking for his tall
ends Ian Donald and Lance
Fletcher if he's forced to the
air.
Here are the Village Look PLAYBOYS. All suede. Putty beige. Grey.
Faded blue. All styles available in "His"— $9.95. "Hers"— $7.95.
($1 higher west of Winnipeg)
You're right when you wear playboys
Foot-watchers see more PLAYBOYS than anything.
Reason? The Village Look is big now. And PLAYBOYS
have it!
Dashing! Light! Casual! Select suede uppers look better
longer. Plantation crepe soles. Steel shanks.
J&     Ask for your PLAYBOYS at your shoe store today.
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PLAYBOYS «r HEWETSON
A Division of Shoe Corporation of Canada Limited Friday, October   15,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
RALLY NUT GETS "ready-set-vroom" count-down at Thursday noon rally sponsored by UBC sports car club. Fifty-
eight cars entered confusing contest. No one knows how
many finished.
ALL FOR YOU
Intramurals open,
10 sports planned
UlBC's intramural program is
in action again.
Softball, curling and hockey
competition began last week.
Swimming heats began last Friday with trials in the 55-yard
butterfly, breaststroke, and the
220 individual mjedley.
Hockey, which features five
new teams this year, goes Wednesday from 4 to 5 p.m., and
Thursday evenings from 8:30
to 11:30.
St. Andrews, winners of the
league title last year, are expected to find top contenders
in Ramblers and the Law squad.
Curling is held each Thursday at 9:30 p.m. Last year's
champion Doug Kendrick and
his Phi Delta Theta rink are
defending  their   1964-65 title
Grad class meet
Elections will be held today
for graduating class officers at
noon in Hebb theatre.
Every student graduating
from UBC this year is eligible
to vote for candidates running
for the positions.
UNIVERSITY HILL
UNITED CHURCH
on University Boulevard
Invites  resident  students
to attend church
Sunday morning al 11 a.m.
SERMON:
"On Being A Real Person"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
Come also on Sunday Eves.
to  our   interdenominational
Students' Club
at 7 p.m.
Our Fall Programs include:
"The New Morality"
"The Election"
and Various  Social Events
against no fewer than 44 other
entries.
Additions to the intramural
program are co-educational
golf, tennis, volleyball and badminton, and men's seven-ito-a-
side rugby and field hockey.
These activities will not be
underway until the second
term.
Referees are in short supply
in football, hockey, volleyball
and basketball. Those interested in officiating in any of these
sports should leave their name
and phone number at room 309,
Memorial Gym.
24-8
IN RUGBY
Totems trample
new Tech team
By DOUG MOSER
UBC rugby got into stride in fine style last Saturday
under crisp, fall skies.
B & G had the four pitches
at Wolfson Field in perfect condition for the fast, open style
so characteristic of UBC rugby
teams.
One of the features and perhaps prophetic of future intercollegiate competition in the
area was the visit of the new
team from B.C. Institute of
Technology which put up a
spirited battle before going
down 24-8 to the UBC Totems.
UBC Braves bounced back
from their opening defeat last
week   against   the   Vancouver
U.S. puts
Polish flavor
in volleyball
The UJS. national men's volleyball team, which plays the
tough Soviet squad Saturday
at UBC Memorial Gym, will
display a distinct Polish influence.
The Americans have announced that Jim Coleman,
who recently completed an exhaustive study of Polish volleyball techniques, will be the national team's coach.
Coleman is a chemistry instructor at the University of
Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas.
He was selected by the U.S.
State Department to study
Polish volleyball methods at
the world championships in
Warsaw held last month.
There, he saw the Russians
add the world championships
to the Olympic gold medals
they won at the 1964 Tokyo
Olympics.
Poland finished second.
Coleman is aware that the
Americans have never won a
game in four meetings with the
Russians.
city champion Meralomas to a
fine 10-3 victory over Vancouver Island champs, James Bay.
The T-Birds and Tomahawks
coasted to easy wins over the
game but injury-riddled Richmond's first and second teams
32-0 and 38-0 respectively.
