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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1985

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol.LXVIII,l\lo.4
Vancouv
Friday, September 20,1985
cVl>-
228-2301
Women challenge Hollywood
As the scene unfolds a slight
figure appears pacing to and fro
behind iron bars. Her perfectly
pencil-lined eyes are full of resignation. When the camera pulls back
we see the woman in full view - her
hair is slightly mussed, her lips full
and red, her thin wet dress clinging
to her body.
A sudden hope registers in her
eyes as she spots a man in the
distance. Her protector, her man,
her reason for living. The Hero.
Fighting off the enemy, he frees
her from her captors. The damsel in
distress is safe in his strong arms.
His brave soul, his strong body, his
rescue mission.
His noble deed does not go
unrewarded. He carries her - his
trophy - off into the sunset. End of
scene.
But as this scene, typical of the
portrayal of women in mainstream
film and video, closes, other scenes
are just beginning. Scenes of
women created by women, who are
trying to define women's own images through the camera's lens.
In the last 20 years women have
begun to challenge the images of
women offered by Hollywood
films. These images of woman as
whore, woman as Madonna, and
woman as helpless child have served
to control and limit the real lives of
women. Today, feminists are taking
up the challenge and working outside the mainstream film and video
industry to create a feminist alternative.
For Karen Fainman, a feminist
filmmaker in Halifax, creating new
images means also dealing with the
problems women have had trying to
create a voice in the past.
"1 dealt with a lot of women and
silence. I wanted to build a
language beyond silence. I was tired
of not being able to speak," says
Fainman. Using the feminist slogan
- "The personal is political" - as her
guide, Fainman uses her own experiences as a woman in a male-
dominated and male-defined society as a base for her films.
"Often in my films I contrast the
outside objective world by juxtaposing my personal experience in
relation to this."
Tradition, Fainman's most recent
video, places questions about
women's changing role in society
against the traditional values of
Jewish culture.
With the soundtrack of the Fiddler on the Roof playing in the
background, a woman scrawls
questions such as "Why do 1 have
to go to the Synagogue? on pieces
of paper.
This personal-is-political style of
women's filmmaking truly began
with the "Second Wave" of
feminism in the 60's.
In the 1960s women began to
organize film and video centres as a
means of creating and distributing
these women-make films. Women
in Focus in Vancouver, Cinema
Women in London England and
Woman Make Movies in New York
were all born in this period. The
woman involved in these centres
tried to develop their own films based on how women see themselves
and society.
In 1974 the National Film Board
of Canada created Studio-D, an
English women's branch of the film
board. Within the film board itself
women occupied less than one-sixth
of all creative positions and even
ELIZABETH DONOVAN
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
less occupied positions with creative
authority. Studio-D had as its purpose to reach out to women filmmakers and technicians with offers
of apprenticeships, assistance in
producing independent films and
technical training programmes.
Gaining technical experience is
still the biggest barrier for women
who want to make films.
Pat Kipping, a feminist and filmmaker living in Halifax, says she
decided in 1976 that there were far
too few women with any technical
experience working in film and actively sought training. In her four
years as a freelance film technician
she says she was often the only
woman working on a set.
"It was uncomfortable
sometimes", she recalls. "I really
missed working with women then.
But it is so important for women to
develop skills in all areas of film, so
that if a woman wants to make a
film from beginning to end then she
can draw on the talents of other
women."
In Halifax women have orjpriiz-
ed a, local version of Studio-t) to
combat the problems women have
working in mainstream film co-ops.
Although the group, Women in
Film, is only a year old, it already
has ten active members.
The members of Women in Film
are trying to share skills within the
group so that it will be possible for
them to produce their own indepen
dent films. Even this method of
teaching through sharing hasn't
solved all the problems. When they
find that no one in the group knows
how to do a particular task it
becomes necessary to bring in men
to give workshops.
"It's hard for men to relinquish
their reign of power but we are not
going to reject the expertise that
men have and can contribute, since
men still have had the support and
training," says Maxine Tynes, one
member of the group.
