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The Ubyssey Jan 24, 1969

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Array Teaching vs. Research
— gordie tong photo
*
By FRANK FLYNN
HARGER: I was hired as a population ecologist
from the point of view of the research I had done
and my research potential. My job was to set up a
research in marine ecology.
I went to a science symposium at Rosario Beach
«, where a philosophy professor proposed that we stop
doing research and attempt to utilize knowledge we
already had for the purpose of improving ourselves.
I stood up and said I wasn't going to give up
science because I had spent ten years getting into
the position to be able to do research.
Afterwards I thought of why I had said this and
I had to think of what science was and what I was
— gordie tong photo
doing in it and what the purposes of scientific investigation were.
I came to the conclusion that I couldn't really
answer any of the questions.
In the process of talking to people I talked to
Dr. Chitty and he said he was leaving this year to
go on a sabbatical and would I care to take his history of philosophy and biology course.
I jumped up and down with joy and said yes.
Just before Christmas I was informed my performance was acceptable and that I would be recommended for a two year appointment with possibilities of further appointments.
UBYSSEY: How long have you been here?
Harger: About a year and a half.
While I sorted my own ideas and designed the
course my research started to slide down and I didn't
publish about the stuff I had .already done.
When I was asked about this I said I would like
to devote my time to teaching and philosophy of
science or philosophy generally as well as research.
I no longer see it as an end unto itself as it once was
for me.
The accompanying interview was held in the
office of Robin Harger, an assistant professor in
zoology.
Harger has been notified he will not receive
any appointment past June 1970.
After the Harger interview, The Ubyssey contacted Dr. W. S. Hoar, head of zoology for his
comments.
Hoar said the decision was made by a committee of eight senior members of the department.
"There are three areas to be considered -when
evaluating members of the department. These are
teaching, research and departmental activities in
committees and the like."
Hoar said Harger was hired to develop research in marine biology.
It was the decision of the committee Harger is
not doing what he was hired for and is therefore
being released.
Hoar stated he was personally very fond of
Harger and there was nothing personal involved
in the action.
Subsequent to this, some of the senior members
of the department decided on the basis of my statement they were not interested in having a person
whose ideas on research didn't coincide with theirs.
I was told that I had a one year terminal, (ed.
note: in the letter noting Dr. Harger of his termina-
a
tion, Dr. Hoar, the head of zoology wrote the following:
"Although we have been well satisfied with your
enthusiasm and dedication to the teaching program
we are disturbed about your research productivity
and your stand with respect to future development
of a research program. As you know, this department is committed to not only first class undergraduate teaching but also to the nuturing of dedicated
research groups which would be led by scholars of
international repute.")
Ubyssey: Have you started looking for other positions?
Harger: I've started to think about it and talk to
people but it's difficult.
Even when I publish about the research I have
done I'm not in a position to sell myself as a population ecologist.
I don't see any possibility of getting a job in any
department of  philosophy.
So I'm in a quandary. I'm caught between what
I_ was  trained  for  previously,  and
what I think I would like to do.
It is acceptable to have the views I
have and talk, about the things I've
been talking about provided you'vi*
already gone through thirty years oi
research. When you have reached
a ripe old age and are within th(
superstructure and cannot be dislodged you are then at liberty t<*
comment on the way which you sec
society should evolve.
Another thing is that I haven'i
exactly kept my mouth shut with
respect to the local news media.
So I suppose there is a certain
amount of reasoning to do with getting rid of trouble makers.
At this point I'm feeling • quit'
bitter about the whole thing.
Ubyssey: What course would you
be teaching next year?
Harger: Zoology 400 again because
Dr. Chitty has asked me to and perhaps the experimental ecology cours**.*
I am teaching now.
Ubyssey: Are you going to appe-il
this ruling?
Harger: Yes, I'll appeal it on principle because I think I got a raw.
deal. I'll appeal to the academi**
committee of the faculty association
I feel I was probably tried in ab-
sential and that comments I hail
made about the nature of research
were used as arguments to engag**
my dismissal out of context and rm
one at that time asked me what I
felt.
But this is the general sort of way
these committees work so I guess i'
behooves one to keep one's mou'li
shut and hide in the bushes and do
one's researching.
Ubyssey: Have you talked to tin1
head of your department since yen
received the letter?
Harger: Yes. He told me he didn't
see any reason to reconsider.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1969
Vol. L, No. 37 <*^*48 228-2305
Under the covers
Course unions formed  p.2
Flowers in Concrete    p.2
Straight in straits?   p.3
A Trip to WW II p.4
Page Friday .._  p.5
Letters p.14
Sports   p.14
'Tween Classes  — p. 16 Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24,  1969
Zirnhelt wants student
criteria for new prez
Tenders have been called for the construction of a new UfiC
administration president.
Well not quite. But Alma Mater Society president, Dave
Zirnhelt is looking for students to formulate criteria by which,
from the students' point of view, Kenneth Hare's successor should
be chosen.
He said any students willing to write up their own views
on the subject or to survey those of others and arrange them
should contact him in his office.
Zirnhelt said the submitted papers will be discussed in council and a working paper will be derived to be presented to the
committee making the decision.
r*^*^r^Jr=Jr=Ji=ir=Jr=Jr^r=-Jf=Jr=J t-*=Jt=J r=Jr=H=Ji=ir=ir=ir=ip=*Jf=*
A Flower in a Concrete Plant
This column is continuing (wow!) as a s:rvice to students
who have any kind of a problem concerning UBC. All questions
should be sent to Flower in a Concrete Plant, Ubyssey offices,
SUB, or left in the ombudsman's office, in the main foyer.
Q. I think that on Friday and Saturday evenings, and
during exam timj, (he SUB cafeteria should be left opTi until
11:30 p.m. Can anything bo done about this?
A. We found that, according to the caf. teria staff, operation of the cafeteria un'il 11:30 on Friday and Satu'day nigh's
is uneconomical, as it would mean paying a t extra four-hou
shift each night. The extra business that would result would not
be enough to pay for this, so the result of the extra service
would be raised prices. However, the cafe will probably be open
during final exams.
For students who need late-night coffee, there is a 24-hour
hot-drink machine at the foot of the east stairway of SUB.
Q. Do students have to pay to park in the visitor's parkin*,;
lot behind Brock Hall at night?
A. We spoke to the traffic office about this and found
out students with a valid parking sticker may park in any lot,
without charge, after 6:00 p.m. This excludes, of course, lots
marked Faculty and Staff, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
tsT**"
$50,000 LIFE INSURANCE
(Initial Amount)
(20-YEAR  DECREASING   CONVERTIBLE  TERM   INSURANCE)
IT WOULD PAY YOU TO COMPARE
THIS WITH ANY OTHER TERM PLAN!
MONTHLY   PREMIUMS   (P.A.C.   PLAN)
AGE   21   -     $7.48 AGE   35   -   $13.56
AGE  40   -   $19.85
AGE  45   -   $28.69
AGE (25    -    $8.21
AGE  30   -   $10.03
Feme Jean
OCCIDENTAL LIFE
OF CALIFORNIA
PHONE  763-3417  (CoHect)
WRITE BOX 341, WESTBANK, B.C.
PROBLEMS
Increase your
reading speed
comprehension
study skills
UBC READING IMPROVEMENT COURSE
• 6 WEEKS, STARTS JAN.  27
• 2 CLASSES PER WEEK
• USE OF READING LAB ALL YEAR
NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE $35
NON-STUDENT $55
CONTACT
EXTENSION DEPT., EAST MALL
OR PHONE 228-2181
M\ ■■   -^t^^i^fwIS^.;,,: • -. ■--- ■ ■• „
j,*?'        < ■        * ' f   •^?&*'***V&? ^-*4    -      "** *■ **V ■-.•**
— david walford photo
MEMBERS of the anthropology and sociology union discuss the latest crisis, ah  bureaucracy.
New look in academic reform
spreading slowly but surely
Would you like to see greater
student influence regarding
curriculum and the general operation of academic departments?
Would you like a way of
meeting and exchanging ideas
with other students in the same
department?
If so, your answer may be a
course union.
Course unions are the newest, fastest growing and potentially most important development in the campaign for academic reform.
Basically, a course union involves the organization of students within a particular department for the purposes of
influencing academic policy
and, in some cases, providing
a forum for ideas on the subject involved.
The guiding light for new
unions is the PSA (political
science, sociology, and anthropology) department at Simon
Fraser University.
The PSA students union,
formed in August, has now
been granted complete parity
with faculty in all major departmental decisions.
At UBC, however, the situation is not as highly advanced.
Promising beginnings have
been made in graduate studies
and some courageous attempts
are being made on the undergraduate level, where, in a reversal of the cherished drama,
organizers are encountering
surprisingly co-operative faculty and not surprisingly apathetic students.
"{Last year there were only
two or three grad student
unions," said economics grad
student John Dickenson, "there
are now 30."
The unions exist in such varied departments as Anthropol
ogy and Sociology, Chemistry
and Physical Education.
Dickenson described the purpose of the unions as being twofold; to bring greater democracy to the affairs of the departments and to provide a
social club for students.
Dickenson said the response
from faculty members has been
varied.
"Some departments have invited grad students to participate in departmental affairs,
some departments are uninterested and some have responded
negatively," he said.
"Most of the department
beads did not respond favorably."
Dickenson described student
reaction as mixed but generally
encouraging.
"About 80 per cent are generally apathetic," he said,
"there are about five or six
active people in each department."
One of the more successful
grad unions is the history
union.
The union, formed in September, has begun a series of meetings with faculty committees
regarding; curriculum, grading,
finances and the graduate reading room.
As is the case with most
unions, there have not yet been
any concrete changes.
"Students are spending a lot
of time fighting for elementary
things," says president Bob
Griffiths.
"This is not a question of
student power but of proper
running of the department."
"The faculty would drag
their feet all along the line if
they weren't pushed."
Dickenson said he is currently attempting to form a com-
WATCH UBYSSEY, TUESDAY, 28 JANUARY
for full programme of the
Festival of the Contemporary Arts
29 JANUARY - 7 FEBRUARY
mittee which would coordinate
the activities of all grad unions.
The committee would be
composed of one representative
from each union.
"The aims of the committe-*
would be to get increased graduate participation in departmental affairs, to improve communication between the grad
student executive and grad »
students in general, and to serve
as kind of a clearing house for
grad student problems," Dickenson said.
Of the undergraduate unions,
two of the most successful have
been the Anthropology and
Sociology and English Literary
unions.
The   English Literary   union   "*
has occupied the old Ubyssey
office in Brock and has miraculously made the place fit for
human habitation.
The room is used as a combination office, lounge and
seminar room.
On the political front, three
students sit as voting members
on the English department -j,
council and 12 students are
members of the student-faculty
liaison committee.
"We reached a peak last term
when 150 people attended a
general meeting," said union
vice-president Andy Scott.
"Since then things have gone
down to a core of about 25." _
Scott said the faculty has
been more co-operative than
expected.
The Anthropology and Sociology union, formed October, is
beginning a series of special
lectures and films, and is publishing a regular newsletter.
Student policy will be made
at general meetings relayed to ,
the   department  through   nonvoting student observers on all
committees.
The union is also beginning
a campaign for the construction
Continued  Page  13
See: UNIONS
EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY' Friday, January 24, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— dirk visser photo
SUSAN JACKS . . . beyond the clouds
"Daves manifesto
"is not dead yet
"Fair Weather or Foul?" has not been scrapped.
„       For those of you who don't remember, this was a brief on
S" University   reform   presented   by   the   Alma   Mater   Society   to
faculty, senate, and the board of governors last summer.
Various deadlines were made in the brief for negotiations,
forming of student-faculty committees and presentation of progress reports.
Although most of the deadlines were not met, Dave Zirnhelt,
president, is pleased with ihe progress being made.
"Students' council wasn't prepared to force anything," he
said, "as long as the administration knows there is a certain
urgency to it."