This Saturday the Birds and
Tomahawks host the Trojans,
at Wolfson field at 1:15 and
2:30.
Meanwhile, the Braves and
Totems travel to West Vancouver's Ambleside Park.
Under head coach Brian
Wightman, honorary assistants
Hal Rogers (Queens University,
Belfast and UBC Thunderbirds),
John Grange (Canada and
UBC), and Keith Foster from
Australia are each coaching a
team.
Head Manager and still urgently in need of help is former
player Rob Peebles.
For those who might be interested in playing, practices
are held at Wolfson on Thursdays from 12:30 to 2:00 p.m.
No experience necessary!
Grey  flannel-type
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everywhere"
leisure
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4445 West 10th Ave.
near  Sasamat
2906 West Broadway
At Mackensie
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —   Students .35<   Adults .60f
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:   The  Centre  will  be  closed  all  day  Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:  Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
Pimm's No.1 has a Gin base
Pimm's No. 5 has a Canadian Whisky base
Two things about Pimm's: easy to
serve, and a taste you'll enjoy.
Just pour into a tall glass and add
ice and fill up with your favourite light
mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to
(both are absolutely delicious!)
make the traditional Pimm's, famous
throughout the world. But don't bother
unless you're in the mood.
A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's.. .and enjoying every moment
of it.
DRINK
PIMM'S
simply because you'll enjoy
the taste of it.
H. CORBY DISTILLERY LIMITED, CORBYVILLE," CAN.
This advertisement U not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia
r   S   T   *  *  *   1 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1965
' 'TWEEN CLASSES
Club calls all squares
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
Join today in Hut L-6.    Beginners welcome.
ED. U.S.
C. J. Brauner speaks on the
"Campus Rebel" today noon
in Ed. 100.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting today at
noon in Hut 0-16. All are welcome.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Welcome to Mexico!    Talk,
films,    Spanish  guitar,    I.  H.
lounge Sunday, 8 p.m.
SUS
General meeting noon today,
Hennings 200.
VCF
Publicity  meeting noon  today, Bu. 2224.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Laurier    LaPieree's   speech
on The Lunatic Fringe in Canadian Politics cancelled.
NDP
M. J. Coldwell, former national leader of the CCF,
speaks Mon. noon, Bu. 104.
UNIVERSITY
QUAKER GROUP
Meeting for worship 11 a.m.
Sunday, Bu. penthouse.
OPERATION-CROSSROADS
AFRICA
Don Simpson, executive-secretary of Operation-Crossroads
Africa, Canadian Committee,
speaks on Crossroads for 1966,
Bu. 100, Monday noon.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
SOCIETY
Tour of Woodward Medical
Library.    Meet    at    main entrance today at noon.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting   Monday noon, Bu.
203.      Film: — "The    Living
Stone."
TREASURE VAN WUS
Meeting noon today, Bu. 317.
NEWMAN CLUB
General    meeting    Monday
noon, Bu. 204.
UN CLUB and IH
UN    special    advisor to U.
Thant, C. V. Narasimhan, will
speak on the international situation Monday noon at IH.
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting in Bu. 2201 noon today.   Topic: Suicide.
DEBATING UNION
Forum debating. Resolved
that B.C. should secede.    Bu.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
«• TRADES        * TERMS
4 RENTALS     * REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFTNISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
217,   noon    today.    Everyone
welcome.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting noon today, Bu. 204.
Bullfighting film will be shown
with comments by Senor Di-
centa.
CLASSICS MEETING
First meeting at home of M.
F.  McGregor, 4495 West Sev
enth, today at 8 p.m. Speaker
is H. Edinger. New members
welcome.
ROMANCE STUDIES AND
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
In conjunction with French
Day at IH, film "L'Art Negre"
will be shown at noon. Admission free.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock  Hall,   Ext.  26.  224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost k Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publioa-
tiona office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-8242.
FOUND — BOY'S TIMEX WATCH
(with broken grey leather strap).
See Proctor at Brock Hall.
POUND — WOMAN'S DARK
brown glasses — contact AMS
office,   Brock  Hall.
