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The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1987

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the Ubyssey
T-BIRDS DEFEND NATIONAL honor against America's best. And win.
Coalition demands
abortion clinics
By Mike Gordon
VANCOUVER (CUP) —
They're expecting police arrests
and attempted closure by the government, but a coalition of B.C.
groups is determined to open the
province's first free-standing
abortion clinic.
The broad-based B.C. Coalition for Abortion Clinics is part of
a national campaign to de-criminalize abortion, and establish clinics throughout B.C. and Canada to
provide safe, supportive and accessible abortion services to
women.
Coalition organizers say the
Vancouver-based clinic is long-
awaited, as many pregnant
women seeking an abortion are
dangerously delayed by hospital
boards caught up in red tape.
"This is a matter of safe,
adequate medical services that
women are entitled to have? Vancouver city councillor, Libby Davies, told a recent press conference.
"A women's right to safe abortion is part of that fundamental
right to medical care? she said.
Only 250 out of Canada's 860
accredited hospitals have therapeutic abortion committees, while
in B.C. the ratio is 38 out of 115,
according to Pat Brighouse of
Concerned Citizens for Choice on
Abortion.
"Meanwhile, those that do
provide services are constantly
under attack? she said. "Governments waste our money prosecuting staff of free-standing clinics."
"It is not the right of the state
to deny women freedom of choice?
said United Church minister,
Linda Ervin.
"Women have the right to
make choices for their own bodies? she said, adding that the
church and community have a
responsibility to provide support
for women who have an abortion.
From the University of British
Columbia Students for Choice, to
the Brotherhood of Carpenters
and Joiners, coalition members
say Canada is facing a crisis in
access to safe and legal abortions,
especially for native women, immigrants, and those living outside
urban centres where abortion
centres are most often located.
Brighouse said no abortions
were performed in Prince Edward
Island between 1982 and 1985,
according to Statistics Canada
figures, and that in Saskatchewan, women have to go to
Saskatoon to even be considered.
The result, say coalition
members, is either unwanted
pregnancies, costly trips to the
U.S. for an abortion, or unsafe and
traumatic experiences in B.C.
According to Eileen Jarrett of
Canadian Abortion Rights Action
League ,82 per cent of abortions in
the U.S. are performed at free-
standing clinics, and 50 per cent
are done at eight weeks of pregnancy or less.
In Canada, she says, only 25
per cent of abortions are done at
eight weeks or less.
Instead of the constant battle
to establish fair, non-partisan
hospital boards, the coalition has
shifted its focus to pushing for
legal, government-supported freestanding clinics.
Not only will the clinics provide cheaper, safer and more
humane services, they say, but
will directly challenge the illegality of abortion.
"The public really doesn't
have control of who sits on those
(hospital) committees? said Maggie Thompson, BCCAC coordinator. "That is not a fair or representative system? she said, adding
that the Vancouver clinic will be
abl e to serve a much broader range
of women.
"Right now there is a three-
week delay at VGH (Vancouver
General Hospital), and we've just
lost Richmond General? said
BCCAC coordinator, Jackie Ainsworth.
The new clinic, which is to be
announced a day prior to being
opened, will also offer counselling
and reference services, eventually
covered under the provincial
health plan.
"We are expecting stiff opposition from the Vander Zalm government? said Thompson, adding
that premier Bill Vander Zalm has
already said he will shut the clinic
down, and that part of the
coalition's fundraising goals is
creating a defense fund for arrested clinic workers and supporters.
"In the community we call on
people to defend the clinic and
keep it open? she said.
Thompson said a May 1987
Omnibus poll undertaken by B.C.
Television reports that 87 per cent
of roughly 900 people asked support a woman's choice for abortion,
and 51 per cent support a freestanding clinic.
"We want to turn the pro-
choice support in the province into
pro-clinic? said CARAL's Jarrett.
After rush
president resigns
By Corinne Bjorge
and Ross McLaren
The UBC fraternity
community's anger at the Kappa
Sigma's handling of rush functions has led to the resignation of
the Inter Fraternity Council president and a fine of $248 levied
against the Kappa Sigma fraternity.
The Kappa Sigma fraternity
was charged by the IFC with holding a rush function east of Oak
Street and providing professional
entertainment at a rush function.
Problems began for the Kappa
Sigma fraternity after they chartered a cruise boat for the last of
three rush functions.
The cruise ship docked east of
Oak Street violating the rush
constitution which prohibits rush
functions east of Oak Street.
The location rules were written for the purposes of cross rushing to allow fraternity pledges to
attend two fraternity functions
during an evening before making a
final choice.
IFC president Carey Wong
resigned because it was his fraternity that was charged.
But Wong said he did not feel
that being a member of the Kappa
Sigma fraternity had biased his
decision making in IFC.
Wong said he felt pressured
by the IFC to resign from his position because the other members
were mad at the Kappa Sigmas.
But he said an underlying reason
for the anger was the large number of Kappa Sigma pledges.
"Since I'm the biggest figurehead for my fraternity they (IFC)
wanted my head to roll. Somebody
had to pay for us having a large
pledge class? said Wong.
Delta Kappa Epsilon
president Jamie Delmotte said
Wong took a fall for the (Kappa
Sigma) fraternity to a certain
degree but said Wong had also lost
his credibility with IFC.
"He should have been more
decisive? said Delmotte. "He obviously knew what they were doing
one or two weeks before (the final
rush), and didn't bring it up to
IFC? said Delmotte.
But Wong said he wasn't
aware of the Kappa Sigma rush
plans until a week before the
event, and brought them up at the
first IFC meeting possible, on
see page 6 Fraternity
photo steve chan
Fraternity
wants
change
The recent ousting of Inter
Fraternity Council president
Carey Wong and the fine dealt out
to the Kappa Sigma fraternity
may bring some positive change to
the council, according to some fraternity members.
"It has changed the role of
IFC? said Kappa Sigma member
Mike Doyle. "It was often a mockery. We need a body to regulate
and to make (the fraternities)
equitable? said Doyle.
And one way to make IFC
stronger is through a carefully
written constitution he said.
"The (current) constitution is
poorly laid out in a sense? said
Doyle. "In some cases it specifies a
penalty, and when there is nothing specified, the judiciary
committee has to decide," he said.
Kappa Sigma member Carey
Wong said a new constitution is
needed "so there won't be people
trying to use loopholes to prosecute the fraternities and the fraternities won't try to find loopholes
to get through the system."
The fraternities at UBC are
currently not official members of
the North American fraternity
association (the National Inter-
fraternity Council). Wong said
that by adopting the NIC
constitution and setting up a fraternity alumnus, UBC will develop closer ties to NIC. It would
make IFC "more professional?
said Wong.
Wong also said a new
constitution wouldmean "committing ourselves to sticking to (the
constitution) to a Tee." There
would be "less flexibility," he said.
But the adoption of the American constitution might pose some
problems.
"There are striking differences between the fraternity system here and the fraternity system in the States," said Sigma Chi
president David Lucescu.
Lucescu said the constitution
must be examined carefuly. "The
adoption of it is not a routine
thing," he said.
Volume 70, Number 13
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, October 20,1987 IHOT
I FLASHES
PUBLIC
SPEAKING
Improve your PUBLIC SPEAKING and LEADERSHIP skills in a
fun environment with W.E.S.T.,
the newest West End TOAST-
MASTERS Club. We are located
at the Gordon neighborhood
House, 10119 Broughton St., in
the heart of the West End. Come to
a demonstration meeting on Tuesday, October 20th at 7:30 p.m. For
more information, call Axel at 684-
7117 or Katalina at 228-1826.
GUATEMALAN
CHILDREN'S
DANCE
GROUP
Los Patajos, A childrens dance
group from guatemala perform at
Lutheran Campus Centre, Wed.
Oct 21st; 6:00 p.m. Food, music,
storytelling. All welcome. Sponsored by United Church Campus
Ministry.
MUSICIANS
WANTED
MUSICIANS WANTED. Do you
play an instrument: Expand your
horizons and come and play in
Capilano College Symphony, a
group of amateurs & beginning
professionals. Strings are most
needed, also the Lower wood
winds. Rehearsals Tuesdays at
7:30 p.m. at Capilano College, just
across 2nd narrows Bridge. For
more information, contact Karl
Kobylansky, Music Dep't., Capilano College.
UBYSSEY STAFF
The UBYSSEY Staff will be discussing editorial structure at our
general staff meeting on Wednesday at 12:30, SUB 241k. BE
THERE!
THE CLASSIFIEDS
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MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:00 a.m. on the day before
publication. Publications Room 266, S.U.B.,
UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A7
05-COMING EVENTS
50-RENTALS
WEN-DO UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE, once
again sponsors Women's Self-Defense
classes; beginning Tues. Oct. 20 and Wed.
Oct. 21 thru to end of Nov. 5:30-7:30 p.m.,
S20 students, $30 non-students. Registration at women's Students Office, Rm. 203,
Brock Hall.
St. Anselm's Anglican church
University Blvd.
(across from Golf course)
Sunday Evening Oct 25 7:30 p.m.
CHORAL EVENSONG
A Quiet, Reflective, Renewing time
to begin the next week
10-F0R SALE COMMERCIAL
HELSINKI METHOD. Hair regrowth
100%. Money back guarantee 271-3207.