Men's stranglehold on filmmaking skills comes from a history of
male domination of the film industry. According to the Directors'
Guild of America, of the 7,332
films produced in the United States
between 1949 and 1979, only 14
were directed by women. Canada's
own record isn't any better. Between 1968 and 1980, of the 260
films made with Canadian Film
Development Corporation funding,
only 11 were directed by women.
Practical considerations aside,
women filmmakers ofketi have a
different philosophy from men
about film and video productions.
Liz McDougal, a feminist video
artist in Halifax, says she doesn't
see making videos as an end in
itself, but more as a political tool.
McDougal's commitment to
grassroots activism is reflected in
her video about MUMS, Mothers
United for Metro Shelter, a group
of single mothers without  perma
nent housing. MUMS is organized
on a collective, non-executive basis.
Working with these groups gives
McDougal a more supportive base
for her feminist perspective than
traditionally structured groups.
"The male-stream [mainstream]
has a whole hierarchy of roles
within it," she says. "Feminists try
to have an egalitarian or non-
hierarchical structure."
McDougal says video is less expensive than film and as a result
more accessible to political
grassroots groups.
The relatively low cost makes it
possible for feminists with limited
financial resources to make videos.
The distinguishing difference between women-centred and male-
stream film and video is emphasis
on process versus product, says
McDougal.
"Many feminist films/videos are
non-slick productions. Women
want to concentrate on the process
and pay less homage to the form."
McDougal doesn't just talk about
her feminist politics - she practises
them.. ■/};!(
In her video of the Debert peace
protest organized by women, she
recruited women who never
operated video equipment before.
For some of these women, working
with technical equipment was a
chance to de-mystify the operation
of these machines.
Feminists are also challenging the
myth of "objectivity" in
mainstream    film-making,    which
tries to balance "both sides of the
story" by distancing itself from the
topic.
For McDougal it is important to
be subjective.
"1 try to connect personally.
With the work I'm doing with the
peace movement, 1 analyse my position to those women as one of those
women," she says.
One American film that reflects a
feminist structure both in
philosophy and structure is Rosie
the Riveter. The film challenges the
historical image of women, showing
how much influence the media had
in determining the image of women
during the years of the Second
World War.
Rosie the Riveter shows how
women formed the backbone of the
ship building industry for the war,
but once the men returned from
fighting, women were targets of a
huge propaganda campaign to
move them back into the home. The
film's structure allowed women to
tell their stories through first person
recollection.
Says McDougal, "Dwing the war
the images of women you saw were
strong - always shown holding a
shovel. But these images were ordained by the state, and later conveniently changes. Women were never
really given the power."
Both Maxine Tynes and Judith
Penner share McDougal's subjective   approach   to   film   making.
See page 2: WOMEN Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
Women redefine old values with new films and videos
From page 1
These women are making films
which touch them personally. And
through film they are recognizing
women's valuable contributions to
society. For Tynes, a black Nova
Scotian poet, this means remembering the struggles of black women in
Nova Scotia while growing up.
"My first film is about a little
black girls in Dartmouth who learns
something about herself and the
history of black women. Every day
she hears women around her saying
they are 'In Service'. And for a little
child this has romantic connotations until she discovers that 'In
Service' means menial, hard
domestic labour."
While Tynes came of age during
the '60's and options were opened
for her, she remembers that for her
sisters who matured during the 50's
many of the doors were closed.
"Many of the women around me
were still doing domestic labour
then, and this really affected me,"
she says.
Tyne's message is not only a
women's message. She hopes her involvement in the film medium will
make it easier for others in the
black community to work in film.
Judith Penner is a writer experimenting with a film that
touches her personally. Her subject
is an 83 year old friend who led a
dynamic and active life, yet doesn't
consider herself successful.
"My friend considers herself a
failure, which is common for
women from her generation
because of their lack of support
groups. The film is an attempt to
redefine success", she says.
Penner  says  success  is  usually
measured in male terms like the
amount of power or money one has
accumulated. She doesn't agree
with this definition and hopes to
convey this in the film by
highlighting her older companion's
strengths and talents.
This redefining of values continues, with the widening of a
feminist film and video network.
