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The Ubyssey Sep 26, 1986

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Array UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 6
Vancouver, B.C. Friday. September 26,1986
228-2301
President, faculty react to election
By EVELYN JACOB
Premier Bill Vander Zalm ended
weeks of speculation Wednesday by
calling a provincial election on Oct.
22.
The 52-year-old Social Credit
leader asked the people of B.C. to
support him as premier of the province after seven short weeks in office.
University presidents and faculty
were hesitant to make pre-election
comments but all agreed on the
education issues that the new
premier must address.
Student aid, post-secondary accessibility and government funding
are the major concerns of all.
UBC president David Strangway
said the new premier must ensure
the universities remain competitive
by maintaining adequate funding
for faculty salaries.
"I'd like the new premier to look
at faculty salaries right away," said
Strangway. "We've had a lot of
retiring faculty members and there
is an enormous retirement rate coming. In some disciplines it has
already hit us very hard," he added.
UBC faculty wages have been
frozen for the last four years and remain far below those of other
universities.
University of Victoria president
Howard Petch said the new leader
should reduce "confrontation" in
education and look into the low
participation rate among rural
students in B.C.
"Fifty per cent of young people
live away from metropolitan areas
in B.C., and I don't think it's right
that they are not benefitting from a
university education," said Petch.
He said it is more important than
ever that society provide higher
education. The poor student aid
program in B.C. is also restricting
opportunities for students, Petch
added.
"The new premier should set up a
royal commission to look into the
public education system. That's
the first order of business," said
UBC political science professor Phil
Resnick.
Resnick said government funding
to post-secondary education has
been an "on-going" battle and said
the universities should obtain a
clear statement of funds earmarked
for education in the coming year.
"What we need is a change in
mind-set," said Resnick. "One
doesn't often get praise from the
government about universities, and
I'm not optimistic it will come from
Vander Zalm or any other government he would lead," he said.
UBC faculty association president Barrie Morrison also said provincial funding to the universities
and colleges must be addressed.
"Almost all of the universities'
expenditures are paid for by the
federal government," said Morrison. "The province is ducking its
share of fiscal responsibility for
post-secondary education," he
said.
NDP   leader   Bob   Skelly   has
criticized Vander Zalm for making
education a lower priority in the
province.
During his political career,
Vander Zalm earned a reputation as
a "teacher basher" when in 1982 he
introduced legislation forcing
teachers to work five days without
pay.
But the premier promises to be
less confrontational this time
round, and his popularity and
charisma is what will carry him into
the October election.
Vander Zalm . . . calls election
Clubs gear up for election
Bv SVETOZAR KONTIC
New Democrat and Socred club
members are eagerly anticipating
the Oct. 22 provincial election.
UBC Social Credit party club
member Craig Sicotte said the calling of the election is great news.
"Vander Zalm will win in a hands
down landslide," said Sicotte. "It
will be good for the club's popularity-
UBC NDP club member Adrian
Dix said Vander Zalm wasn't
elected by anybody but some Social
-otto zsigmund photo
BORED TOTEM RESIDENTS stand amazed as two students attempt to
stretch chewing gum between five floors. The ladies figure that even if
they do not make the Guinness Book of World Records, they can always
hide it under the edge of the building.
Funding declines
As the Social Credit government goes to the polls with education
bound to be a major issue, B.C.'s universities are having to take a
larger share of their operating revenue from tuition fees because of
declining provincial revenues.
UBC vice-president of finance Bruce Gellatly said tuition fees, expressed as a percentage of the operating budget have increased from
10 per cent in 1978 to 16 per cent this year.
Vice-president of finance Ernie Scott confirmed equivalent figures
for Simon Fraser University.
"Since 1982, B.C. universities have gone through an extremely trying period," said Scott. "Our ability to continue to provide quality
education has been very stressed," he said.
UBC's total operating budget for this fiscal year is $223 million
compared to $214 million last year, representing a 4 per cent increase
which has come mainly out ofthe provincial government's Fund for
Excellence in Education.
Asked if UBC received enough money to meet its budget this year,
Gellatly said "given what we've been allocated we've made the
budget fit."
NDP education critic Mark Rose said that universities relying
more on tuition fees to meet the operating budget is like "a cat chasing its tail."
"The more money you raise the less money you get from the
government," said Rose.
Credit delegates. It really is not a
snap election.
She added: "our resources have
been mismanaged over the past
eleven years. It's time we had a
government concerned about the
long term future of the province instead of getting elected every four
years by going down waterslides."
But Socred club member Lisa
McNaughton said Vander Zalm will
run his election on style. "Vander
Zalm is much more of a leader. He
can attract a lot more support than
Skelly," she said.
Vander Zalm can meet the people
and the media on a more comfortable basis than Skelly,
McNaughton claimed.
Dix claimed the election will be
won on issues. The Social Credit
party will use an intense publicity
campaign centered around Vander
Zalm to avoid issues and the
government's failure, she added.
Ordinary people in the province
recognize the Socreds have failed
over the past 11 years and that
Vander Zalm is an important part
of that failure, said Dix.
"His record as a Cabinet minister
is so abysmal that his cabinet colleagues repudiated him on several
occasions," she added.
McNaughton said the Socreds
See page 2: ELECTION
Sexual harassment committee lacks students, UBC staff
By PATTI FLATHER
A group of students concerned
about the lack of student and staff
representation on a UBC sexual
harassment committee wants to
raise campus awareness of the issue.
"Without widespread discussion
the committee's work will be in a
vacuum," said Janet Patterson, law
3.
The four-member presidential ad
hoc committee, formed this summer, has no student or union
representatives. Its mandate is to
consider a statement of policies
regarding sexual harassment and to
report to UBC president David
Strangway on its implementation.
Patterson and three other law
students  are   encouraging  groups
and individuals at UBC to discuss
sexual harassment and to submit
briefs to the committee. The
students meet Monday to plan their
strategy.
"There has to be encouragement
for women to speak about the kind
of harassment they face," said Patterson. She was a graduate student
member of a similar committee at
York University from 1979 to 1981.
Sexual harassment committee chair
Bertie McClean defended the lack
of student or staff representation.
He said letters are being sent out
this week encouraging groups to
send briefs.
McClean, UBC associate vice
president and law professor, said
the committee hopes to produce a
final report by Christmas. An
earlier UBC sexual harassment
committee dissolved itself more
than two years ago without submitting a report.
UBC is one of a handful of Canadian colleges and universities which
have not yet implemented formal
procedures to ensure due process
for both the complainant and the
alleged offender.
McClean said he wants to see
specific centres established to handle complaints. They now travel
through various channels including
the Women Students Office, deans
and department heads, and the personnel service.
Women Students Office director
June Lythgoe said she has full con
fidence in the committee. But
Lythgoe agreed the committee
should have student and union
representatives.
Other members are associate
lav/ professor Lynn Smith,
associate history professor Jean
Elder and associate physiology professor Dr. Nadine Wilson.
Lythgoe chaired the first sexual
harassment committee, formed in
November 1983 and dissolved the
following spring.
She said the committee lacked the
administration and faculty support
it required. The committee's mandate from the president's office,
then under George Pedersen, was
to examine only sexual harassment
of students by students.
"That's nonsense," said
Lythgoe. "That's an impossible
frame of reference."
Sexual harassment complaints by
students are not "swept under the
carpet" now, added Lythgoe. Many
are referred to the Women Students
Office, and Lythgoe said the office
handles four to eight cases a year.
If possible an informal meeting is
arranged between the complainant
and the accused by the Woman
Students Ofice. lythgoe said if this
does not settle the matter it may be
referred to the department head and
then the faculty dean.
The current system is awkward
for the Women Students Office,
said Lythgoe, because her office has
no official role. 't :
Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 26, 1986
McGill refuses engineers
JERRY'S COVE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLB
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill
University is contesting the legal
status of the engineering graduate
society, and is refusing to collect
their fees or provide any services.
"The university has filed a brief
with the Supreme Court of Quebec,
contesting our accreditation," said
Robert Blumethal of the Electrical
Engineering Graduate Students'
Society.
The dispute began last spring
over the Quebec law concerning accreditation of student associations.
The society received its official ac
creditation from the Quebec
government last Dec. 16.
EEGSS asked the university to
collect $5 at registration from each
of its members, but the motion was
stalled by senate and on March 26,
was tabled indefinitely.
The university has also named the
government accreditation officer,
the minister of education and the
procureur generals du Quebec in the
suit.
"Because the representative of
the Minister of Education granted
the accreditation, the ministry and
Lobby against tariff
VANCOUVER (CUP) — A university bookstore is asking students to
lobby prime minister Brian
Mulroney to remove the 10 per cent
tariff imposed in June on English-
language books from other countries.
"Students and people who read
in general are being penalized," said
Debbie Harvie, manager of Simon
Fraser University's bookstore. "We
are asking people to actively work
to get the tariff rescinded."
The tariff was imposed after the
American government put a 35 per
cent tax on Canadian shakes and
shingles.
Although course books are tax
exempt, Harvie said students will
begin to pay more for general interest books in October or
November, when the tariff begins
to affect new orders from
publishers.
"The government thought there
would be an outrage in June, and
then that outrage would
disappear," she said. "But the issue
is not dead."
Harvie   said   about   4,000   SFU
Election sparks fly
haven't
From page 1
talked   about   education
issues yet.