11-FOR SALE PRIVATE	
FOR SALE - 1 lined winter weight denim
jacket, white fringe, brand new $150 will sell
$75 681-7456/737-8351
HEINTZMAN PIANO type O, asking
$4000™. Plain upright, walnut. Good condition. Call 536-3172
HONDA HAWK2 1979 Lady driven, good
condition, low km. $750 OBO. Leave message at 266-7386, Phyllis.
MAPLE SYRUP FROM QUEBEC - perfect
for Xmas gifts - $15.™ a litre; See Bob, room
356, chemistry bldg; 228-2592
20-HOUSING
! UBC CAMPUS - 2bd. bright and spacious
I apt. to share. Modern furnishing; California
I style living. Ideal for clean, active, friendly,
resp. non-smoker,   available Nov. 1, $375.
Daryl 228-1867
KITS BEACH HOUSE share 1/3. Very
clean. Rent $400.0B. Call Brad 685-6521
days or 733-1856 eves.
30-JOBS	
P/T EXPERIENCED Sandwich maker &
cashier required between 11:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Apply in person between 3-5 p.m. at the
Delly- SUB lower level.
WORK WITH GREENPEACE to preserve
the planet through non violent action. Pos.
avail, on our Outreach/Canvass staff. PT &
FT Eves. Cate 736-0321.
ARC UNDERGRAD
LITERARY
MAGAZINE
Arc Undergrad Literary Magazine
is holding a contest. They're looking for essays, short stories, poetry
and artwork on the theme of "The
City." Prizes of $100, $50 and $25
will be awarded. Submit with a
self-addressed stamped envelope
to the ARC letterbox in Buchanan
tower, Room 397.
3510ST
WHITE SKI JACKET Sept. 21,1:10 p.m. in
Angus girls' washroom, main floor. Has
Velcro front opening. Phone: 274-4217. Reward if found.
REWARD forlost burgundy leather wallet.
All Que. ID's and addresses. Please call
Alison at 734-3336.
50-RENTALS     	
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS - 255-
7342. We rent IBM PC and compatibles. All
types of printers, daily, weekly, or monthly
rentals.
Tops^
sm    -<<-°
CiTR Mobile Sound
228-3017'SUB Rm 233
TODAY
80-TUTORING
TUTORING GERMAN with native
speaker. Professional Translator. Andrea
875-8654
85-TYPING
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE
SERVICE, essays & resumes, scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425
ACCURATE REPORTS. Broadway and
Granville. 732-4426. Student rates available.
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 - W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351. Experienced and accurate; student rates available.
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING, 201-636
W. Broadway (Micom & IBM PC), $1.50
($1.75/pg. for Laser print) dble. spaced text.
Equations & Tables: $14/hr. Photocopying.
876-5333. Visa/Master.
WORD PROCESSING, Mac Plus, Editing.
Experienced, accurate. Call Jack, 224-0486
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
Write, We Type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, Eves., Wknds. 736-1208.
WORDPOWER - Word processing- I.B.M. &
Macintosh laser printouts. Student discounts. 222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 yrs. exp.
Word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Laser & letter quality printers.
10th & Discovery 222-2122.	
FIRST-CLASS TYPIST-EDITOR ready at
all times. English, French, German. Translations.  IBM Selectric.  876-5769
TYPING, QUICK, BY UBC - $1.25 page all
kinds. Rob 228-8989 anytime.
ESSAYS EDITING and typing, freelance
writer and ex-executive secretary will edit
and type essays for a perfect presentation.
Louise 921-8735.
STAR SECRETARIAL SERVICES, professional word processing. Phone Alfie 299-
3061.
WORD WEIVERS still on 41st Bus line.
New location #101 -2258 w. 41 st Ave. at Yew
St. Excellent student rates for quality, custom word processing, Aussi en Francais.
Tele. 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE, RELIABLE typing of
essays, term papers, thesis. SI.25 per page.
872-8449
AMNESTY U.B.C. Oct 19-23rd.   Amnesty
International Week - letterwriting table.
11:30-1:30. SUB Concourse.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB Organ
izational Meeting for the New MAC
chapter. Noon. HEBB 10.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB ATARI
Meeting - "Andre won't Byte", "New
members Welcome." Noon. SCARFE 1021
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB AMIGA
Meeting - "New AMIGOS welcome."
NOON. SUB 111
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore meeting - "Desperately
seeking new members!!" Noon. HEBB 10.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB  IBM
meeting - "Hacking into WATO" "Stephen
welcomes new Hackers." Noon. SUB 211.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE General Meeting providing information about planned events
and seeking members' suggestions. Noon.
SUB #205.
A. GORA EBRAHIM, Secretary for Foreign
Affairs, Pan Africanist Congress (PAC)
speaks on struggle in S. Africa. Noon
(12:30 p.m.). Buchanan A 203.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Falafel Lunch w/Israeli Consul to Toronto.
12:30. Hillel House.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome. Noon. Lutheran Campus Centre
PRE - MEDICAL SOCIETY Lecture on
psychiatry by Dr. Yorkston. 12:30-1:20.
IRC; WOOD #1.
EAST INDIANS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Meeting to discuss Samosa Nite & other
concerns. Noon. BUCH. B221.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT Co-op
Supper. 6:00 p.m. Lutheran Campus
Centre.
EAST INDIANS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Samosa Nite: Everyone Welcome. 6:00 -
9:00 p.m. Main Gage Lounge.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Philosophic conversation: "Philosophy of
Art." 7-10 p.m. Grad Center Lounge.
KER WORD PROCESSING SERVICE.
Using IBM-XT with WordPerfect. #1-1581
E. 10th Ave. Call Kerry 876-2895.
ECONOTYPE TYPEING & WORDPRO-
CESSING Special Student Rates; 7 Days a
week.  Kitsilano. Leave Mssg. 736-1442
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1987 AUTUMN LECTURES
DR. E. ARTHUR BELL
An outstanding plant biochemist and world-renowned botanist, Professor Bell is Director
of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, England. A man of vision and an active researcher,
he emphasizes the necessity of botanic gardens for the collection and housing of economically and scientifically important plant species.
THE PLANT SCIENCES AND MEDICINE
Thursday, October 22 In Hall 4, Woodward IRC Building, at 12:30 PM
BOTANY AND THE SURVIVAL OF MANKIND
Saturday, October 24 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 PM (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
WEDNESDAY
THE UBYSSEY presents a newswriting
seminar with Kim Bolan, Vancouver SUN
reporter. 3:30 - SUB 241k.
THE UBYSSEY staff meeting.  12:30.  SUB
241k.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOC. General Meet
ing. 12:30 p.m. BUCH. B223.
BAHAI CLUB general meeting/social.
12:30/noon. SUB 119.
READING by Canadian poet Bill Bissett.
Admission Free. 12:30. Buchanan Al02.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH Brown
Bag Seminar Series.  Seminar on "The
Marketing of Canadian Technologies in
the Developing Countries in Southeast
Asia: by Dr. C. L. Hung, Univ. of Calgary.
12:30 p.m. Asian Centre, Room 604 (all
welcome, free admission)
UBC ARCHERY Practice.  7:30 p.m. SUB
Ballroom.
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY Entertainment -
Fireside Lounge Grad Center. 8:30.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB IBM.
meeting. "Hacking into the K.G.B." "New
Comrades Welcome" 11:30-12:30. SUB
111
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP  Lecture
on Insecurity by Pastor Edwin Kong.
Noon. SCARFE 209
UBC SCHOOL OF NURSING  lecture:  Dr.
Joy Calkin on "Is The Current Illness Care
System in your Best interest"7"
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS FOR TECHNICAL
EXPERIENCE (IAESTE)   information
Meeting for students of Engineering, the
Sciences, and some related fields who are
interested in working overseas.  12:30 to
1:30 p.m.  CEME Building, Room 1204
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hebrew Class.   Noon.   Hillel House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL.
Hot Lunch w/Live Classical Music.  12:30.
Hillel House.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB Public
Lecture: "Poise Under Pressure" with
guest speaker Grant Clark. Noon.
BUCHANAN B225
U.B.C.  ENTREPRENEURS. Seminar:
Preparing a Business Plan. 12:30.  Henry
Angus Rm. 425.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY Field Trip To
UBC Hospital. 12:30-2:15. Meet at IRC;
Room G-30 (Please be early).
UBC STAMP CLUB Canada at Face Sale
and unveiling of club list. UBC Noon.
International House, Boardroom.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY Life in a community
Dental Clinic. Mr Ian Ross administrator
R.E.A.C.H. Dental Clinic. 12:30 p.m.
Woodward (I.R.C.) 5
CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVE UBC reminder of
our weekly discussion. Noon. SCARFE
204.
U.B.C. PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
APPLE meeting. "William says...Adults
only" "New members welcome." Noon.
SUB 215
U.B.C. SCHOOL OF NURSING Annual
Marion Woodward Lecture. 8 p.m.
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
Lecture theatre #2.
The UBYSSEY announces its annua!
Hallowe'en
Ghost-Writing,
Graphic & Photo Contest
Share from your anxiety closet
your deepest, vilest fears
in a
typed,
double-spaced,
exposition
of about 1500 words.
Drop off by 12 noon, Oct. 28
at SUB 241k
Secret PRIZES awarded
in each category
10% OFF
WITH THIS ADD
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Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 20,1987 THE CPAX BUILDING was torn down earlier this week
dan andrewi photo
Medina blasts bias
Journalist searches for
By llona Biro
Well known CBC reporter and
foreign correspondent Ann Medina spoke on the dangers of advocacy journalism and her experiences as a female correspondent in
Lebanon in a talk held at International House Thursday afternoon.