Other feminists involved in filmmaking are presenting women in
powerful and active roles, challenging the stereotypical blonde bomb
shell image and replacing it with
real women: single mothers, community activists, explorers, and
sisters. Together with these women,
feminist film and video makers are
creating another language to
describe their reality.
Dr. Kenneth W. Brown
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Expo jobs bore UBC students
By DAVE A. PASIN
Some UBC students won't be lining up anxiously for 15,000 temporary jobs at Expo 86 because the
wages are low and they think Expo
is a waste of public money.
But others say they will apply for
a job at Expo which began accepting applications Tuesday through
select Canada Employment Centres.
Cynthia Meagher, unclassified 5,
said Thursday she would not apply
for a job at Expo based on principle.
"It is just a waste of good money
that could be better spent on such
things as education," she said.
Norm Ravvin, arts 5, said he will
consider   applying   but   added   he
doesn't find the Expo spirit appealing. "It would be a rather big embarrassment to work there," Ravvin said.
Roger MacDonald, geology 3,
said he thinks he probably has a job
lined up next summer but even if he
didn't he would likely not apply at
Expo because the wages are low.
Expo itself will be hiring only
5,000 people for the six month
transportation fair — the majority
of these jobs will be skilled, higher
paying positions.
The other 10,000 people will be
hired through the pavilions of the
various participating countries and
corporations. These will be mainly
entry-level positions including hosts
and starting at $4 to $5 an hour.
Expo spokesperson Bard Philley
said very few jobs will be in supervisory capacities and most will be
less skilled jobs such as concession
stand work.
Filling the 15,000 jobs is the
largest mass hiring in B.C. history
and will provide many students
summer jobs, Philley said. Actual
hiring, he added, does not begin until December.
Heather MacNeill, science 1, said
she will apply although she feels Expo is too extravagant.
"I would have to get another
job," she said, "but my previous
jobs were at that wage level, so it
doesn't really bother me."
Mike Holmes, pharmacy 3, said
he won't apply for a job, because he
needs a practical position in his
field. But he thought Expo will provide the community with much
needed growth.
"Coming from Kamloops, where
there's nothing going on, the
growth here is tremendous, and
depending on the type of job, the
wages are probably comparable to
the private sector."
Janice King, sociology 4, s?id Expo is patronizing the unemployed
and using them as political pawns.
"I don't like to feel as if I am being
used, so I am not going to apply,"
said King.
Council opens
CUSC discussion
Student council defeated a motion Wednesday night to approve in
principle a national student
organization which limited discussion to student issues in its mandate.
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
who supported the motion said the
Coalition of University student
councils would limit discussions to
issues concerning student fees,
academic standards and accessibility.
"It has a mandate for student
issues so we don't talk about El
Salvador or anything else like
that," she said.
The new coalition organized by
the University of Alberta will limit
membership to universities with a
minimun 7,500 student enrolment.
•'They're (the U of A) very conservative like our campus," she added.
Arts representative Barbara
Waldern opposed the motion and
said the coalition was elitist, and
added the restricted mandate for
discussion in its constitution would
stifle discussion.
"Students have all the major problems of the day on their minds,"
she said.
Graduate student representative
Phil Bennett agreed that the mandate was "narrow".
"If 50 per cent of the people want
to talk about El Salvador then, they
think it's important," he said.
Council struck a committee to
look further into CUSC after
defeating the motion supporting it
in principle.
» * *
Council tabled a motion to put
up notices in the student union
building informing students that
some products were being sold from
companies holding investments in
South Africa.
Vice president Jonathon Mercer
said the motion was a "first step"
in opposing something "we should
not condone.
"We're still wet behind the ears
on this situation," he said.
Law representative Tim Holmes
said, "If we inform people we start
discussion."
Mercer said council should consider a boycott of products from
companies which invest in South
Africa, "If thy (students) come to
us with a petition."
The motion was tabled to be
reworded more precisely.
AMS administration director
Simon Seshadri said he was making
progress in efforts to liberalize the
rules on charitable status for student liquor functions.
He said meetings with the liquor
control board in Victoria had gone
well.
Seshadri said a major letter
writing campaign he wants to
organize might have some effect in
relaxing the rules.