"Education is not the party's
platform. The NDP promises
money but where will they get it
from?" asked McNaughton.
But Dix said: "Japan — which
can hardly be confused with
socialism — is constantly providing
money for education based on the
fact that the jobs of the future will
require it.
According to Dix, forestry is also
mismanaged. She said the provincial government has done little
reforestation, although the federal
government's Pearse Report stated
that B.C. may have a shortage of
forestry products over the next 20
years.
McNaughton claimed the NDP's
campaign will centre around making Vander Zalm look like he has no
policies.
But she added: "The Socred party has enough substance." Dix said:
"Unlike Mr. Vander Zalm our party has principles."
Dix then quoted Vander Zalm. "I
have principles and if you don't like
them, I have other principles."
students signed a petition against
the tariff, and the store has sent between 1,000 and 1,500 postcards to
the prime minister protesting the
tax. The petition and cards are part
of a national campaign organized
by the Canadian Bookseller's
Association.
At New Westminster's Douglas
College, technical services librarian
Penny Swanson said the tax interferes with intellectual freedom
because additional paperwork
necessary for tax exemption will
further delay the arrival of books in
B.C.
"I don't know what the federal
government thinks is going to happen to Canadian researchers often
consult findings of their American
counterparts.
"It seems to me that the exchange
of knowledge can only help," she
said. "If we can get the information
easily from someone else, then we
should — we don't want to reinvent the wheel."
And Kevin Williams, manager of
the downtown branch of Duthie's
books, said students shopping in
off-campus bookstores may end up
paying the tariff on books not
readily identifiable as texts, such as
those used in literature classes.
Williams also said the tariff will
affect the number of titles available
in Canada.
"Every time a book price goes
up, you have to worry about it going through a price break," he said.
"A book which it might be possible
to sell a copy at $39.95, will probably be impossible to sell at
$44.95."
When you need copies
quickly and hassle-free, see
us at Kinko's. Our self-
service copiers are very easy
to use and give you the great
quality, inexpensive copies
you expect.
kinkes
GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
I 222-1688
M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
To Students in the Faculty of Arts:
FORUM ON THE
B.A. CURRICULUM
You are invited to a Student Forum to discuss the interim
report of the Faculty's Curriculum Review Committee.
Wednesday, October 1st,
12:30-1:20 p.m.
BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE
Issues include admission requirements, breadth requirements
in the first two years of the B.A., academic advising, the
language requirement, the science requirement, the literature
requirement, Major and Honours programmes, and interdisciplinary programmes.
Copies of the report are available in Bu CI54.
the Quebec legal system are also involved", said Blumenthal.
Under Law 32, any incorporated
student association has the right to
receive official government accreditation and recognition. Once
accredited, a group is entitled to office space, furniture and bulletin
boards provided by the university.
The university is also required to,
upon request of the association,
collect fees from its student
members.
The university brief, submitted
last spring, claims that the engineering society is ineligible for accreditation because it represents only graduate students.
"(Therefore the society)
represents only some of the students
in electrical engineering," according to the brief.
"EEGSS is not a faculty-wide
organization," said Irwin Gopnick,
Dean of Students. The department
includes students at the
undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate level.
One contentious clause in the
brief states that, "the university attempted without success,
throughout the months of February
and March 1986 to convince
EEGSS of the illegality of its accreditation."
"The larger issue is one of principle. What size group of students
should be elegible for accreditation?" said Gopnick. "Any group
that is large enough to be certified,
we will treat as if they are certified.
However we don't feel that EEGSS
qualifies."
Blumenthal said the society will
use legal assistance, but doesn't expect the case to come to court for
two to three years.
Minutes away from UBC Campus -^^—
Remember "DAILY SPECIALS"
Hot & Cold Food from 11:30 a.m. until Midnight
3681 West 4th (4th & Aim.)      734-1205
FOR MEN
For smartly classic or
uniquely original clothes for
all occasions from casual to
formal wear.
The consignment shop with a difference.
5581 Dunbar St. at 40th Ave. Ph. 266-3393
Open Seven Days A Week
Community Sports
offers alU/O discount off
regular prices of all merchandise
to all UBC students, staff & faculty
SEVEN MONTH SKATE
SHARPENING PASSES FOR
3355 W. Broadway
ONLY Wtf ■ UU
733-1612
OPEN 7DAYS A WEEK FROM9:30 A.M.
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking
for a career in the business world, come see us. We're
Chartered Accountants from downtown firms who will be
on campus October 1 to talk about career possibilities in
one of the most stable professions — chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new
skills and diversity to this growing dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for
accounting and auditing in Canada and, because of their
education and training, are in demand by business around
the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to:
"Vintage" and Cheese
Salon B
UBC Faculty Club
Wednesday, October 1
6:00 p.m.
For more information contact Eileen Pearkes
at 681-3264, The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
9A
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia Friday, September 26,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Injuries to women unnecessary
VANCOUVER (CUP) — The
B.C. government could prevent
serious injuries to women by adequately funding therapy for wife
assaulters, says a UBC psychology
professor.
And the therapy is cheaper than
the costs associated with repeat offenders, he says. Dr. Donald Dut-
ton, who runs a $39,000 program
treating 27 assaultive men per year,
said current funding levels are inadequate.
"We are having to do this constant balancing act where we are
keeping the program alive and
viable under minimal funding circumstances."
Demand from the court system
indicates the program could teach
conflict resolution skills to at least
double the current number of men,
some of whom must wait for six
months to enter the group, said
Dutton.
"From a cost/benefit point of
view it seems to be worthwhile to
spend some money up front on
these programs," he said, arguing
the government must pay more
money for police and court costs
for the men who become repeat offenders.
Dutton also said assault offenses
result in increased social costs for
hospital care, transition houses and
therapy for battered wives.
And while direct funding from
the B.C. attorney-general's ministry
is only $39,000, Dutton said the Ontario government has allowed $5
million for programs dealing with
wife assault.
Ted Harrison, regional corrections director for the attorney
general's ministry agrees that some
men convicted of assault are unable
to get into the kind of program Dutton offers.
"But given the limited resources
in this province and the competing
demands for services, I am satisfied
that the amount of money going into wife assaulters' programs is
reasonable," he said.
Harrison said Vancouver is lucky
to offer this kind of program which
is unavailable in most parts of the
province. The attorney general's office identified only two other programs, one operating in Victoria
and another based on a private
practice model in Vernon.
But a Boston study indicates the
human cost of inadequate funding
is   more   women   ending   up   in
emergency wards, said Dutton.
"Thirty-three per cent of the
women admitted to Boston
emergency wards were there
because of injuries sustained
through wife assault or from males
they were living with," he said.
While Canadian statistics are
unavailable, Dutton said the U.S.
rate of assault for co-habiting
couples is about one in 10. While
both sexes report equal incidences
of violent behavior, women end up
the victims in 95 per cent of the
cases.
Studies from Minnesota, Oregon
and Arizona indicate similar rates
for college populations.
Dutton said the high success rate
of the UBC program justifies expansion.
In a group of 50 men completing
therapy, only two repeated a
criminal offence within a follow-up
period of two and one-half years.
The rate in untreated populations
was 40 per cent, or ten times higher.
Club president
angers members
i**p>
By JENNIFER LYALL
Aquasoc members are upset that
the society's president drafted a
new constitution without consulting
the club executive or membership.
"Nobody ever tried to contact
me (about the constitution)," said
Aquasoc dive coordinator Peter
Clifford.
The new constitution places the
dive shop under the control of the
aqua society shop management
board, a four-member voting body
including the president of Aquasoc,
a member at large, and two AMS
excutives.
At a general meeting of the
aquatic society Tuesday, a motion
was passed asking the Student Administration Commission — which
passes club constitutions — to
disregard the new constitution until
members have a chance to review it.
Executive club member Marc
Majka said the problem with the
constitution is that it forces
Aquasoc to give up its autonomy.
"Suddenly we don't have policy
control over any of the services we
provide," he said. "For us to go to
the AMS with all our policy
disputes would be ridiculous."
Clifford objected to the suggestion that the shop should become a
money-making enterprise.
The shop serves the needs of the
students, he said. "Now it will
become another commercial diving
shop and will not benefit the
students."
In the past, club members controlled the shop which traditionally
sells and rents equipment at very
low prices.
But Aquasoc president Dave
Marjoriebanks said the arrangement will be "mutually beneficial"
for Aquasoc and for the AMS,
arguing the new system will free the
club executive from day-to-day
operations of the shop and ensure
it sound financial management.
He said that shop finances will be
controlled by the Aquasociety shop
management board but "all profits
from the shop or the club will stay
within Aquasoc."
"The club is responsible for
social activities and will have all the
money it needs for those activities,"
he said.
Marjoriebanks expressed concern
about the current financial management of the shop.
"Because the AMS has a lot of
money invested in the shop in the
form of diving equipment, I want to
make sure it is being run correctly,"
he said.
AMS director of finance Jamie
Collins said the only concern of the
AMS is to ensure that the shop is
properly run.
"I'm not interested in making
policy for Aquasoc," he said. "It's
a pain in the ass. All I'm interested
in is making sure the shop is run
under the appropriate guidelines
and serves the divers and club
members."
Collins said the new constitution
would not result in a loss of
autonomy for Aquasoc.