LOST — GOLD CHAIN BRACELET
between Chem. Building and C lot.
Sentimental value. Please phone
Diana at AM 1-9423.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE at Frost
Dance at Armouries last Saturday
night, 1 Navy blue ladies' coat
with white buttons. Could owner
of navy coat please contact, AM
1-8037.
LOST ON CAMPUS, man's wallet,
lost around last Thurs., Oct. 7th.
Call  738-6732  after 6 p.m.	
DOST — GLASSES, brown frames,
approx. Sept. 30. Phone WA 2-
8806.
REWARD FOR LOST EC 200 Text,
"Intro, to Economics", white cov-
er(?), around BU 2244, Tuesday.
Phone  Hugh,  WA 2-6487.	
LOST — MEN'S BLACK HORNED
Rim Glasses within last few weeks.
Phone  Wayne,   224-9794.	
FOUND — LADIES' Black Gloves
by Library Thursday, 9.30 a.m.
Call at Advertising Office, Ubys-
sey, Brock Hall.	
FOUND — BROWN KEY CASE in
Bu. Annex Thursday morning.
Contact Advert. Office, Ubyssey,
Brock Hall.
Special Notices
13
FORESTER'S HARD TIME "UN-
dercut" Dance Oct. 15 PNE Show-
mart Bldg. 8:00 p.m. Buses from
Residences.   All   students   Invited.
ONLY BEVEN MONTH TO GRADU-
atlon. Next Tear's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office.
PERSONS INTERESTED IN POET-
ry, to work on the staff of Talon.
CA  4-4785. 	
DID YOU SEE THE ACCIDENT
at University and Acadia Road on
the morning of October the sixth?
If so please phone Dan (after 6
p.m.) at AM 1-3538.	
DANCE TO THE SHOWMEN AT
Totem Park, Fri. Oct. 15, 9:00-1:00,
50c, AM£ Cards only	
SPECIAL COLLEGE RATE subscriptions for Playboy Magazine,
1 yr. $6.50, 2 yrs. $12.00, 3 yrs.
$16.50. Call Fred,  RE 8-4504.
CURLERS WANTED! 3 mixed or
mens' rinks needed for Friday
nights at 6.15 p.m. Individuals
accepted. Call Soren at 733-1713 or
John at 261-6479
REMEMBER! Campus A-Go-Go is
swinging tomorrow nite in the
Armouries! Tickets AMS or at door
Transportation
14
RIDE OR CARPOOL WANTED from
45th and Arbutus, 8.30 or 9.30,
Monday through Friday. AM 6-8114
RIDE WANTED, 41st and Marguer
ite, MWF 9.30, TTh 8.30. Phone
Heather,  263-3320. 	
RIDE WANTED for two: for Tues.
Wed. evenings only, 10 or 10.30,
to vicinity 41st and Cambie. 321-
9239  (Mary) or 327-3862  (Marilyn).
RIDE WANTED from 25th and
MacKenzie, 8.30 Mon. Wed. Fri
RE  6-0968.
DRIVER WANTED for Carpool in
area of 25th and Cypress Street.
Phone 733-4620.
HELP! NEED RIDE, 2 people, MWF
8.30, TT 9.30. 14th Ave. West Van.
Phone  926-2677.
AUTOMOTIVE  8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sal*
21
'54 METROPOLITAN NASH, good
condition, $300 or offer. Phone
WA 2-8336.  .
•56   HILLMAN   HDTP.,    radio   and
heater. $225'. CA 4-7101.	
'56 RAMBLER — A.T. six cyl.,
radio, pulmanized. Looks and runs
great. WA 2-6846.
1953 BUICK, A-l shape, 2-door hardtop, radio. Must be seen to be
appreciated.   431-2341   or   431-2636.
'53 METEOR, $250, A-l mechanically
good tires, radio, 1-owner. Phone
Terry, 224-9819.	
59 VW, good condition, 59,000 m.
6E25 President's Row, Acadia $725,
any  time.	
