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The Ubyssey Feb 20, 1968

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Array REPORT TO EQUALIZE COUNCIL SHAFTED
By   NORMAN  GIDNEY
A controversial report by Alma Mater Society
treasurer Dave Hoye which aimed at a radical restructuring of student government was narrowly
defeated by council Monday night.
A motion to approve the report in principle
twice came to a six-six tie. On both occasions the
chair — first vice-president Don Munton on the
first vote and president Shaun Sullivan the second
time -—• cast the defeating vote.
Hoye's report calls for commissions, similar to
the present finance committee and Brock management committee, to take over much of bureaucratic
AMS work.
Undergraduate presidents, the residences representative arid the university clubs committee president would no longer sit on council. Main business
would be cairried no by an executive of seven and
up to four members-at-large and representatives from
10 constituencies.
Smaller faculties like nursing and home economics would be lumped together under one constituency and get one representative. Medicine,
pharmacy and rehab medicine would be another
constituency.
Large constituencies like arts and music would
get five; science, three; education and phys ed,
three; grad students, two. Roughly, one representative equals 1,000 students.
Criticism of the report centred around the lumping together of odd bedfellows like engineering and
architecture; and law, social work and librarianship.
"The way constituencies are lumped together
will make a lot of people unhappy," said AMS public relations officer Kim Campbell.
She voted against approval both times.
Vice-president Don Munton suggested the basis
for one representative on council should be the
smallest faculty. Larger faculties would get larger
representation.
President Shaun Sullivan favored a 25-man coun
cil, with 12 elected from specific constituencies and
13 elected at large. "You get the advantages of
both systems," he said.
Hoye said his recommendations would involve
more people in student council, would make it
more democratic and by getting trivial details out
to commissions would allow council to deal with
more relevant issues.
A report brought to council two weeks ago by a
constitutional revisions committee called for a bicameral council with a 60-man upper house. It was
rejected by council, again because of disanity within the executive.
Hoye said large parliamentary bodies such as
the 84-man UBC senate and B.C. legislature are
moribund, unwieldy groups which usually pass
things already decided.
The report will not be referred to the constitutional revisions committee, which is working on
revisions to be presented to the AMS general meet
ing March 21.
— kurl hilger photo
THE HAZE OF ULTIMATE consciousness hovers over milling throngs of students at Friday
night's arts dance. The primitive demanding beat of Tomorrow's Eyes elicited gyrating,
uninhibited responses from dancers.
Revolution needed for books
UBC librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs has called
for a revolution to make reading materials
available to students at less cost.
''The bookstore situation at UBC is an insult," he told student council Monday night.
"There has to be a revolution to make these
materials available to students at a lower price."
Stuart-Stubbs was discussing the library
situation at the invitation of student council.
In answer to a question by treasurer Dave
Hoye he said there should be a much closer relationship between the bookstore and the library.
"The library is not equipped to handle the
mass of required reading assigned by professors."
he said. "I don't see why publishers can't print
textbooks on newsprint to make them cheaper.
"Students never use a textbook more than a
year anyway," he said.
He emphasized that it was not the bookstore management's fault that facilities are
inadequate.
"They have space problems as well," he said.
Earlier Stuart-Stubbs outlined the problems
facing the library as revealed by a survey taken
in November, 1966.
"We've made a lot of progress in the last
four years, almost doubling our collection, but
it's not enough," he said.
He  said  almost  everything  done   was   done
To Page 3
See: MORE STUART-STUBBS
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20,  1968     °^§^>4
Petitions win
ballot count
The ballots of the Alma Mater Society election held Feb.
7 will be counted tonight.
Student council Monday night decided to count the ballots
cast in the election between Stan Persky and Brian Abraham
after student senator Gabor Mate presented two petitions demanding that such action be taken.
Signatures on the petitions, collected on campus last week,
totalled 1,300.
The election was declared null and void by council last
week after students' court found Persky unqualified to run for
president.
Council also decided at that meeting to accept the court
recommendation that the ballots not be  counted.
After Mate asked that council count the ballots, university
clubs committee chairman Mike Coleman moved that they be
counted.
(The AMS constitution states that a referendum may be
called on any issue if a petition of 500 signatures is presented
to council calling for the referendum.)
One petition presented by Mate was worded by AMS
treasurer Dave Hoye and contained 500 signatures. It calls for
a referendum on the question.
The other petition, signed by 300 Fort Camp residents is
not legally worded according to the constitution. It calls for
the immediate counting of ballots.
Mate presented the latter first as an indication of student
opinion, then asked council to count the ballots.
"If council is willing to go ahead and count the ballots then
I will not use the petition calling for a referendum," Mate said.
Coleman then moved that the previous motion of council
that the ballots not be counted be rescinded.
The motion, which needed a two thirds majority, passed
nine to four.
Second vice-president Kim Campbell then moved that the
ballots be counted.
"I resent having any more eggs splashed across my face,"
she said. "It's preposterous if we don't count them."
The motion to count the ballots and make the results of
the election public carried eight to four. It was then agreed
they be counted tonight at 7 p.m. in Brock.
I >'
\ Tenacious teams tug   J
UBC's engineers are trying to solve a ponderous pro- |
*   blem of poundage. 1
They want a huge tug-of-war anchorman for a 15 man 1
all-faculty team which will challenge Simon Fraser Uni- I
versity next Monday in front of the Vancouver courthouse. I
Purpose  of the weighty struggle  is  to  decide  which j
university's   queen   will  preside   at  the   three - day  North 1
American   gymnastic   championships   in   Vancouver   Feb. H
29 to March 2. Canada, the U.S., Mexico  and  Cuba will I
participate. J
Any large student who can pull hard is welcome to |
try out for the team. The first practise will be today at §
noon on the main mall. 11 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  1968
LINDE
Linde demands
action, money
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The student must be a leader, says Alma Mater Society
vice-president elect Carey Linde.
"He has to be a leader at this university because that's
the only way he's going to get anything done," Linde said in
an interview Monday.
"Although it should be the responsibility of the administration to see that the student gets the maximum ability to improve
the talents of his body and mind, we all know the provincial
situation is such that there simply isn't enough money. So, it's
the students who must demand action."
Linde, tall, married, and usually followed
around campus by his black Labrador dog,
Friar, was elected vice-president in the AMS
elections Feb. 14. He will take office late in
March.
He sees the university as an institution
faced by a severe financial crisis affecting the
     library,  book  and  food  service,  housing  and
M  ^55l|l   athletics. "The issue is clear: get more money
£     *r     ^H   ^0 invoive more people."
The crisis in athletics must be alleviated
by cutting the flights to Hawaii and taking
advantage of the fact that Simon Fraser University is right next
door, he said.
He also said the reasons for turning students away from
the recent UBC-SFU basketball game must be seriously investigated.
Linde is already working on the problem of curtailing pre-
registration next year.
"I talked with registrar Reg Parnall and dean of arts Dennis
Healy and it is clear the problems they face are not large," he
said. "Healy told me he would bring the matter up at the next
faculty head meeting March 5. Parnall said if Healy gave the
green light it was fairly certain the pre-registration program
will  continue  this  summer."
Linde sees communication throughout the university as a
major concern.
"This applies to communication between the executive and
council, between student government and administration, and
between the campus as a unit and the province as the sponsor
of all this wonderful confusion."
Linde has already begun trying to alleviate this problem
by holding open executive meetings and inviting representatives
of the administration.
After his election, he went to a meeting of the engineers
undergraduate society and spoke to them.
"I spoke, answered questions, got tanked in the library
pond, then went back and talked some more."
TYPICAL LACK OF COMMUNICATION
Linde invited UBC director of information Arnie Myers to
the first meeting of the excutive-elect last week after learning
Myers had not yet been invited. "This is typical of the lack of
communication between the main segments of our university
community."
The student must be a leader, but he must also realize the
role of the administration.
"We as students are demanding the right to sit on the
senate and eventually on the board of governors. It is upon us
to see that representatives of the administration are at our
meetings as well."
Linde believes that all major problems facing the university must be dealt with in segments.
"We can do part of housing, part of the bookstore operation, part of the library problem."
Students should be able to handle some of the book selling
on campus if they cannot have a co-op bookstore immediately.
They should also be able to handle some of the buying of
near-by houses for use toy students, he said.
On the library crisis, Linde said it should not be the problem of students, but the need forces them to get involved.
"We could use Brock, or maybe the women's gym for
emergency study space," he said.
EXECUTIVE POTENTIALLY CREATIVE
Linde says there is a potentially strong and creative executive for next year, but emphasized the need for a president
equally strong in ideas.
"We are faced with great opportunities with SUB, new
UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare and the incoming council,
and we need a president who can effectively deal with people
as individuals and will get get results," he said. "The executive
should be and will be a body without a head."
He hopes the meetings of student council, now held Monday
nights, will in future be held Thursday noon.
"This way will give the students more opportunity to see
their government in action and to participate in that government," he said.
The job of vice-president, he said, must be primarily to
deal with the local scene.
"I can't help being concerned about things like Vietnam,
but my job as vice-president must be to help students accomplish
what they want to accomplish."
Caribbean   beat
at International
Students around International House may Ibe
jumpy this week.
That's because the beat
coming from Caribbean
week activities, which
started Monday, is bound
to be infectious.
A highlight of the week,
initiated this year by the
Caribbean Students Association, is a West Indian
entertainment revue Wednesday night. The free
event will feature calypso, folk-dancing, and steel-
band music in IH starting
at 8 p.m.
Today at noon grad student Bert Nepaulsingh
will talk in IH on "West
Indian Literature in English."
Thursday features a
'cook up' lunch time and
a series of West Indian
films at 8 p.m.
A calypso carnival
dance, featuring steelband
music, will be held Friday night at the Legion
hall, Sixth and Commercial.
There will be an exhibition of arts, crafts and literature in IH 400 and 404
all  week.
Anti-calendar
work begins
Work has just begun on one
faculty anti-calendar and a second is expected to be published next week.
Ralph Stanton, arts vice-
president, said 10,000 copies of
the arts anti-calendar questionnaire have been printed and
will be distributed this week.
Law students are also preparing a course evaluation survey expected to be published
next week.
Stanton said Monday the new
anti-calendar with a initial budget of $900, will cover English
100 and 200 and other courses
ommitted from last year's survey. He said a group of about
20 students are working on it
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J Tuesday, February 20,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Senate  strikes  committees
— lawrence woodd photo
PRETTY IRENE Wasilewski donned a bikini as an election
gimmick for education presidential hopeful, George Hollo.
Irene, George's wife and another co-ed who refused to be
identified toured education lounge Monday noon with
election  bumph.
Mousers get big cheese
Education undergraduate society elections will be held today
and Wednesday.
A total of nine candidates are running for four positions
in the elections.
Presidential candidates are George Hollo, ed. 4; Barrie
Mowatt, ed. 3, and Gerry Olund, ed. 4.
Secretary seekers are Margot Haller, ed. 1, and Barb
Landels, ed. 3.