Neither the director of administration nor I is interested in
taking over Aquasoc," he said, adding that revenue generated by the
shop would go to maintain shop
facilities and service to members.
— rory a   photo
ANARCHIC 'GEERS MAKE "Barricade flambe" out of these former B-Lot gates. The dastardly deed, reflecting
the 'Geer desire to overthrow society, occured Thursday afternoon at SUB plaza.
Okanagan College wields power
KELOWNA, B.C. (CUP) —
Despite a court ruling declaring last
April's elections invalid, the executive student council at B.C.'s
Okanagan College continues to
wield power, says former council
chair, Heather Gropp.
And although the executive may
unfairly influence the fall elections,
a court-appointed trustee refuses to
intervene, she says. Gropp said the
council was barred from office after
a local court declared there had
been conflict of interest in the April
elections.
That executive included the chair,
Bruce Metcalfe, academic affairs
coordinator, Paul Hesketh, and
financial affairs coordinator Shan
non Fitch.
The court then appointed
Kelowna lawyer Jerold Schlosser to
manage council affairs until the fall
elections.
But these decisions mean nothing
since the executive continues to
work and make decisions, said
Gropp.
"While these people lost their
positions, they actually gained
power," she said. "Not only did the
trustee leave them free to make
decisions themselves, he allowed us
(students) no input into those decisions."
Normally, the council would
have to answer student questions,
or   make   minutes   of   meetings
Aid to El Salvador takes the
form of bombs, speakers say
The airforce in El Salvador is
routinely bombing unarmed
civilians in zones held by rebels, a
representative of a Canadian aid
agency said Thursday.
Salvaide member Rhena
Hymovitch told 30 people in Sub
Plaza North that the bombing raids
are followed by land-based assaults
aimed at destroying everything in
sight. She said even hospitals,
crops, and schools are attacked.
Hymovitch and co-speaker Rob
Taylor were invited into zones controlled by opponents to the government of president Jose Napoleon
Duarte when they visited El
Salvador in April.
Due to the bombings, Hymovitch
said, "hundreds of thousands of
refugees from the El Salvadoran
government are herded into refugee
camps near the city of El
Salvador."
And in response to requests for
aid by the Duarte government, she
said the Canadian government has
sent millions of dollars to help feed
those refugees.
Salvaide estimates that more than
60,000 people have been
assassinated and 3,800 have disappeared without explanation in the
Central American country in the
last five years.
Salvaide is a Canadian volunteer
group formed to provide food and
medical supplies for people in zones
controlled by the opposition. The
speakers said $75,000 has been raised to date.
In contrast, they said the U.S.
government has sent more than one
billion dollars to the El Salvadoran
government since 1979.
"From the perspective of people
who live in the zones, the aid they
receive is in the form of bombs,"
Hymovitch added.
She said the official government
uses C47 gunships, a type of
helicopter supplied by the U.S., to
run its campaign of terror and annihilation.
They are trying to crush the
FMLD (Democratic Revolution
Committee), a military committee
created by opposition groups to
counter what they call decades of
economic and social repression.
The committee has established
schools, medical clinics, and collective farms in the territories they
control, said Hymovitch.
The Latin American Solidarity
Committee and AMS Speakers
sponsored the talk. People wishing
to contribute to Salvaide can write
P.O. Box 65309, Station F, Vancouver, V5N 5P3.
public, but this is not happening
now, Gropp explained.
Gropp said the executive has
acted against student interests on
several ocassions, including a proposal by ex-financial coordinator
Shannon Fitch to cancel membership in the Canadian Federation of
Students. She is also concerned
about student cards, as the executive did not distrubute them during registration, choosing instead to
hand them out for only two hours
per day until Sept. 12.
Without the cards, students cannot vote in elections or participate
in Studentsaver, a program giving
discounts at businesses in Kelowna
and elsewhere.
"Whether their handling of the
distribution is just bad management
or a deliberate attempt to limit
voting in the next election, I don't
know," said Gropp. "But right
now they're deciding who gets to
vote and who doesn't, and
therefore, who will win the elections."
When asked to respond to
Gropp's statements, Joyce
Hesketh, the staffperson hired by
the executive said she would only do
so if authorised by a letter from the
trustee.
Similarly, trustee Schlosser had
no comment on the executive actions. He said his involvement in
council affairs was limited mainly
to retrieving funds from the college
board, paying debts, and organising
the fall election.
Schlosser said he thought
everything was running smoothly,
and could see no reason to interfere. Sure, "anything could run
smoothly when all opposition is
suppressed," said Gropp.
"It's like talking to a brick wall,
and I just don't think the court's
decision was intended to give the
people exclusive rights they now
have." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 26, 1986
Tales off Grin
Show us a great big smile.
Teeth are in and style is where it's at until Wednesday, Oct. 22 when we
go to the polls to vote for a new provincial government.
But will there be any substance in Victoria during the next four years?
At a twelve-ring circus at Whistler late last July, 800 or so Social Credit
party members elected Bill Vander Zalm to lead this province into the next
crisis. Ever since, there has been a major media love-in with our toothy new
leader.
But while providing marvellous photo opportunities, Vander Zalm hasn't
made any deep, well considered policy statements showing a clearly
thought out agenda for the future.
He has done a double-take on abortion, a triple-take on casinos and
created new excitement about the future of B.C.'s softwood lumber industry, a major part of our economy.
He has also pledged to investigate conflict of interest of cabinet
members, but has done nothing. He announces all over B.C. that he will
investigate increasing the power of local communities, but there is no
evidence of any government action. And since NDP leader Bob Skelly
brought up the idea, he is also "looking into" the minimum wage which he
thinks he might like to abolish.
Vander Zalm was part of the government led by Bill Bennett which introduced the July 7 restraint measures in 1983, a harsh program of cutbacks to education, social services and human rights.
And he knows those measures were unpopular, so he objected to them
recently. But his complaint was about the style of implementation, not the
content of the legislation. He said the same thing about this own efforts as
education minister — perhaps he might send personalized letters to irate
students, teachers and parents if he were cutting schools today, he hasn't
said much else about education policy this time, but he did say universities
might have their priorities decided by the community.
The NDP does have a policy on universities. They see them as important
to the economic future of the province.
They have a committment from the grassroots of the party to significantly increase post-secondary education funding.
Bob Skelly, doesn't smile as well, and he pauses to think about what to
say, but he does have coherent policies on jobs, women's issues, education and social policy to speak about.
Vander Zalm has a powerful media presence but if he does as few concrete things during the next three and a half weeks as he has done in the
past two months, there will be little to look forward to after the election.
We will have to see what happens before the election but the last time
the Socreds won on style (Bill Bennett's "tough guy" image) the results
weren't quite what was expected. What are all those teeth really for?
THE UBYSSEY
September 26, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
It all began in 241K at 5:00 p.m. Svetozar Kontic and David Ferman talked of line stories and tops, as
wetl as lengths of stories. The assembled group of intrepid reporters were suddenly aware of his
presence. "Oh no," said Patti Flather, "What's he doing here?" "You're not coming to College are
you?" said Robert Beynon. "My Godt "screamed Evelyn Jacob, "this can't be happening! As if
quoting him isn't enough, now he's here to oversee us put out the paper. This is a travesty!" Peter
Berlin and Jeffrey Swartz fell of their chairs in disbelief. Michelle Hartmann began to cry, and Darryl
Jackson mumbled something about editorial autonomy and Freedom of the Press. Peter McDougall
yelled, "Go home, or I'll misquote you!" Jennifer Lyall conducted an On the Spot Interview: Stephen
Wisenthal arrived and demanded to know why there is no beer at council meetings. James Young,
Rick Hiebert, and Susan Bertoia perked up in anticipation of quaffing "Ambar Nectar" every second
Wednesday. Chad James, Ron Stewart, Anya Waite, and Sharon Knapp, under the artistic direction
of Michael Groberman pondered the Entertainment Page and were oblivious to the attempt to undermine Responsible Journalism. "Chill out guys," said Martin Cocking, who was almost Dead On Arrival," "I only want to see how The Ubyssey is put together." And with that, they headed to the
printers where after much clacking of typewriters, discussion of the election, and pasting of pages, the
paper was ready to go to bed. And so were twenty-two tired staffers ... Is this okay? Editor's note:
Actually Martin this is quite crappy in a sophomoronic way. But we like it.
ne
J
Student solves B-lot
So you don't like the new parking
system? As a first year student I
have nothing to compare it to, but
that doesn't stop me from feeling
that the present system has some
merit.
I also think that many of the problems for students and for Traffic
and Security could be solved with
ease if everyone just put their little
grey cells to work.
For example, some students who
have to go in and out of B-lots a lot
during the week claim they have to
pay more in the long run than they
did with the decal system.
Unfortunately, traffic control
says that they don't want the hastle
of patrolling the lot for decals.
Stalemate, right?
Here's my solution: Students
who live in residence and have cars
have already been given pass cards.
This proves that they can be made
available.
These same students must pay so
many   dollars   a   year   for   the
privilege.
I suggest that Traffic and Security
charge regular students so many
plus some dollars for the same
privilege. This way students who
only use B-lots once in a blue moon
can still pay the 25 cents exit fee
while others have the convenience
of a pass card.