A packed house of about 200
people listened to Medina say the
latent power that journalists possess in reporting events could have
dire consequences if used to promote some goal.
"It scares me - if reporters
could begin to use their power to
influence events... I don't want to
start using that power. I think it
could be very dangerous and difficult to stop," said Medina.
Medina said her role as a reporter is not to save lives, wage
war, or to make peace - but to be as
faithful to the facts as possible and
to learn to accept the consequences of reporting as a fact of
professional life.
The best way, as a woman, as a
person, as a reporter, that I can
report, is simply to have the power
to report to you the facts, and noth
ing more. I hope I have that power,
but I hope no one gives me anymore? said Medina.
American-born Medina said
"the CBC is terrific -1 am staying
in Canada? and said CBC journalists are easily among the best in
their field. She credited her former bosses at the CBC with "giving us the freedom to be reporters", and criticized the American
networks for telling their correspondents what to report on.
Medina was careful responding to questions regarding possible sexist hiring policies at the
CBC. Although there have been
highly publicized dismissals of
some top female reporters in recent years, Medina said she
doesn't believe this to be proof of
discrimination.
The heads of the CBC are
justifiably concerned with viewer
approval said Medina, but often
end up misjudging their audience
by pulling the very faces that the
viewers relate to best.
Medina also spoke on the
reporting style she became known
for as a foreign correspondent.
style
Medina said she took a certain
amount of criticism from her male
colleagues for her people-oriented
reporting style of the events taking place in Lebanon.
"What I wanted to do with my
stories was to get at something
that would put the headlines into
context? she said.
Medina said she is happy that
adding a human angle has become
a more common way of reporting
conflicts in recent years, and said
"there is nothing that should cause
my reporting as a woman to differ
from that of a man's".
On being a female reporter in
the Middle East, she said "sometimes people don't take you seriously enough", but that often this
allowed her to be more strident in
her questioning than perhaps a
man could be.
Medina's speech was titled
"Women and Power, A Reporter's
Perspective". The talk was part of
the day-long series "An Uncommon Wealth of Women", sponsored by the UBC Office for
Women Students and the Lion and
Thea Koerner Foundation.
No more meat wagon
UEL to lose ambulance service
By Rick Hiebert
UBC's ambulance service is
being taken out of the hands of the
University Endowment Lands fire
department next spring, a move
that will result in better emergency service, said the regional
manager of the provincial ambulance service.
The transfer of the service to
the provincial body next March 31
will mean that more qualified full-
time ambulance personnel
operate the ambulances, said
Terry Reed.
"The UEL fire department
has done an excellent job, but the
firefighters have had the same
qualifications as part time ambulance personnel? said Reed.
"Years ago under the old philosophy, firefighting and pre-hos-
pital care could be done effectively
by the same people, but now you're
dealing with two different, highly
specialized fields." said Reed.
"We felt it was in the best
interest of the people out there
that we take over. Emergency
Health has the mandate to provide
pre-hospital care for all of B.C."
said Reed.
"It's time that the people in the
UEL got the same level of service
as the rest of Vancouver? said
Reed.
The UEL fire department, said
fire chief Wilf Ferguson, is not
entirely displeased with the transfer.
"We're going to end up with a
better qualified crew to man the
ambulance, a better crew than we
ourselves can supply at this time,"
Ferguson said.
"I think that after 15 years (of
operating the ambulance), you
could say we've done a reasonable
job in this area? he added.
The new crew, said Reed, will
probably operate out of the UBC
hospital.
PRACTICING HALLOWEEN TACTICS at UBC's smallest classroom has
become a fashionable trend. Students have been seen leaving the building
{with stuffed back packs.
dan andrews photo
October 20, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 The
MO
-C/Von/c/i
ron/c/es-
M/i/vafl
Easf Indian
Interaction
Although an executive wasn't
formed until after Clubs' Days,
there is indeed a club on campus
promoting social and cultural
interaction between all East Indian  students. Watch for club
CLUBS
notices around campus and in
"Between Classes" column in The
Ubyssey. General Meetings are1
usually held on Thursdays at
12:30. Locations will be announced.
FranK Knew the slightest noise
m\qV>+ triggfer the. restless herd.
DONALD.   SUTHERLAND    AS
INI
THE WOLF AT THE DOOR
"The vibrant over-extended passions of Gauguin
rage... fine performances by Sutherland and
Von Sydow" -la times
"Donald Sutherland is never less than brilliant"
-MOVIELINE
"Lively as well as intelligent... a succession of
witty and ribald scenes" -women's wear dail_
"The acting is uniformly terrific"    -la daily news
"Mr. Sutherland gives his all and that's a lot, a sensitively shadowed
portrait..!' -Walter Goodman, NY TIMES
"Donald Sutherland's performance is of Academy nomination caliber...
a gem of a film" -mcnaught syndicate
"Donald Sutherland gives one of the best performances of his career"
-Jeffrey Lyons, SNEAK PREVIEW/INN
IXJNAIJ) SUTHERLAND ix'THK WOLF AT THE DOOR"
JEAN WJNE   S()E1E GRAB. )EI,   Grll'lA \"()ERBY   MERETE VOLDSTEDLUND \m» FANNY BASTIEN
JOERGEN REENBERG    HENRIK LARSEN    IA IS REGO    un M.AX VON SYDOW asstkimibkkc
!?'li?I;l?i?!' \iik\el saijOMo.n   *-m'NI'^ Christopher hampton
s™ bv JEAN-CLAUDE CARRIEKE x HENNING CARLSEN    Ml ? ROGER BOURIAND     PRniS[»i'v HENNING CARLSEN
CONSTITUENCIES
Phys. Ed. offers fun time
and fantastic T-shirts
It's nearly here: Physical
Education's Mid-Term Blow Out
Dance, Saturday, October 24 at
the Grad Centre. Tickets are
$5.00 and will be on sale from
12:30 to 1:30 in the SUB Concourse lobby and War Memorial
lobby Monday 19 to Friday 23.
Only 400 tickets are to be sold so
don't procrastinate. Tickets will
be available at the door (possibly)
for those who want to come early.
A note to all sports fans:
Physical Education will be selling
U.B.C. "Thunderbooster" T-
shirts. The Thunderbooster is
guaranteed to boost the spirit of all
sports fans. Support U.B.C. athletics and buy your T-shirt at any
U.B.C. sporting event. HELP
SPREAD THE SPIRIT!
,R FILM PRODI <T I US:i
\L-_^-wi\:-i
W'i'lMWi  h'MAI \l\kkKTIV; Kf-'I.K \SK
Subject to
Classification
OPENS ON OCTOBER 23rd AT THE BAY THEATRE
' m A
/proposed
■_-£_JJ»?^—■,
I „-	
■ i i
hair and suntanning co.
20 SESSIONS - $69
Wolff system
(On Regular Beds)
5784 University Blvd.
| (in UBC Village) 1/2 Blk. away
■ WITH THIS AD
224-1922 or 9116
Exp. Nov. 30/87 [
(Buy Now-Use Later)j
AQUA SOCIETY
UNDERWATER
PUMPKIN
CARVING
CONTEST
October 24 Saturday
2:00 p.m. at Jericho Beach
Awards and Dance Afterwards
$2.00/person (Buddy Teams)
FIRST PRIZE: 2 New Regulators
For More Info: 228-3329 or
Drop in at THE AQUASOC SHOP
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 20,1987 Universities Week: Administrators wave
hot weenies but students left in the cold
Ottawa (CUP) — It's time for the
hard sell again as university P.R.
departments wind up for National
Universities Week, and once again
students are being left on the sidelines.
"It's a university celebration,"
said Dr. Kenneth Ozmon, co-chair
of the National Universities Week
programme and president of St.
Mary's University in Halifax.
"We're not trying to get involved in
student or faculty issues specifically. It's not a political activist
type of event, so that's why students take less of an interest."
This is the third time the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada (AUCC) has
organized the Week, which is set
for October 23 to November 1. The
two previous Weeks, held in 1983
and 1985, were criticized for not
involving students enough in the
planning and the events.
Ozman said that students
were involved in planning the
Week this year through the participation of the Canadian Federation of Students.
But CFS Information Officer
Catherine Louli claims CFS "had
only minimal involvement in the
planning of National Universities
Week." She said CFS will be a
participant in the Week, "but a
minimal participant."
In Fact, Louli questions
whether students have any cause
for celebration, considering government underfunding of universities, accessibility problems,
overcrowding and high tuition
fees.
"My question is, if students
were involved in the Week, would
they be calling it a celebration?"
said Louli.
Louli added however that the
CFS Policy Manual encourages its
members to participate in the
Week.
"We are encouraging our locals to hold forums or debates or
whatever works. We think it's a
good thing that people will be focusing on post-secondary education? said Louli.
This year the scheduling of
the Week has also created problems. The National Forum on Post
Secondary Education in Saskatoon is set for October 25 to 28 —
right in the middle of National
Universities Week.
"In some ways (the overlap of
the Forum and the Week) will be
beneficial. On the other hand it
might drag a lot of people away
who would have been organizing
events on their campuses? said
Ozman.