Zirnhelt said there is agreement between senate and students
and terms of reference outlines were drawn up in December.
"Things are going on really well," Zirnhelt said. "The Sub-
'Commissions of the AMS-Senate Joint Conference are working
now, and a preliminary report is expected for March 7."
The joint conference is a group of 20—ten senate members
and ten students—who are studying lie brief in weekly meetings.
The conference members are also broken down into a number of sub-commissions which are studying the specific recommendations of the brief.
The general area of student participation being studied in
these sub-commissions include academic and administrative ap-
X*«* poin+.ments, student housing and educational financing, physical
planning, and the presence of students on all governing bodies
of the university.
Residents
looking
for rebate
They're pulling the old
student power bit in the
new towers at Totem
Park.
A petition has been
placed on each floor of
the towers to ask the
UBC housing administration to rebate on the
spring term residence fee.
Residents have complained they shouldn't
pay the full fee because
of "inconvenience" and
"lack of service" caused
by the "failure to complete construction of the
towers."
Representatives of the
residents are meeting
with housing director Les
Rohringer today to legitimize his authority over
the residences.
Straight is deep
in money trouble
By JOHN ANDERSEN
"We almost went under during our last issue," lamented
Dan McLeod, editor-in-chief of the Georgia Straight, Thursday.
"The financial situation is really bad — we have no money.
It's as simple as that."
McLeod blamed the current crisis at the Straight on the
frequent court actions against the paper.
Sentencing on the most recent case is due this morning.
Since it began publishing in 1967, the Straight has been Involved in three major court actions.
McLeod said the newspaper is still paying lawyer's fees from
the first court case — when Vancouver license inspector Milt
Harrel revoked its business license.
The Straight won its right to publish in that case, although
McLeod will not say how much it cost them.
The second case involved a charge of criminal libel arising
from an article published July 19, 1968. The article clamied to
be awarding prominent citizens for "noteworthy" acts.
One of the recipients was Magistrate Lawrence Eckhardt,
who had found several persons guilty of loitering at the Vancouver courthouse fountain. For his ruling in that case, Eckhardt
received the "Pontius Pilate Certificate of Justice" in a satirical
article in the Straight.
The Crown charged libel against the paper, McLeod, and
writer Bob Cummings.
Judge C. W. Morrow of the B.C. County Court will hand
down his decision at 10:30 this morning at the courthouse.
The third case, in which the Straight, McLeod and cartoonist "Zip" Almasy are charged with obscenity is still in progress,
continuing next on Jan. 28.
They were charged following the publication of an Acidman comic strip in which famous world figures were shown nude.
The Straight has not even started to pay the lawyer's fees
in the latter two cases.
McLeod would not comment on the court cases, fearing
another libel suit.
The future of the Straight depends on the success of a benefit dance planned for the Garden's Auditorium Feb. 2. Donations
can be mailed to Defence Fund, Georgia Straight, 217 Carrall
St., Vancouver 4, B.C.
The Straight is currently selling 10,000 copies of each issue.
Seventy per cent are sold by the street-corner vendors, many of
whom depend on sales for their living.
The editors and office staff are presently unpaid.
"We can't even give them bus fare," McLeod said ruefully.
Montreal cops bust
students at meeting
MONTREAL (CUP) — Montreal police hauled 100 students
from a meeting room in
CEGEP Mont St. Louis here
Friday after they were called
in by administrative officials
to enforce a school regulation
banning student meetings not
approved by the administration.
The police action came as
the latest in a series of repressive measures authored by
CEGEP administrators around
the province. School officials
have been clamping down
severely to ward off fresh outbreaks of student protest in the
provincial junior colleges.
In October, the entire
CEGEP system was shut down
for two weeks as students occupied   11   of   the   23   schools
Smart students fail multiple-choice
Multiple-choice testing and education
just don't mix, an authority on testing
said Wednesday.
"These tests corrupt education," Dr.
Banesh Hoffman told 250 professors and
students after illustrating the ludicrous
aspects of testing.
The greater your knowledge, the
■harder you think, the less chance you
have of getting the "right" answer, he
said.
"Ambiguity is inescapable in this type
^f question, unless you ask for a fact."
He  said  the reasons  for  choosing  a
particular answer were usually more important than whether or not the answer
was "right".
Hoffman, author of The Tyranny of
Testing, spoke of children who picked the
wrong answers for "charming, whimsical
reasons".
"These are children of imagination,"
he said. "If you ridicule them for it, you
do enormous psychological damage."
Hoffman concluded with the story of
some researchers at an American university who programmed a computer to
evaluate essays and considered it a monu
mental breakthrough for objectivity.
The 31 criteria which the computer
used included items such as the number
of commas, average length of the words
and sentences, and the number of common words used.
"If you took an essay marked this way
and mixed up all the nouns for instance,
and then fed it back through the machine; it would give the same mark," he
said.
This was entertainment with a touch
of horror.
and tied up the rest in study
sessions and boycotts.
The students were protesting
massive deficiencies in the junior college system.
The 100 students were evicted from the meetirfg which followed a protest march through
the streets of Montreal Friday
afternoon. The march was a
show of solidarity with students all over the province who
have been victims of administrative crackdowns.
If your bag
is travel . . .
"It's  about  the  copy,"   ,
said  the   usually   patient *
printer.  "Where the hell  $
is it?" <■>
The red faced blorgs
just sat in the office —
with the copy — while
the presses, blocks away,
sat idle. Meanwhile a ,
voice from on high crap- J"
ped about a message not
being a message until it's
received.
The Ubyssey needs a »
copyrunner with a car to
traverse the blocks twixt ■>
the two, so The Ubyssey
goodies reach the public.
Financial details can be
arranged —• babv! Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24,  1969
MWSSfY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
Whatever can go wrong* will.
—Murphy's Law
LETTERS on page 13
EDITORS: Maurise   (Blushing   Rose)   Bridge,   and
Co-ordinating           Al   Birnie unpolluted    Elaine    (It's    Hard    to    be
„ . _ . Humble) Tarzwell. John Gibbs llght-
plews   **onn TW|99 footed around Nick Orchard, who pro-
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner tected his self-writeousness from vicious-
Managing       Bruce   Curtis ly engineered barbs. Barb Wire chewed
ANMt.i. d»..i  i^.HV ointment    with    Harry    Krishna    as    a
Associate   Paul Knox prelude to Alisen Brown*s entry. Other
Wire   Irene Wasilewski ubsters downing petitfours amid ribbon-
Page  Friday   Andrew  Horvat cutting and tripewriter lacks were Nate
.Mrfc ,:_. M.,-,-in Smith,   Laurie Roff,  and artsie  Charlie
■"►pons   jim madam „ .,   *    T, .,      * ,      ^        ...
JT Hulton.   Kennedy petered  out  early.  If
Pnoto       Fred   Cawsey Paui   Knox,   can   Renee   Russel?   Bryn-
Ass't News    John Gibbs jolff's   son   Erik   heralded   the   pix   of
Gordie    Tong    and    Dirk    Visser    with
Patti  Cake  came in  for opening fes- aahh's,  but David  Walford's  Susan,  he
tivities and  revived  the ancient  Pango just hung out his tongue and blathered
Pango    ceremony    of    tongue-in-cheek too. Sports was devoid part today. Meet
diamond-swallowing,    to    the    astonish- if you like Friday, but bring your own
ment of Straight arrow John Andersen, chairman.
CLAUSTROPHOBIA
By NICK ORCHARD
Pop went festival
The Student Union Building is officially
opening.
I don't mean to make a fuss, but it is rather
disconcerting to find that for all the time I've
spent in SUB the past few months the building
has been officially closed.
Now various people are running around
putting up ribbon and cutting it down again (I
suspect the opening was scheduled for after
Christmas because ribbon is half price then),
downing free coffee and waving pretty balloons.
An added attraction of the opening is Erlen-
meyer Flask, Science 2, paralyzed in dancing
position since the Pop Festival last week.
Some people are upset about the way the
Pop Festival was handled.
I find no reason to complain, although I
had no idea they intended to use the entire
campus for it.
In fact, the first I heard of this was when
I came upon a man taking tickets at the entrance to D lot and saw hundreds of couples
boogalooing around the Volkswagens.
Over in the barn nearby, Nat Swine, agriculture 3, sat on a stool and moaned, "The
cows will never come home unless they turn
down those car radios."
Meanwhile, and this is where it gets exciting, I turned in my ticket and got my hand
stamped with the word "Pop". This was in case
I tried to escape.
Taking out my trusty compass I began to
push my way towards SUB, trampling over the
dead bodies and twitching victims of claustrophobia.
I made it to the building within a few
hours, and after a lengthy conversation with
what turned out to be a door post, I was inside.
"There certainly are a lot of people here,"
said an unidentified promoter, and I was inr
clined to agree with him.
I said hello as politely as I could to the man
I was stepping on, then crawled upstairs, being
careful to avoid the bubble gum being blown
by the kindergarten convention.
It was interesting to observe the new dance
patterns which evolved out of the festival.
This involved, in its most elaborate form, a
flexing of the stomach muscles, moving of the
shoulders up and down, and various facial contortions.
This is not to be confused with the expression of pain, which, although similar in style,
was derived from elbows in the kidney and
crushing of the toes.
Through the generosity of the festival prdf^
moters,  Erlenmeyer has  been  cast in bronze
with part of the $11,000 grossed. He now stands
outside  the  ballroom  as  a  permanent monument to the Pop Festival.
POLICE OIM CAMPUS
114 persons face criminal charges because armed policemen intervened
In an academic dispute at Simon Fraser University In November.
This article, from The Ubyssey of Jan. 28, 1944, shows what forcible Interference
in a supposedly autonomous university can mean.
As the German authorities in occupied countries feel their grasp over the
unwilling slaves slipping, a ruthless
and intensified persecution of leaders
and the intellectual elite mounts.
After weeks of effort, M. Vienot,
who spent some three years in the
French "underground" and who is now
Editor's note: From reports we
have received through underground
organizations from students of all
Occupied Europe, we see that this is
only the beginning. Students have
been made to suffer brutal atrocities
under Hitlerite Europe. To aid them,
as fellow students, we at UBC should
give to our fullest extent in the coming I.S.S. (International Student Service) campaign.
in London in charge of co-ordinating
all information coming out of France,
has compiled the full details of the
shocking efforts made to destroy the
University of Strasburg on November
25 of 1943.
The University of Strasburg was
moved to Clermont-Ferrand in 1939 at
the outbreak of the war. At 10 o'clock
on the morning of November 25, the
building on Garnet avenue which had
been turned over to the University, began to be encircled by German troops.
Inside the professors were in the middle of their lectures. An hour later, as
the classes finished, the teachers informed the students that it was forbidden
for anyone to leave the building as the
German soldiers, armed with Tommy-
guns and revolvers were advancing
from all directions. The words were
hardly spoken when the soldiers entered and ordered all the students and
teachers into the large assembly hall
on the main floor. At 11:15 some 500
persons were present. The Germans
gave a sharp order for all to raise their
arms and remain absolutely still. At
each window the machine-guns had
been placed in position. The room was
extremely cold and the students who
had no opportunity to put on their
overcoats, were obliged to remain rigid
and shivering for nearly an hour.
At noon the professors were ordered
to leave the room—arms always above
their heads — and once in the hall the
students were told to follow. They were
divided into two groups — one to the
right and the other to he left. This operation was directed by a young pro-
German student named Mathieu assisted by a German girl student (planted
in the University as an informer), wearing a fur coat. All the members of the
University of Strasbourg except four
teachers were sent to the left, the
teachers and pupils of the University
of Clermont-Ferrand to the right. A
third group was made up of Jews and
foreigners.
At the same time. Professor Dan-
gean, rector of the University saw
the German police officers who burst
into the room after breaking the door
with kicks. They were armed with
tommy-guns. The rector followed
them into the hall asking what had
happened. He was accompanied by
Professor Coulomb who received a
harsh order to raise his hands. He
turned in surprise, and the German,
furious, mowed him down with
machine-gun bullets.