Next question — what about car
pools? No problem. Each member
of the pool can chip in for the price
of one card. This card can then be
used in connection with any one of
their cars! Otherwise, if they prefer,
they can still pay a quarter on each
exit.
These are just some suggestions
that occurred to me that could help;
solve some of the problems of B-lot!
parking. Not everyone can be pleased, but with a little thought on the
matter maybe a few more than there
are now can be added to the list of
the satisfied.
Jennie Mott
artsl
Pedlar criticizes accuracy
I would like to correct a few major errors I found in Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
First: That I "declined" to say
who is responsible for the Food
Bank. I didn't say that; I said I
didn't know. I still don't. I don't
think it's my responsibility, because
despite having come up with the
idea, doing some preliminary
research on it and applying for the
job, someone else was hired — and
paid to do it. However, I have
chosen to accept the responsibility.
That's different.
Which brings us to what I supposedly said next: That the Food
Bank would be my top priority if it
did not take too much time. I did
not say that. I did say that I would
not be able to do it all myself, since
I am a full time student.
Since I only found out in
September that I would be doing it,
my work on it has been limited.
However, the Food Bank has been
and will always be my top priority. I
have met with Ray Shultz and have
heard from a few others interested
in helping, and we will hopefully get
something done on it soon.
I also did not say that the External Affairs Committee would be
discussing the Food Bank. I mentioned the committee to your
reporter in connection with a completely different issue.
And last but not least, my
favorite: "I do not see apartheid as
a black and white issue". As entertaining as it may sound, I did not
say that. I did say that I do not
believe sanctions to be a black and
white issue.
Apartheid is about as cut-and-
dried as moral issues get. In my opinion, however, sanctions as a way
to deal with it are still debatable, as
unpopular as that opinion may be.
However, as I did say, if enough
students want divestment, I will
support it.
Part of your responsibility as
journalists is to take the time to
make sure your stories are accurate.
One error is human, but four
screwups in two separate stories —
in the same issue — is positively
supernatural. Making copy is important, but so are people and their
reputations.
Carol Pedlar
coordinator of external affairs
Frats rushing dry
During the next two weeks the
10 fraternities associated with the
campus of UBC will be opening
their doors to interested persons.
Each fraternity will hold three functions during this period. These
functions are designed to expose interested parties to a fraternity's personality and the GREEK system as
a whole.
Although, in the past, the first
Rush function has been associated
with free beer a number of fraternities have decided to hold a dry
first function, which will center on
information and conversation.
The decision to hold a dry func
tion has been prompted by a
number of reasons: increased
alcohol awareness programs,
liability concerns, attraction of
uninterested individuals, pressures
from Governing bodies, and the
past successes ofthe Beta Theta Pi's
dry functions.
All interested parties are welcome
to attend any function. Also, if you
plan on drinking at any of the
alcohol functions rides will be made
available for pick-ups and return.
Let us make sure you get home safe-
ly-
Brent Lymer
IFC Rush chair
Geer solves B-lot line ups
It seems that (Alma Mater Society administrative director Martin)
Cocking's solution to'avoid line-ups
to B-lot during morning rush hour
was unique in that it involved little
or no thought.
As any fool can plainly see, the
problem is the gate coming down
after a car has entered B-lot. This
slows down the next car following
the first. The solution is a very
simple one. During rush
hour keep the gate up. This will
allow the cars to nip through the
gate at a reasonable clip.
But wait, there's more. When the
counter approaches the lot capacity, it will signal to the gate to
operate as before. What this means
to the driver approaching the lot
during rush hour is, that the lot is
about to be full and he should try
another B-lot.
This cunning solution solves
mose of our problem. As it is still
September, most people are rather
sluggish in planning their travel
time to arrive at UBC.
Jim Davies
Civil Engineering III Friday, September 26, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student   pleads:  "Divest   before   cancer spreads!"
I admit it. I was ignorant about
the issues of apartheid. Oh, of
course I knew that it was wrong,
but I didn't know just how wrong.
To tell the truth, I was another victim of the syndrome called, 'so
what can just one person do?'.
Fortunately, I experienced Peter
Davis' film called 'Generations of
Resistance', and therefore became
enlightened, educated, and
motivated to fight apartheid, to expose its deep injustices, and to protest against the savage consequences
which this film showed in such
graphic detail.
In this film, it was very evident
that the South African government;
made up of mature, intelligent,
white males; believe that people
with brown or black skin are not
quite human, but that they are really only animals with human
features.
The white population of South
Africa are socialized to believe,
therefore, that it is morally correct
to impose their will onto people
with darker skin.
This apartheid philosophy is a
cancer which feeds itself by attacking the values of humanity in every
part of our world. It is an ugly, evil
growth which sucks at the
wholeness and harmony of our
world by perpetuating greed,
violence, and hate. Like a cancer,
the apartheid philosophy will
spread, sooner or later.
Therefore, it is up to us, as the
motto of UBC proudly proclaims,
to cut this cancer out of our world.
What can just one person do? A
lot, if we all shout together. First,
raise your own awareness of the
history of apartheid, as I did. Go to
a film, listen to a lecture, read
about the issues, and talk to people
about your convictions.
Secondly, do not believe the
South African government's propaganda that economic sanctions
hurt the black population. The
truth is that the present generation
of blacks feel betrayed by Canadians because our government
refuses to divest. Young black people, especially think that Canadians
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INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1987 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resumes to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by October 2,
1986.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted
on or about October 10th regarding campus interviews
which take place during the week of October 20th. Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
CALL FOR
^APPLICATIONS
>m
Applications are now being accepted to fill
one (1) vacant student SEIMATE-AT-
LARGE seat. The term of office will
commence October 15th, 1986 to March
30th, 1987.
As per the Universities Act and the A.M.S.
code of procedures and by-laws, the
successful candidate will be an A.M.S.
member. Applications may be picked up
from SUB 238 and returned by 4 p.m.,
Monday, September 29, 1986.
For more information, please contact AMS
President Simon Seshadri SUB 256,
228-3972.
agree with apartheid.
Third, as a UBC student or
worker, you can put pressure on the
board of governors to fully divest
now from those companies which
have economic ties with the South
African government.
When each of us takes these steps
and, therefore, accumulates the
might of individual power, then the
black population of South Africa
will know, through direct contacts
from this campus, that the Univer
sity of British Columbia, this in
stitution of high ideals, justr., and
equality, truly supports freedom
and, furthermore, that this institution has the independence to publicly say NO to Apartheid.
Janice Kirk
graduate studies
ATTENTION:
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
IF YOU WERE ASSESSED $280.00
FOR MEDICAL INSURANCE
COVERAGE, YOU MUST APPLY
AT THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE BEFORE YOUR POLICY
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You should talk to &l(HK'llC Ross
\If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession and
gain experience in accounting, auditing, tax, business valuations, electronic data processing and insolvency, Touche Ross
is the firm for you. We will be on campus:
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, October 20, 21 and 22.
Submit your application, accompanied by recent transcripts, to the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3-
We will be in contact with you as soon as possible.
^louche Ross
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS/MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
VANCOUVER
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564-1111 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Sep
Poet laureate
hated university
By CHAD JAMES
Ted Hughes, the first British poet
laureate to read in Canada, gave a
stirring performance last Friday
evening in the U.B.C. recital hall.
Hughes' unassuming manner combined with sardonic recollections of
his hated university days as an
English student quickly won over
the audience.
Ted Hughes
UBC Recital Hall
September 19
Throughout the reading Hughes
divulged anecdotes, sometimes
humerous, often sombre and
melancholy, of how the poems
came to be created. These
testimonial vignettes are helpful to
our understanding Hughes'
poetry, giving outline to the
engimatic persona behind the
poem.
The selections focused mainly
upon his obsession with the moon,
his intent observation of wildlife,
and his memory of World War II
and how it destroyed his father.
From his poem Out:
My Father father sat in his chair
recovering
From the four-year mastication
by gunfire
Body buffeted wordless, estranged by long soaking
In the colours of mutilation
Hughes began the evening with
Thought Fox after explaining how
he had conceived it. Late one night
he had given up on an attempt to
write an English essay and gone to
bed. He began to dream; a dark
shape crept into his room toward
the desk. As it approached, he
recognized it as a fox walking on its
hind legs. The fox stopped at the
aborted essay, put a bloody paw to
the page, and told Hughes to quit
trying to finish the paper. Hughes
awoke in a panic and searched for
the bloody paw print. He found
nothing but years later his vivid
memory of the dream gave rise to
the poem.
Pulling a large number of pieces
from his most widely acclaimed collection, Crow, Hughes set off on a
tangent of despair, morbidness, and
violent imagery. The audience loved
it.
As each poem progressed to an
abject crescendo of depression, the
tension in the audience would
mount simultaneously. Then the
final line would drop unexpectedly,
almost like a mistake in the poem,
and the audience would explode into a cathartic, nervous laughter,
glad of the repreieve from the horror of the poem. Hughes just stood
immutable, patiently waiting for the
laughter to recede so he could begin
again.
Anne seeks kind
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
She may be homely.  She may
have red hair. But she has ima-a-a-
a-gination.
 1
Anne of Green Gables
Directed by Alan Lund
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
until tomorrow night
Anne Shirley or, as she prefers to
be referred to, Anne of Green
Gables, leaps from the pages of a
novel, 21 years across time from it's
original opening in Charlottetown,
to the Expo 86 World Festival
stage. And she's still looking for a
kindred spirit.