Trying for treasurer are Richard Chang, ed. 4, and Bonnie
Lefever, ed. 3.
Alma Mater Society representative contestors are Susan
Shaw, ed. 2, and Judith Sigurdson, ed. 3.
Judith Wolfe, ed. 3, is vice-president by acclamation, while
Judith Larson, ed. 1, is public relations officer for the same
reason.
In physical education, meanwhile, nominations for first
slate elections close Wednesday.
Mark Ryan, p.e. 2, and John Slamela, p.e. 3, are running
for president, while Marti Brester, p.e. 3, is trying for secretary.
Leona Thorsteinson, rec. 3, is nominated for treasurer.
First slate physical education elections will be held Feb.
28 and 29. Nominations for second slate, including co-ordinator,
public relations officer and vice-president, will close Feb. 27.
Executive elected
Russ Grierson. comm. 3, is the new commerce undergraduate
president.
In the election held Friday, Grierson beat Keith Guelpa,
comm. 2, in the vote 377 to 252.
On the same slate, Bob Drury, comm. 2, was elected external
vice-president over Glen Rickard, comm. 3. All other positions
on the commerce executive went by acclamation.
UBC senate will establish committees to
consider academic objectives and investigate
building needs.
At its meeting senate also approved a motion
that the registrar conduct the election of committee members and announce results before the
next senate meeting, May 22.
A committee on the role and organization
of senate earlier recommended setting up the
two bodies.
A change in academic year, which will begin on the second rather than third Monday in
September and end the last week of April
rather than the first week of May was approved.
Although the length of the year is unaltered,
the two terms will be equal in length.
MORE  STUART-STUBBS
From Farje 1
without the aid of university operating funds.
"Books have been purchased through a grant
from H. R. MacMillan and the Woodward library
was a gift," he said.
He said the number of volumes per student
is very low when compared to Ontario and
Alberta, that there is a severe lack of study
space and that one of the worst problems concerns the library supply of serials.
"Professors are not telling us soon enough
what serials to order so we are met with demands we cannot meet," he said.
He said the library survey will add weight
to his argument to the board of governors for
more money because it reflects the problem
from the student point of view.
"Any student with ideas on how to improve
the library situation is invited to drop in and
talk to me," he added.
New AMS exec,
calls   meeting
for  problems
UBC's newly elected
Alma Mater Society executive will hold an open
meeting Wednesday noon
in an effort to tackle
problems facing students
at UBC.
Meeting in the upper
committee room in north
Brock will be vice-president Carey Linde, external affairs officer T o b i n
Robbins, internal affairs
officer Ruth Dworkin, coordinator Jill Cameron,
treasurer Donn Aven, ombudsman Bob Gilchrist
and secretary Sally Coleman.
Although the executive
does not officially take office until late in March,
this will be its second
meeting. The entire executive except Aven met Friday noon.
The 1968-69 year will begin Sept. 9 and end
April 30.
A faculty senator said the increase in l1/^
unit courses gives urgency to the establishment
of symmetrical terms.
The proposal includes a provision that delins
have the authority to allow specific departments to begin classes later than the date
specified.
A letter urging first priority to the library
operating budget in view of a lack of study and
storage space was also discussed.
A student senator suggested providing study
in Brock when the new student union building
opens.
The chairman said the possibility was under
consideration.
In other senate news:
• Establishment of a department of compu-
tor science was approved.
• An education of the deaf diploma was also
given approval.
Whose  fault  was
the   open   vault?
The Alma Mater Society vault was left open
all last weekend.
Treasurer Dave Hoye said Monday he did
not know who was responsible for the incident,
which was confirmed by AMS president Shaun
Sullivan.
Among other goodies, the vault contains
ballots from the voided AMS presidential
election.
Nothing was reported taken from the vault,
which is usually locked tight during weekends.
LET'S SEE, that place I lived in was like a dog house, muses
Friar Hound as he fills out the AMS housing survey. Fill
out and return yours soon.
m^
WHILE TAKIMJ THE TALKJNC DOG TO TKE
POLICE, nORALTW rtET5_Al&Er?r....
I
ED THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo,
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex   04-5224.
FEBRUARY 20, 1968
Simple issue
The issue in next week's constitutional revision referendum is a simple one.
The present constitution severely limits eligibility
for the position of Alma Mater Society president. As
student court has interpreted it, the constitution restricts
potential candidates to those who have completed two
full winter sessions at UBC. This means that any student who has taken Grade 13 at a B.C. high school can
never run for AMS president unless he plans to go
into graduate school. Similarly eliminated from a chance
at office are the increasing number of graduates of two-
year junior colleges and transfer students from all other
universities.
This situation is, to put it mildly, unfortunate. As
well as eliminating Stan Persky, the constitution bars
many other highly qualified candidates for student office. The proposed revisions, as drawn up by law student Mike Coleman, are reasonable and fair. They
broaden eligibility requirements and at the same time
leave students with adequate constitutional safeguards
against the possibility of immature or ill-informed candidates.
UBC needs all the qualified presidential candidates
it can get. The proposed change deserves student support.
Potty Les
Members of the Social Credit government are prone,
by their actions, to make public asses of themselves.
Recently, for example, we have had Premier Cece Bennett's display at the federal constitutional conference.
Too, we have witnessed highways minister Phil Gag-
lardi's pathetic non-answer in the legislature to some
well-documented charges made against him.
An equally egregious piece of recent Socred assin-
inity is education minister Les Peterson's plan for a
province-wide study of the effects of drugs, particularly
marijuana.
Standing committees of the legislature, we are told,
are going to study the causes and effects of drug use.
If this were all the committee was to do we would have
no objection, although we would respectfully suggest
that instead of launching into a study of their own, the
committee investigate some of the existing scientific material on marijuana. A good deal of excellent work has
been done, including the LaGuardia Report which goes
into both medical and sociological factors involved in
marijuana use. The committee members could then
reveal what they learn to their legislature colleagues
and members of the professional press, many of whom
are badly informed about marijuana.
It is apparent, however, that an objective study of
the problem is not what Peterson has in mind. For, according to press reports, the minister hopes he can
"recommend changes in laws or other measures to halt
the increasing use of drugs." Such terms of reference
leave us in doubt as to what the committee would recommend were it to find that marijuana is non-addictive,
generally harmless (especially by comparison with alcohol), and in many cases beneficial. If such were the
results there would be little point in recommending
measures to halt marijuana use. But it is evident that
results of this "study" have been pre-determined.
Worse than the basically fraudulent nature of Peterson's "study" is his statement that "committee members may also recommend other steps to meet faulty
leadership by professors in some of the institutions in
our province on this question."
"Faulty leadership" in this context can only refer
to professors whose research has indicated that conventional views of marijuana — as expressed in Canadian
laws — are wrong. Several faculty members in the
sciences and humanities, to their credit, have tried to
enlighten students and others about this question.
They have done so in exercise of the fundamental
university right of academic freedom and the basic
human rights of freedom of inquiry and of speech. We
hope such professors will continue to exercise these
rights, even should their views conflict with public prejudices. Peterson has said students, professors and marijuana users in general will be asked to give evidence
before the committee. In view of the committee's predetermined conclusions we urge everyone concerned —
including UBC students and faculty — to have nothing
to do with this latest piece of Social Credit foolishness.
"Always give the people what they ask for, I say.'
Wow/'
Editor,   The Ubyssey:
I have just this moment returned from Half a Sixpence in
the auditorium, and I have just
one word to say: Wow! I have
been involved in  quite  a few
musical productions myself, but
never one in which there was
so much talent coupled with enthusiasm. There wasn't one
single person who let the show
down in any way. I came out
of the auditorium without having been bored for a single
moment.
CHRISTINE STECHISHIN
grad studies 6
Survey  good
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I want to make a special
point of congratulating the
AMS housing committee, and
particularly Jim Slater and
Don Munton, for the outstanding housing survey they have
prepared. This is without a
doubt the most thorough, comprehensive and well organized
piece of work I've seen on the
subject of immediate and long-
range housing needs at UBC. I
hope the students give it full
support.
J.  B. THOMAS
director
International House
Survey  bad
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
On-campus residence housing, by its very nature and by
the fact of the physical, social,
and political isolation of this
campus, creates a total environment for residents. This
necessitates a total or "holistic"
approach to residence planning. Piecemeal functional
planning creates the enamelled
dosshouse-soupkitchen environment of our present residences.
These are designed for eating,
sleeping, studying, and "recreation" — but not for living.
An environment for living is
not the mere aggregate of its
'■-;:*&
functional components. Unfortunately the AMS-UBC housing
survey perpetuates the old
piecemeal approach. So called
"objective" questions designed
to probe satisfaction - dissatisfaction with the individual facets of residence life-food, cost,
etc.—miss the point. The survey may result in "improvements", but the total effect will
be the same — sterility. The
absence of any space for individual comment on the housing
survey questionaire is an indication of the blindness of the
committee to the real needs of
students. It is a sign of more
sterility to come.
CARL DIEHL
arts 4
'Protection
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your publication printed a
letter from a lady accusing me
of protecting a cowboy singer
named Jimmy Dean from Senator Gabor Mate on my CJOR
radio show. (Ubyssey, Feb. 15)
The fact is that I felt called
upon to protect Mr. Dean because I did not wish to be
splattered by his blood! In Mr.
Dean's somewhat neanderthal
political lexicon, Barry Gold-
water is a Red! Knowing Gabor
as you do, I think you will
agree Jimmy Dean was entitled
to protection in much the same
manner as a small child that
wandered unaware into the
middle of a freeway.
JACK WASSERMAN
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
News     	
Susan  Gransby
Managing
Murray   McMillan
Photo	
Kurt  Hilger
Senior
Pat Hrushowy
Sports
Mike   Jessen
Wire
Norman  Gidney
Page   Friday
 Judy  Bing
Ass't.  City
            Boni  Lee
Gasp. Wheeze. Moan. Roar. Groan.
Shriek. Yell. Scream. Shout. Curse.
Bellow. Yodel. Choke. The sounds of
production, while created for sound
reasons, prevented Elgin Lee from
sounding Howe Sound. Nevertheless,
Paul Knojf plugged in a recorder and
was   left   reeling.   Mike   Finlay,   who
ZAP
It's rumor time again . . .
such as the one that says some
of the money behind a now-
solvent, onetime underground
newspaper is Mafia money . . .
It's said this is the reason ex-
boy wonder deejay Fred La-
trimo left Vancouver's free
press . . . Despite housing czar
Les Rohringer's assurances,
Acadia Camp and Park people
are convinced their rents will
rocket in September . . . one
family man wants his lease
amended to guarantee no rent
increase for at least six months.
Lease is signed by board of
governors chairman Nathan
Nemetz  .  .  .