He said the AMS used book store
was successful this year, selling over
$60,000 worth of books.
"The lineups have been longer
than at the UBC bookstore," he
said.
Seshadri referred to a story in the
Ubyssey about McGraw Hill
publishers increasing the frequency
of new editions in order to destroy
the used book market, saying he
plans to start a petition opposing
the plan.
— ed photo
GET A BALANCED education by going to UBC and riding around on a unicycle. The engineers are working on a
powered model for Expo but no one has mustered the nerve to ride it yet. The high cost of riding the buses is making students try anything in the rush to attend classes but most prefer more wheels for comfort, safety and convenience. Philosophers are trying to resolve their difficulties with the two wheeled unicycle.
UofR board bans student referendum boycott
REGINA (CUP) — The University of Regina's board of governors
has overturned a student referendum calling for a boycott of
Carling-O'Keefe products.
Although the board gave
"freedom of choice" as the reason
for its decision, the university pub's
liquor licence could be revoked if
the boycott were approved.
"The liquor licensing law says
holders of the license can't
discriminate between brands," said
Stu Mann U of R vice president of
finances and services.
Barry Hicks, chief inspector of
Saskatchwan's liquor commission,
confirmed that a Carling's boycott
would be against the law.
"You're expected to handle all
DTUC lives on in Kootenay school
The Kootenay School of Writing
is starting again this fall offering
courses like those offered at the
former David Thompson University
Centre.Their workshops in Journalism are now accepted as transfer
credits at UBC, Selkirk College and
at the University of Victoria.
The KSW was established as an
independent, non-profit school,
said school staff member Gary
Whitehead.
"Our objective is to service and
establish a community of writers in
Vancouver," he said. "It seems like
when we were up at OTUC there
was a community of writers sticking
together, working, writing . . . then
we came down to Vancouver and
the first thing we saw was a lack of
community."
The school aims to replace the
centre, closed by the provincial
government in May, 1984. At the
former centre students could take
first and second year classes from
Selkirk College and third and
fourth year classes from the Univ.
of Victoria. Graduates received a
bachelor of fine arts.
"Then the government closed the
centre. They way it was economic
reasons but they also say it was
political reasons - they want to centralize education in the Lower
Mainland," said Whitehead.
The school is currently funded
mainly by student fees, funds from
the Vancouver Community Arts
Council and Chevron. A $15,000
grant from the Canada Council is
used to finance office operations
and a full time staff member.
Last year the school was voluntarily run — "a labour of love,"
said Whitehead. Although most
courses have not begun yet approximately 180 students are registered.
The school is expecting more
students because their brochure was
distributed later than usual this
year. The deadline for registration
for classes beginning this week has
been extended.
three major brands unless there is
ample evidence one brand is unpopular," Hicks said. "The intent
is, any products that are normally
requested by the patrons are expected to be on hand in reasonable
quantities."
Student Council President Brian
Belinsky disagreed with the board's
decision even though he was publicly opposed to boycotting Carling's.
"I stood up for the students, but
now, to me, the whole question of a
boycott is redundant. I think it's my
position to let the students know it's
a dead issue," Belinsky said. "This
is what it comes down to — do you
want a bar or a boycott?"
U of R student Lori Stinson, who
helped organize the referendum,,
did not think a boycott would be
that drastic. Stinson said the whole
issue could have gone through legal
channels to get government permission to boycott Carling products.
"Right from the very beginning
our plan of action was to approach
the liquor commission and they
could have made us an exception,"
Stinson said. "It is possible to do
that."
The   Board   action   killed   any
possibilty of getting permission, she
said.
"I don't know if they were misinformed or just morally bankrupt,"
Stinson said.
The Board investigated licensing
laws before it made the decision but
did not ask the liquor commission if
any exception could be made for the
UofR.
"Quite honestly, we never posed
the question to the liquor licensing
commission," said Mann.
"I would guess that by next year
most universities would have a
boycott in place," Stinson said. "If
the U of R doesn't, it will be
something to be ashamed of."