In the hall, all the students and professors were searched and then forced
into trucks which were taken to the
barracks of the 92nd regiment and
there parked in the courtyard where
they were forced to remain several
hours. More and more students arrived,
brought in from the university library,
the law school, the faculty of theology
and so forth. Due to the extreme cold,
several of the elderly professors fainted.
At seven o'clock in the evening the"
students and teachers were herded into
hot barracks and a close examination
of identity papers followed.
Always under the direction of Mat- _
hieu and the German girl student, the
police   divided   those   held   into   two
groups, one of which was to be liber,
ated later. Among those arrested were,
Kirrmann, professor of chemistry; Kay-
er, medicine; Froster, dean of the faculty  of medicine;   Scremooukhov,  lecturer in Russian;  Unbegaum, director
of the Institute of Slav Studies; Yvon,
professor of science; Chabotty, mathe-'-
matics.   Licmerowitz, mathematics,   as
well   as   Sabron,   Eppel,   Houey   and
others, all of the University of Strasbourg. In all 98 students and 11 or 12
professors were  arrested.   Eppel,  professor of Theology was seriously wounded by a gestapo agent who arrested him
at his home. He suffered nine intestinal
perforations and died December 2 .       ^^
There followed a thorough search
of  all  the university of  Strasbourg
buildings,   particularly   ihe   library
where every book was examined. As
the students and teachers of ihe university   were   assembled  a   Gestapo*
agent   on   guard   shouted   at   ihem:
"This time the University of Strasbourg is really dead I"
We are still a long way from Strasbourg. But the precedent has been set. Students
and faculty, like industrial and professional workers, must not tolerate outside
Interference in their disputes with administrations.
Our standards of academic autonomy demand that the criminal charges
against the 114 be dropped.  Page
Friday
Goes
Cheap I
I
In a desperate last ditch effort to rape the minds of
present (and future too)
CKNW listeners, Page Friday stupes to concurr with a
fantabulous dullerfortynine-
day special COMPETITION!!!!! The object of the
game is to guess (correctly)
the five groovy greats of lit
whose mugs are mustered on
this deluxe tribe-size flier
(i.e. cover. Ed. Note).
Our lucky and talented winners, are awarded an exciting, erotic, ectoplasmic four
hours in the torrid seething
hot balcony of none other
than Vancouver's one and
only Olympia Theatre with
moviedom's hairiest nemesis
STEPHEN ACASSANDRAQ
SCOBIE.
We know that a lot of you
guys and gals will be phoning in, so the big tie-breaking
question will be, just which
magazine did the intrepid
Page Friday staff steal these
groovy cartoons from? On
your mark, get set, groove . ..
The number to call is 228-
2309.
Reliable sources have reported that the B.C. Government advertised recently in a certain paper for
hostesses for its pavillion
at Expo 70 in Osaka. All
the necessary qualifications for this job, at least
in the eyes of our local
hickocrats, were feminine
charm, something which I
should think is not the
specialty of starch-fed folk
from Social Credit ridings,
and an ability to play the
bagpipes.
This combination might
have been a winner at the
last Kelowna Regatta, however, I shall not swear by
its success at Osaka. Even
if the B. C. Government
were not to hire specialists
in Japanese, but were to
train students of B.C. History as guides, giving them
a chance to learn Japanese, this would be a step
in  the right direction.
Supposing the B.C. Government would do the only
just and logical thing,
namely to hire half the
class of fifty taking the
Japanese 100 course and
allow them to perfect their
language abilities in the
six months they will be in
Osaka. B. C. then would
have some twenty - five
fluent speakers of Japanese who could then translate a few more Nobel
prize winning novels and
maybe a couple of big iron
ore contracts besides.
r
pt 2WO
Wildroot revival
By MIKE QUIGLEY
Ubyssey Grease Music Critic
Do you remember^ Elvis Presley? I don't mean the
Elvis of the cinematic travesties which continue to
haunt the Orpheum or the Elvis of the recent TV special
where the pseudo-grease flowed right off the TV screens
into the living rooms of America. Instead, I mean the
throbbing, pulsating Elvis-the-Penetrating-Pelvis who
rocked, knocked and shocked it to everyone back in
1957 on the Ed Sullivan Show.
Or do you remember Frankie Lyman? The Four
Freshmen? Buddy Knox? The Coasters? (Yakity-Yak!)
The Five Satins and a hundred other groups? If you
used to groove to their hits with the disc-jockeying of
Red Robinson and Buddy Clyde on CJOR and CKWX,
then you're ready for the sound of Ruben and the Jets.
Cruising with Ruben  and  the  Jets  (Verve V6  5055-X),
the latest album by Frank Zappa and The Mothers of
Invention, is bound to set rock music back at least
fifteen years, it not earlier. All the prerequisites of early
rock music are here: the ubiquitous nasal vocal harmonies
backing the lead singer with priceless phrases like
"Boppa dooayyydoo", "Bop bop bah", and "Oooo-oo-oo-
oo-oo-oo" with an oozy sax riff once in a while.
The Mothers explain their somewhat revolutionary
new album this way: "This is an album of greasy love
songs and cretin simplicity. We made it because we
really like this kind of music (just a bunch of old men
wi'h rock and roll clothes on sitting around the studio,
mumbling about the good old days). Ten years from
now you'll be sitting around with your friends someplace
doing the same thing if there's anything left to sit on."
As well, there's a poignant plea: "All the guys in
the band hope tha* you are sick and tired like they
are of all this crazy far out music some of the bands
of today are playing. They hope you are so sick and
tired of it that you are ready for their real sharp style
of music. They are good socially acceptable young men
who only want to sing about their girl friends. They
wan* everybody to start dancing close back together
again like 1955 because they know that people need to
love and also want to hold on to each other. Even holding
hands is okay to them. They want you to hold hands
and dance the bop and fall in love to their music. One
of the main guys in the band was filing me a couple
of weeks ago when we were talking about how only
half the guys in the band ever show up at rehearsals
most of the time ... 'If the people would just hear my
plea I would give everything just to sing the songs tha*
was turning me on in high school'."
Of course, all our contemporary cynics, well brainwashed in the various schools of negative thought, will
snicker at the possibility of Cruising wiih Ruben being
significant, saying it's jus* another you-can-have-this-
shit-and-eat-it-too put-on in the tradition of earlier
Mothers albums like We're Only in ii for the Money.
R
U
B
E
N
However, I'd be inclined to suspect such a reaction,
after considering Zappa's perceptive article in Life Magazine last June on the history of rock music and its
relationship to our society.
Zappa is probably one of the best pop musico-
sociologists around today and is well aware that our
ignorance today towards pop music and pop culture in
general is appalling. For example, have you ever tried
to obtain early copies of Hit Parader Magazine for research? Or do you ever hear any music on CKLG older
than last week's Boss 30*, except for a few not usually
representative hits played on "Solid Gold Weekends"?
Cruising with Ruben and the Jets is a noteworthy
attempt to start exposing old rock for its campy qualities
and also provide an album of some historical significance
for those of us who were where it's at fifteen years
ago but have had our musical tastes destroyed by a
steady progression of brainwashing by insidious formula
radio techniques, such as that of CKLG.
Consider, for example, the good vibrations -which
can be produced by such lines as "Jelly Roll Gum Drop,
go* my eyes on you / The way you do the bop / Like a
spinning top / The Pachuco Hop / And the L.A. Slop /
You make a street car stop / At the soda shop / And
my eye-balls pop ..."
If your cultural perspective extends at all beyond
the bopper-oriented commercialism of. CKLG-AM and
the pseudo-intellectual sound-of-mucous nose-drippings
of CHQM-AM and FM, then for God's sake buy Cruising
with Ruben and the Jets. And while you listen to it,
drink beer or white port with lemon juice or a bottle
of Vaseline Hair Oil. And give thanks for people like
Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention who care.
*
r
j
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24,  1969 p£ £hvee
Loot, a double take
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
Death: hateful and smug companion of conscious life's attack on time; source of conjecture, mystery and piety
since man's dawn; breeder of
symbols, rituals and myths, in
order to fathom and endure.
Where the yet-living' mourn
and exalt the barbaric object
from which its divine soul has
finally freed itself. Before a
wooden box the bereaved, in
this secular age, reconsider
their own lives, and consequently,  the church.
Joe Orton's play Loot is about
death, and about the reaction
it causes among the members
of the deceased's family. The
aura which the termination of
life has been able to create
around itself is the ultimate
happy hunting ground: it enables Orton to take the potshots he loves at so many of
the audience's sacred cows that
they emerge benumbed from
the theater.
Loot begins shortly after the
death of a catholic mother and
wife. Father is accordingly
morose and, with the help of
the deceased's pious nurse, preparing for the funeral. Son
Hal, however, with the help of
the mortician, has just completed a bank robbery and is
more interested in a place to
stash  the  loot  than  in   filial
condolences. Mother's coffin is
the obvious answer.
Complication enters, however.
A man from the water board
—who looks and acts like Inspector Maigret—enters on the
spoor of the robbers and also
the nurse, who has a somewhat shady past (unfortunately never substantiated by an
exhibit "a") and who has meanwhile joined the robbers.
Maigret, here called Truscott,
eventually cracks the case of
course, but quickly accepts a
share of the take and busts
righteous, law-abiding father
instead.
On this basic theme of death,
Orton almost jumps over himself in his effort to wreck our
every value. Were ' I to be
philosophical, I could say that
for Orton, loot, money, objects
for the consuming body have
completely replaced the spiritual virtue rituals aspire to as
the driving life force. This is,
of course, vividly evident in
Loot, as one of man's most
sacred rituals becomes a tool
for its direct opposite: the
spirituality and mystery of
death and the spirit is perverted into a means to satiate the
body. Loot takes the place of
myth (or God) in this thorough
invasion of values. The nurse,
Fay, exemplifies the whole
blasted cosmic schizophrenia
with her pious mouth and her
satanic action.
But all that is a pretty heavy
trip which I don't want to get
into, because the main effect
of Klaus Strassmann's direction of the play is hugely humorous — comedy like we
haven't seen at the Freddy
Wood for some time. Orton's
one and two-liners are a riot:
"What? Bury my mother
naked!? This is a Freudian
nightmare." or: "Have you
seen paradise?" "Only in photographs."
When Alan Scarfe enters in
trench-coat and moustache,
a caricature representation of
justice, he immediately choreographs all action around himself and carries it to its logical
and absurd conclusion.
Strassmann has preferred to
spotlight the wit, the situational humor of the play, rather
than dwelling on Orton's gut-
turning jabs at morality. We
saw the same kind of subtle
dog-eat-dog development in
Entertaining Mr. Sloane by
Orton a couple of weeks ago.
There the mood was fairly
heavy, characters were real,
and the action moved into the
grotesque. In this play, however, Strassmann sweeps the
turn-around of values decidedly into the farcical, and the benumbing effect of Orton's onslaught is less direct—on-look-
ers can laugh easily and with
less apprehension.
By DERMOT HENNELLY
It is a commonly held and socially acceptable
fallacy that a person must do something, or be
by his nature, useful. This is, of course, a fallacy
of the productivity syndrome, the original sin
of which is mammon; money, or to be more
succinct: loot. But loot is not the original sin; it
is merely the original symbol for it. Or symbols,
for loot is a diverse entity. It exists in many
* disparate forms, an increasingly common one being the university degree.
The original sin was God, which was the best
excuse mankind ever invented to avoid the
existential dilemma, namely: life. There used
not to be a dilemma, in Eden. But curiosity bred
relativity, which in its turn bred the value system.
And so became symbolised insecurity, which had
always existed, but only been understood by the
sensual appetites. Loot emerged as the inevitable
i   temporal laxative.