Economics, pol. sci. and psychology people who inhabit the
Angus Building are peeved
they have to go to commerce
dean Philip White about how
they arrange their office and
class space . . . They say one
boss —■ arts dean Dennis Healy
— is enough . . . Ex-Ubyssey
associate editors do different
things: Al Birnie is running the
Western Gate, Vancouver's second (after The Ubyssey) quality paper. Birnie says his first
issue has sold 4,000 copies and
a second is planned forthwith
. . . Meanwhile Kirsten Emmott, ex-editor and senator, is
slinging corned beef sandwiches and knishes at Rubin's
on Granville . . .
World University Service
gray eminence Dave Zirnhelt
is contemplating the March 13
presidential election. Where,
some voters may ask, was he
in the previous election? . . .
Man who likes to think of himself as The Great AMS Kingmaker is special events chairman Gerry Cannon, the man
behind Zirnhelt . . . Cannon
is aghast that his Enemy Number One, Stan Persky, may become AMS prez . . . He hates
Persky because of a squabble
the two had over UBC's experimental college . . . Also
pressured by Cannon to run
against Persky was onetime
University of Montreal politico
Daniel LaTouche, UBC's own
separtist.
Lameduck AMS prez Shaun
Sullivan was so trembly at the
prospect of a Persky sweep
that he ran around frantically
trying to scare up an acceptable opposition candidate . . .
He even approached science
leader Robin Russell who
wasn't interested . . . UBC's
answer to Simon Fraser's faculty uproar could come when
the English department explodes . . . Many younger faculty members are uptight
about some funny firings.
was esteemed, went to press and sat
down with the thing burning his leg.
"This is an iron on knee," he said.
Irene Wasilewski, to be brief, came
in pursued by a horde of mice.
"Rats," she said. Fred Cawsey looked
over 21 and decided against all of
them, while Norm Gidney threw empty
tequila bottles in a return engage-
meent to council. Judy Young spelt
Irving Fetich wrong, but not Ann
Arky,   much   less   Lin   Tse-Hue.
Lawrence Woodd said he would,
and even did, as Bob Brown bobbed
up and down in brown rice, which
wasn't mice in the darkroom. Kurt
Hilger lept about, shouting with anger
at the bug in his shutter.
John Twigg, John Twigg, John
Twigg and John Twigg attacked Hilda
Hoopter in the jock shop. Tuesday, February  20,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
iiS^iffi^dtMM:i«©«3r^ft
'Two-faced'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In Friday's Ubyssey, Carey
Linde called me "irrational",
"neurotic", and "insincere". On
Monday, he privately apologized for being "unduly harsh".
Until now, I hadn't suspected
there was such significance in
the fact that his campaign posters showed Mr. Linde as being
two-faced. If this is his criterion of sincerity, then perhaps
hairy Carey should be committed.
MIKE  COLEMAN
UCC president
'Addlebrained'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Enough of addlebrained pomposity! Enough of virulent, vacuous verbosity! Enough of
bombastic blather! Please stop
printing letters to the editor
from waffling, whining, irreverent, irrelevant, bureaucra-
tically bungling, caustic cater-
waulers.
MIKE COLEMAN
offender
Tew  think'
Editor, Page Friday:
Hurrah for Gabor Mate!
Rarely does a person exhibit
such insight into the interrelationship between the people
and society of North America.
His thoughts, as expressed in
"Cultural Oppression in the Affluent Society," (PF, Feb. 16)
will be interesting reading to
those few people who think
about the direction in which
our society is leading us. Why
do I say few people? Because,
of all the values society displays to the individual, few
people ask themselves which of
these values are important to
him and which are not. Few
people ask themselves what
they are doing with their lives,
or why they are living at all.
Few people think about
whether or not North American society possesses characteristics that can cause a human being to become "hung-up,
screwed-up, alienated, and despairing." But this is a sad
thing—that few people think
deeply about these questions.
Because these are the most important questions a person
could ask himself.
RICHARD FULTON
elect, eng. 3
Congrats
Editor. The Ubyssey:
In Thursday's Ubyssey you
heaped praise on your own
pubsters for winning the boat
race at the Pool Capades. Crap.
The mighty team from P.E.
won the contest rather easily,
only to be beaten by the last
minute P.E. girls team entry.
In Friday's Ubyssey the picture
of the delectable creature on
the front page was none other
than Marg Clements, an erstwhile member of the P.E.U.S.,
not a "mouser". Also in the
picture with his broad and
powerful back exposed to the
camera was none other than the
glorious President of P.E., Mr.
Ernie "T.J." Yacub. Eyeing him
hungrily were two other jocks.
The whole week was a joint
effort by the faculty of education and the school of physical
education and recreation. However, a story on page 3 of Friday's Ubyssey was headlined
Ed. Week Electronic. Damn it
all, we put a hell of a lot of
work into the week and we
want due credit. Many thanks
to those who helped organize
the week and those faculties
that participated in the Pool
Capades. Much as I hate to do
it. I must ojongratulate The
Ubyssey for their fine' losing
effort.
ENRIE "T.J." YACUB
great white prez., P.E.U.S.
'One  path'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In the previous two issues of
this exalted rag the beginnings
of a great debate have arisen
between Messrs. Coleman and
Linde over the issue of the
constitutional referendum of
Feb. 27 and more specifically,
over the issue of Stan Persky's
eligibility.
Being a new member of the
AMS executive, I feel the necessity of adding my comments.
The major issue on campus
right now is STAN PERSKY.
Unless the questions involved
in his campaign for the presidency are resolved, Persky will
remain to haunt myself and
the rest of next year's council.
I don't want Persky over my
head, and neither will any new
president who will have to
continually live in dread of the
words — "you were our second
choice".
Consequently, there Is only
one path left open to us as
students. Vote for the constitutional change as worded at the
Feb. 12 council meeting. Let's
decide on Stan Persky once
and for all.
Right-wing elements can put
up the strongest candidate possible and a fair fight will ensue. Go out and beat Persky
but do it above board — festering sores do no one any good.
The efficiency of next year's
council hangs on this decision.
Let's not hide our dirty laundry any longer. Let's get Persky on the ballot, and if necessary defeat him. Vote for the
constitutional revision on Feb.
27.
TOBIN  ROBBINS
external  affairs officer-elect
Questions
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It may be old age settling in
— but the whole syndrome of
this year's AMS Council as typified by Shaun Sullivan, Lynn
Spraggs, and the AMS presidential election disturbs me
terribly as seeming unconscionably arrogant, irresponsible, immature, and small-
minded. Consequently, I have
a few questions for anyone who
is concerned enough about this
sort of democratic abortion to
think about it:
1. How many AMS Presidents of the past ten years
were eligible on election and
continued to be so during their
term in office? (ie: course load,
marks, years at UBC etc.) How
many were not?
2. How often in the past has
student court been asked to
decide on any councillor's eligibility, and what has the
'usual' attitude towards their
task been
3. Why is the AMS constitution so inflexible on some occasions that affect student interests and yet so flexible on
other occasions?
4. Why did the AMS executive panic into a decision that
the constitution needs changing in order to solve a particular problem that had been created in the first place by that
executive? If it felt flexibility
so beyond its ken why did it
not recommend a mere amending of the constitution to stipulate that exceptions to the 2-
year qualification could be
made in the case of a candidate
who had held office on either
a UBC faculty or general council executive? In my opinion
the 2-year clause is a good one
— it should, however, be loose
enough to include persons who
obviously already possess the
qualities that particular clause
tries to ensure.
5. What possible reasoning
can there be behind not making the results public? Who figures who is going to be harmed?  How?  Why?
Finally—how can we expect
the federal government of Canada to exemplify democracy—
conducting itself in an intelligent, empathetic, strong and
good manner when those qualities cannot be found even on a
university campus. After ail-
where are the nation's leaders
coming from? Frightening, isn't
it?
PENNY  DAMM
UBC library
Who's competent?
Editor. The Ubyssey:
It is agreed that law students
are not the only persons competent to sit on student court.
As Mr. Mate points out, student court is composed solely
of law students. Had Mr. Mate
taken the time to read the
relevant section of the constitution instead of running off at
the mouth he would have
found that four out of seven
places on the bench may be
filled by students from other
faculties, if any had shown Interest enough to apply to student council for appointment.
By-Law 12 (6) (f) (ii) states,
"The Chief Justice and at least
one other judge, and at least
one alternate judge shall be
members of the Law Student's
Association."
Secondly,   he   criticizes   the
"destroy the ballots decision"
as being "clearly unconstitutional" and then contradicts
his former position by stating
that the constitution should not
be strictly interpreted. Again,
a cursory perusal of the constitution would have told Mate
that the ballots need be preserved only until the general
meeting after which time they
could be destroyed. What in fact
the "Pillars of Constitutional
Morality" did was to make a
policy decision which reflected
the political realities of the situation in that it was recognized
by the court that no useful
purpose could be served (unless
Mr. Mate considers the causation of "up-tightedness" useful)
by publishing the results of a
void election. Mr. Mate's conception of political reality
seems to be such that persons
in his own position should vehemently voice groundless gut-
reactions, controvert facts and
color issues for the sole purpose of causing dissension. How
enviable a position to be in
where one can criticize the
judges for being responsible,
knowing full well that the
judges, by reason of their position are unable to defend themselves against unwarranted
and untruthful accusations.
PAUL LAWRENCE
law 2
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  1968
COURT DECISION
Below is the full  text of student court's
decision concerning Stan Persky's eligibility.
JUDGMENT OF THE  STUDENTS'  COURT
OF THE  ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE
UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Sitting Held: February 12,  1968
Oral  Judgment  Given: February 12, 1968
Written Judgment Delivered: February 16, 1968
In Re: A Reference Respecting the Qualification of Mr. Stan Persky for AMS Presidency
under by-law  4 (3)(a) of the AMS constitution.
Members of the Court Present: Chief Justice
Mr. A. M. Stewart; Judges Gary McShane, Al
Donaldson, Peter Gerger, Carol Powlett.
Making Submissions to the Court: Messrs.
Steve Gill and Mike Harcourt (for Mr. Persky).
Messrs. Bob Johnston and Dave Gibbons (for the
Society).
This is a constitutional reference placed be-
for Students' Court by a motion of Students'
Council dated February 5, 1968. The reference
is in the following terms:—
"That Students' Council refer the question of the qualification of Mr. Stan Persky
for AMS Presidency under By-Law 4 (3)(a)
of the AMS Constitution to Students' Court
as a Constitutional reference."
"That Students' Court sit no later than
Monday, February 12, 1968 and that Notice
of Hearing be given on Tuesday, February
6, 1968."
By-Law 4 (3)(a) reads as follows:—
"(3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be the following. The requirements
for successful completion of particular
years or equivalents are minimum requirements only:
(a) The President, who shall have successfully completed his second year
or its equivalent, and 'who has attended the University of British
Columbia for at least two years, and
who has not previously held the
position of President of the Society."
JURISDICTION
It is our opinion that this Court has jurisdiction to entertain the reference set before it by
motion of Students' Council. The authority for
this statement is By-Law 12 (c) (f) (viii) which
reads as follows:—
"'(viii) The Court shall be the sole interpreter
of  the   meaning   of  the   Constitution,
Code and By-Laws of the Society and
shall deliver written opinion upon any
portions thereof at the request of the
Students' Council, or any active member of the Society."