This play was first presented to
the world in the Expo 67 World
Festival. Anne might have imagination, but another Ann (Ann Farris
Darling, producer of this World
Festival) has not. This is the only
major Canadian theatrical production at this World's Fair.
Farris Darling's creative deficiency aside, this show is fun, frivilous,
and charming. It is set in turn ofthe
century Prince Edward Island.
Anne is a young orphan adopted in
error by an elderly brother and
sister who wanted a boy to do farm
work. She endears herself to them
through her charm and eccentricity,
and endears herself to the community by winning a large scholarship and bringing honour to the
town.
Tracey Moore's Anne is vibrant,
exhuberant, and delightfully odd:
"Oh what a romantic experience it
must be to have nearly drowned,"
she says excitedly having just heard
of someone's near fatal accident.
Moore is also too old for the role of
a 13-year-old girl. But her singing is
outstanding, especially in the
operatic parody, Oh Mrs. Lynde!
Glenda Landry has the same age
problem. She is Anne's kindred
spirit,  Diana Barry.  But  she too
DOYLE, MOORE . . . seeking kindred spirits in its secc
Secretary lives
"hi toit ni loi"
KUSS, ELWORTHY . . .
bloody intense relations.
Lizzie
LIZZIE!
LIZZIE!
By SUSAN BERTOIA
Lizzie Borden took an axe,
And gave her mother 40 whacks.
When she saw what she had done
She gave her father 41.
"Did you, Lizzie, did you?"
1892. Fall River. A lone house is
the set for the play Blood Relations.
Lizzie Borden, who was aquitted
on the charge of brutally killing her
father and stepmother and her actress friend, re-enact the days
before the bloody axe murder.
Blood Relations
By Sharon Pollock
Directed by Charles Siegal
Frederic Wood Theatre
until tomorrow night
The actress plays Lizzie and the
actual Lizzie plays Bridgette the
maid. The audience is left to decide
whether she killed her parents or
not.
Susan Elworthy plays a rebellious
Lizzie who struggles for her rights
as an equal member in the family.
Her animated movement and facial
add
— quy palmer photo
to   her   perfor-
expressions
mance.
Tanya Dixon — Warren's
character, the narrow-minded stepmother, gives a refreshing comic
performance.
Because the play was designed in
the traditional Victorian style from
set to costume and acting perhaps a
more original and contrasting direction might have been appropriate.
Charles Siegel did however direct an
effective and unified production.
Brian Jackson's design for an
angled and twisted Victorian stage
lends to the realistic conflicts of the
play. Dynamic lighting designed by
Douglas Welch emphasizes the
ever-changing moods of the
characters and helps in the transition from story flashback to present.
Blood Relations tells the audience
how the repression of her Victorian
society led Lizzie into an upward
struggle against her family.
She won't be forced into a marriage arranged by her father.
So with her back against a wall of
Victorian brick, Lizzie fights
back ... or does she?"
By SHARON KNAPP
Agnes Varda's film Vagabond is
a sombre and brilliant film which
won the first prize at the 1985
Venice Film Festival. Sandrine Bon-
naire also won the French Academy
award for best actress for her strong
and finely tuned portrayal of
Mona, the rebellious secretary who
has turned her back on the system
and hitch-hikes across the French
countryside.
Vagabond
Directed by Agnes Varda
Royal Centre
Vagabond begins at the end of
Mona's story. Our first glimpse of
Mona, the woman "ni toit ni loi"
(without roof or law, its original title) is of her frozen corpse in a
ditch. The narrator is puzzled by
this young drifter's motives, and
tries to recreate the last few months
of her life by interviewing the people she encountered on the road.
Varda splices episodes from
Mona's travels with interviews with
Mona's benefactors which turn into
telling scenes from their own lives.
Everyone has been deeply affected
by Mona, although no one really
knows her. Mona keeps her words
to a minimum and her feelings hidden.
Some of her benefactors romanticize her wildness and her freedom
when that is what they want for
themselves; others condemn her for
her aimlessness when it is their own
alienation they see played out.
While Mona represents an extreme
personality, none of Varda's
characters remain untouched by the
alienation of the 1980*s.
Sandrine Bonnaire subtly
registers the changes in Mona, who
goes from being a tough and
resourceful woman into one who is
increasingly unable to cope due to
hunger, cold and drugs. Her story is
a tragedy in the Greek sense; her
fatal flaw is her inability to tolerate
any demands being made on her.
This is perhaps Varda's most
striking accomplishment. In a film
that interweaves many of the
themes of French feminism and existential Marxism, Mona's situation
does not lend itself to a simple
reading by either of these -isms.
There is something in Mona's inscrutable past and personality that
makes her shun relationships with
people. People exist for her only to
satisfy her appetites for rock music,
food and shelter.
She brags that she is doing this
because she prefers champagne on
the road to workng for the bosses.
However, Mona is a dozen years
too late to be a flower child. Her
pleasures on the road are brief, her
potsmoking interlude with a
Woodstock-like hippie and her
brief communion with a sherry sipping granny are paid for by many
cold nights sleeping in the fields.
Mona's freedom, based as it is on
her inability to cope with intimacy,
is only illusory. She moves in concentric circles, encountering the
same people again and again.
Ironically, the more she drifts, the
more she becomes dependent on
other people for her survival.
Why we don't dislike Mona for
her apathy and self-centredness is a
testament to Bonnaire's acting
abilities. She manages to reveal
Mona's childlike inability to
understand the limits of people's
hospitality and their desire for
reciprocity. We feel for Mona as
her increasing alienation causes her
to lose control over her life. As one
of the songs in the film says,
"freedom is slavery". Mona is
enslaved to her need to be free
which compels her to strike out on
her own, even when she can no
longer fend for herself.
Vagabond is a thought-
provoking film about a loner,,
revealing her through her relation-
ships. It avoids all the usual cliches
of the Hollywood goin'-down-the-
road and goin' down-the-tube
movies, and gives us a new picture
of the disenchanted and the
dispossessed, thanks to Bonnaire's
ability to bring out the complexities
of an ordinary woman. tember26, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
red spirits
shines in her role. She becomes accidentally intoxicated on what she
and Anne believe to be raspberry
cordial, and is then discovered by
her mother. This is perfect farce.
Elizabeth   Mawson   as   Marilla
nd world festival.
Cuthbert, Anne's adoptive mother,
is moving in her firm but loving
discipline of the unwieldy, unpredictable Anne. Terry Doyle as
Matthew, Manila's brother, is
everybody's favourite grandpa. His
awkwardness with words gets in the
way of his deep love of Anne, as expressed in his beautiful song, The
Words. His death near the end of
the play devastates Anne and the
audience.
The songs by Don Harron,
Mavor Moore, Norman Campbell,
and Elaine Campbell are typical
musical theatre fare: lively, clever,
corny, and sentimental. And with
26 songs, they make up most of the
stage activity.
Murray Laufer's set is beautiful
and effective in its simplicity (a note
to designers of those monster
realistic sets at the Playhouse, Arts
Club, and Freddy Wood). The farmhouse in which Anne and the
Cuthbert live is suggested by a two
dimensional wooden house outline,
sided by two dimensional mesh
trees. A table and chairs in front of
the wooden scenery comprise the
kitchen set.
The school house is a wooden
school outline, with desks and a
blackboard sitting on the stage, in
front of it. The sense here of a
child's play set lends the production
the air of childish fancy and imagination so integral to Anne's
character and to the story's magic.
Blue Velvet: ears
to a sinister flick
By RONALD STEWART
If Fellini ever made a Hardy Boys
film, the result would look a lot like
Blue Velvet, directed by David
Lynch (the man who brought you
Eraserhead and Elephant Man).
Sound weird? It is.
The film's story begins in the
"good" world of middle-class
suburbia. Our young hero, Jeffrey
(Kyle MacLachlan of Dune), finds a
severed human ear.
Blue Velvet
Directed by David Lynch
Capitol 6
A detective's daughter, Sandy
(Laura Dern — yes, Bruce's
daughter) feeds Jeffrey's curiousity
about the case; she tells him the
police have been watching a lounge
singer, Dorothy Vallens (Isabella
Rojssellini). Jeffrey decides to investigate for himself.
Dorothy discovers him in her
partment, and suddenly Jeffrey
faBsinto a world far removed from
hig. This world is dominated by
Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper), the
most repellent antagonist in films
since Richard Widmark shoved an
invalid down a staircase.
Booth has kidnapped Dorothy's
husband (who owned the ear) and
son to force her into a sado-
mascochistic affair with him.
like any good egg, Jeffrey wants
to help. Instead, he finds himself
drawn further into this dark world
- induced by Dorothy, kidnapped
by Frank.
A simple mystery, you say; but
the- characters complicate matters*
Our heroes receive our scorn, not
our sympathy. Lynch parodies
them and their world, particularly
through their bland, clicked
dialogue —- providing the film's
best comic moments.
An anguished Jeffrey asks Sandy, "why do there have to be people like Frank, why are there so
many problems in the world?"
Gosh and golly, but the guy has a
way with words.
Despite the thorough evil of
Frank and his dark world, Lynch
plays with audience sympathies here
as well. Frank actually cries during
sad 50s pop songs. This pathetic
characteristic tempts one to think,
"Holy shit, this guy's in his own
private hell."