God,   the   ultimate   value   system,   has   become
loot, the root of all evil. A negative force, the
positive pole of which is  a destructive freedom,
-   for the existence of loot necessitates deprivation,
Friday, January 24, 1969
a well-known truism on which the rich persistently
play the Nelsonian-eye trick; today known under
such platitudinous titles as Her Majesty's Government's Commission On The Underprivileged, or
Senate Investigation On Poverty. The newspapers
are full of the concern Reasons are offered, symptoms are mistaken for causes, and the wheel continues to revolve as today's newspapers report
yesterday's editorials on tomorrow's solutions. But
in the productive tomorrow, life is sacrificed for
loot, and the ritual is interpreted as progress.
It is all for loot It may have been or it may
still be for God. It is the argument, at any rate,
for productivity. Not creativity, for there is nothing
to create. As all is, there can only be it. All else
is wishful thinking, called ambition, another social
fallacy, a direct descendant of loot. But the Hem
of Our Father in Heaven's Garment still exists for
a large some. Church-going is still a way of life,
like bingo. And why not, for much loot can be
reaped by the simony of beliefs — anaesthetic
against the awful insecurity of faith.
There was no end.
There will be no beginning.
THE     UBYSSEY
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Festival — Burns
By  STEPHEN  SCOBIE
Once upon a time, long ago, it used to be
that a "Festival" was something special, out of
the ordinary, automatically worth going to. But
in these degenerate days, Festivals are five
cents for twelve.
A "real" Festival, I feel, should at the very
least go on for a week, and provide some attraction not normally available. It is not simply
a matter of shoving half a dozen rock bands
into SUB for an evening and proclaiming a
"Pop Festival."
Film Festivals are in an especially bad way.
Once, a prize at Cannes or Venice meant something; now, just about any foreign film can
drum up a "Special Jury Prize" at San Sebastian or somewhere in the Balkans. The Varsity Theatre's current Sunday afternoon offerings are advertised as the "Finest from the
Festivals". Which Festivals, it doesn't say.
As far as Vancouver is concerned, the big
daddy festival, The Vancouver Festival, is dormant this year, sleeping off its debts. But there
is still a plethora of festive festivities available
to the avidly cultural.
Here on campus, the Festival of Contemporary (try not to mispronounce it) Arts,
launches forth next week on its annual binge
of the avant-garde in various media.
In the film world, two separate Festivals
are preparing to dazzle and delight the public.
Perhaps some elucidation as to their differences
will enlighten the confused addict.
First to get going will be the Vancouver
International Film Festival (VIFF), which will
be showing in the QE Playhouse in June. VIFF
is an internationally accredited body, run (I
can assure you!) on a non-profit basis.
VIFF relies heavily on short films, and
offers prizes therein. This year, the whole
system of judging and classifying the entries is
being organized in close co-operation with
the local community of film-makers. Contrary
to what my friend Mr. Ruvinsky reported in the
Province, there are no entry fees of any kind.
But in its public showings, VIFF also hopes
to present a wide range of feature films from
all over the world. Since VIFF does not pay
entrants, and has (to quote Frank Zappa) no
commercial potential, it obviously cannot afford
to attract the biggest names in current film
production: that is left to the other Festival,
the annual Varsity Festival in July. Don
Barnes, the Varsity's manager, has all the
money of Odeon Theatres behind him, and can
offer lucrative commercial bookings to follow
up the one-day showings of the films at his
Festival. So if you want to see the latest Bergman or Godard, or the latest critical rage in
New York, the Varsity is the place for you.
VIFF's films are necessarily more modest in
reputation; but that is not to say that they are
lower in quality. It is at VIFF that you will
see first films by directors who will become
major names over the next few years; it is at
VIFF that you will see excellent films from
all countries which lack the big names to be
commercially attractive to American distributors. Whereas the Varsity deals with these
distributors, VIFF deals direct with the government film boards in the countries of origin.
Thus, most of the films at the Varsity are
those which are shown in New York, and will
probably be re-shown commercially at the
Varsity itself; whereas a film shown at VIFF
is almost certain never to be shown in Canada
again. The Varsity's films are established sue.
cesses, and with any of them you can be sure
of your money's worth; at VIFF, there is an
element of risk.
But wherever you go, be festive.
• • •
Tomorrow is January 25th, the two hundred
and tenth birthday of Robert Burns; and all
over the world gatherings of maudlin Scots will
Friday, January 24, 1969
worship whatever idol of Burns they have
erected in their own image.
Meanwhile, in Scotland today, poetry goes
on being written—as I know to my cost, having
finally disgorged myself of a four hundred page
doctoral dissertation on the subject.
The last two volumes of the Penguin
Modern Poets series, numbers 11 and 12, have
each included one young Scots writer.
By far the better of the two is David Black,
represented in number 11, along with Peter
Redgrove and D. M. Thomas. Black writes
weird fantasies, with such jolly openings as:
/ lay down and having
died, gave my instructions.
In the middle of a long poem, "Without
Equipment", Mr. Black offers us a sample
of the speech of the dwarfs:
Shoo goad be ub, cub ub a bub bup, goan
owk on zeez an porrests. Ah, and
glok cat I am, vo new
ve pessag a pocky glie, gloyvol,
yetch, gloyvully glubbylell,
egg my yor summongs. Ah-ah,
like a git-gat gaiter a ging-ging!
Because (or despite) of such passages, let me
assure you that Mr. Black is one of the more
inventive, and interesting younger poets in
Scotland today; I certainly find him a more
logical choice to be represented in this series
than Alan Jackson, the young Edinburgh poet
whose work appears in number 12.
Mr. Jackson, when I met him four years
ago, was writing very pleasant little comi.:
verses, well represented by his poem 'Tb.'i
Moral Code":
if the hair of thy neighbour offend thee
pluck it out
The present selection includes some of his
cruder anti-Christian ditties, but unfortunately
omits the immortal:
This week'is Christian Aid week, friends.
Remember,
the Christians need all the help we can
give them.
His later poems included in this selection
are more ambitious, and probably, I suppose,
"better" — but to me Mr. Jackson's best poem
is still "Loss":
A tulip fell deid
bi ma doorstep the day
dark rid the colour o blood
Wis the only yin come up this year
I imagine it fell wi a thud
But Penguin Books would do the world
a far greater favour if they would turn their
attention to the poet about whom I discoursed
at some length in these pages last year, Ian
Hamilton Finlay, the greatest of contemporary
Scottish poets, who continues to produce his
poems of unsurpassable delicacy and beauty.
I could wish tha*, one fraction of the cultural
good-will which will tomorrow be expended in
alcoholic tributes to the Immortal Memory of
Robert Burns might be directed to the immortal
present of Jan Hamilton Finlay.
THE     UBYSSEY
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"And  that's  the end
of the hymen • • •"
<=> CONTACT LENSES II
By BONITA LEE
There are those who prefer to learn about sex
by doing. Up to now, there haven't been any
other good alternatives. Until January 13th, that
is. On the night of January 13th, the first in a
ten-lecture course on Human Relations and Sex
Education was presented to 400 students from
the health sciences and education faculties.
Sponsored by the education faculty, the non-
credit course consists of a series of 75-minute
lectures and one and a half-hour* discussion
periods. And the reaction of nearly all participants—including this one—was enthusiasm and
praise. Dr, George Szasz of the faculty of medicine dealt mainly with the biological and physiological aspects of sex in the first t.wo lectures on
human sexual behavior.
The lectures were graphic, frank, informative
—and interesting. Definitions and techniques of
masturbation, petting, homosexuality and intercourse were revealed in a calm, factual, impersonal manner not unlike that of a prof explaining the details of writing an annotated bibliography.
In more than a few instances, humor was injected into the lectures. For instance, in explaining intercourse in relation to the hymen:
"The hymen is likened to the seal on a jar of
coffee. During intercourse it is broken (showing
a diagram of a circular seal with a puncture
in the centre) and falls apart in fragments
(showing a diagram of a circle fringed in
jagged uneven fragments.) PAUSE. And that's
e end of the hymen."
r: Question from a female member of the
audience: "Doctor, is it +,rue that men are likely
to experience an erection at night?" Doctor:
"Yes, it is. But then, men are likely to experience an erection at any time." Perhaps
the laughter from the audience resulted
not so much from the humor of the doctor's
statements but from comic relief. In any event,
the total lack of inhibition and embarrassment
in the lecture was refreshing.
Co-ordinator Mrs. Leslie Lennox, an education
student, says the main objective of the course
is to convey "a positive and accepting attitude
toward human sexuality" as well as to impart
information. The purpose of the seminar groups,
thus, is to encourage people to discuss sexuality
on personal levels.
In some groups, discussion has tended to bog
down but the objective will probably be realized once seminar members get used to one
another. The groups are integrated, allowing
participants to engage in honest, heterosexual
discussions. For all our over-the-coffee-table
sex harangues, people are still reluctant to discuss sexual matters with the opposite sex.
One of the most beautiful things to come out
of this will be that students learning to communicate their ideas and hang-ups about sex
to virtual strangers will find it much easier
than our present generation of parents to communicate sex knowledge to their own children.
The same objective is no doubt the basis of the
frankness and openness of the lectures.
There aren't many places where the average
person can be told of the lesbian tongue-insert-
ed-into-the-female-organ  method   of   pleasure.
The inherent sexuality of every being is recognized—and, in so far as this is possible,
neither encouraged or discouraged—in isolated
statements within the lecture:
"There is no physical harm in masturbation. It
is usually the first occasion at which a person
experiences orgasm. The female indulging in
petting should speak up in determining whether
methods of stimulation are pleasurable or painful. Petting is another plateau in the experience
of orgasm. In almost every form of mammal,
some homosexual and incestual relationship
takes place."
It will be interesting to see if this attitude is
continued in upcoming lectures dealing with
morality and values, cultural attitudes, deviancy, contraception, abortion and venereal
disease, and the legal implications of sexuality.
The lecturers', incidentally, come from a wide
range of faculties: philosophy, education, anthropology, psychiatry, zoology, medicine and
law.
The ultimate aim of the course is to lay a basis
for the establishment of an inter-faculty credit
course on sex. We're not, sure whether students
are really as uninformed as a campus survey
on sex information among university students
indicated  three  years  ago.
Students certainly seem willing to make use of
the opporutnity offered them. Outside of a
notice in the Inter Professional Health Education newsletter, little publicity was given the
lectures. Despite that, 400 students turned
up at the auditorium for the first lecture. And despite the snow and freezing temperatures, 600 students attended the second
lecture Monday night.
The course is still open for registration. "All
the feedback has been really positive," notes
Mrs. Lennox. "Students are quite excited
by the course, but since sex is such a sensitive
topic, we're waiting for the negative feedback
and the problems that come with it."
Well, we hope they don't come. But for all you
out there who are confused, puzzled, or hungup about sex, we hope you do register for the
sex and human relations course. In fact, even
if you aren't confused, puzzled or hung-up, the
course is recommended.
Monday nights in the auditorium and then the
education building—coffee served—from 7 to
10 p.m. It can only do you good.
There aren't many places where the average person can be told of the
lesbian tongue-inserted-into-the-female-organ method oi pleasure.
Friday, January 24,  1969
THE
UBYSSEY THE BIG MOTHER
Wednesday
JAN. 22
to
Sunday
JAN. 26
Light Show
And
Dance
Light Snacks
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A SNIP IS OFFERED
Bring This Ad With You And Get A 50c Refund!
pf 6ix
Beatlephobia
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Page Friday Entomological Critic
I'm sick of the Beatles. There, I've said it.
Like   everybody   else  in   the   Northern  Hemisphere,   I
listened religiously to the new album when it came out,
and now I confess. I didn't like it.
It was tuneless noise and I don't care how musically
significant tuneless noise is, it's ugly and nobody I know
listens to it.
It has parodies of fifties rock. The Fugs do that better and what's more, they've been doing it for years. The
Beatles probably stole it from them.