By-Law 12 (6) (f) (viii) gives the Court jurisdiction  to  deliver  a  written  opinion  upon the
meaning of any portion of the Constitution, Code
or By-Laws of the Society. Therefore, the Court
is  within  its   jurisdiction   in   attempting  to   interpret By-Law 4  (3) (a).  However,  the  Court's
urisdiction under By-Law 12 (6) (f) (viii) is not
imited to interpretations of sections of the Con-
titution, By-Laws or Code in the abstract.
Such a limited interpretation of the jurisdic-
on granted under By-Law 12 (6) (f) (viii) is un-
'asonable, for if the Court were unable to ap-
y its  interpretation of the  Constitution,  Code
•r By-Laws to particular facts, the jurisdiction
mted by the By-Law would be rendered use-
Every contingency cannot be provided for in
t abstract interpretation. The usefulness of the
Court's jurisdiction arises from its ability to
apply its interpretation of the meaning of a
section of the Constitution, By-Laws or Code to
a particular set of facts. Those facts may be
brought before the Court by way of a hypothetical question or by way of a full-fledged
trial of issues of fact.
In the reference before the Court, the Court
has taken jurisdiction over a matter involving
he latter form of proceeding. The Court there-
ore had jurisdiction to entertain the reference
laced before it.
ITERPRETATION OF BY-LAW 4 (3)(a)
By-Law 4 (3) (a) reads as follows:—
"(3); The  members  of the Students'   Council
shall   be   the   following.   The   requirements for successful completion of particular  years   or equivalents  are   mini-
mium requirements only:
(a) The  President,  who  shall have successfully  completed his second year
or  its   equivalent,   and  who   has attended   the   University    of    British
Columbia for at least two years, and
who   has   not   previously   held   the
position of President of the Society."
This   section   sets   out   the   mandatory   requirements for a student who is to sit as President
of the AMS. This section in no way affects the
eligibility   requirements    of   those   running   or
nominated for said position.
It is the finding of this Court that the By-
Law has three standards for qualification:
FIRST, the President, at the time of taking
office, must have completed his second year or
its equivalent at any institution and over any
period of time.
SECOND, the President must not previously
have held the position of President of the
Society.
THIRD, the President must be one "who has
attended the University of British Columbia for
at least two years." The Court is faced with
three reasonable interpretations of "year":—-
1) Calendar year, January-December
2) Academic  year,  September-August
3) Winter session, September-May
The Court accepts alternative "3" for the following reasons:—
ALTERNATIVE ri". CALENDAR YEAR: It
is unrealistic that a person attend the University for a calendar year and be credited with
one year's study.
ALTERNATIVE    "2",    ACADEMIC    YEAR:
It is obvious that a student can have one year's
standing without attending Summer Session.
Therefore, it is the opinion of the Court that
for a person to attend the University for at
least two years, he must be the one who has
completed at least two winter sessions at UBC.
Thus, the Court has drawn a distinction between academic requirements and attendance
requirements.
THE  INSTANT CASE
It is the opinion of this Court that the following facts have been revealed unequivocably by
the evidence.
Mr. Persky was admitted to UBC in September 1966 with nine units advanced standing,
and in the year 1966-67 Mr. Persky completed
a further fifteen units. At Summer Session 1967,
he completed a further three units.
On the basis of these twenty-seven units, Mr.
Persky was admitted to third year conditional
standing and it is the opinion of this Court that
he fulfills the requirement of completing "his
second year or its equivalent."
However, it is the opinion of this Court that
as of March 1968 Mr. Persky will not have
attended UBC for two years, no matter which
interpretation is given to the word "year".
Accordingly, we find that Mr. Persky cannot
sit as the President of the AMS in the term of
office 1968-69. The crucial point in time for an
interpretation of By-Law 4 (3) (a) is March, for
according to the By-Laws, it is in March that
the President-elect takes office <see By-Law 4
(6) (f) and By-Law 2).
RECOMMENDATIONS
Although, admittedly, it is not strictly within the terms of the reference before the Court,
it is the intention of this Court to speak to the
issue of what should be done with last week's
election for President. This Court strongly recommends that in the interests of Justice, the
election be declared null and void, the ballots
be destroyed, and that a new election be held.
It is further recommended that a motion be
placed before the student body to the effect
that the By-Laws be altered so that problems
such as the qualification of an individual under
By-Law 4 (3) (a) be brought within the jurisdiction of the Eligibility Committee.
The preceding is a true copy of the unanimous decision of Students' Court delivered
in open court February 12,  1968.
A. M. STEWART
Chief Justice
Students' Court
Work-in   protests  increase
SACKVILLE, N.B. (CUP) — Mount Allison University
students have opted for a work-in to protest residence fee
increases.
The work-in, where students will sell themselves out
to do odd jobs in the local community at 25 cents per hour,is
scheduled for Saturday when there are no classes.
Students feel the publicity from such a stunt will pressure the government to increase aid to the university.
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BNAS B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
presents
AT BUCHANAN
HILLEL SPECIAL
EVENTS WEEK
Monday, Feb. 26-12:30 p.m.
Room 102 — Robin Harger — An Ecologist looks at the
future of man with reference to population growth,
food control,  magnitude of problems.
Tuesday, Feb. 27-12:30 p.m.
Room 100 — Rabbi John M. Sherwood looks at the
future of man in terms of an appropriate religious
response to the epistemological realities of the "Space
Age".
Wednesday, Feb. 28-12:30 p.m.
Room 10*0 — Dr. Hanna Kassis looks at the future of
man in terms of progressive patterns developed by
society as  early  as  the  ancient  Near  East.
Thursday, Feb. 29-12:30 p.m.
Room 102 — Dr. David Suzuki looks at the future of
man  through  a   Geneticist's  point  of  view.
Friday, March 1-12:30 p.m.
Room 100 — To be announced.
NO ADMISSION — All students are cordially invited
to attend Tuesday,  February 20,  1968
THE     U BYSSEY
SFU s rapid growth causes
dissatisfaction, says report
Page 7
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Simon Fraser University's
sudden growth is one cause for
its faculty's dissatisfaction with
the administration, says the report of a special investigating
committee.
"This unprecedented growth,
while a matter of some pride,
is a basic cause of the malaise
we found in some parts of the
faculty," the committee members said in their 23-page report, released earlier this
month. SFU was opened in
1965.
But, said the report, "the
headaches of growth cannot
excuse all errors of administration at all times, or some at
any time."
COMMUNICATIONS   BREAK
The three - man committee
was formed in October by the
Canadian Association of University Teachers at the request
of the SFU faculty association.
The association had complained of a breakdown in
communications between it
and university president Dr.
Patrick McTaggart-Cowan.
For a week in January, the
investigators toured the campus, speaking with faculty
members. Their request to
meet with the board of governors was denied.
An example of the sense of
frustration felt by professors,
says the investigating committee's report, is the case of psychology assistant professor
Kenneth Burstein.
LAPSED CONTRACT
Burstein's contract was allowed to lapse by the psychology department head whose appointment to the post Burstein
had opposed.
After three months of appealing to the university salaries and promotions committee, Burstein was re-hired on a
one-year contract, although
president MCTaggart - Cowan
had recommended the professor be offered a normal two-
year appointment.
In addition to internal departmental failure, the committee noted the one-way communication between the president and faculty members that
led to frustration of the
teachers.
"Communication from a faculty member to the president
was frequently more successful than the replies, or even
independent communications,
from the president to the individual faculty members," the
report said.
It blamed the unsatisfactory
communication on the concept
of administration at SFU,
which it called feudal.
The president and 25 department heads hold the dominant
administrative positions, the
committee discovered. Furthermore, Dr. Gordon Shrum, chancellor of SFU, is also chairman
of the board of governors. The
chancellorship is ordinarily an
honorific post.
"Many members of faculty
distrust what they call 'absentee management'," the report
said.
BUREAUCRACY CHANGE
Although the concentration
of power in the president and
heads of departments was
necessary during the university's birth, the administration
bureaucracy should now be
changed, said the committee.
"Today it is inconceivable
that a president can run a university of 7,000 students, off
and on campus, with a faculty
of 315, with only himself at
the top and with so-called
strong heads of departments
under him.
"Unless there is a real delegation of authority at the top,
the president is likely to be increasingly confronted with
claims of maladministration of
the sort involved in the appointments we have just discussed."
To remedy the undemocratic
distribution of power, the investigating committee recommended short term appointments for all academic administrators, including members
of the board of governors.
ACADEMIC BODY
It also recommended the
establishment of an exclusively
academic body to represent the
whole faculty. Such a body
would end confusion between
the faculty and the faculty association.
The board, the president, the
faculty association, and representatives from the faculty
elected by a joint meeting of
the faculties should meet regularly, it said.
Renewable contracts should
be minimized or discontinued
completely, and a tenure program adopted, the committee
recommended.
A tenure would guarantee a
certain length of employment.
SFU chancellor Gordon
Shrum called the committee's
report one-sided.
President McTaggart-Cowan
said the report made some excellent points which the university will consider fully.
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ARMSTRONG SAYS:
Protesting is h
By PAUL KNOX
Student activism is great, says dean of applied science William Armstrong.
But Armstrong, deputy UBC president, said
in an interview Monday the tragedy of protest
on campus is that it often dies out after students
leave the university community.
"I've watched many students over the years,
and it seems they forget many of their ideals
after graduation," Armstrong said.
"This is unfortunate. There is obviously a
hard core of protesters who are able to move
many of the students to action.
"But when they are removed from this stimulus, the protest ethic doesn't stick.
"When they become members of the community, they're as resistant to higher education
taxes as the older people in the community."
Armstrong said the only way for students
to effect real changes in the government of the
university is to exercise their voting privileges
as a bloc.
He said the voting age should be lowered to
"It seems student leaders are interested
only in those institutions which provide a
political platform."
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18 to give students a voice in government education policy.
"The number of students, proportional to the
population are going up all the time," he said.
"If young people were seriously concerned
about social reform, they could change the whole
pattern of our social system within 10 years after
they graduate.
"There's little evidence that they're doing this
at the present time, or that they're making any
attempt to.
"Activists must accept the fact that they can't
achieve true democracy in the government of
their affairs unless they apply democratic methods to their efforts."
Armstrong talked at length about the function
of a university in society.
Contrary to the views of some UBC administrators, Armstrong believes the university should
be an instrument of social reform, ferment, and
dissent.
"There's nothing we need more in the world
than a generation of young people who are violently dedicated to social reform," he said. "But
seeming shallowness of this protest is causing me
some concern. Students should continue to protest once they become voters and have democratic  power.
"The university also has to be involved in
the society, and should be a leader of social
change of society. This is why there is so much
criticism of the progressive elements in the university by the community."
Armstrong maintained there are two distinct
groups of activists on campus: those who protest
the Vietnam war, civil rights and other international issues; and those in favor of student
power.