"It has created an over-abundance of problems? said Less
McAfee, who was hired by AUCC
to coordinate a Speaker's Bureau
for the Week. "Of the 31 university
presidents who offered to participate in the Bureau, 25 are going to
the Forum?
McAfee said the presidents
are being booked by such community clubs as Rotary and Kiwanis
but that student response to the
project has been weak.
The Week is being marketed
heavily by AUCC through glossy
inserts    in    Maclean's    and
L'Actualite, 30-second spots on
radio and television networks, and
print advertisements and fillers in
major daily newspapers and other
national publications.
Public Relations departments
at the different campuses are expected to organize specific events
during the Week, while AUCC will
host the official launching in Ottawa on October 23.
But the emphasis seems to be
on improving relations between
the community and the administration, rather than students.
Ozman said St. Mary's University
invites community members to
attend classes during the Week
and Hosts a "Block Party" for
people who live near the university.
"We have hotdogs and hamburgers and people bring their
kids. We get a magic act and
clowns for the kids and my wife
and I walk around and meet the
people. It's usually a very pleasant day."
Quebec students
plan strike over
financial aid
JACKIE DONNELLY, SINN Fein Press Officer, spoke last Friday on human rightsand the judicial system in Northern
Ireland
QUEBEC (CUP) — Quebec students willl stage a one-day strike
next November 12 to publicize
their demands for financial aid
reform.
The demands, which include
greater eligibility to financial aid
and the conversion of student
loans into bursaries, were adopted
at a special conference in Quebec
City last week.
The conference was organized
by l'Association nationale des etu-
drantes et etudiants du Quebec
(ANEEQ), the province's largest
student coalition. Delegates from
35 Quebec universities and colleges attended the three-day
event.
The main issue at the conference was student debt-load.
"I want to be a legal-aid lawyer," said Josette Cote, a delegate
for l'Universite du Quebec a Montreal. "By the time I complete my
education I will have accumulated
a debt of 15 to 20 thousand dollars.
How am I going to pay that? A
legal-aid lawyer doesn't make
much money. I want to contribute
to society and I am being penalized
for it."
According to ANEEQ members, repayment of student loans
is becoming increasingly difficult
as interest rates and student unemployment remain high. They
say replacing loans with bursaries
would actually cost less for the
government.
The major cost covered by the
government is the interest paid on
the loan while students are still in
school. Students only begin to pay
back six to eight months after leaving school.
"It costs the government 40
cents in interest when it lends a
dollar to a student? said ANEEQ
executive Jean-Pierre Paquet. "If
the student remains in school
longer than three years, the cost of
the interest rises until it actually
costs the government 80 cents to
lend a student one dollar?
Paquet said that the amount
paid by the government is even
higher when administrative costs
and the expenses needed to recover the loans are added.
Not all delegates agreed with
the demand to replace loans with
bursaries.
"Our executive instructed us
to vote against (the proposal) because they believe the demands
are unrealistic? said Josee
Lapointe of Maisonneuve College.
"They don't think the government
will ever give it to us because it's
asking for too much."
Other proposals, accepted
unanimously, included allowing
part-time students to receive financial aid, making the loans and
bursaries system more accessible,
reducing the assumed level of
spousal and parental contributions, and allowing students who
live on their own to be granted
independent status.
Under the present system,
students living away from their
parents are not considered financially independent.
ANEEQ members say that
Claude Ryan, the Quebec education minister, is preparing a complete overhaul of the financial aid
system. Delegates agreed that the
province-wide student strike
would be necessary to force Ryan
to consult students and set a deadline for the reform.
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October 20,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 Six great Reasons to
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•
Frat
fazed
after
fun
from page 1
October 5th.
"A lot of people felt I could
have stopped the boat cruise, but
I'm just one vote of fifty? he said.
"We tried to act as professional as we could. In a professional situation you can't decide on
a penalty in a hypothetical event.
We decided to wait until it happened? said Wong. But he added
that the executive "should have
issued an ultimatum" to the
Kappa Sigmas. "That was our
biggest mistake? said Wong.
But Mike Doyle, Kappa
Sigma member, maintains that
although the Kappa Sigmas may
have broken the letter of the
constitution, they did not break
the spirit.
For purposes of cross rushing,
the fraternity gave each pledge a
chance to dock and attend another
rush function, said Doyle.
And the professional entertainment rule, although it was
dismissed, should not have applied to the boat, said Doyle.
"The rule was put in by a Kappa
Sigma member during the spring
of 1982 to keep strippers out of
rush. It used to be a common fact?
said Doyle.
But some fraternity members
feel the rule about professional
entertainment is also to guard
against 'upping the anti' in the
rush wars according to Wong.
In that situation "whoever
has the most money can throw the
best party? said Delmotte — a
situation in which the smaller
fraternities will be hurt.
But Wong disagreed and said
the pledges have to realize they
will eventually be footing the bills
if they join an extravagent fraternity. "By the third (rush) party
they should have gotten past the
image," he said.
Sigma Chi president David
Lucescu said it was "an unfortunate event, largely beyond (Carey
Wong's) control. We have too look
at it positively and take this as a
lesson for everyone? he said
If you have ignored
our staff adds thus
far
WE WANT TO KNOW
WHY!!!
Don't you want to
Be Cool
Be Published
And
Be In The Ubyssey
SUB 241k???
Write. Or better yet
face up to your foul
deed and come
see us in person to
tell us WHY.
(warning, no excuse
is good enough!!)
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 20,1987 >    ^-tv-S^,
"    v.  \
Volleybirds win _
UBC Men bruise Bruins    ri!_■■_■
By Nancy Mior and Jeremy
Fraser
Last night the men's UBC
volleyball team hosted the UCLA
Bruins   in   a   exhibition   match
which ended with a UBC victory
after five grueling games.
Close scores of 15-12, 13-15,
15-13,11-15 and 15-6 treated the
large UBC crowd to an exciting bit
of ball.
Going into the match as the
defending 1987 N.C A.A. Champions, the Bruins did not play as well
as expected. "It looked like we
were playing our first game of the
year? said UCLA head coach Al
Scates.
UCLA's hitting squad was led
by all-American Don Dendiger
who scored an amazing 23 kills,
and was awarded the team's most
valuable player award.
Not to be outdone, the TBird's
very own Greg Williscroft responded with a stunning 26 winners, supported well by #10, Rob
Hill who also scored with eighteen
spikes.
Leading a savagely aggressive roofing team, Kelly Bukowski
rejected an incredible 11 net shots.
UBC dominated the blocking at
net, repeatedly shutting down the
Bruins power hitters. UCLA was
slow to establish effective blocking
against UBC, but later developed
more solid blocking.
While the serving of both
teams was mediocre, UBC displayed considerablv more serving"
competence than in their previous
matches with the Chinese provincial team.
The optimistic attitude of
UBC head coach Dale Ohman was
partially responsible for UBC's
victory.
"As the match progressed the
players began believing in themselves? said Ohman. "They were
not as confident when playing
China and I'm glad to see the
change."
The great array of talent displayed by the UBC men was
backed up by with Rick Kaufmann
who served as an all-round team
motivator.
The accuracy of Rob Hill's
spikes were well complemented by
the crafty tips of UBC setter John
Keleris and the power hitting of
Greg Williscroft.
Greg Williscroft summedit up
by saying, "We played cohesively
and, most importantly, as a unit?
Legendary coach Al Scates
was surprised by the level of Canadian play.
Commenting on the competition, Scates said, "It's obviously
good. They beat us didn't they?"
The Thunderbirds are willing to
take on any other American team
who may be looking for a challenge.
With the kind of support they
received from last night's receptive crowd, the TJirds must feel
that their effort is worthwhile and
aooreciated.
Kevin Hooge (11) slams one down against the UCLA Bruins in volleyball action Monday night
A tie and a win for
UBC T'Birds
women's soccer
This weekend the Thunderbird women's soccer team managed a tie and a win in action this
weekend at UBC's OJ Todd fields.
On Saturday the *Birds experienced a disappointing 2-2 tie
against the University of Washington. UBC led 2-1, on goals by
Christine Pinette and Nancy
Sutherland, going into the final
minutes. With only two seconds to
play in the game, Washington
scored.
On Sunday in Vancouver
league play the 'Birds were more
successful as they downed
Wesburn 3-2.
Goal scorers for UBC in the
game were Sheila Samtani,
Chistine Pinette, and Mitch Ring.
The win puts the 'Birds atop
the league standings.
Field hockey wins tourney
By Gloria Loree
The UBC women were victorious this weekend at the third and
final Canada West field hockey
tournament. But, the accumulative points from all three tournaments puts UBC in second place
overall - one and a half points
behind the University of Victoria.
Victoria is now guaranteed a
seed at the national tournament
and the 'Birds will likely be selected as one of the two wildcard
seeds.
UBC tied UVic 1 to 1 in the
final game and was victorious over
the Universities of Calgary, Alberta, and Manitoba.
The last match against UVic
was the climax of the tournament.
A win for the 'Birds meant UBC
would claim the Canada West
title.
The play was even and the defence superb. The two goals came
from penalty strokes. Plunkett put
in a strong stroke for UBC.
"It was a physiscal game and I
think if the strokes weren't
awarded it could have been a 0-0
game," said Plunkett.
The 'Birds blasted Calgary 3-
0 in the first game of the tournament. The first goal came off a
shot from the top of the circle that
captain Melanie Slade tipped into
the net.