Then, Frank shouts "I'll fuck
anything that moves!", slaps
Dorothy, and makes you doubt
your own instincts. Hopper's performance — repellant as it is —
makes the film.
Rossellini also gives an outstanding performance. She bridges the
gap between Jeffrey's world and
Frank's; her combination of
masochism, helplessness, and sexuality make her character ambiguous, not really belonging to
either world, confusing the audience as much as Jeffrey. The line
between good and evil becomes
almost indiscernable.
The cinematography also makes
the tone ofthe film sinister. Almost
every scene — especially those in
Dorothy's apartment — have a
sense of doom, of something evil
about to happen, merely because
the camera focuses on an open window or a dark staircase rather than
on the characters.
This constant suspense wears
thin, however, as nothing evil happens until later in the film.
The only other problem the film
has is some ofthe unusual imagery.
. As in Done, director Lynch breaks
up the narrative by inserting
isolated images, such as a candle
going out.
Many of these images are
hopelessly obtuse and distractive,
making the film fragmented at
points. However, some of the images, such as the insects in the
suburban lawn at the beginning,
and the bug in the robin's beak at
. the end, prove very effective.
GUILBAUT
international relations with an artistic flare.
Jennifer (yali photo
Saints to write art history
By JEFFERY SWARTZ
UBC fine arts professor Serge
Guilbaut does not believe that art
history should be written like the
lives of the saints. But Saints are
precisely what the leaders of the
movement known as abstract expressionism have become in the annals of many contemporary critics.
Professor Guilbaut turns this
hero worship on its head.
In his controversial book, How
New York Stole the Idea of Modern
Art (1983), Guilbaut persuasively
argues that this movement, which
vaulted New York into the centre of
the world cultural stage, had a
crucial but usually ignored sociopolitical context: Cold War
America.
In order to explore this problem
of post-war culture more fully, Pro
fessor Guilbaut has organized an international conference devoted to
the cultural and intellectual relations between Paris, New York, and
Montreal in the post-war period.
"Hot Paint for Cold War" began
last night at the Asian centre, and
continues today at the Asian Centre
and all day tomorrow at IRC 6. The
conference is free for students.
The Ubyssey interviewed Professor Guilbaut on the eve of the
conference.
Ubyssey: Most people have an idea
what the Cold War is, but what is
Hot Paint?
Serge Guilbaut: Hot Paint . . . the
title of the conference is of course a
little pun on the word. But in
France during the Cold War
abstiact expressionist abstraction
was called Hot Paint in order to dif
ferentiate it from geometrical
abstraction, and geometrical
abstraction was called Cold
Abstraction. So I used the term Hot
Paint because we are going to deal
with this kind of abstraction, and
also because it was hot to handle.
The partition of painting in those
years was difficult because they
were reflecting and participating in
the discourse of the Cold War.
U: Your book is titled "How New
York Stole the Idea of Modern
Art". But who is "New York"?
Who stole this idea?
S.G.: Again it was kind of a little
joke. The major work in the field
was called The Triumph of
American Painting, by Irving
Sandler. I though that was silly. So
I thought well maybe mine should
See page 12: Abstract
Train misses station
By DEAN NICHOLSON
When one thinks of the stories of
the many aces and peoples who
comprise Canada it is likely the
black people in Canada do not leap
to mind.
In an attempt to correct this the
internationally renowned Leon
Bibb has written and directed One
More Stop On The Freedom Train,
a musical cantata which tells the
story of the underground railway of
fugitive slaves coming to Canada in
the early 19th century.
At a time when the world's attention is focused on the plight of
blacks in South Africa such a story
could be very timely. Unfortunately, the Freedom Train does not
charge ahead with the power and
conviction one might expect.
Drawing on a wealth of spiritual,
gospel and freedom songs the music
is great but Bibb seems unable to
decide what form he wants his show
to take. After nearly an hour of
music and dance in which the escaping .slaves tell their story and make
their way to Canada, guided by the
Big Dipper hanging over the bare
stage, the emphasis suddenly switches to a dry closing in which the
troubles of the early black colonies
and schools are recited in a tex-
tbock  manner.
One More Stop on the
Freedom Train
By Leon Bibb
Firehall Theatre
until September 28
Although performed by a
talented Canadian cast the acting is
not convincing. The singing is
strong, although harmonies come
less from the group and more from
a synthesized organ which seems
heavy and out of place with this
type of music.
The choreography is another
disappointment; often
unimaginative it lacks real life in
most of the movements. The
characters move stiffly and without
the energy and looseness normally
associated with black music.
To be fair the show is entertaining, particularly in the lighter
numbers when the cast really seemed to be having fun with each other
and with the material. Overall,
though, one comes away thinking it
could have delivered a lot more.
The appeal and power of black
music coupled with an emotionally
relevant story should have elicited a
greater response both from the cast
and the audience. Unfortunately,
the confusion with the play's plot
and the lack of spontanaiety make
the whole a little plastic and didactic. Like C.P. Rail, Freedom Train
ran but not with the type of service
customers would expect.
Audience led through history story
By DAVE BLOM
If you like history, and if you like
it even better when its disguised as a
good story told by someone who
has lived it, then you should see
Opening Doors, Vancouver's East
End when it plays at the Firehall
Theatre again in October.
The production was adapted by
Donna Spencer from a book by
Daphne Marlatt and Carole Itter,
and consists of ten separate stories
told by characters who are composites of the real people in the
book.
The staging is a little unusual in
that the audience is led around the
building to the "homes" of the
various characters. While the sense
of intimacy that this evokes is often
quite effective, there are some problems.
Out in the courtyard at the back
of the theatre, an old Italian woman
(played by Judith Mastai) took a
break from planting her garden to
talk with us a while, and though the
street noises provided a kind of
audio backdrop, the three fire
engines, two police cars and one
drag-race that managed to pass by
while we were there did detract
from the effect a little.
Opening Doors
Firehall Theatre
coming back in October
As well, space was limited in
several of the "houses", so that
even though the theatre was no
more than a third full a lot of the
audience had to stand at times, and
in a few cases it was difficult for
everyone to see the actor.
One performance that stands out
is Lesley Ewen's "Mama Prior",
the 250 lb. proprietoress of Vancouver's first Chicken Inn who, as
we learn later from a former
employee (also played by Lesley
Ewen) "used to use them fryin'
pans formore than just cookin"
when customers got out of hand.
Ken Tsujiura makes an engaging
character of the Japanese
businessman who avoided internment during the second world war
by wearing a button that proclaimed "I'm Chinese!", because "the
white people could never tell . . .".
Aside from their location, the
common thread of these ten stories
is that they are immigrants' stories,
or the stories of their children who
are still considered foreigners in
their own country. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 26, 1986
Excellence funds threaten UBC's autonomy
By JAN DE VRIES
This article is directed at both the
University of British Columbia's
administration president, Dr. David
W. Strangway,- and the university
community.
The subject of the article is target
funding by the government of B.C.
perspectives
of university programs through the
Fund for Excellence in Education
(F.E.E.).
My objective is to remind Dr.
Strangway that by soliciting for
FEE funds he is compromising
the university's autonomy, which is
its most precious possession.
To meet my objective I shall
quote, in translation from the
Dutch language, the essence of an
article written by Prof. Dr. J.
Huizenga in the 1937 5th edition of
Elsevier's Encyclopeadia. At the
time professor Huizenga was pro
fessor of history at the University of
Leiden and chair of the
Netherlands academy of science.
"Article 1 of the Netherlands
Higher Education Act States:
"Higher education develops a person's scholarly abilities and
prepares that person for independent scholarly work. It prepares
people for positions in society that
require a scholarly background."
"The purely scholarly task is carried out primarily through instruction. Thus, according to the letter
of the Act, the University is not a
research institution. However, it
has become so in practice, particularly in the natural sciences.
"The university is always in
danger of being pushed in the direction of providing professional training. However, the University does
not have the task of delivering a
trained finished product for each
particular profession or business."
"The university does not serve
\\ OPEN IMITATION
TO 4th YEiR
ACCOUNTING STUDENTS
The partners and staff of Peat Marwick's Richmond office invite all students interested in 1987
articling positions with our office to join us for:
EVENT:
Open House
DATE:
Tuesday, September 30, 1986
TIME:
7:00 p.m.
PLACE:
PEAT MARWICK
#212-4800 No. 3 Road,
Richmond, B.C.
R.S.V.P.:
Phone 273-0011 by September 29,
1986
We look forward to meeting you. UCPA forms
will be accepted.
EVERYONE WELCOME. . .
GREAT GOLF! BEAUTIFUL CLUBHOUSE! FABULOUS FOOD!
THE ALL NEW PUBLIC
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
An Outstanding Public Course and Clubhouse
OPEN DAWN
TO DUSK!
GOLF DRIVING RANGE
LARGE BASKET       $     A    f\f\       SMALL BASKET         $   O   f\f\
OFBALLS  H.UU      OFBALLS    £..\J\J
ENTALOF $   «    fw*
LUB 1.00
Annual Range Pass $150
(UNTIL MARCH 31st, 1987)
If you purchase now you will receive a $50.00
discount on the 1987-88 annual range pass.