"The students who want control over the
government of   the university are much better
"Universities shouldn't put themselves in
the position where the government is dictating to them.'*
organized," he said. "But I'm a little disappointed that all their energies seem to be directed
toward representations on senate and the board
of governors.
"Students are a part of the university long
enough to be effective in its government. In
fact, there has perhaps not been enough participation by students in past years. Students should
have been represented on senate years ago.
"But the place where the real decisions are
made is in curriculum committees. Graduate students especially can make a concrete contribution there because they've been through the
courses recently.
"It seems student leaders are interested only
in those institutions which provide a good political platform."
Armstrong agreed that   several committees,
ARMSTRONG
exercise   voting   privileges
such as those dealing with food services and the
library, have little power.
"On the other hand, the housing committee
isn't moving fast enough for my liking," he said.
"We can't move anywhere on issues such as housing until we know what students want."
Armstrong also said he has little sympathy
for protest which is not constructive.
"As a technologist, I'm interested in being
creative and constructive rather than anarchist,"
he said. "I imagine this is where I'm most inflexible.
"I think most hippie protesting is an atonement for the affluence of our society. I've no
doubt that many of the people we usually call
hippies are very sincere, but it seems their protest is often misdirected.
"People like this have existed in almost every
generation.
"We were just as vocal as today's students,
"• In B.C., the people are less conscious of
the values of higher education. This is why
many of our graduates go to other parts of
Canada to work.^"
although we didn't have such highly developed
methods of communication. But instead of influencing the society, I think we changed it ourselves after we left university. I hope the present generation of students can do this too."
Armstrong thinks students are more politically mature than at any time in his 22-year
career.
"They're also more sophisticated, as a result
of today's affluence and improved communication."
Nevertheless, Armstrong believes that apathy
still exists among students.
An example of this, he said, was the meeting
held recently between students and senators on
the open senate question.
"There were more senators than students,"
he said. "Out of 18,000 students, there weren't
more than 50 at the meeting. At a science symposium I attended recently there were only 60
students from a total science registration of 3,400.
"This is perhaps because students in technical
faculties have less free time to spend on this
kind of activity."
Armstrong said engineering stunts were probably a more effective way of releasing the energies the students build up during their heavy
timetables.
He said a serious problem in our society is
the academic gap between the humanities and
the sciences.
"The great problem is that the study of social Tuesday,  February  20,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
carry on
science hasn't kept up with the advances in technology."
"This gap is particularly obvious and unfortunate at the student level. I think the universities should work first to dispel differences in
this regard among the faculty, for these certainly
do exist."
Armstrong, as well as being dean of applied
science, is assistant to acting president Walter
Gage. He is; deeply involved with the money
and space crisis currently plaguing UBC.
"Neither operating nor capital grants are
adequate this year," he said. "Our position is
steadily worsening — we're not even holding our
own. We aren't the only university in Canada
with these problems. But there's no question the
universities in Ontario and Alberta get more
money per student than we do."
Asked what the reasons for this crisis are,
he said provincial government reluctance,  sky-
We may have to revise our way of thinking about construction, in the light of the
money crisis and rising costs."
rocketing construction costs, and increasing student registration were the main ones.
"We have at present a biological sciences
building that hasn't even been started yet, because we didn't budget enough in the last five-
year plan to cover the increase in costs."
Armstrong said the biological sciences building was highest on the list of priorities for construction. After that will come new mechanical
and civil engineering building, already in working drawings.
"Beyond those three, priorities have not been
firmly established. "We may have to revise our
way of thinking about construction, in the light
of the money crisis and rising costs. We may
have to erect buildings to be occupied by several
departments  or faculties.
"I wish I knew the answer to the problem of
getting more money from the government. It's
in a serious debt situation, although they say
they don't borrow money directly.
"They also won't let us borrow any money
for capital construction. But the basic problem
is that large universities such as UBC grow away
from their local communities. We're no longer a
"University of B.C.", any more than the University of Toronto is strictly a Toronto university. We have become national and international
institutions.
"There is less interaction between the university and the community. This is unfortunate
but inevitable."
For this reason, Armstrong favors a system
whereby the federal government has control over
There is nothing we need more in the
world than a generation of young people
who are violently dedicated to social reform."
grants to universities. Such a system now exists
in Britain and Australia, he said.
"This has been a serious error in our national
policy. It will take us a long time to recover
from it.
"Creation of a national standard would also
eliminate discrepancies in provincial educational
systems, although this isn't too much of a problem right now."
Armstrong said the university's public image
is probably not at fault.
"But I do not think our new president (Kenneth Hare) will be more successful, because of
the very fact that he is a new man. This is always
the case in the first year of a new man's tenure.
I hope he will be able to do more than we have."
Private contributions to the university also
do not alleviate the space crisis, Armstrong said.
"There is a strong reaction among businessmen to giving money for capital construction.
They're happy to give money for scholarships,
but they think the high taxes they pay to the
federal government should pay for building
construction.
"We get large donations from H. R. MacMillan for library books, but not for library construction.   This is  quite deliberate."
Although the federal government does give
grants to the provinces for education purposes,
Armstrong said there is no control over the distribution of the money by the provinces.
"This is another reason for having a federal
educational system. It also eliminates differences in the attitudes of the provinces. In B.C.,
the population is less sympathetic to education
than, say, Ontario's.
"In B.C., the people are less conscious of the
values of higher education. This is why many
of our graduates go to other parts of Canada to
work."
Armstrong pointed out the question of whether any government should have control over
education was a very pertinent one.
"Nobody likes the ideas of the government
controlling what the university teaches or what
it does. But you have to look at our responsibility to the community. Sometimes the government has to intervene to avoid unnecessary
duplication.
"This was done in Ontario, which has a
committee to which universities apply for grants.
It's interesting that this committee has brought
the universities together, and they are deciding
on priorities such as establishment of schools
and departments before the proposals reach the
government.
"Universities shouldn't put themselves in a
position where the government is dictating to
them.  We  should  establish  better  rapport  be-
I've   watched   many   students   over   the
years and it seems they forget many of their
ideals after graduation.
•?
tween the universities in this province. They
must get together and present a logical case to
the government.
"It's basically wrong that they should be competing for funds.   This is what's happening now.
Asked about control of university affairs by
business and professional men on the board of
governors, Armstrong, secretary of the board,
said  it has little power.
"The main function of the board is financial,
and these men s.re useful to us because of their
experience in financial planning and their community connections.
"They have no control over courses or academic programming. It's true you can't institute
academic reform if you have no money, but that
isn't the board's fault either.
"I'd like to see one or two senior faculty
members on the board, to improve direct contact
between faculty and the board. This is done at
the present by the acting president.
"But I wouldn't apply the same philosophy
to students. The board should be a compact
group which can make decisions easily, and I
just don't think students have any real contribution to make to the board. "They haven't the
experience to participate in financial decisions."
"There   is  a   strong   reaction   among   business  men
to  giving   money  for  capital   construction.    They're
happy  to  give   money  for  scholarships,   but  they
think  the   high   taxes  they   pay   to  the   federal
government  should   pay  for   building   construction."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  1968
STUDENT   UNIONS
International student unions split three ways ideologically
By BOB BALDWIN
For Canadian University Press
DUBLIN (CUP) — It isn't
just the Iron Curtain that separates student movements in
the world.
This is the conclusion that
can be drawn from the political alignments of the representatives of the various national unions of students attending the First European
Seminar on the Democratization of Education, co-sponsored
by the International Union of
Students (IUS) and the Union
of Irish Students (UIS), January 17-19.
For the alignment was not
the traditional East-West dichotomy. There were three factions; the East European unions, the West European non-
syndicalist unions and the syndicalist unions. And from the
point of view of leftness on the
political spectrum, the syndicalists held the field.
The tone was set by the first
paper presented, an analysis
by Rylard Stemplowski of the
ZSP (Poland).
The following passage was
adopted almost unquestioned
by all delegates except those
from the NUS (Britain), the
SUS (Scotland) and the UIS
(Ireland): "The aim of the process of democratization is to
achieve a democratic education
based on the following principles:
• universality;
• free education and
economic guarantees;
• unitarism;
• progressive and democratic
content  of  education."
This process must have "internal integrity," Stemplowski
said. "The principles of democratic education are linked
with each other and one has to
put them into practice simultaneously."
Stemplowski contended that
"the process of democratization is more advanced in the
socialist countries than in the
capitalist ones." This provoked
an instant response from Geoff
Martin of Britain who irrevocably committed himself to the
statement that a socialist coun
try was not a prerequisite.
Most vocal in opposing Martin's view were three syndicalist unions from capitalist countries, Jean-Marcel Bouguereau
of UNEF (France), Harold Bre-
her of UGEQ (Quebec) and Jeff
Wellans of VVS (Belgium-
Flemish).
These groups all emphasized
the essential political and ideological nature of education
which inevitably becomes
bound up with interest of the
controlling group in a society.
They view the new role of the
university as a factory for
learned robots as being mere
reflections of the needs of the
capitalist class in an industrial
society.
Not unexpectedly, several
East European unions sought to
justify universal accessibility
as an investment by government in the future increased
productivity of university
graduates, thus subtly differing
from the syndicalist view. This
was especially evident in the
stand of Sijbolt Noords of the
NSR (Romania). Only UGEQ
and YUS (Yugoslavia) thought
to justify universal accessibility in terms of developing a
critically aware society
through education.
In terms of strategy, the
three schools of thought were
definitely delineated.
The Western European non-
syndicalists preferred to direct
their efforts toward close consultation with government and
university officialdom. Their
activities assumed reasonableness and responsibility as well
as a basic identification of interest between the students
and those who determined educational policy. Governments
and university officials were to
be thought of as friends and
not to be pushed too far.
The Eastern Europeans were
basically of the same mind although their rationale lay in
the concept of the collective
self will of a democratic socialist state. In other words, they
saw the state as representing
the people's will and therefore
they did not see the student's
role as being in a position contradictory to that of those in
control of their education. Like
the Western Europeans, they
saw themselves as lobbyists
integrated into the mainstream
politics of the state.
The syndicalists represented
a radical departure from this
point of view. They saw the
collective self interest of the
student as being in essential
contradiction to the interests
of university officialdom and
the powers in control of education — the  capitalist  class.
The syndicalists concentrate
on developing a high degree
of class solidarity to undermine
the opposition's power. This
includes affiliation with groups
of similar interest, including
labor unions. They see themselves as outside the mainstream and bent on destroying
it, not co-operating with it.
To most people the seminar
was a success. But to the Western Europeans, their conservatism guaranteed they got nothing. One wonders why they
were there.      	
HELD OYER - FINAL
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1968 GRAD CLASS
General Meeting
TODAY-NOON
ANGUS 104
All   graduating  students  are  asked   to  attend   this   general
meeting  to  help  decide  several   important  questions.