It has some nice little tunes that are okay, just like
nice little tunes done by the Moby Grape, but not nearly
as good as just about anything by Billie Holiday, or even
Papa Bear's Medicine Show.
Bands have their gimmicks. Some have soul, some
have fantastic musicianship, some have an exceptionally
interesting lead singer, some have sex. But the Beatles
have always had just two big things: themselves, and
novelty.
I mean, I dig reading all the witty things they say.
"I call it Arthur" is the perfect answer to witless comments about one's hair. And I loved Yellow Submarine
because that's the way they really are. Cute. Colorful.
And they have their flashes of genius. Eleanor Rigby
and the Rubber Soul album and nearly all of Sergeant
Pepper. And yes, I liked all that stuff the first five
thousand times I heard it.
But the gimmicks are wearing thin. I hear the
copies day and night. What's worse, I hear the original
Beatles day and night. CKLG seems to have taken a
large bribe from whoever is distributing the new album,
judging by the frequency with which they play it.
I know all sorts of musicologists who revere every
note the Beatles ever played will hate me for this. They
will call up radio stations and dedicate old Ray Peterson
and Elvis Presley records to me. They'll insist that Paul
McCartney's thin, white voice is a stream of gold, that
all those boring tunes and unimportant lyrics are the
folk art of the twentieth century and that my boyfriend
probably works in a car wash.
However, I shall stick to my guns. I defy Teeny-
bopper Power and I also defy Little Stevie Wonder.
I'm not going to listen to any more poor music even if
it is composed by the young gods from Liverpool.
But gee, fellas, I don't mean to be really tough
about this. Come around next time you write something
good, won't you? But knock loud, so I can hear you
over my Nina Simone records.
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N
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W
Y
O
R
K
13
works by 13 internationally famous
New York artists
Jan. 22 to Feb. 16
THE VANCOUVER
ART GALLERY
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24, 1969 pf 7even
Festival frolix
The Festival of Contemporary Arts hits campus next Wednesday, January 29th. Today
Page Friday previews some of the major attractions of the Festival. The Ubyssey next
Tuesday will include a full programme of all
events throughout the Festival, with full details of all times and places. This programme,
which will appear on pink paper, will act as
the official (and only) Festival Programme,
and should be kept as a reference for all events.
Poetry
New York poet Jackson MacLow will read in
the Student Union Building Theatre on Tuesday, February 4 at 3:30 p.m. Mr. MacLow,
also a composer who often titles his poems
"dance" or "play" has said: "The poet creates
a situation wherein he invites other persons
and the world in general to be co-creators
with him! He does not wish to be a dictator
but a loyal co-initiator within the free society
of equals which he hopes his work will bring
about." Influenced by avant garde composer
John Cage and by activity on the New York
jazz scene, MacLow believes that chance and
improvisation should play a strong role in the
performance of his works: "There are kinds
of inner and hidden causation that are very
difficult to distinguish, on the one hand, from
'chance' or 'coincidence', and on the other,
from 'synchronicity': meaningful acausal interconnection."
Posidron
The Posidron is an electronic . audio-visual
space-frame environment and instrument which
can be played by a group of players in either
a planned or random situation. It consists of
a colour-coded keyboard laid out on the floor,
which activates a 12-point sound system and
12-point light system connected with the space-
frame above.
By moving over the coloured keyboard panels
and through the space-frame, a person sets
off a complex pattern of light and sounds:
figuratively (not literally!) the person becomes
part of the circuit. What happens, in terms of
the person's interaction with the Posidron, is
an ongoing thing: having moved into the space-
frame, continuous interaction between the person and the sounds and lights that flow from
his movements becomes possible.
The Posidron is designed and built by Dave
Whetter (Architecture 2), Jim Cavers (Graduate student, Electrical Engineering) and Pete
Palffry (Graduate student, Electrical Engineering). It will be situated in the Crit Room in
the basement of the Frederic Lasserre Building, and will be in operation throughout the
Festival period (29 Jan. - 7 Feb.).
Interested persons are invited to use and experiment with the space-sound-light possibilities of the Posidron during the Festival, and
thus, it is hoped, enlarge the possibilities and
ideas implied in it.
Festival Scores
Festival Scores, directed by Helen Goodwin,
will take place on each day of the eight days
of the Festival. It is an attempt to programme
a time duration in terms of time, place and
audience involvement, and to find a graphic
language for such a programme.
The format of the scores varies from very
low-keyed and casual to more tightly-structured systems. The scores are essentially instructions or directions which will be issued
at announced times and places during the
Festival, or which in other instances will take
place at unannounced times and unannounced
places. In some cases, these scores will be 'performed' by clearly designated performers who
will interact with those in the location where
the score will be carried out. But, in other
cases, any Festival goer or watcher can pick
up a score and carry out its instructions.
These instructions may involve such things as
'listen to the space between sounds', 'perform
an ordinary event in an ordinary way', 'listen
to   and  record  a   conversation   that   does  not
Friday, January 24, 1969
involve you and then deliver your recording
to specified locations where it will be acted
out by other persons', 'make an image of
yourself, and other, related things. Some of
the more structured pieces will include a
'fugue' for motor vehicles, transistor radios,
transmitters and performers; 'Operation Feedback' in which the audience determines the
course of the music by means of using a voting
computer; and 'Collect Call', in which instructions will be exchanged by telephone between
UBC and Oakland, California.
The score aims to break down existing attitudes towards 'performancs', or to dissolve
the whole concept of 'performance'. Watch
very carefully in the full Festival programme,
which will appear as a special insert in The
Ubyssey on Tuesday, 28 Jan., for details concerning the scores. Watch also for special
score scrolls which, it is hoped, will be available during the Festival.
Films
There will be four separate programmes of
films in the Festival. One will be of Canadian
films, two of American films, and the fourth
is an animation programme.
The Canadian programme has four films, of
which the highlight will be Square Inch Field,
by local Vancouver film-maker Dave Rimmer.
This richly visual film, which was released a
few months ago, has already acquired an international reputation, and has been widely
acclaimed as the best short film ever produced
in Vancouver. Also on the programme will be
Solipse, by Toronto's Bob Fothergill, three
Chansons from the NFB using the unique pinboard method of animation, and John Hofsess'
Palace of Pleasure, one of the best examples
so far of the bi-polarised asynchronous film.
The "American One" programme is designed
to show the progress of the experimental,
underground film in the USA over the last
twenty years. It will open with At Land and
Meshes in the Afternoon, two films made by,
and starring, Maya Deren, who pioneered the
whole field of the underground movie in the
40s. Contrasted will be three American underground films made within the last year: Green
Desire, 7562, and Wavelength.
"American Two" opens with a new film by the
Kuchar Brothers, makers of the immortal Sins
of the Fleshpoids. This one is called Craven
Fluck. Enough said. Also on view will be Ed
Emschwiller's Dance Chromiatique; the White-
ney Brothers' Lapiz (the best computer-animated film to date) and Andy Warhol's Vinyl,
a dual-screen study in sado-masochism, starring
(swoon!) Gerald Malanga.
Also
American composer Morton Feldman will be
on campus during the Fest vial; he will give an
illustrated lecture on "Between Categories" on
January 30th, and there will be a recital of his
works the following day. Other composers
featured during the Festival will be Ross Barrett, Murray Schafer, John Swan, and Lloyd
Burritt, as well as other works by students in
the Department of Music. Martin Bartlett and
Alden Jenks of San Francisco will present
Deus Ex Machina, and on February 6th Kathryn Bailey will present The Unorthodox
Piano, works by Cage, Cowell and Bartok.
The Fine Arts Gallery will have a show of
"Some Younger American Painters and Sculptors"; and there will be a gallery tour conducted by New York art critic Lucy Lippard on
February 6th. And on February 5th, Alan Solomon will give a lecture, followed by open
forum discussion, on "New York Art in the
60s."
At the Freddy Wood, there will be four performances of Chris Johnson's play Super-Safe,
directed by John Linton. This is described as a
"purple comedy", set during Super-Safe's Annual three-day Liverwurst and TV-Dinner
Carnival Extravaganza. Also, a war breaks out.
"Why" demands the author in his publicity
hand-out, "is masturbation a threat to the
North American economy?"
THE       UBYSSEY
Passport, Application and Identification
PHOTOGRAPHS
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U.B.C. EXTENSION PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES
For Appointment—228-3228
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UNDERGROUND FILMS
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Jan. 24 & 25 - 8:30 P.M.
Entrance By Donation—$1.00
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This' is an excellent opportunity to
gain sales experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions for part-time
work. s
The Publications Office needs two
second or third-year business-minded |
students who will work hard for 8-10
hours a week during February and
March and return to the job next
September.
K
If interested apply to the
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Room 241, Student Union Building p£ Sight
i**MM-^p«««-*a«-fl
NEW YORK
# \
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Not long ago the Sun's Ken Oakes produced
a photograph of two little girls at an art
gallery. They crouched down on the floor
peering into the grate of a hot-air register.
It ran with some such caption as "two
galley-goers who obviously know what they
like ..."
Well, I may know a little about art, but I
don't know what I like. I mean, there were
all these people at the opening night of the
New York 13 show at the Vancouver Art
Gallery, surrounded by original Rauschen-
bergs, Warhols Oldenbergs. And they were
WALKING on Robert Morris' wonderful
untitled floor piece. (It's a big piece of black
felt folded over.) And I thought that was
okay.
And people were oohing and aahing over
the anonymous Stack of Champagne Glasses
on top of the box for donations.
And someody put a champagne glass (there
was quite a lot of champagne around) precisely Jn front of Ellsworth Kelly's Pony
and everybody was saying how much better
it looked.
But whal turned on the most people wasn't
Claes Oldenberg's ballyhooed Soft Saw
or made-right-here-in-Vancouver Hard Saw
or the music of Mother Tucker's Yellow
Duck or even Allan Fotheringham or James
Barber's tie.
It was reading the found poems in the catalogue. They would turn their back to the
Warhol Brillo Boxes (a large stack of Brillo
boxes) and say: "Listen to this: 100 Campbell
Soup Cans, Marilyn Monroe, Suicide, Disaster  1. My Hustler, Elvis, Elizabeth Taylor,
Blow-Job, Martinson Coffee, Flash, Jackie,
Jackie, Jackie. Jackie."
"But Donald Judd's credits are better. Get
this: Untitled, Untitled, Untitled. Untitled,
Untitled."
A lot of people regarded the hard-edge
sculpture as something to play with, especially Morris' Untitled a collection of sixteen
big black boxes arranged in neat rows in a
little side gallery. All the beautiful people
gravitated to the alleys between the boxes
and several attempted to climb into them.
(It's not possible, they're too tall.)
George Segal, on the other hand, has reached the pinnacle of pop respectability — a
Time spread — by wrapping live models in
plaster for a sculptured image full of meaning.
"Art excludes the unneccessary. Frank Stella has found it necessary to paint stripes.
There is nothing else in his painting," says
the catalogue. The same could be said of
Barnett Newman and others in New
York 13, encouraging gallerygoers to mumble, 'I'm gonna get some paint and do some
of that stuff.' Stella's, however, seem to be
rather more interesting since he is getting
away from canvases that have corners.
James Rosenquist got his start, he reveals,
by painting billboards. Confronted with a
four-foot long eyelash, he suddenly comprehended the meaning of purely plastic
form and seas of color.
In Aurora Borealis, Rosenquist has realized
another dream of humans seeking to draw
meaning from large-scale boredom. He unrolled about 25 rolls of aluminum foil All
The Way. And hung them from the ceiling.
Of course, what with crumpling and all, the
piece must change every time it's moved to
a new gallery, but what the hell. Art is
dynamic.
By VALLEY
Contemporary dances have
been a controversial subject
throughout the ages. In 1893
the Oan-Can was the dance
that unnerved Paris, at least
according to the Cole Porter
musical of that name.