The Thunderbird Lounge at the University
Golf Club is pleased to present it's Fall
Entertainment Schedule by presenting:
DAVID PARIS
Fri.-Sat., Sept. 26-27 - 8:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
We can honestly say we have the best prices in town!
University Golf Club
Zlf A/^e     5185 UNIVERSITY BLVD.. VANCOUVER. B.C.
~^(WJ_W? Banquet & Office Phone: 224-7513
4TWc^ Pro Shop Phone: 224-1818
the techical-economic-political apparatus of the day. Instead, it serves
society as a whole.
"Independence is the university's
most precious possession. It enables
the University to hold high the
ideals of civilization, humanity, and
spiritual freedom. The university's
ability to play this role is particularly important during periods of
political degeneration."
To obtain F.E.E. funding the administration has compromised the
university's autonomy, its most
precious possession, by conforming
and catering to the political and
social beliefs of the day, that is, to
the beliefs of the Social Credit
government.
In its eagerness to obtain F.E.E.
money the administration has
forgotten that the university should
not be the servant of the technical-
economic-political apparatus of the
day. The offense committed by this
administration is particularly
serious because B.C.'s political apparatus, the current government, is
profoundly undemocratic and
therefore politically degenerate.
The Social Credit government
does not understand or respect
Parliament. In the fall of 1983 the
Socred majority pushed 27 bills
through Parliament in about five
weeks. Keeping in mind there arc
250 workdays in a year, the B.C.
parliament sat on 83, 96, 74, 62,
and 83 days in 1981, '82, '83, '84,
and '85, respectively.
The legislative assembly has sat
only 37 days this year. Mr. Vander
Zalm has never sat in the assembly
as Socred leader and premier. The
voters have not seen him participate
in debates on economic policy,
education, labor issues, free trade,
unemployment, poverty, native
land claims, etc.
Also, the premier refuses to take
part in an election debate with the
leader of the Opposition. Debate is
at the heart of both the democratic
process and Parliament. It would
give Mr. Vander Zalm the opportunity to show B.C. voters he has
See page 9; Professor
- INFORMATION SESSION -
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY PROGRAM
McGILL UNIVERSITY
MONDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 1986
2:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BROCK HALL - ROOM 200
- NEW STUDENTS -
Can You Enroll For A McGill C.A.?
You can, if you have an Arts or Science degree, or you're a
Commerce graduate.
You can start in May September, or January on a full-
time or part-time basis.
WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES IN
GETTING YOUR C.A. AT McGILL?
1. You don't have to write an entrance exam.
2. You can get your C.A. graduate diploma after one
year.
3. You write your U.F.E. immediately afterward.
4. You choose a January, May, or September start date.
5. You choose between full-time or part-time studies.
6. You can enter the program with an Arts, Science . . .
any undergraduate degree.
TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PREPARING
YOURSELF FOR A REWARDING CAREER, COME
AND MEET THE ACADEMIC REPRESENTATIVES OF
THE McGILL CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
DEPARTMENT.
INFORMATION ON OUR AUGUST U.F.E.
PREPARATORY PROGRAM WILL
ALSO BE AVAILABLE.
McGill
Centre for
Continuing Education
What better place to
better yourself. Friday, September 26, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Professor blasts Strangway, Vander Zalm
from page 8
substance in addition to style.
Parliament is not the only institution the government fails to respect.
In 1981 the Greater Vancouver
Regional District voted to keep the
zoning of a key parcel of land
located in South Delta agricultural,
against the wishes of the Socred
government. To override this decision, the government removed the
planning function from the
GVRD by changing the municipal
act.
For the government to change the
rules to have its way, to me, is just
about the ultimate example of
undemocratic and therefore
politically degenerate behaviour.
In 1981 Mr. Vander Zalm, as
minister of municipal affairs, imposed ALRT, the elevated rapid
transit system on the region against
the wishes of both the city of Van
couver and the regional district.
The system cost close to $1 billion,
with annual interest charges of
about $100 million.
Mr. Vander Zalm, the province's
new premier, does not understand
democracy and the purpose and
workings of Parliament. He does
not understand because he is
uneducated. Recall article 1 of the
Netherland's higher education act:
"... Higher education prepares
people for positions in society that
require a scholarly
background. . ." Examples: the
premier, the ministers of the crown,
high level civil servants including
deputy ministers.
During an interview with a
reporter from the Telegraaf, the
largest daily in the Netherlands,
when he was minister of education,
Mr. Vander Zalm boasted, "I do
not have much education, but with
common sense you can get far
here" (in B.C. . .). Yes, indeed.
You can make it to minister of
education and minister of
municipal affairs, and even to
premier of the province.
In British Columbia you can
manipulate your Fantasy Garden
out of the agricultural land reserve
and make a lot of money in the process.
Rather than allowing and indeed
encouraging the government to set
academic priorities through its
F.E.E. funding programme, the
university should return to setting
its own academic priorities.
It is the task of the university
senate, an elected body, to do so.
The faculties and departments are
then funded from the operating
grant, provided by the federal and
provincial governments, according
to these academic priorities.
OCT. 1,2,3
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. DAILY
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UBC's president has become a
technician whose task it is to juggle
the budget and write F.E.E. proposals that will please the government. Indeed, he has become "administration president". Return of
the university to its unperverted
state would allow the president to
be an academic, first and foremost.
He would then be "university president" once again.
Jan de Vries is a man who keeps his
nose to the dirt and really knows his
turnips from his potatoes. He dug
up, the premier in his garden one
day and became concerned about
politics.
RESEARCH PAPERS
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LICENSED PREMISES
Mon    Fn    11 30 9:00 p.m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundavs and Holidays   '
400 p m   9 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway    t
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Slation
"Unless that
which is
above you
controls that
which is
within yon,
then that
which is
around you
will."
Lutheran Campus
Centre
5885 University
Boulevard
224-1614
Sundays 10 a.m.
Tuesdays 6 p.m.
Jacn Daniel Distillery Named a National Historic Place by the United States Government
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, you
can taste for yourself why our whiskey is so
uncommonly smooth.
As soon as you sip the water we
use, you can tell it's
something special.
That's because it flows,
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At Jack Daniel
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 26, 1986
%^{2&&?
TODAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting and bm garden, 4p.m.-7 p.m.,
SUB 211.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Onee  Shabbat,  8:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m.,   1063
Douglas Crescent.
UBC SKI CLUB
General meeting and bzzr garden,  noon-4:X
p.m., SUB 212.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
General meeting, all welcome, noon, SUB 212A.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY CLUB
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., SUB 21S.
UBC CIRCLE K
Club meeting, noon, SUB 216.
UBC-JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Sushi and Zake social, 7 p.m.-12 a.m., SUB
partyroom.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Speeker (Mark Fettes) "Caught in the Middle —
Canada's Security in the Nuclear Age", noon,
SUB 206.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Bzzr garden, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC SKI CLUB
General meeting and bzzr garden,  noon-4:30
p.m., SUB 212.
SPEAKEASY
We  are  accepting  typists  and  tutors  for  our
registries,    ongoing,    Monday-Friday,    9:30
a.m.-9:30 p.m..   Speakeasy.   SUB   100,  across
from Dukes.
ECONOMICS STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Bzzr and magaritas garden, 4-8 p.m., Buchanan
Lounge.
SATURDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Folk night, featuring Margot Izard, 8 p.m.-11:30
p.m., Gerden Room Lounge, Graduate Student
Centre.
SUNDAY
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Worship service, 12 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd Ave.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Morning worship,  10 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Center.
SORORITIES OF UBC
Open   Houee,   all  welcome,   11   a.m.-2 p.m.,
Panhellenic House.
MONDAY
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Meeting end election of executive, noon, Grad
Student Centre, VIP rm.
SUB FILMS
Film: "Reefer Madness", 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
TUESDAY
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Council meeting, all welcome, noon. International House.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Clinic and prectice, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, Buch. B320.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op eupper, 6 p.m., Lutheron Campus Center.
SPEAKEASY
Accepting tutors end typists for registriee, M-F,
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Speakeesy SUB 100.
UBC LAW STUDENTS' LEGAL ADVICE
PROGRAM
Free legel edvice, noon-2 p.m. every Tuesdey,
SUB 216.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
General meeting and lecture on volunteering, all
welcome, noon. Wood. 1.
EAST-INDIAN STUOENTS' ASSOCIATION
Pizza night, 6 p.m., UBC Pizza.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM group "pre-swing" meeting, all welcome,
noon, Hebb 12.
Booze
breaks
Hey hipsters take a gander at Chris
meander.
All you pretenders to haute
coolture lend a lobe as Chris Wong
lays down the law on how to write
about Art in a fine rub-a-dub style.
Chris presently at the Sun, late of
the Georgia Straight and just plain
tardy when with The Ubyssey, will
set you straight on writing feisty
features, rock reviews, getting past
bouncers, embarassing questions
pertaining to monks, the good, the
bad, and Elvis Presley's brother.
Chris will be speaking in The
Ubyssey office (SUB room 241k)
this Friday at 3:30 and when he is
• finished he will tell you how to dress
cool.
bank
UBC rji (E-X-C-E ■ L- L-E-WT) xr
Th e   eateri
%
1 FEEE BURGER
I
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF & TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISN'T VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
ATTENTION ALL!