Alma   Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
World University Service
Exchange Scholarships
JAPAN — The holder is entitled to study at Keio University,
Tokyo. Students studying in the social sciences are preferred, as the Institute of International Relations and the
International Centre, where the student will have to
spend a large part of his time, are on the main campus,
which has a social science orientation.
U.S.S.R. — While the present annual programme is primarily
an academic exchange, the UBC WUS committee wants
to encourage social and cultural contacts between different societies through scholarships which are mutually
beneficial at both personal and community levels.
All enquiries concerning eligibility and  applications should
be directed to the WUS Office, Room 257, Brock Extension.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
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THE     U BYSSEY
Page  11
^K--* '^MV^
HER DAUGHTER graduated in 1947 but this sweet little old
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library and then slips into the bushes where she reads them.
jood triumphs over evil
Good triumphed over evil Monday.
Observers said it happened in the Nitobe Gardens. But
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In any event, calm prevailed. So did Irving Fetish, arts 2.
It is believed the largest-ever crowd in a Canadian coliseum
itched good's victory.
Yay, we say, for good.
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Strike brief prepared
MONCTON (CUP) — Canadian Union of
Students president Hugh Armstrong flew to
strike-bound University of New Brunswick Friday to survey the situation.
He will accompany a student delegation to the
legislature today.
Students at UNB are protesting a fee hike
recently announced by the board of governors.
The students are demanding increased government aid and abolition of tuition fees.
Friday a brief will be presented to New
Brunswick premier Louis Robichaud, his education and finance ministers and the president of
the province's committee on higher education.
In a telephone interview Monday, Jean Richard, chairman of the Moncton student council
and New Brunswick representative on the CUS
board of directors said he expects about 300
Moncton students to accompany the delegation.
Richard said between 1,500 and 2,000 University of New Brunswick students in Frederic-
ton are expected to join the march, along with
Moncton's affiliated College de Bathurst and
students from Mount Allison and other universities in the province.
Asked about the possibility of sympathy
strikes at other universities, Richard said: "On a
question like this solidarity among students
would help a lot.''
But if it doesn't materialize he won't be disappointed. "We started this strike alone and
we'll go through with it to the end," he said.
He said the faculty have supported the students, and met with the premier and the minister
of education Monday. Results of the meeting
are not yet known.
University president Adelard Savoie last
week said students who miss lectures Thursday
or later will have to make them up in their
spare time or they won't be allowed to write
final exams.
But Richard said the student union will negotiate with the university on this. He said it
would be pointless to strike if the students were
going to make up their lectures in their spare
time.
"That wouldn't be a strike,' he said. "That
would be having fun in your spare time."
So far they have received support from CUS,
the National Society of Acadians, The Acadian
education society, the New Brunswick assembly
of students (which called for a province-wide student strike in sympathy), and Mount Allison and
the University of New Brunswick student councils.
Last week the New Brunswick Federation of
Labor suggested once tuition fees are eliminated
the cost could be borne by a provincial lottery.
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Although learning to read dynamically requires no special talent or aptitude, mastering this wonderful skill is a lot like learning
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J Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  196
'Morality sidestepped'
—prof  loses  appeal
OTTAWA (CUP) — George Haggar, Waterloo Lutheran
University professor contesting the non-renewal of his one-year
contract, lost his appeal to the Canadian Association of University Teachers Monday.
Haggar claimed his contract was not renewed because he
wrote articles condemning the Vietnam war, his colleagues, the
Israelis in the six-day summer Israeli-Arab war, the character
of Waterloo Lutheran, and Canadian institutions in general.
In its decision the CAUT committee on academic freedom
and tenure said there was nothing it could do about the nonrenewal of the contract.
In a public letter to Haggar it said, "The contract was for
one year, that non-renewal does not constitute dismissal, and
that in such circumstances a faculty member has no legal claim
on the university.
Signed by Percy Smith, CAUT executive secretary, the
letter said Haggar had previously agreed that this was so.
Haggar disagreed with the CAUT decision, saying they
completely sidestepped the issue of morality.
The CAUT was critical of the university:
• for not giving a clear, written reason for not renewing
the contract;
• for a section of the university's statement on academic
freedom and tenure forbidding professors from attacking or in
any way disparaging the Christian religion.
"Criticism of Christianity and the Lutheran church in particular is to be made in a constructive manner for the welfare
of Christendom rather than its detriment," the section states.
CAUT agreed since Haggar had accepted this section when
he was hired, it could not accept his claim that academic freedom has been infringed because of his objections to the religious
basis and bias of the university.
The CAUT decision is not binding on the university since
in these matters it acts only as an advisory body on the rights
and responsibilities of faculty members.
NOTICE OF CONSTITUTIONAL REFERENCE
Take notice that Students' Court has been directed
by Students' Council to determine, with reference to the
Alma Mater Society Constitution and By-Laws, whether a
duly elected AMS executive member must register in the
academic year following his election to continue to be
eligible to hold office.
The Court sits in determination of this issue at 12:30
p.m., Wednesday, February 28, 1968 in the Students' Council Chambers.
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• Salary   range—$4500   to   $5000   per   year   and   other  benefits
INTERESTED?
For information  contact
The World University Service Office,
UBC, Brock Hall 257
SIR JAMES DUNN
SCHOLARSHIPS IN LAW
tenable at
DALHOUSIE LAW SCHOOL
Seven Scholarships — $2500 each
may be awarded to Male students, who are Canadian citizens, entering the
first year of the course leading to the Bachelor of Laws degree at Dalhousie
University. The Scholarships are renewable for students attaining a first
class average and standing in the top ten of thein class.
Successful applicants must have a declared desire to study law, must have shown evidence of outstanding academic ability and must possess in the opinion of the selection
committee the qualities needed for the attainment of distinction in the legal profession.
Candidates are invited to apply to
the Dean, Faculty of Law,
Dalhousie  University,
Halifax, Nova Soctia,
not later than March 30th, 1968
UBC  SWEAT  SHIRTS
SHORT SLEEVES
STYLE COLORS
OLYMPIC . . . white, maroon, blue, black
KODEL... powder blue, charcoal, olive green
CREW NECK.., orange, red, navy, whisky
YACHT ... yellow, powder blue, maroon
(NOT MANY LEFT)
LONG SLEEVES
STYLE COLORS
METALLIC ... silver grey, navy
OLD ENGLISH ... olive green, navy
V-NECK CRESTED SWEATER . camel, brown
PLUS' JUST ARRIVED: Lightweight CRESTED WINDBREAKERS . -. $16.95
■hmmm In: Green, Olive, Tan, and Navy
Complete Stock Sellout Continues
S.U.B. SALE-College Shop
BROCK EXTENSION
(FOR A LITTLE WHILE LONGER ANYWAY] Tuesday, February 20,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
CULTURAL OPPRESSION CONFERENCE
UBC ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26TH   TO SUNDAY, MARCH 3RD
Orgasms at home and napalm abroad. It this all our culture has to otter? Many people would object to
this shorthand detinition and yet they recognize there is a coldness to our times. Combatting alienation
and tinding meaning and community for their lives is the dilemma of the middle classes. For minorities
there is the reality of being deprived of their cultural values and excluded from the feast of the Affluent
Society. For the non-Westerner who has not felt the Napalm there is the constant struggle to stay alive.
These people watch as the foreign investment and aid flow in while their standard of living remains unchanged and the gap between rich and poor broadens. And for all these people there is the problem of
finding ways to change the conditions of their existence at a time when they are powerless.
Romeo Paquette   "Self Determination and the French Canadian'
J i      MONDAY 12:30
BROCK
Mr. Paquette has been Secretary General of the French Canadian Federation of British Columbia for four years.
Marie Baker
'Tower for Indian Communities"
Miss Baker is a member of the Canadian Indian Youth Council.
//T~JL_~I~~.. —J U..__...//
Gerald McGuigan "Technology and Humans
Dr. McGuigan is involved in the Arts One Project.
TUESDAY 12:30
BROCK
WEDNESDAY 12:30
BROCK
James Bevel  "North American Myths on the Nature of Man"
THURSDAY 12:30
F.WOOD THEATRE
Rev. Bevel, an associate of Martin Luther King, is a  veteran of the civil rights and anti-war movements.
John Porter
"Canadian Power Structure and Social Change"   ^J^ 12:30
Dr. Porter, a sociologist at Carleton University, is the author of VERTICAL MOSAIC, the definitive work on
Canada's social structure. There will be a charge for his evening speech. He is presented in co-operation
with Special Events and the Extension Department.
"Canadian Class Structure and Education"
FRIDAY 8:00
HEBB THEATRE
John GeraSSI  "Oppression: Vietnam and Latin America"
SATURDAY 1:00 P.M.
BROCK
Dr. Gerassi visited North Vietnam as a member of the War Crimes Tribunal. He is an expert on the current
situation of underdevelopment and on revolutionary movements of Latin America. He is the editor of
VENCEREMOS, the collected works of Che Guevara and NORTH VIETNAM: A DOCUMENTARY.
Ronald Kirkby "The Corruption of the Democratic Mind"
SATURDAY 8:00 P.M.
BROCK
Dr. Kirkby teaches at the Santa Jolla philosophy department of the  University of California.   A  panel of
participants. Dr. S. Kato of the Asian Studies Department and chaired by Mr. H. Rosenthal will follow.
John Doheny "1984 and the Nature of Human Liberation
Dr. Doheny teaches in the UBC English Department.
'Student Liberation
// SUNDAY 10:00 A.M.
BROCK
Greg Calvert
m
ji
SUNDAY 1:00 P.M.
BROCK
Mr. Calvert is a member of the national council of Students for a Democratic Society, a major New Left
Group in the USA. He is a former history lecturer at the University of Iowa. A panel and discussion will
follow.
H£C £tu4entA  2$c per £eMictt
$1.00   FOR  OTHERS   .    .    .   THURSDAY   to  SATURDAY 'age  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  1968
'TWEEN  CLASSES . . ,
. . . GRUNT!
Back Trudeau  movement  up and away
Organizational meeting to
choose     committee    members,
noon, today, Bu. 214. Everyone
welcome.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Baptism of Love is Mel Boring's topic in Ang. 212 noon,
today.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting noon, Tuesday, Bu.
205.
SAILING CLUB
Members planning to sail this
weekend must sign out at club
house and pick up key to sail
locker.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau and Andy Schneider: forum on modern psychology (students report on
various authors) noon, today,
Bu. 203.
IL CAFFE
Selected records, noon, Wednesday, IH 400.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Meeting    noon,    Wednesday,
Tweet, twang!
STAR CITY (UNS) — Thousands of putrescent, hideously
deformed sweet potatoes have
been converging on this tiny
prairie town for the past week
to perform in the second annual Oscarina and Jew's Harp
Quartet competition.
Bu. 204. Speaker: Dr. I. Johnston.
EAST ASIAN SOCIETY
Executive meeting noon
Wednesday at Asian studies
reading room.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Playhouse   Stage   Two   presents   Three   Rituals   for   the
Theatre.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen  Sie   und  sprechen
Sie   deutsch.   Heutemittag   IH
402. Cocktail Parti, Mittwoch.
WUS
General meeting cancelled.