Because of their parent companies' business interests in South
Africa, a boycott of all products
produced by Carling O'Keefe was
established by a student's referendum at the U of R this summer. The
stated intent of the referendum was
to have all Carling O'Keefe products withdrawn from sale at the
campus pub.
UBC Alma Mater society
students council as of yet has not
taken a stand on the issue of apartheid in South Africa. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
LZ PBFSFNTS==
AU«-»
This Weekend
Friday •   Saturday
THK KKD HOT BI.UKSMAN!
R.C.A. RKCOROING ARTIST
Sept. 23-28
f^lttf^0    H°T FR°M TOKONTO
FIRST TIMF ON THH
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M..H   IIhi^V ill ,s   i,   „|
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S.tl    mini ,S  |2
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Oct. 21 -Oct. 26
M.(   A. Recording Artists .incl
W1NNKR Ol TORONTO'S Q107
BKST HOMFGROWN BAND"
Mun   1 bur- ')   4M c\    I 1   4H
uivci- Ss m S3.00 at door before 8:30
Sept. 30-Oa. 12
His KMfhink tribute m Ins brother. \l;irvm C.iw
Sinn   hiur. 'I  *n .-,   I I   .it hl     ,   s   N   m ii
.in. S* » S3.QO at door before 8:30 li.'k.i. sm un
Etta James Show Temporarily
Postponed.
Watch for further details.
T*St
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-IN THE FRASER ARMS HOTEL-
1450 S.W. Marine Drive (foot of Granville) • 261-7277
TICKETS: VTC/CBO, Eatons, Woodwards & all usual oudets.
Charge by phone: 280-4444 Info: 280-4411
What? You went through U.B.C. and never wrote for the Ubyssey? No wonder
you become a pitiful, useless derelict and burden to the state instead of a productive individual and nifty dresser like me. To avoid a sorry fate such as his,
come to our staff meetings at noon on Wednesdays, or our photographers'
meetings at noon on Tuesdays, both at our office, 241K S.U.B. You can even
come on our wild and wooly (when was the last time you heard those words
used?) weekend retreat on September 28th and 29th. We will be enthusiastically greeting potential staffers at our booth and in our office during
clubs days on ITIonday and Tuesday.
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University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
Tennessee Williams
THE GLASS MENAGERIE
with
Marjorie Nelson
SEPTEMBER 20-28
(Previews Sept. 18 & 19)
Curtain: 8 p.m.
STUDKNT SEASON TICKKTS
4 Plays for $13
September 18-28
THF. GLASS MENAGERIE (Williams)
November 6-16
LOVE FOR LOVE (Congreve)
January 15-25
MAJOR BARBARA (Shaw)
March 5-15
AS VOl  LIKE IT (Shakespeare)
* * BONUS PRODUCTION * *
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April 7-May 3
THE THIRTY NINE STEPS
A new Musical by John Gray (Subject to rights approval)
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
AMS considering South Africa
By MARTIN WEST
The Alma Mater Society will consider an informational campaign
against companies selling products
at UBC that have ties to the South
Africa government.
Student council tabled a motion
at their Wednesday night meeting to
begin the campaign immediately,
however, because some members
felt they lacked enough facts on the
issue and a strategy to make the
program effective.
Council's   plans   included   the
posting of prominent notices in
SUB and around campus informing
students that some companies, such
as Carling O'Keefe and Rothman's
are owned by South African interests.
A spokesperson for one campus
lobby group, the Southern Africa
Working Group, feels the proposed
campaign does not go far enough
and that the informational plan
should have been passed without
delay.
AMS vice president Jonathan
Mercer said Thursday he hoped
council would have a new motion
formed by the next council meeting
Oct. 2 and does not regret keeping
the campaign on the table for
another two weeks.
Leslie Roosa of the Southern
Africa Working Group said there
was already enough support on
campus to go ahead with an informational campaign at the
minimum.
"We support a total boycott of
South African goods and I don't
think this proposal goes far
enough," Roosa said. "South
Africa is in the news all the time and
while I didn't expect council to go
ahead with any kind of boycott
without student petition, there was
no need to put off the informational end of it."
Mercer, however, said that proper planning was essential for even
the informational end of the campaign.