During free play in the second
half, Jennifer Vanstone passed off
the ball in front of the goal to
Plunkett who then flicked it into
the net.
The third goal came from a
long corner play. Sarah
Lillkywhite drove the ball into the
circle and Vanstone tipped in the
goal.
The game against the University of Alberta was much more of a
struggle for the 'Birds who were
luckytofinish withal-0victory. A
turning point in the game came
when UBC's goalie, Darcy Vogel,
saved a penalty stroke. The UBC
team attack then picked-up and
Lillywhite tipped in a goal which
was shot by Vanstone.
Asked why her team had such
a hard time with Alberta, coach
Gail Wilson said, "Having beaten
the University of Calgary we were
expected to beat the University of
Alberta - that pressured us.
The third game was all offence for the 'Birds. They had 19
penalty corners, a number of long
corners, they hit the goalie with a
barrage of shots, smacked the post
twice, and only finished withal-0
victory.
The goal came in the second
half during a penalty corner when
Slade picked off a rebound resulting from a Laura Farres shot.
"The score could easily have
been 6-0? said Wilson.
The   UBC   team   produced   two
Canada West all-stars in Penny
Cooper and Melanie Slade.
"I was surprised, and happy,
but I feel some other players on our
team are equally deserving? said
Cooper.
UBC head coach Gail Wilson
was awarded Canada West coach
of the year honors.
"I think there are excellent
coaches in Canada West and I feel
flattered to be named coach of the
year by my peers? Wilson said.
• LOW LOW PRICES
• SUPER COPIES
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
• automatic collating
• 3 hole paper
• standard coloured paper
2nd Floor, 2174 Western Parkway
(at University Village)
Vancouver, B.C. Tel: 224-6225
Mon-Th8-9, fr»8-6, Sat-Sunll-6
AUTHOR
BE COOL
BE PUBLISHED
BE IN THE UBYSSEY
SUB 24 IK
VISITS
:<• •
A DOUBLE CELEBRATION...
of the publication of DENNIS LEE'S latest book of poetry
'THE DIFFICULTY OF LIVING ON OTHER PLANETS'
($12.95)
(light verse in the tradition, says his publisher, of Ogden Nash, James Thurber and Hillaire Belloc)
and, at last:
The paperback edition of Lee's great children's classic
ALLIGATOR PIE'
STORE
NEWS
Dennis Lee will be at the UBC BOOKSTORE
to sign copies of both books on
Wednesday, Oct. 21st, at 12:30 p.m.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd., Van., B.C. 228-4741
October 20, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 There is something about stucco...what is it? Is it the way it goes on - in a splattering,
viscous stream that recalls a child vomiting, or a some monstrous supernatural being
hacking a fleckie? Or is it the finished product itself- the jagged edges that draw blood
at the slightest touch? Just what is it about stucco anyway?
HOW CAN Yi
TRAIN TICKET?
□
Diet for a month.
Try to get sent as
a parcel.
retend you're
under 12.
Show your student
card.
The train's definitely the smart way to
travel. Even smarter these days with VIA's student
fares. Just show us your student card and you're
on your way, 1/3 richer. Have a relaxing ride. Meet
some new friends. And let the good trains roll!
For more information and reservations,
call your Travel Agent or VIA Rail. VIA's student
fares are available to full time students. Some
conditions apply regarding times and dates of travel.
Ask for details.
Next time,
choose VIA.
CLlfi.
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Corf
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ftlS *-tl
\
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\
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V
Soccer 'Birds on warpath
By Sean McLaughlin
Strong defense and crafty set
plays on the prairies enabled the
UBC men's soccer team to chalk
up victories over the Calgary Dinosaurs and the Lethbridge
Pronghorns last weekend.
The Thunderbirds defeated
Calgary 1-0 Friday and manhandled Lethbridge 3-0 Saturday. But with a record of 5-0-2
head coach Dick Mosher's 'Birds
are still one point behind the UVic
Vikings (6-0-1) in Canada West
standings.
UBC took an early lead
against Calgary when Mike
Allina made a quick turn and
tucked the ball past the
Dinosaur's keeper in the 15th
minute. The'Birds stingy defense
prevented the dogged Dinosaurs
from equalizing.
On Saturday the Lethbridge
Pronghorns had been hog-tied by
the 'Birds before the thirty minute
mark.
Steve Burns started the UBC
onslaught by sending an in-swinging corner kick into the Lethbridge
net. Seven minutes later Andy
Marden flicked a header into the
net off a long throw by Mike
Mosher.
Defender Gregor Young finished off the scoring in the 25th
minute by nodding a Steve Burns
corner kick into the Lethbridge
net.
Dick Mosher was satisfied
with his team's performance.
"All sixteen players contributed to our success on the week
end? said Mosher. "I was particularly impressed by the play of
Andy Marden and first year player
Tom Kim."
Defense is not a concern for
Mosher as his "Birds have only
allowed one goal in seven outings
against Canadian teams. However, the TBirds are having problems at the other end of the field.
"We're not finishing well from
the field? said Mosher "but our set
plays have been quite successful."
UBC plays host to the University of Alberta and Saskatchewan
this Friday and Saturday before
going head to head with the UVic
Vikings in one weeks time.
Three victories would give the
'Birds the Canada West title for
the fourth consecutive year.
UBC women's soccer team in action against the University of Washington
photo steve chan
UBC TBirds fumble football in U.S.
By Michael J. Bryant
The UBC Thunderbirds football team knew they were facing
their toughest opponent yet when
they travelled down to California
to play Chico State University on
Saturday. But the Birds turned
out to be their own worst enemy, as
they blew a 13-0 first quarter lead
to lose 37-19.
Costly fumbles and questionable refereeing led to UBC's first
loss this season, although they
remain unbeaten in Canadian
league play.
UBC fumbled the ball three
times inside their own 30 yard line
— each turnover led to a Chico
State touchdown. But the officiating may have also hurt UBC, as
one blocked punt for an apparant
touchdown was called back due to
an inadvertant whistle.
While the 'Birds passing
game appeared on track after their
lowly performance last week
against Alberta, the UBC defense
could not make up for the "Birds
offensive turnovers.
'Birds quarterback Jordan
Gagner had a great game throwing a school-record 52 pass attempts, completing 26 for 311
yards and two touchdowns.
Gagner broke the UBC record
for pass attempts that he had previously set against the same team,
Chico State, in a 1985 game. The
UBC quarterback also tied his own
record for most pass completions
(26) that he set against U of Manitoba in 1985.
The hard hitting game led to
various injuries for both-teams —
the most significant one being a
knee injury that may have ended
the season for the rugged UBC
fullback Carey Bymoen.
The 'Birds play at home on
October 24 against Manitoba in
WIFL action.
Rowing crews come
together at Burnaby Lake
By B. Wheat
This past weekend at
Burnaby Lake and Deep Cove the
UBC men's and women's crews
competed very successfully
against their biggest rowing rival,
UVic.
On Saturday at the Vancouver
Rowing Club Fall Invitational
Regatta held at Burnaby Lake, the
UBC varsity women's lightweight
eights, the varsity men's lightweight eights, the varsity men's
heavyweight eights, and the varsity women's heavyweight fours
all won their respective 3.5km
headraces. The UBC novice crews
also put in very promising performances.
On Sunday the action was
moved to Deep Cove for the grueling eight km Deep Cove Classic.
The heavyweight men came in to a
very close finish behind UVic, and
the lightweight men won in their
division. The women's JV heavyweight crew and the women's varsity lightweight crew both beat
their respective UVic women's
crews.
UBC and UVic, two of the best
collegiate crews in the country,
will meet again on October 31 and
November 1 in Victoria for the
Head of the Gorge Regatta and the
Elk Lake Fall Regatta. The Thunderbird crews will be strong favourites once again.
VKC Fall Invitational Regatta - 3.5km
Vawiitv Women's Lightweight 8*
LUBC 13:23
2. UVic 13:34
j Varsity Mon'a Lightweight B+
L UBC 11*48
_ UVic 11:56
, 3. UBC 12:20
i Varolty McnV Heavyweight 8+
: l.UBC 11=28
2. UVic 11:30
V_r_ity Women'* Heavyweight 4+
l.UBC 14:37
2. UVic 1449
S. UVic 18-01
: Deep Covv Cliwsie . £km
\ Men-8+
i 1. UVi«-A
'. 2. UVic-B
S. UBC-A
: 4. UBC-B
: 5. UVio-C
«. UBC-lwt-A
21*07
21;U
21:1T
22*22
22t31
22:39
7. Brentwood-A    23*41
. 8. UBC-lwt-B     23iS6
! ». Brentwood-lwt 24:18
: 10. BrerrtwocxMV 25:12
j »om*'( 8+
i l.UVichwt       24:38
! 2. HI.AC.hwt       25:34
i 3. UBC-hwt-JV     2&10
! 4. UViohwt-rV    2&16
; S. URC-lwt       27:32
: 6. UViolwt        2H:0_
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
October 20, 1987 Rugby lads undefeated
record threatened
By Donald Jow
On Saturday in their toughest
test so far this year, the undefeated UBC Thunderbird rugby
team beat the Kats rugby club 11 -
6 at Brockton Oval.
With Margaret Thatcher's
husband, Dennis, looking on Kats
held UBC to two tries and a penalty, the lowest offensive output
for the "Birds this year.