ALLIANCE FRANCIASE
French conversational groups
meets   Monday   and   Tuesdays
Bu.  3348, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, IH.
HISTORY 206
Film,  Africa  Awakening  —
Sierra    Leone,    Guinea,    etc.,
noon today, Bu. 106.
DEBATING UNION
Forum debate, noon today,
Bu. 217.
HOUSING SURVEY
COMMITTEE
The  housing  survey  is  out.
If you received one, fill it out
and return as soon as possible
to the AMS office.
GSA
GSA is sponsoring a chamber
music concert featuring two
quintets   playing   Trout   by
Schubert and Oivertlmento by
Mozart Thursday, Feb. 29 8:30
to 11:30 p.m. Tickets are free
but must be obtained in advance at Thea Koerner House.
UCC
General meeting noon today,
Bu. 202. Elections.
ALLIANCE   FRANCIASE
Venez voir la comedie Elena
et les Hommes, le  29 fevrier,
dans Buchanan.
ONTOLOGY
Participate in a new situation
with  your   questions   and   discussion noon, Wednesday, Bu.
223.
COMPUTER CLUB
Honeywell Corp. representative will speak noon, Wednesday, in Ang. 314, on hardware
and communication systems.
CIASP
Muchas   Gracias   to   singers
and  others who  helped make
Coffee House a success.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Former Berkeley chaplain
Mel Boring on How to Receive
the Holy Spirit, noon, Wednesday, Ang. 112.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
William Shakespeare's
HAMLET
Sunday, 2 p.m. only
Veteran director Grigori Kosintsev
has turned out a great film of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet*. Brilliantly photographed in black and white Scope,
with an exciting dramatic score by
Shostakovich, this is above all, a
movie. Like Pasternak (whose translation he uses) Kosintev sees 'Hamlet'
as a drama of Denmark as well as of
the Prince, and he has succeeded in
rendering in visual terms both Hamlet's context and his soul. With Inno-
kenti Smoktunovsky. Subtitles by W.
Shakespeare. Venice Festival. U.S.S.R.
Varslfu Sundc,y'2 pm-
224-3730v     Students $1.25
4375 W. 10th
WEEKEND SEMINAR
Speakers   and   Informal   Discussion
THE GLOBAL VILLAGE and
THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY
Sponsored   by:   International   House,   United   Nations   Club
and World  University Service
at
LOON LAKE, HANEY
Leave   International   House   March   1,   6:30
Return   Sunday,  March  3
Cost $9.00 per person (room & meals)
Application forms at A.M.S. Office,  International  House  and  Brock
Ext. 257 - Deadline Feb. 21st
27
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
It
%ii
THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL
Witty Comedy of Manners
by  RICHARD   B.  SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed  by John  Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24, 8:30p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 - 12:30 p.m.
Tickets:  Frederic Wood  Theatre  Rm.  207  or  222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
——FREDERIC WOOD THEATREi^——
il€
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Dr. Hamilton speaks of the
possibilities and problems of
social wok as a profession noon,
Monday, Bu. 203.
Men's Oakalla volunteer
group meets for orientation
noon Thursday, Brock Ext. 361.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 dart $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
'68 GRAD CLASS PARTY — AT
Johann Strauss, Feb. 21. Tickets
$2.50 per couple from A.M.S. or
Faculty Reps. Hurry — Supply
Limited.
START THE MID - TERM RIGHT,
Dance to the varied beat of the
Sound Tunnel, Brock Hall Feb. 21,
9:00-12:30,  Admission:   $1.00.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST TAN RAINCOAT WITH DE-
tachable lining, please leave at
Math  1103.  Reward.
BLACK PURSE STOLEN LIBRARY.
Return to Pub. Office (At least all
identification.
FOUND LAST TUESDAY NIGHT.
Opal ring. Claim Pub. Office (or
phone   224-6520).
Rides & Car Pools
14
CAR POOL DRIVERS NEEDED UR-
gentiy. Central Park area, 9:30
classes,   433-5327.
Special Notices
IS
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
3 RITUALS AT STAGE 2. 8:30 Tonight through Feb. 24. Tickets at
Van. Ticket Centre, Eatons or Door
L.M.T's $1.25. Stage 2 Theatre
Dunsmuir-Beatty.
RUMMAGE SALE — WEDNESDAY,
Feb. 21. Lions Gate Memorial Hall
2611   W.   4th   Avenue.
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m., Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,  5736 University Boulevard.
TRUDEAU: BUCH 214 TODAY NOON
We  split   up  into  committees.
Choose your  committee.   Back  Trudeau   Noon  Buch   214.
HANG ON WE'RE COMING — MID-
term dance with the Sound Tunnel
in Brock Hall Feb. 21, 9:00-12:30.
Admission   $1.00.
Travel  Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
GET INVOLVED WITH CAMPUS
activities! Work on the Homecoming committee. Applications in
A.M.S.    Office.
SAVE CAMPUS KIWI. CAPTURE
Live Pledgeworms 50 cents each. F
& G Assoc.  5745 Agronomy Rd.
WANTED — J. Z. YOUNG. LIFE OF
The  Vertebrates.  Don  224-1490.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'65 VOLKS DELUXE, RADIO, heater,
seat belts, 25,000 mi., new brakes,
excellent.   $1280.   or   ?  RE  1-3957.
1965   V.W.   IN   EXCELLENT   COND.
31,000   mi.   Phone   224-6332.
HILLMAN 1951. BEST OFFER. CALL
John,   AM 6-9544  after  6.00.
1958 FAIRLANE 500 2-DR. HARD-
top. V-8 Auto, power Equip. Phone
Andy  after   5:30   p.m.   224-7030.
'60 STUDEBAKER LARK — 2 DOOR
hard top — 6 cyl. 10,000 on engine.
Phone 261-4255 Days, 277-5373 Evenings.
;61   MG.   MAGNETTE.   $780.   EXCEL-
lent   Condition.   Phone   731-8450.
1956   PLYMOUTH  HARDTOP
2  door. Phone RE 8-7070.
STD
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
146 Robson H MS-1214
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University Blvd.  228-8942
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
MAIDS, ITS LEAP YEAR AND ALL
that stuff, so hang on we're com-
ming, Sound Tunnel, Brock Hall,
Feb.   21,   9:00-12:30,   $1.00.	
MAKERS, ATTEND THE MID-TERM
Dance, at Brock with the Sound
Tunnel, Feb. 21, 9:00-12:30. $1.0C
But Beware!  — its  leap year.
Typing
40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC
224-6129   -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Please call Dallas Simkins. 926-
2741.
"GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after   10   a.m.,   738-6829.
TYPING:  PHONE 731-7551 — 9:00 TO
5:00.  266-6662  after 6  o'clock.
THESES TYPING BY MRS. J. M
McLean, Delta Business Services 35
cents per page.  Call 943-3016 or 943-
1051.
EMPLOYMENT
Help W'led—Male or Female    53
LIFEGUARDS^CITY OF KAMLOOPS
Riverside Park. Positions open for
2 males and one female. Apply in
writing before March 15 to P.S.
Hall, Beach and Pool Supervisor,
Apt. No. 4, 2176 W. 40th, Van. 13.
263-6144.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
BASIC LATIN — ASSISTANCE IN
Translation on or off Campus. As
time   permits.   228-3213   or   738-8879.
Tutoring
■4
FRENCH. ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian. Library Science tutoring given
by   B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
SPANISH LESSONS GIVEN BY
Spanish Journalist. Art Critic. $5
hour.   736-5008   after   7  p.m.
EXP. TUTORING, HIGH SCHOOL,
1st and 2nd year Math and Chemistry.   Phone  263-4005.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues   50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.
Room & Board
81
IT'S UNANIMOUS! BEST ROOM &
board on campus at the Deke House.
Phone 224-9691 for more information.
EXCELLENT FOOD — REASON-
able rates on Campus. Phone 224-
9986.
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD.
Double room places for three men.
St.   Andrew's   Hall   224-7720.
L U X U R I OUS ACCOMMODATION
superlative cuisine at Phi Kappa Pi
Vacancies now and for this summer.   Phone   224-9667.
ON CAMPUS AT PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Good food, sauna bath, colour   television.   Call   Larry   224-7843
BOARD AND ROOM WITH LAUN-
drv. Male or Female. $90 month
3165    Collingwood.   Phone   738-5689.
Furn. Houses ti Aprs.
II
POST DOCTORAL FELLOW WANTS
to share apartment with senior students.   Manu   731-7258   eves.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February 20, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
Tired Birds toppled twice
CYNTHIA LEWIS (left) and Barbara Symons are only two
of the lovely girls on the UBC synchronized swim team. The
team goes, to Edmonton for the WCIAA meet this weekend,
ApcJit iatL
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
The approach of UBC to sports is pathetic. I wonder why
the people in charge even bother running a sports program.
While attending two weekend events, I became convinced that
no one cares about the spectators or the participants in sports
out here.
The situation at Saturday's soccer game had to be a big
discouragement to the 80 people in attendance. The concession
stand wasn't open, the public address system wasn't working
and the scoreboard showed only the score.
There may only have been 80 spectators but I'm sure they
won't encourage anyone else to come to the
next game. Concessions, P.A., and scoreboard
are a public service no matter how small the
public is.
All concessions on campus have to be
handled by food services and if they don't
make money on an operation they pull out.
Just because they had to throw out some hot
dogs at a pervious event in Thunderbird Stadium, food services refuses to even have a
coffee maker at the next game.
JESSEN PLAYERS FEEL THE EFFECT
Such an attitude can only lose fans and in turn it will hurt
the players. If there is no one to cheer him on, an athlete soon
gets the impression that nobody cares and, being human, he
will develop the same frame of mind.
Another sore point is the pitch that the field hockey team
has to play on. An all-weather pitch would cost money to install
but it would soon pay for itself because it wouldn't need the
maintenance of the present one.
Saturday, despite all the recent sunshine, the field hockey
pitches were still not dry. They had been rolled but after a
few minutes: of play, pieces of turf were coming loose and
that means more money to pay to put the pieces back.
BASKETBALL ALSO SUFFERS
But this; lack of planning and disregard is not restricted
to what the athletic department calls its 'minor sports'.
The way the first Simon Fraser-UBC basketball game was
handled is history. But with only 200 tickets to give away to
the hoop rematch this Friday at SFU, one can not honestly
criticize the odd way in which the free ducats were distributed.
The athletic departments of both universities, however,
sadly underestimated the interest that the contests would draw.
On the subject of basketball, the refereeing at Saturday
night's basketball game was as atrocious as the feeble attempts
put forth by our cheerleaders.
For some unknown reason Maury Mulhern is nearly always
one of the two referees working the UBC Thunderbird's games.
Saturday he ruined a good game by calling it much too close.
By the end of the game, five players had fouled out.