Buddy Bloodrop wants you
To give at UBC — SUB
BALLROOM — Level 2 6138 Student Union Building Boulevard,
Tuesday, September 30,1986,10:00
-4:00. Wednesday, October 1,1986,
10:00 - 4:00. Thursday, October 2,
1986, 10:00 - 4:00. Co-sponsor:
Engineering Undergraduate Socie-
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
APPLICATIONS are
now being accepted for
5 positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
1 position for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
and 2 positions for
MEN'S ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
Applications and further information can be obtained in the Administrative Assistant's office, SUB
Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
NO LATER THAN 4:00 p.m. THURSDAY,
OCTOBER 2, 1986 to SUB ROOM 238.
5 - COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
70 - SERVICES
"GOD'S IMAGINATION
AND OURS"
A worship service with instrumentalists, liturgical
dance, and DR. CLIFFORD
ELLIOTT, as guest speaker.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 28
7:30 P.M.
WEST POINT GREY
UNITED CHURCH
8th 6 Tolmie
(Just outside UBC gates!
WORK
STUDY
STUDENTS
Several students authorized for
Work Study Program needed
NOW.
— handling bulk mail
— assembling course material,
etc.
Easy work, flexible hours. Contact David Miller, 228-5398.
Continuing Education Health Sciences
UNIVERSITY HILL
UNITED AND
PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel.
Vancouver School of Theology.
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
PHONE 224-6377
6060 Chancellor Boulevard
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THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
SATURDAY, SEPT. 27
LIFE UNDER COMMUNISM:
SOVIET UNION AND CHINA
Prof.    Eugene   Kamenka,   The
Australian National University &
Prof.    Alice    Erh-Soon    Tay,
University of Sydney.
LECTURE HALL 2,
UBC WOODWARD
BUILDING
at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
COMPUTER Hyperion EX expansion chassis
with ten meg. hard disc, $2600. 681-7932 or
980-0268.
BIKE TO SCHOOL — Save on gas, parking.
'82 Suzuki GS 7S0E with helmet. $1,800
obo. Phone Rob at 733-3146 or 879-1012
(eve./wknd.).
20 - HOUSING	
STUDENT WANTED: Large room available
in home of elderly lady, full use of house,
dinner & breakfast included. Nice area, 10
min. to UBC, N/S. $250. 286-6327.
ROOMMATE WANTED. (N/S M or F) to
share furn. Kits apt. with Asian studies student. 2S61 Cornwall Ave., 1 block from
beach. $350/mo. & util. Ph. 738-6937,
Peter or Francis.
WORK
STUDY
STUDENT
One senior student authorized for Work Study Program
needed NOW.
Will conduct learning needs
assessment for physicians.
Contact Bob, 228-3250.
Continuing Medical Education
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U BYS S E Y
Page 11
Cheap booze means high social costs
In response to Mr. Vander
Zalm's desire to decrease the retail
price of alcohol sold in the province, I offer two good reasons why
this should not be.
The first is that decreasing the
price of alcohol would undoubtedly
increase consumption thereby in-
Smoked
death
I'd like to expand on Richard
Seaton's comments Sept. 16/86
Ubyssey) on the morality of your
publishing cigarette ads, by passing
on the following little-known
statistics (given for the U.S., but
roughly true for Canada):
Out of 100 young adult smokers,
— about 1 will be murdered,
— about 2 will be killed in traffic
accidents,
— about 25 will be killed by tobacco.
Jonathan Thornburg
astronomy v
creasing the enormous social and
medical costs of the already
endemic overuse of this drug. To
suggest that lowering liquor prices
would give the working person a
'break' is to belittle the importance
and the extent of the negative effects of alcohol.
Secondly, I, amongst others,
have the strong conviction that
while access to alcohol should be an
individual choice, the effects of the
drug should be borne by the users
of the drug. That is, that the retail
price of alcohol bears all, or at least
part of the social and medical costs
of its deletarious effects, as well as
funding preventative measures such
as youth education. Social costs include funding women's refugee
homes, rape and suicide crisis centres, human resource costs and
policing of child molestation, and
so on, not to mention the quiet
tragedies of anxiety and depression
in so many homes around the province. Medical costs include road,
work and domestic accidents, liver,
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stomach and neurological disease,
detoxification and rehabilitation
facilities as well as dealing with
other overt expressions of alcohol
abuse. A recent study in Nanaimo
Regional Hospital snowed 50 per
cent of admissions to be directly or
indirectly related to alcohol, and
that's at $500-odd per day, per patient.
I propose that rather than
decreasing the cost of liquor, that a
specific health/prevention surcharge be added to current alcohol
prices to meet many currently
underfunded needs. Based on
1984/85 figures from the Liquor
Control Board, a five cent increase
in the price of a bottle of beer,
cooler and cider, together with a 20
cent increase in the cost of a bottle
of wine and spirit, would generate
in excess of $40 million.
Adequate funding of prevention
and management measures of
alcohol abuse would save many
millions in B.C.'s medical costs, not
to mention the social ones. You only have to spend one evening in a
hospital emergency department to
realize how important these words
are.
Dr. Ron Aspinall
general practitioner
Green Party of B.C.
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Public Service Commission Commission de la Fonction
of Canada publique du Canada
Careers Public Service Canada
The Public Service Commission of Canada announces the following recruitment
competitions:
The Audit Trainee Program - 1987
Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Closing date: 30 September 1986
The Foreign Service Officer Recruitment Competition - 1987
Foreign Service exam: 25 October 1986
Closing date: 15 October 1986
Employment Opportunities for University Graduates - 1987
Closing date: 31 October 1986
For information on minimum qualifications and application procedures, pick up our
publications  at your campus placement office or at any office of the Public Service
Commission of Canada.
The Public Service of Canada is
an equal opportunity employer.
Canada
Being on a Winning Team-
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And it's the winners we want on
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At Coopers & Lybrand, we have an
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If you believe yourself to be a "fast track"
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You take the first step: send a resume
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C&L Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 26, 1986
Abstract expressionism jumps on to art scene
From page 7
be silly too, but on the other side. I
meant to show that what happened
in the late forties was a shift from
the centre. The cultural center of
Western culture was shifting from
Paris to New York.
But by 1945, and especially by
1947-48, American liberal intellectuals and the government of the
time realized that Paris was not and
should not be this kind of "Light".
New York should be. So they snatched away the cultural hegemony
and it was in part conscious apd in
part unconscious. It's not as simple
as the title implies, but there is a
sense of stealing, yes.
U: Was there a dynamic between
abstract expressionism and the Cold
War in Montreal at this time?
S.G.: Yes. What is interesting is
that it is not talked about. What is
talked about are the automatistes,
who were like the abstract expressionists or the abstraction in Paris.
They are known, but they are never
put into an international context.
We don't have an analysis showing
that those people were doing very
interesting stuff. Very interesting
experiments of automatiste-ism
went on in Quebec before New
York.
But the problem was that they
could not do anything with it. There
was no market, there was no
organization of museums like in
New York. There Was also no
strong liberal party like in New
York that was interested in this type
of painting because it was anti-
communist. In these three countries
you have this concept of individualism which is very central to
this period, which represented the
opposite of the totalitarian man.
U: Your views of abstract expressionism — putting it into this
political context. I wonder whether
it is possible to lose some of the initial "fan" element, some of the en
thusiasm of enjoying these paintings.
S.G.: Why? Do you think you have
to be dumb in order to enjoy painting? You don't have to be dumb.
You have to be aware, so that you
are not taken in. The more you are
aware of how things work, the more
you can enjoy them. I mean this is a
kind of romantic idea that the
dumber you are the better you are
going to enjoy a painting. I think
that's silly . . . Sorry (laughs).
I mean people are painting for
more reason than that. Especially
the generation in the post-war
period. They thought that their
paintings were going to transform
the world. They were not kidding.
Those people, their background
was in the thirties, where painting
weas supposed to change the world.
Not politcally directly, but through
the brain, through the mind of people.
U:   Does "that   differ   from   what
might be called a post modernist
perspective?
S.G.: Yes, very much so.
U: You once wrote, "Under the
cover of irony, post modernism has
revived something which has been
repressed for years: a gigantic
operation of reductionism and
banalization". Could you explain?
S.G.: (Laughter)
U: What is banal about postmodernism?
S.G.: Abstract Expressionism
became banal too. When you create
a new code of discourse everybody
jumps into it. The third generation
of abstract expressionists, they
forgot what was really at stake at
the beginning, so they just splashed
. . they just had aesthetic orgasms
by exploding on the canvas. You
know, painting as ejaculation, people used to say that in the third
generation.
Banal? That's because there is
nothing at stake really, there is no
fire in it. Modernism has repressed
all kinds of approaches, realist art,
and art that talks about social
issues. Post modernism is trying to
reintegreate this, but at the same
time they say everything is okay,
there is no more discussion . . .
U: There is a loss of meaning . . .
S.G.: Yes, there's a loss of meaning, a loss of discrimination, a loss
of "quality". But now who cares,
all this stuff is being transformed
into commodities. They are objects
for sale, and the content: who
cares?
U: I wonder if in closing, you could
briefly talk about the conference?
S.G.: I organized a conference in
1980, Modernism and modernity.
This one is more focused in scope.
All the papers are not going to be
talking aobut the three cities; some
just New York, some Montreal.
But overall the papers will give an
idea of what kind of connections
were going on there,
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