A penalty goal in the sixth
minute gave UBC an early 3-0
lead. Hard running and high, pressuring, kicks characterized play in
the game. UBC and the Kats
played a similar style of rugby,
utilizing all 15 players and emphasizing support around the field.
Both teams displayed aggressive rucking which earned both
teams several penalties and kicks
at the goal. Neither team could
convert their chances into points
as the kicking lacked the quality of
the running game.
The Kats scored next when a
breakdown in UBC's centres allowed the Kats to scoop up a
dropped ball. A grubber kick towards the corner flag bounced up
into winger Lee King's hands and
he ran in the try. The convert was
good and the Kats led 6-3. It was
the first time this year the 'Birds
trailed their opposition.
UBC came back to score a try
of their own two minutes later
when Terry 'Sedgehammer'
Sedgewick and Mark 'Blue Lagoon' Smith set the ball for Pierre
Duey to distribute to Evan
Scholnick for the score.
Scholnick was a standout in the
game, at times playing more like a
forward than a winger. The convert was missed and the half
ended with UBC up by a point, 7-6.
Two minutes into the second
half UBC scored again with one
swing of the ball through the backs
going 50 yards down the field, freeing Owen Walsh to score in the
corner.
The convert was missed again
but UBC had all the points they
needed to win.
The rest of the game saw
UBC's defence thwart any Kats
threat. The offence, squandered
several chances to score.
A 20 yard ramble by Jeff
'Flower' Knauer set up a swing to
the backs that saw Evan Scholnick
come across the field to loop the
backs and get knocked into touch
one yard from the try line.
That run set up the second of
four UBC scrums inside the Kats'
five yard line that all failed to earn
points for the 'Birds.
The Kats's scrum and impatience on UBC's part led to poor
offensive decisions that prevented
the score from being much higher.
Full time came with the score
unchanged, an entertaining 11-6
win for UBC.
The Kats, burdened by injury
and a lack of depth through the
club, have been unsuccessful this
year. With the return of players
such as Matt Kokan and Rob van
den Brink, they are returning to
usual form.
In second division play, the
UBC Braves escaped a scare from
the Kats with a 26-20 win while
the UBC Frosh were downing the
Meralomas 2 team. In third division, the UBC Totems lost their
fourth of nine games this season,
6-16 to the Kats.
The 'Birds take a break next
week while several players join
the BC Under-23 team to play a
touring Under-21 side from New
Zealand at Swangard Wednesday
night.
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••TV*
UBC cross-country _
runners finish stroiigly
by Myron Neville
Under good racing conditions
on Victoria's 2500 metre Beacon
Hill Park course UBC runners
placed first in the men's division
and second in the women's.
The UBC men narrowly beat
the University of Victoria in total
points 34-33. The top UBC runner
was Tom Bessai who placed fourth
in the 10,000 metre race that was
won by Scott McDonald from the
University of Alberta.
While the women's team did
not win their race, they ran well as
a team, placing second and capturing all the spots from 9th to
15th.lt was a strong showing with
Cara Hoffenden being the first
UBC runner in.
The meet was also the official
try-out for UBC team positions in
the upcoming CIAU cross-country
championships to be held later
this fall.
The UBC athletes will be competing in the Canada West cross country championships which will held
at UBC on October 24th. Top placing teams from this event will
qualify for the CIAU championship's held in Victoria on November 7th.
The men's team is made up of
Tom Bessai, Al McAndrew, Larry
Nightingale, Ken Lucks, Al Lewis,
Al Klassen, and Joel Silverman.
The women's team is comprised of Cara Haffenden, Anita
Hildebrandt, Jennifer Mawby,
Lisa Parrish, Kirsten Madsen..
Lyn Mitenko, and Carolyn
Daubeny.
The starting line for the Canada West championship is at the
fields behind Osborne Gym. Start
time for preliminary races is 11:30
am,with the women's race getting
under way at 1 pm and the men's
at 2 pm.
UBC Men's basketball
has questions to answer
By Victor Chew Wong
In the national final just eight
months ago Bruce Enns and his
amazing basketball team placed
second to the University of Brandon and ended their season with
an exclamation point. Ifyou had to
describe this year's team in punctuation terms you'd have to use
one of these:'?'.
The questions that loom over
the UBC varsity men's basketball
team this year are many. Who will
replace the scoring and leadership
of departed guards, Kevin Hanson
and Paul Johansson? Who will
step into Johansson's scoringrole?
Who will provide rebounding and
stability in the front-court? Will
they be able to duplicate last year's
inspiring performance?
The answers to these questions lie in the waitingmonths, but
here are some possibilities.
The heir to Kevin Hanson's
throne may well be the best point
guard in the nation. Look for
Perrie Scarlett, a six foot ebony
bolt of lightening, to steal balls
like a black hole steals stars from
the heavens.
The rest of the back court
players will complement Scarlett's
dashing, passing style.
Most notable is the return of
the best rookie  tandem in  the
country last year. J.D. Jackson
and Alan Lalonde are fresh from a
summer tour of duty with the
national junior team, and oh the
changes a year can make.
Jackson's holster was greased
and he's sped up the draw on his
deadly shot. With a quicker shooting release and a dose of confidence Jackson has been tearing up
practice scrimmages.
In the annual alumni game he
rose over two rooted foes and jammed the ball through with a two
hand stuffier. Jackson, if anyone,
has all the tools needed to lead the
'Birds scoring attack this year.
Lalonde is coming off an ankle
injury and is just about at the
same level he was last year.
Reg Wiebe, a defensive terror,
and rookies Chris Frye and Terry
McNamee fill out the rest of the
back court.
While the 'Birds have excellent depth at guard, the forward
position may be a little suspect
and Enns acknowledges this.
"The front line has a little
catching-up to do? says Enns.
Conspicuosly absent from the
line-up this year are forward ex-
trordinaire Aaron Point, and
highly touted John Carlson.
Carlson   ran   into   financial
problems and could not afford
another year at UBC; he was offered a more viable financial deal
from North Idaho State College
and accepted it. However, he does
promise to return to UBC.
Carlson the 'Birds can do
without, but Aaron Point's 12 rebounds and 15 points per game
will be missed.
Point cites three reasons for
not playing this year. The first is to
have surgery performed on his
ailingshins. Thesecondisalackof
desire to play competitively at the
collegiate level. And the third is to
take a year off to boost grades that
took a beating last year.
Those looking to fill Point's size
14's will be newcomers Brent
Henderson, Kevin Korol, Kevin
Parkinson, and Jason Leslie.
While they're getting used to
Enns's system, returning forwards Mike Clarke, Eric Kristiansen, and Gord Matson will
man the front court.
Ifyou ask Enns if he can repeat
last year's performance with so
many questions to be answered
and such a mish-mash of talent,
hell shoot you a devilish smile.
Then you^l think a moment and
remember that he was faced with
the same questions last September.
*
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SELTZER        presents
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OMBUDSOFFICE
Unsure of how to resolve
a University related problem?
ASK US!
WERE HERE TO
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4940 -- No. 3 Rd.
At Aldcrbridge)
273-0371
COQUITLAM/
NEW WEST
403 North Rd.
(Next to PJ.'s All Star Cafe)
936-1422
VANCOUVER/
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3328 Kingsway
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438-6122
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October 20,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Expoville...
Faaantastic!
Expoville, the land of enchantment and
fun, is about to be developed. But before the
government rushes into things, we've got a
few ideas to pass on.
The important thing in any development
is to retain a B.C. flavour. For instance, to
get that supernatural feeling, False Creek
should be dredged and cleaned. Pollution is
not part of the supernatural image. Could
we put a picture of dead fish floating upside
down on a poster?
Another ingredient is fantasy. Living as
we do in the province most out of touch with
reality, why not a theme park for Expoville.
The park could offer train rides, like Disney
Land, through an enchanted world where
education was properly funded, where hospitals had enough staff to man all the beds,
and where labor cooperated with business.
As the park was built, using products
and managers from the United States, the
press could find out that several B.C. cabinet ministers had shares in the company
building the project. Faaantastic!
The concrete, of course, would come from
Stan Hagen's ready-mix plant, and if this
was a problem the government could appoint one of its employees to investigate.
All the poor people would be located in a
special area on the east side of the park,
preferably a walled-off area (big, big, walls),
so as not to disturb the visitors.
Around the park there should be large
murals with the slogan "B.C. for sale, hurry,
hurry", and "the last bastion of capitalism,
B.C." Of course there will be price tags on all
the buildings, and maybe even the people.
Such a proposal, we believe, will result in
increased investment activity and further
cooperation between all B.C. residents.
Now that's the B.C. spirit!
Quote of the Week
"Weinberger said that 1,000 rounds of five-inch
shellshadbeen aimed at the platform. After that, Weinberger said, there was "nothing left" of the platform.
He said there was "no Iranian reaction to the
attack."
From an Associated Press story quoting Secretary
of Defence Cap Weinberger about the American attack
on an Iranian oil well.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 20,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k
of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
"O ye fooles and wicked ones', spewed Kevin Kirkwood venomously, directing his
wrath at Rick Hiebert, who cowered cowardly in a corner. Laura Busheikin, in a
fit of pique, and not being aware of what was going on around her, spat "Crush the
Pope!" "Yeah," howled Ross McLaren, anticipating bloodshed, yet more than bloodshed. Victor Wong raced through the room, running over R.D.Shore, Deanne
Fisher, and Jody Woodland in his attempt to elude the Bquealing Monster-Swine
which had suddenly reared its ugly head again. "Get a fiyswatter," drawled
Katherine Monk, passively. She was quite unperturbed by the Monster Swine.