STUDENTS LIVE THE exciting life at UBC after long boring summer only to find things are not any better in the ivory tower on the point. Man
playing on beaches, getting up late making love and generally enjoying lost control of neck muscles in despair while woman retired into self-
unemployment. Man and woman had just completed first week of classes    imposed jacket exile.
POET would let students pay later
MONTREAL [CUP] — A Concordia University student has the
Macdonald commission beat. He
proposes universities eliminate tuition fees and make bursaries
available to all students.
Pete Wheeland spent two years
researching the proposal. The free
education system he envisions is
called POET - Post Obligatory
Education Tax. Wheeland brought
the proposal to the New Democratic
Party — Quebec's founding convention last week.
In a document called "Leaping
the barriers to post-obligatory
education," Wheeland outlines his
formula for POET.
"Every student who enters the
post-secondary education system
shall begin paying a special tax one
year after finding her/his first job,"
he said. "This tax shall amount to
no more than two per cent of
her/his gross earnings and shall be
paid for a fixed term of three years
for every one year spent in a post-
secondary institution."
The revenue from POET will pay
for education for all entering post-
secondary institutions and will provide an all bursary financial aid program instead of the loans and bursary programs which exist today.
"It seemed so simple, I couldn't
believe nobody had thought of it
before" Wheeland said, "I've spent
the last two years trying to blow
holes into it and inviting others to
try as well but so far nobody has
been able to do it."
At the convention someone tried.
It was suggested that society be taxed in general to pay for free post-
secondary education as we do for
primary and secondary education.
Another suggestion was to tax
employers who benefit from the
skills students get in school.
Wheeland responded to the
criticisms and suggestions in an interview after the convention.
"I find it hard to convince the
majority of people to pay more for
education when the people benefitting are from the middle and upper
classes," he said. "Right now the
bulk of revenue to pay for education comes from the lower classes."
"When we have the perfect world
and the perfect tax system that does
an adequate job of redistributing
wealth - 100 years from now - we
might be able to support as a single
society a free education system and
an adequate financial aid
program," he said.
"Assuming we believe that intelligence is not a function of class"
he said, "we must ask ourselves
why persons from the lower
economic strata are so under-
represented in our post-secondary
educational system."
Are tuition fees the problem?
Yes, Wheeland answers.
He also cited two major problems
with the loans and bursaris program: The loans portion of financial aid acts as a disincentive to app-
Ontario classes
crowded this year
TORONTO (CUP) — First year
university classes across Ontario
promise to be more crowded than
ever this year as enrolment is up
even more than last year's record
level.
Figures compiled as of Aug. 14
by the Council of Ontario Universities show 1.1 per cent more
students have enrolled in first-year
programs.
Of the 70,520 people who applied
to the Ontario universities application centre, more than 39,000 — 55
per cent — had accepted offers of
admission by Aug. 14. However,
COU official Grant Clarke said it is
impossible to know how many were
rejected (because of a lack of space
or failure to qualify) and how many
decided to go outside the province
to drop their university plans
altogether.
ly for such aid, and the eligibility
criteria leave many needy students
without any, or enough financial
aid.
The NDPQ is sending his proposal to its council for re-working.
Wheeland expects it will be adopted
after that.
"This isn't a stall tactic," he
said. "We simply don't have
enough concrete evidence (about
the companies) and I believed there
was a problem with the wording in
the present motion, which is why it
was tabled.
"I don't think the extra two
weeks will hurt and it wil give us a
chance to formulate a more precise
and effective motion instead of going into it half baked."
Mercer said there are no plans to
take any direct action against any of
the companies, such as removing
beer or cigarettes from UBC shelves
because council did not believe it
would be the most effective strategy
in the long run. He added that he
was not sure students would support such a motion.
"This is a moral issue and it's
something that the students
themselves have to decide and voice
their opinions on," said Mercer. He
added that more input is needed
from the student body to take direct
action.
Mercer said he believed most
students on campus were not aware
of the connection between the companies and the South African
government, or if they were they
were not vocalizing their concern.
"Sales have not slumped, and as
we're an elected body of the
students we need their input before
we can act. We welcome any kind
of feed back on this issue," Mercer
said.