So defending your right to
do your own thing is nothing
new. Imagine masquerading as
a laundress by day in order to
keep open a dance club by
night. That's how it happens in
Can-Can and it takes a pretty
wily proprietress to seduce a
judge into standing trial to defend the cause he initially
prosecuted. Gloria Bondoreff,
a fifth-year Ed. student at
UBC, carries the role with the
necessary voluptuous wile in
Mussoc's production of the
musical. Ken Irwin, star of last
year's Half a Sixpence, plays
the eager young magistrate
whose innocence she preys
upon. Their eventual romantic
entanglement leads to more
and more complications which
give the show its zany impact,
climaxing in an impromptu
demonstration of "the dance"
in a dignified court room.
Musical comedy is, unfortunately, a little known commodity
on this end of the continent.
New York's Broadway goes
through more musicals weekly
than you can shake a leg at,
and Can-Can is undoubtedly
one of the most prominent
and best-known ones to come
west. Mussoc has been producing musicals on campus for
decades; the club itself is dedicated to the preservation of
this stage art. Its productions
reach standards so very nearly
professional that downtown
papers are prone to review
them on that level. Past productions have included Li'l
Abner, Bye Bye Birdie, Once
Upon a Mattress, and How To
Succeed in Business Without
Really Trying.
Under the professional direction of Bob Ross, the necessary cast and production crew
of thousands are preparing for
the opening night of Can-Can,
Feb. 6. This will be the first of
three student performances,
where you can learn to cancan for a mere 75c. Curtain
at 8:30 on the 6th and 12th,
noon performance on the 13th.
Place is the Old Auditorium,
which might be seeing its last
Mussoc show if threats to tear
it down are not curtailed.
Public performances are at-
tendable at public prices, $1.50
or more, Feb. 7, 8 and 13-15, at
8:30 nightly. Tickets for all
performances are available at
the Old Auditorium Box Office.
If you've been piously ignoring
musical comedy out of ignorance or unavailability, give
yourself an education at this
year's Mussoc show. Can-Can
is scandalous, non-fattening,
and just plain fun. Try to
make time to attend.
THE     UBYSSEY
DUTHIE  BOOKS
is back on Robson Street
At 919 ROBSON - 684-4496
OUR  U.B.C  BRANCH
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and
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DUTHIE  BOOKS
FILMSOC PRESENTS
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OF TRANSPORTATION, WHETHER IT BE BY AIR,
LAND OR SEA, DESIGNED TO SUIT YOUR BUDGET.
WE WILL MAKE ALL YOUR RESERVATIONS,
ISSUE ALL NECESSARY TICKETS AT TARIFF  PRICES
AND SUPPLY YOU WITH A DETAILED  ITINERARY.
Call for a chat with
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AND A CARE-FREE TRIP
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J    -
Friday, January 24,  1969 Friday, January 24, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
LETTERS
No newspapers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am writing to ask for the reinstatement of
your delivery service to the grad student center.
Many Grad Student Association members are
used to obtaining The Ubyssey at the centre
because they are working in parts of the campus where the paper is not easily obtainable.
I feel your action is detrimental to the paper
itself and will isolate a large section of the
students.
MIKE RHODES
GSA public relations
A meagre grant from a parsimonious student council has forced The Ubyssey to cut
costs in any and every way possible. One of
these is to cut back the number of drop-off
points to 15, thus eliminating extra charges we
must pay for every drop above that number.
Since the GSC is fairly close to the faculty
club, it is one point which unfortunately had
to be chopped.
The Ubyssey is attempting to have student
council hold a referendum on the question of
making its grant non-discretionary, i.e. tied to
the number of students on campus. This will
mean that rising costs faced by the paper can
be offset by increased revenue as enrolment
goes up. The referendum will also attempt to
increase The Ubyssey's per student grant.
Grad students — and others feeling the
pinch — can work toward reinstatement of the
eliminated drop by asking their council reps
to help get the referendum OK'd. If that fails,
petitions will be circulated because they have
to give you a referendum if you present a
petition with 500 names asking for one.
And when ihe question finally comes to a
vote, you can vote in favor of giving your newspaper enough money to provide the service you
want.
In the meantime, we suggest with regret
that grad students raid the faculty club's bundle
of papers.
THE STAFF
Information
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was. naturally, distressed to -read, in an
article signed by "The Staff" in your edition of
Jan. 17, that The Ubyssey is in financial difficulties and has had to cut back production.
I can understand why, under the circumstances,
you would be impelled to draw financial comparisons between The Ubyssey and UBC PReports. It's a pity, though, that no one bothered
to check the facts.
Your article claimed that "UBC PReports
costs $4,000 per issue, just for printing costs.. ."
The facts are that the printing costs for our
last three campus editions (circulation 15,000 -
19,000) were as fololws: Dec. 5, $395; Dec. 12,
$339; January 15, $383. The printing cost of
our Dec. 19 off-campus edition (circulation 76,-
000) was $2,233.
I won't try to disguise the fact that UBC
PReports is a more expensive publication today
than it was in the past. Many readers seem to
think it's also a better paper. And the increase
in costs has not been as astronomical as you
seem to think. The average cost per copy, including postage for our off-campus circulatioin,
in the current academic year is 3.9 cents. In
1967-68 it was 3.3 cents.
We might argue, sometime, whether even
3.9 cents is too much to spend on a publication
"to present the administration's viewpoint," as
your article puts it. But the fact is that UBC
PReports this year has presented a wide range
of viewpoints, some of them quite critical of
current university policy.
UBC PReports, as we have said repeatedly,
is open to thoughtful contributions by students,
faculty members, administrators, alumni or
other members of the University community.
T. A. MYERS.
Information director
The Ubyssey's figures were based on data
issued by the information office in November.
At thai time Myers told us an eight-page, 85,-
000-copy issue of UBC Reports wiih off-campus
distribution cost $4,000. This figure was printed
by The Ubyssey without subsequent comment
from Myers.
Original information as to the proposed
weekly publication of UBC PReports did not
make it clear that off-campus distribution was
proposed for only one out of four issues each
month.
THE STAFF
Kills you dead
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Once again the great Canadian legal system
triumphs over the forces of good and strikes
down a once-admired folk hero. A resume of
Stan Persky's trial has been printed in Dominion Law Reports. Stan is now eternally placed
at rest in the living tissues of the law.
Poor devil, Cite: Regina vs. Persky 1 DLR
(3rd) 36. Legal horseshit; ignore it.. Stan is up
on the shelf along with thousands of other
victims, all dead, forgotten, irrelevant. It's part
of the great common law tradition. What's more,
he is filed under Constitutional Law, not Civil
Liberties. Printing a case report in a legal volume is the system's method of final disposal of
defendants. If you go into that book, you're
finished, thrown onto the rubbish heap of history.
Only the law student, in his belief that an
awareness of social issues clouds the true vision of a lawyer, might come across the remains
some day and sneeze over the page.
DELL VALAIR
C.U.S. Charter Flights... 1969
Vancouver - London   Return
DEPARTURE
May 18
JUNE 4
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RETURN
SEPT. 3
AUG. 24
For   Information   and   Forms   Write or   Phone: Also Available
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Regina students
close meetings
REGINA (CUP) — University of Saskatchewan students
here reversed themselves Tuesday (Jan. 21) at an emergency
meeting called over continuing negotiations with their administration.
About a quarter of the 4,000-student campus turned out to
come down slightly in favor of closing negotiating sessions as
their union and the administration try for a settlement in the
fees fight here.
Last week the campus voted for open meetings. However,
the administration replied that open sessions would force it to
maintain its position on refusing to collect student union fees
because of student union support of the newspaper, The Carillon.
In a complicated supplementary motion, the students also
enabled the union to break off negotiations if it wishes.
The motion also authorized the union to collect its second-
term fees on an interm basis to operate a reduced program of
activities and continue publication of The Carillon.
Other sections of the motion called for programs to educate
the Saskatchewan public on the issues by linking with public
organizations, publishing papers and speaking to as many groups
as possible.
With the student stand clarified, negotiations were to continue behind closed doors Wednesday (Jan. 22). The openness
question brought Monday's opening session to a halt.
Eight Regina campus students and eight administrators are
involved in the talks. There were threats of a student strike if
no agreement was reached.
Meanwhile at the university's sister campus in Saskatoon,
student leaders were awaiting more concrete action from Regina
before responding to the board of governors Dec. 31 statement
on the Regina union and its newspaper.
At one point, student councillors were contemplating joint
negotiations with the administrations of both campuses to settle
the administrative role in collecting student union fees. However this was dropped pending more concrete developments in
Regina.
From Page 2
of a new museum of anthropology.
The union's first newsletter
says the collection of Northwest Coast Indian Art is currently poorly stored in the library under great security
problems and fire hazards.
Other unions exist in one
form or another in Political
Science, Geography, Psychology, History, and French.
Most of them have attained
some form of representation on
departmental committees, but
are still in the planning stage
as regards concrete reforms.
Almost all of them have
found more interest among
faculty than students.
"The faculty are more radical
'■■ *ilgyx;jjgjijM: .iiiiii-kss: ^ x y^x--:itti^m--^^yX!;:.
mmimm
than the students," says Harry
Crosby of the Political Science
union.
"There are a few reactionaries in the department but
they have very kindly taken
leaves this year."
There are no course unions
as such in the Science faculty,
although the Science Undergraduate Society, through its
liaison committees, is campaigning for reforms in several
courses.
The Education Undergradute
Society is also attempting to
bring about reforms.
It was announced Thursday
that students will be represented on all faculty committees in
education.
Exact details will be announced within the next week.
Jhe Simple d5eauh
y
of rvjatcklna (/Sands
Simplicity
300.00
20.00
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
GRANVILLE AT PENDER SINCE 1904 Page 14
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24,  1969
— dick button photo
DOUG "BUTCH" BUCHANAN, one of the team's most promising young rookies, is seen in action against the University
of Saskatchewan. Butch is a fine skater and has all the
possibilities of being a very good hockey player. His style
continues to improve with each game as he gains in experience and confidence.
MOUETTH
VOLKSWAGEN REBUILDERS
-   AND WRECKERS   -
A Complete Stock of New and Used
Replacement Parts for Volkswagens
20% Discount to U.B.C. Students & Faculty
On New Parts (Except items that are on Special)
Guaranteed Mechanic Service
Open 8 a.m. to 9  p.m. Weekdays —
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays
CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY
•*♦•
200 Victoria Drive - 255-7431
2 Blocks N. of Hastings Ask for Tyrone or Linda
U?se? *49 50
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us . . . AND REALLY SAVE !
OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES
Complete from $9.95    Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
677 Granville
VANCOUVER
Opp. The Bay
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale
-        681-6174
521-0751
987-2264
Johnny Owen Memorial
Hockey this weekend
The Johnny Owen Memorial
Cup will toe the spoils for the
victors this weekend when the
UBC Thunderbird ice hockey
team takes to the ice against
the University of Calgary
"Dinosaurs".
This annual hockey classic
was started in 1966 to commemorate the late Johnny
Owen.
For over 27 years Johnny
served the cause of athletics
at UBC.
At a time when athletics was
just beginning to appear on
campus, he was one of the
main driving forces behind it.
In fact when the old gymnasium was still here he was
the official grass cutter, custodian and UBC's first equipment manager.
He was an integral part of
all the early teams at UBC and
is well remembered 'by many of
the old athletes.
Being a hockey star in his
own day, before he was forced
to retire due to an injury, it is
very appropriate that this  in
vitational trophy bears his
name.
A Johnny Owen Memorial
Bursary Fund was also set up
in 1967 and the first winner
was none other than UBC's
basketball whiz Ron Thorsen.
Since the first Cup was played for in 1966 the Thunderbirds are the only team to have
their name engraved on the
trophy and they will attempt
to keep it this way.