The contest was so exciting that our cheerleaders forgot
their job and just watched the game. How about some cheers
for our team, girls?
HINDMARCH  ON HOCKEY
UBC's ice hockey coach, Bob Hindmarch, returned from
Grenoble, France, with nothing but praise for the play of the
Canadian national team.
Hindmarch admitted that he didn't know how Canada
could get back into the running for the gold medal but said
that a stronger national pride in our team might help.
"If people in Canada would be as enthusiastic before the
tournament as they are after the team has lost it would be
great," said Hindmarch.
The hockey coach added that Canadians were all too ready
to criticize the team for losing but they were not willing to do
anything about improving or supporting the squad.
Perhaps this attitude exists at UBC also. If the athletic
department expects to get anything out of their athletic program, then they must do more than providing the uniforms and
the ball.
By JOHN TWIGG
"Take me out coach, I'm
tired," said two UBC players
to coach Peter Mullins as they
ran past the bench in Friday
night's game against St. Martin's College of Olympia, Washington.
If nothing else, this is bush
and reminiscent of high school.
But  there  is  something else.
First, a player should be able
to play a full game under most
conditions. For example, the
St. Martin's team played only
six players Friday, while Mullins substituted wildly.
Second, the coach should be
able to see when a player is
tired and a player shouldn't
be telling his coach what to
do. When Mullins gives directions, not much response is
elicited.
Mullins may look fierce, and
his cusses may shake the rafters, but his team plays on.
Could it be that the Birds are
spoiled? Some people close to
the team think so.
After the SFU basketball disaster of Feb. 10, the Birds had
earned the title of "the epitome of ineptitude," but in a
truly Jekyll and Hyde performance the Birds looked un-
JV's
win two
As Ron Thorsen goes, so go
the UBC basketball Jayvees,
and both were flying high in
two one-sided weekend games
in War Memorial Gym.
Friday night the JV's played
Big Bend Community College
from south - eastern Washington, to whom they had previously lost by three points.
However, they were not to
be denied as the JV's ran wild
breaking the magic hundred
mark, winning 101 to 66.
UBC broke in front on the
strength of a phenomenal first
half performance by Thorsen
as his 21 points boosted them
into an insurmountable 52-34
lead. Thorsen wasn't gunning
though as he made 10 assists in
the game to tie Gordie Hogg's
JV record.
Unfortunately Thorsen finished with only 25 points and
was well off the 40 point record held by Phil Langley. But
he was still the class of the
floor as his twisting drives and
soft jumpers confounded Big
Bend.
Thorsen was not the only
star though, as Keith Marget-
son hit for 20 points and the
JV press completely rattled
Big Bend, producing several
turnovers.
Saturday was much the same
as the JV's ran over Trinity
Junior College from Langley
96-51.
Captain Bill Ruby was high
scorer for the JV's with 26
points, mostly on long jumpers.
He was 10 for 19 from the field
and six for six from the foul
line. Thorsen also scored 17
points against the outclassed
Trinity squad.
The JV's next game is their
prelim to the SFU-UBC scrap
at SFU Friday night. After this
game and in coming weeks
look for some of the JV's to
play with the Birds, particularly Thorsen or perhaps center Terry Mackay.
usually potent against a powerhouse team from St. Martin's
College,   over  the  weekend.
The Birds shot about 45 per
cent and scored 82 points Friday while Saturday they shot
40 per cent for 90 points, but
lost both games in true New
York Met style.
With three minutes left Friday the Birds were winning
76-71, but were showing signs
of tiring. Then St. Martin's
dumped in 10 unanswered
points to lead 81-76. But Neil
Murray scored two quick jumpers to make the score 81-80
with one minute and two seconds left.
St. Martin's stalled until
Murray committed a foul with
43 seconds left. Fortunately the
foul was missed and UBC got
the rebound. Frank Rotering
pumped in a jumper with only
15 seconds left and the Birds
led 82-81.
St. Martin's had time for one
more rush but again they missed their shot and in the confusion guard Phil Langley got
the rebound. He immediately
called a time out, with seven
seconds left.
But coach Peter Mullins called off the time out, presumably thinking that he had none
left and St. Martin's would be
awarded a technical foul shot.
But UBC had one left.
The referee called a jump
ball which UBC lost. A quick
pass to St. Martin's Little-All-
American Terry Easter, and
the game was over.
In my opinion, had the Birds
played this game against SFU,
they would have made the
game respectable, maybe even
winning.
Saturday night the Birds succumbed to the stronger and
taller SMC team, losing 100-90.
The Thunderbirds kept pace
with their opponents in the
first half as the score was only
48-47 for SMC, but faltered in
the second half.
Frank Rotering, UBC's
sparkplug center, fouled out
with only six minutes gone in
the half and UBC appeared to
tire as though the two fast
games had finally caught up
with them.
UBC put on a scoring spurt
in the final minutes but it
wasn't enough.
The Birds play a return
match with Simon Fraser at
SFU Friday at 8:30 p.m. UBC
enters the game 25 points down
in the total-point series for the
John Buchanan trophy.
GOING SKIING
Over  the Mid-Term
Break in your Volks?
Make sure you'll
get BACK in
your Volks . . .
Get   your   V.W.   fixed   before   you   go—all   work   fully   guaranteed
Most reasonable prices in  town
AUT0-HENNEKEN SERVICE
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)
Phone Hans 263-8121 for an estimate
GREAT SKIS
for
GREAT SKIING
Vrl/ E5p3\/|\jr
▼ rVCuU T I ▼
G-88 METALS Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 20,  1968
BILL MACKIE, star of the UBC gymnastic team, will help
represent Canada at the North American Gymnastic Championships to be held in Vancouver Feb. 29 to March 2.
The March 1 competitions will be held in UBC's War Memorial Gym.
Former mate foils
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds wish that Bill Sinclair still
played for them instead of the New Westminster Labs.
Sinclair stopped a point blank shot by UBC's Jim Briggs
Saturday after Briggs had drawn out Lab goalie Ro'bbin Davies.
If Briggs had scored, UBC would have won but instead the
Birds had to settle for a 1-1 tie at Thunderbird Stadium.
The tie kept UBC at the
head of the pack in Pacific
Coast League soccer standings, one point ahead of the
Labs. Columbus and Victoria
are only two points back of
the Birds.
This Saturday the Birds
play the improving Victoria
team in the Vancouver Island city. Victoria helped out UBC on
Sunday by beating Columbus 4-3.
The Birds missed numerous scoring chances in their game
against New Westminster as many shots whistled harmlessly
past the goal post or over the net.
UBC's Gary Thompson opened the scoring midway through
the first half, with a spectacular shot. Thompson was lying on
his back with his head toward the New Westminster goal but
still managed to put the ball past Davies with a hard over-the-
head kick.
The Birds then forgot about scoring, till Brigg's fine effort,
and played defensive soccer.
With all the play in the UBC end of the field something
was bound to happen and it did when Metro Gerela tied the
game for the Labs.
Pacific
Coast   Leag
ue
W      D     L
F
A
Pts
UBC T'Birds
6      5       3
27
16
17
West'r   Labs
6       4       4
19
17
16
Columbus
7       14
25
18
15
Victoria
7       15
24
20
15
Firelighters
6       16
18
20
13
Burnaby  V.
4      4       7
22
33
12
North Shore
2       2       9
13
24
6
Track
women superior
UBC's women's and men's track and field teams came first
and second respectively in the Western Canadian Universities
Indoor Championships held on the weekend at the University of
Saskatchewan at Saskatoon.
The women's team upset the U of S 59-52 in a spirited showing. UBC was paced by Joanne Heatherington who entered eight
events, Carol Kitchen in seven events and Betsy George with a
first and a second as well as a good showing in the 4x130 yd.
relay which UBC won.
The women were a pleasant surprise for coach Lionel Pugh
as they were expected to place about second.
The men also did well, coming second to the U of S by a
score of 97-89 on the strength of their distance runners, but
their sprinters were non-existent.
UBC came first, second and third in the one and two mile
events. It was Ken French, Bob Tapping and Tom Howard in
the mile and Tapping, Howard, French in the two mile.
In the field events, UBC garnered firsts in the long jump
from Gordon Dong and high jump from Sam Vandermeulen
while Dong finished second in the high jump and Dave Corcoran
finished second in the shot put.
Ken French won the 1,000 yards and the two mile for
UBC as well as contributing to the second place 4x440 relay
team.
Mackie leads gymnasts
Coach Bruno Klaus has the gymnastic team
on the move.
UBC's gymnasts defeated Everett Junior College 108-92 in a dual meet Saturday. Three team
members and Klaus are now headed for the
Canadian Intercollegiate Championships in Anti-
gonish, Nova Scotia, this weekend.
John Salmela, Bill Maokie and Dennis Fridu-
lin will accompany Klaus to the maritime town.
It was Mackie's brilliant performance in Saturday's meet which enabled UBC to win. Mackie
won five events and the all-around title. Off his
showing in this and other meets over the last
two years, it is no wonder that Mackie was picked to represent Canada in the upcoming North
American Gymnastic Championships.
The 19-year-old Vancouver native has been in
gymnastics for nine years and is considered one
of Canada's future stars.
Mackie joins five other men on our national
team.
Gil Larose, a 23-year-olds phys. ed. teacher
from Montreal,  appears   to be the strongest  of
the team. Larose is a former collegiate and Canadian champion. He competed in the 1962 world
championships, the 1964 Olympics, the North
American championships from 1964 to 1966 and
the  1967 Pan American Games.
Others on the men's team are Barry Brooker
from Toronto, Rick Kinsman from Fonthill,
Ontario, Victoria's Gordy Gannon and Roger
Dion from Quebec City.
Pan Am gold medalist, Susan McDonnell,
heads the Canadian women's team. Marilynn
Minaker, Barbara Thompson, Sandra Hartley,
Gail Daley and Glenna Sebestyen form the rest
of the team.
The North American Championships will be
held in the Pacific Coliseum on Feb. 29 and
March 2. The March 1 competitions will be held
at UBC in War Memorial Gym.
There will be two competitions on campus.
The first starts at 12:30 p.m. and the second at
7:30 p.m. Students will be admitted for $1 to
the afternoon events. There is also a special
student admission price for the coliseum events.
FIELD HOCKEY BIRDS
HA VE OLD PROBLEM
Every time the UBC field
hockey Thunderbirds lose a
game, the reason is their inability to finish off their scoring attacks.
Saturday the Birds lost their
third game of the season, this
time by a 2-0 score to Hawks
I. As in their previous losses,
UBC controlled the play.
"Hawks only entered our
circle three times and scored
on two of them," said coach
Eric Broom. "We had about 70
percent of the play but we
can't finish off our nice build
ups."
With three losses, UBC has
lost the chance to win their
league. But Broom hopes the
Birds will win the last encounter they have left with
Hawks, the probable winner.
In other games, the Braves
edged Jokers III 1-0, Tomahawks won 2-0 over Vancouver II and Scalps beat Hawks
IV 1-0.
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