Mercer added that pressure on
campus against these companies
was slight and although South
Africa had been in the news for
some time, graduate student Ed
Wishnow submitted the first official complaint at the Wednesday
meeting.
Carling O'Keefe and Rothman's
have financial ties with the Rem-
brant Group, a South African corporation which has the majority of
its shares on the Johannesburg
stock exchange.
More parking tickets planned
By DAVE PASIN
U.B.C. students can expect continued rigourous enforcement of
parking regulations, the supervisor
of traffic and parking said Thursday.
The enforcement procedures will
include ticketing and towing of illegally parked cars.
"The preferred lots will be receiving the most attention for the first
few weeks of classes, as they seem
to be the ones with the greatest problems," said, John Smithman adding A-lol will be strictly patrolled.
Smithman said the first two or
three weeks of classes are the most
hectic for students using the parking lots.
AMS fobs progressed
The race by the five Alma Mater Society executives to complete
their summer jobs by the September first deadline was not a photo
finish in 1985.
Finance director Jamie Collins was basically on track in his summer schedule with the exception of bringing down the budget in time
for the new school year.
"I am embarrassed to admit the budget is not complete," he said.
"I wasn't tough enough on club budget standards and ended up doing more work on it (the budget)."
Collins said he is comforted by the fact this year's budget has not
passed last year's late approval date yet.
Vice-president Jonathan Mercer said he completed his tasks except
for a slide show project he was working on with the AMS archivist.
Coordinator of external affairs Duncan Stewart managed to complete one of his five projects which was to enable post secondary
education students to purchase concession bus farecard. Stewart
said he is now close to getting the bus passes.
Director of administration Simon Seshadri said he "almost entirely" completed his summer mandate except for bicycle storage and
handicapped access projects. He attributed the lateness of these projects to delayed responses from the university to his funding requests.
President Glenna Chesnutt said she completed "all" of her summer projects. "I know that others did not finish all of theirs but
they still did an incredible amount of work," she said.
AMS hiring committee chair Nicci Ricci, who was in charge of
dealing with hiring the executives for the summer, has said there were
no stipulations in the hirings allowing for dealing with incomplete or
late projects.
"The enforcement and the
students becoming more aware of
the parking regulations should
result in the parking situation easing over the next few weeks," he
said.
Smithman said if students find
their lot full, they should report to
the L-Lot kiosk or the traffic and
security office to be assigned a new
temporary parking space.
While this solution may not be
acceptable to some students, he
hoped that they would understand
and cooperate.
B-lot enforcement has not started
"but expects increased enforcement
to begin within the next two
weeks," said Smithman. "It is expected that students know the parking regulations and follow them."
The paving of B Lot has eased the
parking situation there considerably, said Smithman.
He said the improvements have
made the lot more organized, safer
and easier accessed.
"In fact, we have recieved several
compliments from students on the
improvements."
"B Lot is greatly improved, but
the parking stalls are too small,
especially if you have a big car"
said commerce student Zita
Liszkay.
Her comments were echoed by
other students like Cameron J.
Johnston, engineering, 4.
"B-lot is greatly improved over
last year but the spaces are too
small and there seems to be much
wasted space. But at least you do
not get muddy anymore," he said. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
Attb Bezst
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~TH EIRE....
l-^t's  L_e»UfL H/r*j
TH5RE    flMfc
REALTY CrET COR,
WORTH/f
HUE.TT
Apart-Aid
Apartheid isn't the only injustice students should be
concerned about but the protest against it is something
the UBC Alma Mater Society should strongly participate in.
Without a stand on the current situation in South
Africa, the AMS creates the appearance they approve
of Apartheid.
They should show their backbone and take a strong
stand against the Botha regime and its perpetuation of
the current situation in South Africa.
One way to do this is avoid products produced by
South Africa or companies associated with South
Africa.
The AMS should definitely do as their tabled motion
said and inform students about the situation in South
Africa and the connection with products currently sold
in SUB.
But, they should also go beyond mere words and actively boycott products tainted by South Africa.
Many other organizations have recognized the horror
of the situation in South Africa for years and had
boycotts for years.