In '66 and '67 the Birds defeated the University of Calgary "Dinosaurs" and last year
they defeated the University of
Saskatchewan "Huskies".
The Cup is given to the winner of a two-game total point
series which will be played
this weekend at the Winter
Sport Centre.
The "Dinosaurs" are presently in second place in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association, two points
ahead of the Thunderbirds.
A pair of wins would move
the Birds into second place and
insure that the Johnny Owen
Memorial Trophy remains at
UBC.
Non-Stop     Calypso
CARNIVAL DANCE
FRIDAY,    FEB.    21 ST
THREE BANDS
8:30    SUB    Ballroom
Tickets   I.H.   $2.00   per   person
WATCH UBYSSEY, TUESDAY, 28 JANUARY
for full programme of the
Festival of the Contemporary Arts
29 JANUARY - 7 FEBRUARY
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
ROAST BEEF DINNER
French Onion Soup
Prime Roast Beef
Vegetable        Potatoes
Cole Slaw        Onion  Ring        Garnish
Ice Cream Beverage
THE   FRIAR
4423 W.   10th
(224-0833   for   Delivery   —   Pizza,   Chicken,   Hamburgers,   Fish   &   Chips,
Spaghetti  and  more.)
SUB  OPENING
Swni-3>ohmaL (banoL
Silver Chalice Revue
SUB  CAFETERIA
SATURDAY, JAN. 25f 8:30 P.M.
Full Facilities $3.00/couple
Advance  Tickets  At  AMS
But this could be a difficult
task as the Dinosaurs bring
with them Gordon Jones, the
league's leading point getter.
Jones has a slight two point
edge over Bird's Mickey McDowell and three points over
rookie Wayne Schaab.
John Toner, the league's
leader in sin bin duty, will also
appear as his usual rugged self.
Both clubs will toe seeking
to get back on the winning
track as they both dropped
games last week to the University of Manitoba.
Coach Bob Hindmarch stated
that a few changes have been
made in the club in preparation for these games.
Even the players seem to
have a different and winning
attitude as they individually
put out more in practices.
Last year these same two
teams met on six occasions and
they each won three games but
never by more than two goals
over the opposition.
This year's games should be
very close as these teams meet
for the first time at 8 p.m. tonight^ and again at 2 p.m. on
Saturday at the Winter Sport
Centre.
Both teams will be going all
out to insure a better position
in the league standing and the
winner takes the Johnny Owen
Memorial Trophy.
PIZZA^^
! street from ]
263-44401
WORSHIP SUNDAY
10:30   a.m.
Instruction    in    Christian
Faith  and  Teaching   Begins
on   Thursday,   Jan.   30
7:30 p.m..
Preparation   &   Consideration
for   Membership
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE - 5885 University Friday, January 24,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   15
Intramurals
Intramurals plan to go co-
recreational.
Starting in February, there
will be co-recreational volleyball in the War Memorial gym.
The intramural program plans
to have both instructors and
referees available for those
who want to take this opportunity up.
Teams will toe made up as
the program advances, with
both .males and females on
each team.
Watch for further details in
the paper but the managers of
the intramural program now
seem to think that Friday noon
will toe the time for the program.
Soccer will, because of the
snow around, have to be postponed until at least Feb. 3,
and a new soccer schedule will
be available for unit managers
outside the intramural office
in the Memorial gym.
Weekend Bird
At 226 pounds Cann Chris-
tensen, a fifth year education
student, is a big wrestler.
Cann has won four big blocks
and his coach Paul Nemeth is
looking for him to do well in
his competition this weekend.
He is big, strong and fast, all
the necessary attributes for the
Olympic style of wrestling, as
done in collegiate competition.
The wrestling team is hosting a tournament this weekend
in the Women's gym and teams
from Seattle Pacific University,
Western State College, and the
University of Puget Sound will
be there.
The starting time for competition will be 12:30. Admission
is free with the presentation
of an AMS card.
— dick burton photo
UBC's BRUCE MELTON splashing his way to the finish of a
500-yard race. Melton and his mates will be swimming
against the University of Alberta Golden Bears Saturday
starting  at 5:30 p.m.  at  Percy Norman Memorial  pool.
Swimming Birds
take on U of A
Percy Norman Memorial pool will be the scene of a battle
between the Swimming Thunderbirds of the University of B.C.
and the Splashy Golden Bears from the University of Alberta,
Edmonton, Saturday afternoon at 4:30 p.m.
The Thunderbirds have the lead on paper as they have two
Canadian Intercollegiate swimming champions returning this
year to swim for them.
They are Phil Dockerill and Jim Maddin, both double winners last year at the CIAU swimming championships, Dockerill
taking the two breaststroke events and Maddin winning both
the indivdual medley swims.
The Bears certainly are not marks however, as they also
have a CIAU champ in the person of Mike Morrow who won
the 500 yard freestyle championship.
This will be the Thunderbirds first competition against their
official Canadian opponents, in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
Coach Jack Pomfret thinks that this will be a good meet,
he says, "I think that we can take them but it will be close."
The Birds have lost the services of some of last years stars,
notably Phil Winch and Ken Campbell, but this years crop of
frosh looks promising according to the swim team captain, Jim
Maddin.
Maddin especially pointed to Bruce Melton, Chris Hanna
and Mike Maynard, as those who will add real muscle to the
lineup.
There will be a women's meet at the same time and UBC
will again be strongly represented, by such people as ex-Canadian National Swim Team members Jane Hughes and Shirley
Cazlet.
SKI
ON   GROUSE   MOUNTAIN
And Meet Other Skiers-On WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
For 6 WEEKS - From 5 to 10 P.M.
Plus 1 Hr. 45 Min. Lesson From Top Instructors—5:45 To 7:30
Usual Cost Of Lifts Is $3.50 x 6 = $21.00
Special — Lifts Plus Lessons — $28.50.' I
For Further Information
ERIC — WA 2-6871
Limited Time Only
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING - JANUARY
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
TUESDAY
3:00-5:00
•3:00-5.00
SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
2:00-3:30
*7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
12:45-2:45
*Except
♦Except
7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
Jan. 10 & 24
Jan. 11 *..18
Tues. Wed.
Aft. Aft.
STUDENTS   15c 25c
ADULTS       15c 25c
Fri., Sat.
& Sun.
Aft.
35c
60c
SKATE RENTAL OR
Even   SHARPENING — 35c
50c   For information phone
75c    224-3205 — 228-3197
U.B.C.  THUNDERBIRDS
ICE HOCKEY JANUARY HOME GAMES
(TONIGHT—8  p.m.) (Sat., 2 p.m.)
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY - JANUARY 24    JANUARY 25
—     FREE  ADMISSION   FOR  UBC   STUDENTS    —
FREE — The Arena  & Curling  Rinks are available  FREE through the  P.E.
programme  4  hours  per  day,  Monday-Friday  inclusive   (U.B.C.  students).
VARSITY
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LTD.
A Complete
Automotive Service
All  Models - All Makes
"32 Years at this Location*
10 Ave W& Blanco 224-7424
Formal
Wear
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS  -  DINNER   JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
10%  UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41 st 263-3610
Thunderbird rally
coming closer
The largest automobile rally
west of Ontario gets off to a
flying start Friday, January 31,
with North West Rally Council Chairman Doug Daniels, of
Salem, Oregon, officiating.
The 1969 Thunderbird Rally, with Daniels flagging off the
first cars, starts at the Student
Union Building, located at
Salmon Arm.
Rallymaster Mike Hunter,
of the University of B.C. Sports
Car Club, and a Shell Rallyist,
estimates there will be between
40 and 50 cars in the 1,000
mile, three-day rally.
Following departure from
the Student Union Building,
rallyists face a 30-hour trip
over well-travelled and not-so-
well-travelled roads to the
midway stopping point at Kamloops. Rallyists stay overnight
in Kamloops and then continue
on the second leg of the route
through the Interior and back
to Princeton; first car due back
at approximately 4:00 p.m.,
Sunday, February 2.
The rally is not a speed
event but tests driving skill
and mathematical ability of
each two-man driver-navigator
crew. Rallyists receive time
and instructions which must
be followed exactly or penalty
points are assessed.
Preceding the Friday night
start there is a safety technical inspection from 7 p.m. to
10 p.m. Thursday. Cars are put
through a 20-point test that in-
eludes braking, suspension,
and equipment inspection.
Rules specify that flares, first
aid kits and fire extinguishers
be carried,  and  these  are  in
spected at the safety technical
inspection.
It is the 12th year the rally
has been run, and the fourth
that rallyists have been eligible for national points awarded by the Canadian Automobile Sports Club — governing
body of Canadian motorsport
activities'.
"This rally has to be the
toughest in B.C. because the
route is almost entirely over
snowy country once it leaves
the Lower Mainland," said
Hunter, an articling law student.
"Most of the cars will be
equipped with studded tires on
all four wheels because ice
and snow conditions demand
them. Almost all cars will
carry chains, shovels, rope and
other winter aids."
"Just in case anyone really
gets into trouble we have a
four-wheel truck equipped
with a power winch to pull
any rallyists out of any difficulties," he said.
Results from the rally will
be posted within 48 hours of
the finish when organizers
have completed the complex
calculations needed to determine the winner. They must
tabulate results from strategically located checkpoints which
cars pass through on the route.
More than 1,500 calculations
will be required to determine
the winner.
Overall winner, second,
third, and class winners receive trophies and plaques.
Competitors will be from
as far east as Quebec and from
the sunny climes of California.
Arts  Undergraduate  Society
GENERAL MEETING
JAN. 31
BU 106   -   12:30
All items for agenda to be submitted
by Jan. 30 to Box 57 SUB.
SFU - UBC
BASKETBALL
SAT., FEB. 8, 1969
PACIFIC COLISEUM
RESERVED SEATS - $2.00
NOW ON SALE AT MEMORIAL GYM
TO U.B.C. STUDENTS FOR $1.00
Blocks of tickets may be ordered  by
Clubs, Fraternities, Undergraduate Societies Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 24,  1969
-*•;**. /#■■%■
POT   DEBATE
Norman Depoe, Harry Rankin, Malcom McGregor, and Dr. R. Halliday,
of Narcotics Addiction Foundation,
on Has The University Gone To Pot?
Noon   today.   Ballroom.
FLYING   CLUB
General   meet   noon   today,   Bu.   334.
CIRCLE   K
General   meet  noon   today,  SUB   211.
ITALIAN  CLUB
Dinner and dance, Saturday, Jan. 25,
I.H.   6:30   p.m.   Tickets   until   Friday,
Bu.   2567-259.
EL   CIRCULO
Senor Vosters, Spanish guitarist and
singer noon Monday.   I.H. 402-404.
'tween
classes
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Karl Burau speaks on German resistance to Hitler, noon Monday, Bu. 100.
LUTHERAN   STUDENT  MOVEMENT
Skating party Sunday,  meet  at Lutheran campus centre 7:30 p.m.
UBC   SOCREDS
General    meeting    for    constitutional
revisions   noon   today,Bu.   224.
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
Meeting noon today upper lounge I.H.
French   film   J*an.   30   and   Feb.   6   in
Bu.   100   and   106,   respectively,   noon
and 8 p.m.
DEBATING   UNION
Meeting noon today Bu. 217 on Power
Corrupts.
CANADIAN   INTERNATIONALISTS
Conference   on  world  revolution  9:30
a.m.   to   7   p.m.   tomorrow.   Speakers.
Discussion    also    Monday     noon    in
SUB ballroom.
UKRAINIAN VARSITY  CLUB
General  meeting  noon  Monday,   SUB
213.
CIASP
Meeting noon today SUB 117.
LEGAL  AID  COMMITTEE
Free legal advice in AMS V P   office
noon  Mon.,  Wed ,  and  Fri.
TEACH-IN   STUDY   GROUP
All sections of study group meet
Thursday 8 p.m. Arts I building,
blue room.
AMS    RADICAL   SLATE
Meeting to discuss program, two candidates,  SUB  119,  Monday  noon.