Martin Dawes, oblivious to the swine crisis, munched on ecclesiastical eccles and
suggested nothing. His non-comment was enough to awake Chris Wiesinger, who
responded — on principle, it seemed — by stomping him viciously. Jeremy The
Pulverizer" Fraser joined in the melee, mumbling malevolently. Lisa Doyle,
appalled by all the violence and bloodshed, closed her eyes. Sean McLaughlin, who
has a tendency to run gently amok, ran gently amok. There was an air of rudimentary, yet holistic, fanaticism in the news-chamber. "Infamy!" squawked Myron
Neville, sporadically, with maximum randomness. Gloria Loree made Borne
comments on the human condition, but was duly ignored. A huge pickle suddenly
invaded the premises, but soon left. It had heard about the ferocious nature ofPat
Kirkwood, and being a reasonable pickle, left forthwith. The squealing Monstrous
Swine squealed monstrously. Victor ran. The pig squealed. It was awful. Tim
McGrady, blaming the trouble on Michael Bryant, vomited wrathfully. Nancy Mior
guffawed in confusion. She always guffawed when she was confused. Corinne
Bjorge, having finally given up her attempt to be Lionel Ritchie, now donned a
solitary silver glove and started bleating "I'm Bad. I'm Bad" Will someone get that
damned squealing Monstrous Swine out of here?  It's mucking on the floor....
Ti'wia. w.'f  4-e.lj
ftf 4  i«j   sun   ?
<p*y^
C3
^^--^^7
LETTERS
More musing
on Stein
Annette Garm's views
on logging in the Stein and
their rebuttal by Kevin
Kriese deserve further comment.
Although an environmentalist, I must agree with
Mr. Kriese that Ms. Garm's
economic points are just
plain wrong: tourism won't
ever pay her $35 000 salary.
She tells us that "economic
development" will save jobs
and our environment, and
that the "resource potential"
of the Stein untouched
needs to be "recognized".
Well, the studies have been
done, they don't support Ms.
Garm's views, but the Stein
should be left untouched.
Mr. Kriese's arguments
are more misleading. His
point concerning the "Environmental uniqueness" of
the Stein is well taken, but
he also implies that logging
can be carried out with an
acceptable level of environmental damage. This may
be true in Europe, but I don't
think it's ever been true in
B.C..
"Integrated forest management", a.k.a. "multiple
use forest management" is a
concept existing only in the
minds of forestry professors,
whose labs are subsidized
by forest companies, and on
signs put up by the companies at the outer borders of
their newly created moonscapes.
Most of us not wearing
forester coloured glasses
(even a small number of
tenured forestry faculty)
can see this. Unless the
Ministry of Forests cleans
up its act, or the Ministy of
the Environment is allowed
to be responsible, this is the
alternative to a wild Stein
and it is not acceptable.
Dr. Ralph Brands
Grad Student
Health Care
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters should be as short as possible and may
be edited for brevity as well as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them in person with
your ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB 241k.	
Senate seeks suggestions
There seems to be a
standing question about
UBC's Senate. What does
it do and do students have
representation on it?
The Senate i s the body
that regulates control over
the changes in the academic area of the university. A few of the student
related committees which
come under the umbrella
of the senate are Admissions, Appeals on Academic Standing, Student
Appeals on Academic Discipline.
In previous years the
Student Senate Caucus
has been something of an
enigma. This year the
senators are doing their
best to stay informed and
voice student opinions on
issues affecting students.
In order to properly
represent   the   student
body it is helpful for the
senators to receive input
on relevant issues. Recently an Ad-Hoc committee has been struck to
answer the question of
what to do with registration week, as the new
phone-in registration system will not require this
time. If you have any
ideas as to how the university could use this week,
please contact me, Michael Fahy, at 228-6101 or
drop a note in my
box,158,in the A.M.S.
business office.
I encourage everyone
to raise questions with
your senators and thus enable them to represent
your concerns to the Senate.
Michael Fahy
Student Senate Caucus
Chair
Preinsperg rides rebate rodeo
I want to commmend
the 500 students who signed
the AMS petition against
tuition rebates to faculty
offspring. Since the Faculty
Association was too cowardly to defend this policy in
a public debate, let me ask a
few polite questions:
1. Will the UBC faculty
and administration have
the courage of their convictions and include the information, in next year's
Calender and Registration
Guide, that faculty members will get an automatic
tuition rebate for every
course their dependent children pass at UBC?
2. Should social institutions in a just society ever
exempt offspring of their
employees from normal institutional requirements?
Why should already privileged faculty kids get their
tuition waived when children of welfare recipients
and other poor students face
a tuition increase?
3. If a person comes to feel
victimized by social injustice- realizing, for example,
that he or she wasn't given
the same educational opportunity as other people - why
should such a person feel
social responsibility, respect for society's laws and
loyalty to its institutions?
As a philosophy student
who has always carried on
his studies in dire poverty, I
am profoundly disillusioned
by UBC's blatant preference
of faculty offspring. One of
my ethics professors calls it
an "aberration" that "makes
me want to puke".
A policy like this makes
one feel that we aren't living
in a great liberal society that
strives for equal opportunity for all, but in a corrupt
banana republic in which
the children of the privileged get most of the lucky
breaks.
Kurt Preinsperg
Philosophy Grad Student
Help for Acne
sufferers
In the October 16,1987
issue of THE UBYSSEY I
read Lori Ewert's letter
about pimples. I was reminded about my unfortunate youth when I also had
a proliferation of zits. Like
Lori Itried the usual creams
and jells (and even prescription drugs) to get rid of
them. When this failed after about 3 years I went to a
dermatologist (you have to
get a recommendation from
your doctor) where I was
eventually given a drug
called ACUTANE. It is a
powerful (no pregnancies
during the time of use) and
expensive (about $100.00
per month) prescription. I
took it for about 3 months
and I haven't been plagued
by "spueeze-a-snacks"
since. Every time I pass
some person who has a severe case of acne I want to
tell them that there is something that can be done. Ask
your doctor about this medicine, it might help.
John Broughton
Paper
Painful
There comes a time
when things have to get out
into the open, when we simply must lose some weight,
when the Spirit moves us.
This smelly daily experience
must be savoured if we are
to enjoy any relief at all from
the perpetual commotion of
the student life.
Smooth, absorbent paper is a must if we are to be
successful in this goal. The
stingy AMS seems unaware
of our plight, supplying us
with flimsy, translucent
ass-wipe which couldn't
even absorb the pus from a
zit.
I, for one, would be
more than willing to swallow any increase in fees
necessary to bring us the
best toilet paper on the
market.
Elias Fleck
October 20,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 10 Perspective
Trash excess
garbage
An average Vancouverite produces 730 kilograms of garbage
per year. That equates to 846 000
000 kg of waste in greater Vancouver that must be allocated each
year to the five landfill sites in the
GVRD.
It does not take much insight
to realize that the problem of solid
waste disposal is critical. Using
landfill sites for municipal garbage is the easy way out for most
citizens. However, it is a short
term solution with many long
term problems. Landfill sites pose
the danger of contaminating rivers, lakes, and groundwater with
toxic chemicals that are leached
from the site. They are also unattractive and use land that could be
better used for farming or urban
development.
"So how does this affect me?",
you might ask, "this is a problem
better left to the experts. They can
always be counted on to find a
technical solution." WRONG!! Did
you know that household or consumer garbage makes up more
than 50% of all solid wasted collected in Canada?   That means
YOU are part of the problem and it
is your responsibility to help find a
solution.
What can you do? Start by
looking at your own habits. What
do you do with old school notes,
magazines or the Ubyssey? How
many times do you eat at take out
restaurants where so many non
reusable containers are used?
You see the problem, the solution is so simple we can all be a
part of it:
Minimize the amount of waste you
create
-reuse plastic or glass containers
-recirclate books, magazines,
clothing to charities
-ensure all products you buy are
durable and are packaged in recyclable material.
Maximize the amount of recycling of waste material
-separate your garbage and sort
those materials that can be recycled (newspapers, bottles, cans)
-take your used car oil to special
collection tanks usually found at
service stations.
Sharon Bailey
All this waste could be wasted not ... it should be recycled.
The Ubyssey Presents a
NEWS WRITING WORKSHOP
with
Vancouver SUN reporter
Kim Bolan
on Wednesday. October 21st at 3:30 p.m.
in the Ubyssey office - SUB 241 k
Everyone Welcome
a great introduction to the Ubyssey
busy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20% DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
card and receive 20%
off your dry cleaning.
(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
4480-2 West 10th Ave.
(at Sasamat)
PH.: 224-4212
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Thursday Oct. 22
SPECIAL ATTRACTION
HILLEL'S FAMOUS HOT LUNCH
featuring
LIVE CLASSICAL MUSIC
12:30 p.m.
*«*»«*«*
HEBREW CLASSES
Thursday Oct. 22 & Oct. 29
Lunch Hour
all of the above programs to take place at Hillel House (behind Brock Hail)
For more information, phone 224-4748
Thinking
Law?
Think
Toronto
Study Law at
University of Toronto
The myths and
realities of:
• how to get In
• what It's like
• spedal programs
- student housing
- financial aid
- admission to practice
When: Friday.