SCRAPPING '50 MORRIS MINOR,
still running, as is or parts, many
near new.  224-7952.
Scandals
39A
OH, DO THEY SWING! THE A -
GO - GO GIRLS THIS SAT. NITE
AT CAMPUS A GO   -  GO!
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters fe Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, fM
up. Also Typewriter repair* at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone KB
1-1322.
Typing
43
STUDENTS—Typing done my home.
Essays, reports, etc. Low rates.
Please phone 261-2996.
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK Reviews,
Ardale Griffiths Limited, 70th and
Granville. Phone 263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
ARMSTRONG & REA
L
#K%
Overseas Auto Parts
12th and ALMA
NOW OPEN FRIDAY
NITES TIL 9
Complete Stock of Sports Car Accessories, including:
VOLKSWAGON, MUSTANG and  CORVAIR
10% Off with AMS Card
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,   701  Beach.
INSTRUCTION
Dancing
62
LEARN HOW TO JERK! SWIM!
FRUG! FROM THE A-GO-GO
GIRLS THIS SAT. NITE AT
CAMPTJS A GO - GO!	
Music
63
PIANO TEACHER REQUIRES STU-
dents, beginners or advanced, near
10th   &   Alma.    Ph.   736-7064.
PIANO TEACHER requires Students, Kerrisdale or University
area. Reasonable rates. Phone 266-
8778 after; 6 p.m.	
Tutoring
64
HONORS STUDENT WILL TUTOR
First Year English or Theatre
AM  3-6784  after 6 p.m.	
Tutors Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR MATH 120.
Phone Anne, AM 1-8450  evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most Useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 76 cents.
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 16-45 lbs. From $7.60.
FA  1-1776 and AM 6-2869.	
MICROSCOPE WITH CASE, slides
and two opticals. Up to 900X.
Phone 277-8507 on Saturday, ask
for Brian.
FOR SALE — One trial refractor
set by American Optical Co. —
approx. 200 lenses. Two only radiation meters. Satellite Electronics
Co., 985 Howe St., Van. 1, B.C.
Phone MU 3-0035.
Rooms
81
ROOMS FOR RENT — 1 double, 1
single. Male students preferred.
Kitsilano. Phone after 3.30 p.m.
RE   3-3678.
'52 CHEV., '54 motor, new front
tires, r & h w.w., $200, or best
offer.  Phone Don,  FA 7-5000.
ULTIMATE! IN A TO B Transport,
'53 Austin, $126, or best offer.
Also parts. 922-6872.
SINGLE ROOM, for male student,
kitchen privileges, sharing frig.,
entrance, washroom. Non-smoker.
Phone RE 3-8778.
SINGLE ROOM for Male Student in
quiet home, kitchen privileges,
terms arranged. 4453 West 12th.
WANTED — Grad or Senior student to share one bedroom apt.
Call Bob; 681-0894
HOUSE — Student run, Kits. Wtd.
2 occupants, female pref. Share
duties.  RE  3-5224. ■	
Board & Room
82
EXCELLENT BOARD & ROOM,
laundry, car pool. Male student,
$85. See Grant at 1 o'clock Friday
in Phys. Soc. or phone AM 6-0162.
Furnished Houses & Apts.     83
MALE STUDENT needed to share
housekeeping suite. 2582 W. 5th
Ave.  738-7988. 	
Real Estate      86
THERE WILL BE 25,000 SQ. FT.
OF FLOOR SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR YOU TO DANCE ON AT
CAMPUS A-GO-GO! THIS
SAT.   NITE   —  ARMOURIES!
Icuwood
SPORTCOAT
FOR    RELAXED    LIVING
Clinton's sportscoats and relaxed living
go together. Eye-catching and casual .' . .
yet elegant and  distinctive.
Corduroys  in   six shades.
Blazers in a rainbow of colors as well
as the widest range possible of Saxonies
and light tweeds. Sizes from 34 short-50 tal
ProgressDcand
For
Clinton's
mEtl'S WEAR
Clothing  for campus and  dress-up  occasions
742 Granville MU   1-5625

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