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
Members of YSC, SDU and all independent radicals#meet Monday noon,
SUB   119.
KARATE  CLUB
Meeting Saturday 9 a.m. SUB party
room.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
Lunch together in SUB 113. noon
today.
ALPHA  OMEGA   SOC
Meeting SUB  130  noon Monday.
SDU
Meeting 1616 Acadia Road 7:30 tonight on the relationship of a radical
movement to the official student government.
FILM SOC
Privilege with Shrimpton and Paul
Jones, today 12:30, 3:30 p.m. 50 cents.
ARTS   US
Free   dance   noon  Tuesday,   Jan.   28,
SUB   ballroom.- Mike   Beddoes'   Blues
Band.
COMPUTER  CLUB
General meet Tuesday, Jan. 28, Ang.
314.
AQUA   SOC
Boat dive aboard Argo II Feb. 1. Sign
now.
ARCHOEOLOGY   CLUB
Meeting  noon  Tuesday,   Bu.   205.
ROD   AND   GUN
General meeting Thursday, SUB A.
ASIA   SOCIETY
Rene Goldman on education in China,
including the cultural revolution,
council chambers in SUB, 8:30 tonight.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Meeting noon Tuesday, SUB  105-B.
CUSO
Questions? Slides and returned volunteers will be available Tuesday, SUB
113.
REFORM   UNION
General    meeting    noon    Wednesday.
SUB  230
FEB.
INTERNATIONAL
BALL
Dinner & Dance
Vancouver Hotel
$5 A Person
Tickets at I.H.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,   DARK   SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
willy van yperen
4410 w.  10th avenue
Vancouver 8. b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
urn *5
v/?fwr
AGAR
WATCH UBYSSEY, TUESDAY, 28 JANUARY
for full programme of the
Festival of the Contemporary Arts
29 JANUARY -7 FEBRUARY
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . .For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlesciiibtioH. Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
SKI SALE
Commences Jan. 18th
Ski Boots — Sweaters
Ski Slacks - After-Ski Boots
Skis (Wood - Metal - Epoxy)
Ski Poles — Ski Parkas
£#«&***!'
Cor - Top
Carriers
and   all   Skiing
Accessaries
North Western Sporting Goods
10th & Alma (Open till 9 Fridays)
LTD.
224-5040
CLASSIFIED
RATES:   Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*2, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C. 	
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
BRING A VALENTINE TO THE IN-
ternational Ball Vancouver Hotel,
Feb. 14. Dinner & Dance $5 a per-
gon.	
UNDERGROUND MARDI GRAS
tickets for Saturday, Jan. 31, on
sale   now in  AMS   office.
SUB OPENING SEMI FORMAL
dance Saturday, Jan. 25, 8:30 p.m.
SUB Cafeteria. Tickets at AMS.
$3.00 couple.
Greetings
12
CUE CARDS
with NEW supplement
(1) Honoured    in   200    Retail   outlets;
10 - 40%   discounts.
(2) Special coupons; 2 for 1  at Whistler.   Baker,   Martinizing,   etc.
Available:  Bookstore,  SUB  Info.  Desk,
Canteens — Only $1.50
EXPERIENCE   JASON   HOOVER,
Thurs.   noon  in   the  Ballroom.
Lost   &   Found
13
FOUND — GREEN TOOL BOX AND
hammer in Publications Office. 241
SUB,   228-3977.
LOST ON WED., COIN CHARM
bracelet, sentimental value. Reward.
Phone   731-3785.
LOST: ONE BROWN KEY CASE.
License number 180-099. Urgently
needed.  Phone 278-0203 eves.	
WALLET FOUND BELONGING TO
Jana Veverka. Phone 327-3592 or
325-4285.
OBOE LOST BY LORD BYNG
hitchhiker at 33rd & Dunbar. Thurs.,
Jan.   16.  Reward.   Phone  224-3197.
Rides   &  Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30's. ALSO
ride needed from U.B.C. at 9:30,
three or four nights per week.
Larry 253-0042. First and Commercial.
Special Notices
15
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
WHO WOULD BE WILLING TO
translate an Italian text into English? No highly technical material
involved. Will pay reasonable rates.
Call   228-2092,   afternoon.
UNION COLLEGE CAFETERIA —
Daily meals on regular basis now
available by prior arrangement with
matron.   Phone   224-3266.	
U.B.C. LIBERAL CLUB: CULF
convention delegates to be elected
at General Meeting, Feb. 6. Candidates please submit notice of intention to run to box 117, SUB
before  Jan.   31.   (5  to   be   elected.)
CAN-CAN — OLD AUDITORIUM.
Student performance. Feb. 6, 12
(8:30)   and  13th   (noon).  75c.	
UBC LIBERALS 5 CULF CONVEN-
tion delegates to be elected, General Meeting. Bu. 106 noon Feb. 6.
Candidates submit notice of intention to run to box 117 SUB. (AMS
General   Office)   before   January   31.
MARDI GRAS PRESENTS THE
Trials of Jason Hoover Thurs., January 30 noon in the ballroom —
only  50c!   Don't  miss it!
"MARDI GRAS UNDERGROUND
tickets on sale now in AMS office.
Greatest   floorshow   ever!
TODAY AT NOON IN SUB BALL-
room, "Has the University Gone
to Pot?" Hear Depoe-Rankin vs.
McGregor-Halliday debate the legal-
lization of marijana.  Admission 25c.
FREE! HAPPINESS IS A WARM
pussy. A cuddly black female kitten
needs a home. Phone 876-3154. Help
please.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott    219-9422
SPECIAL NOTICES (Cont.)     15
LAST TIMES TODAY: PAUL JONES
and Jean Shrimpton in Privilege.
t2:30,   3:30  SUB  Aud.   50c.	
A BIG "THANK YOU'" TO THE
Men of Alpha Tau Omega for
letting us stay overnight when we
got stuck. Pam, Lana, Joanne, and
Carol.	
Travel  Opportunities 16
MID TERM - UP, UP AND AWAY.
Fly haK fare with your youth
fare card, $3. Valid until your 22nd
birthday. Call Deirdre for yours.
Swingair  rep.   738-1678.	
MEXICO
3 weeks throughout Mexico, luxuriously inexpensive. Suntan in Accu-
polco, leaving Feb. 1st. Convertible
provided. Share expenses and driv-
ing    738-6007.   Male   or   Female.
 TRY  MARDI  GRASS!	
SKI TRIP — SKI BIG WHITE JAN.
31 - Feb. 2 for $28.00 inclusive. Residence sponsored, 120 going. 224-
9944. RM. 536 for further information   &   tickets.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58 CHEV 2-DR. WAGON REBUILT.
Powertrn, new upholstery. No rust.
New tires (snows) winterized, $425.
Firm call 224-9834, Rm.  580 after 6.
1961 LANDROVER MODEL 109. IN
good   condition,   phone   732-7991.
1965 AUSTIN 850. GOOD CONDITION.
Private 922-6268,  6 p.m.
Autos Wanted
22
WOULD THE FELLOW WHO
drives his mama's Viva (Epic) and
owns a broken M.G.A. kindly phone
Howard   Smith   at   224-9049.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
DUNBAR RENTAL COSTUMES
reserve for Mardi Gras Special Student rates. 3567 West 41st. Phone
263-9011.
Scandals
37
DO IT! DO IT! DO IT! DO YOUR
thing by being an Evelyn Wood
reading dynamics campus rep. See
file P393 placement office or phone
261-1809.
PSST! MARDI GRAS GOES UNDER-
ground next week. Watch for par-
ade  Monday  noon.	
AQUA SOC — GENERAL MEETING
Jan. 30 in SUB 125 (F) — 12:30.
Everybody turn out as important
matters  to  be discussed.
MARDI GRAS BAR ASSOCIATION:
The Trial of J. Hoover — Thurs.
in   the   Ballroom.
MRS. ROBINSON LIVES AT THE
Alpha Tau House. Her new phone
number   is  732-7827.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR   4-9253
TYPING   —   PHONE  731-7511  —   9:00
to  5:00 after  6:00 —  266-6662.
Help   Wanted—Female
51
RESPONSIBLE PERSON FOR
babysitting (2-year-old boy) and
light houskeeping duties, weekdays.
Phone   224-5233.
Help Wanted—Male
52
DELIVER MEDICINE IN YOUR
own car after school, $2.00 per hr.
Call   Archie   Baker   683-9191.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
UBYSSEY NEEDS A COPYRUNNER
to work Mondays and Thursday
from 4-7* p.m. Apply to Bruce Cur-
tis   241-K   SUB.   Car   necessary.     _
Work  Wanted 54
GRAPHS  & CHARTS  FOR  THESES,
publications,    etc.    261-7582.
INSTRUCTION
Music
Special Classes
62
63
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR   SALE
71
HEAD     COMPETITION     GS      SKIS,
215C  Stroltz deluxe racer boots,  81/'*,
excellent   condition.   Must   sell.   Ph.
263-9188
MISC. FOR SALE (Contd.)     71
BIRDCALLS
75c
Publications
Office
241—SUB
BAND EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
Organ, drums, guitars, amps, etc.
University, shure, E.-V. mikes. All
the tea party's equipment goes
priced to sell. Phone anytime Ralph
922-2562,   Jim   922-2084.   •
FOR SALE 200 CM SKIS SIZE NINE
boots  $25.   Phone 224-0670.
CROWN TAPE-RECORDER. AL-
most new, $75.00 or best offer. Also
knitting machine. Good condition.
Phone   731-4302.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER, ROYAL
Quiet DeLuxe, with case. Excellent
condition,   $40.   228-2581.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE SLEEPING ROOM FOR
rent to male student. Near Bianca
Loop.   Phone  224-3504.	
ROOM WITH KITCHEN PRIV.
Phone  738-5985.
1 SLEEPING ROOM, $30. 1 SELF-
cont. room, $70. Priv. bath. Point
Grey.  224-3833 after 5 p.m.
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE ALPHA
Delta Phi fraternity house. Good
food and congenial surroundings.
Phone   224-9866  or   224-4221.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD, EXCELLENT
food. Quiet hours enforced. 2260
Wesbrook.   Phone   Gerry   224-9665.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS—
$85 a month, JJelta Upsilon Fraternity House; good food, short walk
classes, quiet hours. Phone 228-9389
or   224-9841.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
SHARE HOUSE WITH 3 OTHER
students until June. Own bedroom.
Female   over   21.   Phone   876-6652.
WtANTED, GIRD TO SHARE
apartment with two others, $35.
Ph.   732-8182,   1907   Collingwood.
WANTED — GIRL TO SHARE ON-
campus furnished apart, with two
other   girls.   Phone   224-7266.	
SHARED HOUSE: HIGHBURY AT
Seventh. Room for one student.
Full facilities. Immediate occu-
pancy.   Phone   224-3035.	
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED —
Attractive on campus apartment.
Phone   224-7266   after   6.
THREE MALE STUDENTS TO
share quiet house. Individuals or
group. 3rd & Burrard. 738-0784 or
736-7128.
SHARE FURN. HOUSE WITH 3
others. All facil. incl. Cable and
phone. 2 blocks from gates. 224-
0552  after   5.	
WANTED. FEMALE STUDENT TO
share furnished home with two of
same. Own bedroom. Five minutes
from   U.B.C.   $65   month.   228-9105.
SELF-CONTAINED SUITE—1 SEN.
male to share with 2 others —
Great View — Great place. 3rd &
Tolmie.   224-1935.	
MALE,     SHARE    FURNISHED    UP-'
stairs suite,  near gates,  $47.50. Call
224-3517.
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
house with 3 others (2 grad, 1 undergrad). Complete sharing of responsibilities; wash-dryer, pvte.
bedroom, entrance, bath, shower;
full kitchen etc. One block from
gates; good study atmosphere.
Ph.  228-9448   (5:00 -6:00).
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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