October 23,1987
al 12:30
Where: Room 106,
Brock Hall
Who: Joan Lax,
Assistant Dean and
Director of Admissions,
Faculty ol Law,
University ol Toronto
AUDITIONS        AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK
by Sean O'Casey
(to be presented January 13 - 23)
AUDITIONS
TIMES:   WEDNESDAY,  OCTOBER  28 6:30 -10:30 p.m.
THURSDAY,     OCTOBER  29 6:30-10:30 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY AND
STAFF)
Audition material available in Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-3880
to arrange an audition appointment.
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT       AUDITIONS
ffc-fcftW      ^
___--
■--. i
•■»,
We know that
a cheap calculator can
cost you blood, sweat
and time.
Investing in a
Hewlett-Packard calculator, on the other
hand, can save you
time and again.
HF calculators not
only have better
functions. 'The;.' function better. Without
sticking keys and bad
connection;,.
Through October
31. you can get the
cream of the calculators at a non-fat price.
We're cutting SIT)
off the HP-12C. That
buys you more built-
in functions than
anyone else's financial calculator.
And we're giving
away a free Advantage
Module, a S84.95
value, with every HP-41
Advanced Scientific
calculator you buy.
This 12K-byte plug-
in, menu-driven ROM
was designed specially
for students.
So drop by your
campus bookstore or
local dealer and compare HP calculators
with the rest. By midterm, you'll see what
a deal this is.
1nm HEWLETT
UM PACKARD
October 20,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 Frum's Guide is great
Our reviewer gives it an 'A' minus
Let's assume, for a moment, that you
are one of nature's humbler critters, a
Grade 12 student entering university.
Immediately, you start to bombard
teachers, guidance
counsellors and
your parents with
questions about
your potential
choice. However,
they often can't tell
you what you want  i
to know about a
university, namely
"What's the
university really      i
like?"
So, unless you
have friends or
older siblings who
have gone to that
school, you may fall
for university
promo material
written by publicists who could
make Dante's Inferno University
(Abandon hope all
ye who enroll here)
look like a good
place to study.
What can you do?
A recent book
may be able to help
the new student out
of this quandry.
"Linda Frum's
Guide to Canadian
Universities" tries
to give the real
lowdown on what
every English
language and bilingual university in
Canada is like, so students can pick and
choose the university they like best.
Frum's book consists mostly of short
articles discussing the academic life and
the general ambiance of each university
or college. She astutely decided to make
student interviews the backbone of her
guide. This approach seems to work very
well, as Frum backs up her own opinions
with frank quotes
from students at
each university.
For instance,
Frum seems to
like UBC. She
feels that it is a
great school, but
prone to decay,
with a Pollyan-
naish administration, a few too
many concrete
buildings and lots
of hard working,
job minded
students. The
climate's very nice,
but UBC is fairly
isolated which,
with the large
amount of dronish
students, tends to
make UBC an
austere, cold and
foreboding place.
Nice school but no
parking.
Are Frum's
opinions accurate?
An informal poll
among my friends,
classmates and acquaintances not
only at UBC, but
also at SFU and
Trinity Western,
indicates that
Frum's conclu-
photo dan andrews
AUTHOR LINDA FRUM, who still loves free
publicity, almost as much as those cheques
from Key Porter.	
and eternal blahdom, you have to consider
her opinions plausible.
Frum cares about Canadian post-secondary education. She blasts schools that
are like factories, cold and unfeeling, and
has sharp words for underfunding, axed
or gelded programs and school bureaucracies that treat students like cattle
entering the Winnipeg Stockyards.
Frum prefers schools that care about
their students, with approachable professors, academically solid faculties that promote excellence in education, and a vibrant student life. Her suggestion, in an
intoductory overview of the national
system, that Canada's universities are
confused about what they're designed to
do and that urgent educational issues are
often reduced to a plea for more funding,
reflects a heartening concern for the
future of universities in Canada.
Frum writes with poise, intelligence,
tact, perceptivity and style. She has a gift
for an apt turn of phrase and an offbeat
sense of humour that results in amusing
asides (e.g., the lineups for buses at the
University of Alberta resemble the one for
the last train out of Paris in 1940). Her
already good writng shows much promise.
1 The comments by alumni about their
university days, the lists of basic information about each campus, the "do's and
don't's" lists and the very amusing
cartoons on campus life by Edward Hore
(the unsung hero of this book) are also
• good, but Frum's Guide is, alas, imperfect.
Frum leaves herself open for criticism
by not emphasizing academics more. Her
guide would have been a little better if j
she had talked to profs about general j
academic standards in their faculties and
included their comments in a seperate !
section. A section on graduate studies j
would be useful too. '
  j
Linda Frum's Guide to J
Canadian Universities
By (oddly enough) Linda Frum j
Key Porter Books
	
Frum evidently has an I.Q. of several
millions and although she tailors her book j
almost exactly to her audience, she intermittently writes over their heads. She
also has a slight tendency to be a little
nasty in her criticisms, but that is the
danger of being frank.
Frum's Guide, although somewhat expensive and not the quintessential book
on the subject, is an informative, useful
and fun guide to our universities. Any
student going to university should consult
it, especially ifyou are considering going
to school in other parts of Canada, lest
you enroll in Dante's Inferno U.
By Rick Hiebert
V
mm &im !»■
/ f XCUSE rl£. \
I    M*>V£ YOO
\Bftie.rCASE ■'
sions about the universities she visited
reflects widespread student opinion at
each school. So, when Frum does say
things which are hard to accept, such as
her opinion that the 'geers, frats and sororities are what stands between UBC
x /
U.B.C
ACCOUNTING
CLUB
BRAINS &
*N
tfKS
DmnOwEUu
^rii.'j i ruf-.F
PLAY THE MOST EXCITING
LIVE TV COMPETITIONS
IN HISTORY.
DIAMONDBALL
CHALLENGE
Pit your skills
against the pros in
the League
Championships
and the World
Series. Interact
with the action as it
takes place on the
field.
QB1
For the first time in
history, you can
actually interact with
live TV football
games via satellite
right here.
Compete with other
players here and
nationally by
anticipating live
quarterback plays.
.#'
,vnGcj,      University Golf Club
P   5185 University Boulevard
S   Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1X5
'■*ac*r     224-7513
"(At UBC) Club options range the whole gamut...from an Anarchist Club to an Accounting
Club."    (artwork by Edward Hore, sneakily swiped from Frum's book.) j
Africa flick fascinating
On Saturday afternoon the Kim Festival
presented Frontline Southern Africa: Destructive Engagement, a documentary by Toni
Strasburg. It was a graphic revelation of the
extent and brutality of South Africa's attempts to
prop up its faltering regime.
The film showed why the Commonwealth
must extend aid to the five
bordering nations which make
up the front line against apartheid. South Africa brazenly
supports terrorism in Mozambique at a cost of hundereds of
thousands of lives, many of them
children. It supports, along with
the United States, right wing
UNITA rebels in Angola who are
responsible for "brutal raids on civilians."
The film depicted scenes of mutilated children
shot to death in the earthen trenches in which they
had sought refuge from the rebels. It is sadly ironic
as the film points out, that the U.S. supports terrorism in Angola, its second largest African trading
partner.
Another example the film presented, of South
African brutality in Angola is the gut wrenching
number of limbless people in that country. They
are the 20,000 victims of the anti-personnel
mines which are often placed in the fields where   !
people pick crops.
In Mozambique, South Africa is responsible
for the closing of the Beira corridor, an important
rail link for front line states to markets abroad.
As a result, these countries must
now ship their goods through
South Africa at a great financial
loss.
It all amounts to a system-   .
atic policy by South Africa of
destabilization in nations that
oppose its oppression. In the
film, Zambian president Kennetbj
Kaunda said, "Political morality ]
is with us." Robert Mugabe, the prime-minister    ]
of Zimbabwe, drew a link between apartheid and
Nazism. He said, "It took the deaths of many
people to eliminate Nazism; it will take the
deaths of many people to eliminate apartheid but
we are determined to end it." Strasburg's film
left little room for ambivalence; the end must
come soon. j
By Tim McGradyj
Atoms bio win' in the wind
When the Wind Blows is a British animated
film about the effects of nuclear war. Hilde and
Jim Bloggs are a retired Sussex couple, who hear
on the radio that war is imminent. Jim begins to
construct a shelter according to the Council Book
on nuclear safety. They are preparing for a war
that they assume will be like the last one.
After a fantastically animated nuclear blast, Jim
and Hilde hide in their makeshift shelter of three
doors propped against the wall with cushions.
They begin to experience the symptoms of
radiation poisoning, still unaware of the finality
and horrors of nuclear war.
The film is effective simply because it points
out how little many of us know about nuclear
war. But Hilde and Jim's, portrayal as absent-
minded, bumbling senior citizens quickly be
comes annoying, especially when Hilde is shown
as an ignorant housewife continually upset
because she can't "tidy up" after the blast, and        !
because the paper boy hasn't shown up for days.
Based on a best-selling book by Raymond
Briggs, the animation is sophisticated and varied,
combining three-D, cut-out and drawn animation,
with stark black and white and surrealistic
images. The sound track is by Roger Waters, with ■
a title track by David Bowie.
When the Wind Blows is very effective as a reminder of the giant threat of nuclear war, and the
danger of insisting on ignoring that threat, but it
is not an entertaining film in itself, and definitely
is not for children.
By Lisa Doyle
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
October 20,1987

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