Campus organization such as the Graduate students
centre have recently imposed boycotts.
The AMS must recognize that basic human rights,
even in a country as far away as South Africa, is an
issue. They must act by boycotting South African products.
THE UBYSSEY
September 20, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Down in the Stephen wisen-thal (Stephen wisen-valley) patrick the captain was having a snooze
underneath the bush laura bushei-km. The sun was already standing debbie In in the martin west, and
the parti flather had already settled for the night, when evelyn Jacob and andrea schulte came to collect
the leaves of the david FERNrnan, the CAMILE dionne, and the ERIKA Simpson for their re laxtny
night's tea. Suddenly, the 4-R gang, robert beynon, siobhan ryan, norm rev, and yordon rasic came
tucking down the road roaring their famous raygae Sony from ron Stewart, "morgan" Dave Mc
Cullum, nevertheless, ate his obligatory raisin together with david pasin, and gordon dark gave his final
bark.
Stewart slams staffer's
story about summer
The Tuesday edition of the
Ubyssey ran a story that contained
several flaws. In the first place it
was biased in the extreme; secondly
it contains many harmful misquotations; and thirdly and finally it is, in
several instances, factually wrong,
either by mistake or deliberate
omission.
The article asserts that one executive member has not completed
his job proposal, and that that executive is the Coordinator of External Affairs. As far as it goes, this is
accurate. But the article fails to
mention that three other exec.
members did not complete their
summer job proposal by September
1.
My situation, therefore, is far
from unique. The non-completion
of these projects does not in any
way reflect poorly on the individuals on the executive. In my
opinion they all did an outstanding
job over the summer, and the missing of an arbitrary and irrelevant
deadline should not affect the
perception of excellent performances.
The reporter misinterpreted my
comments twice in the article. My
description of the summer hiring of
the excutive as a "legal fiction" is
more comprehensible when considered in context. I was referring to
the underlying purpose of hiring the
exec, which is not so much for the
completion of specific summer projects as it is for the providing of a
salary for those in executive positions. This salary concept is consistent with the policy of other university student societies in Canada.
The second mistake is far more
serious. The reporter completely
reversed the intent of my comments. At no time did I suggest that
the executive should not work for
the society during the summer. In
fact, I have recently been publically
suggesting that all executive must
work for the society for an entire
year, including the summer months
— at a reduced rate of pay.
I feel that his story is sufficiently
biased and inaccurate that I would
ask the Ubyssey for an article that
sets the record straight.
Duncan Stewart
Coordinator of External Affairs
ANY QUESTIONS
ON LAST PAY'S
CHEMISTRY
LECTURE 1
YEAH. COULD YOU REITERATE
HOW CONCERTED INHIBITION
REPRESSORS AFFECT FIRST
ORDER, COt/nED CATAL1ST,
CONCERTED INHIBITION
REACTIONS ?
THE CONCEPT OF SUCH REPRESSORS  AFFECTING
THAT TYPE OF REACTION IS REALLY QUITE
SIMPLE. JUST PICTURE A BIG FACTORY
THAT PRODUCES TRICYCLES TO TRADE
FOR SLICES OF A GIANT PIE.
ONE TRICYCLE EARNS
ONE SLICE.
UNFORTUNATELY,   SOMETIMES  A  MARRIED
WORKER HAS AN AFFAIR WITH A SINGLE
AND ON DISCOVERING THIS THEIR SPOUSE
BUYS A GUN AND COMMITS A
DOUBLE MURDER SUICIDE.
NOW THEN, JUST THINK OF THE PORTION OF
PIE EARNED PER TIME AS THE REACTION
RATE-, THE RATIO OF MARRIED WORKERS
TO SINGLES AS THE EFFECTIVE RATE
CONSTANT, THE NUMBER OF COUPLES AND „
SINGLES AS THE MOLAR CONCENTRATIONS
OF THE TWO CATALYSTS AND THE NUMBER
OF BIG AND SMALL WHEELS AS THE.
MOLAR  CONCENTRATIONS OF
THE TWO INTERMEDIATE
COMPOUNDS.
SURE. LET ME
ONE YOU
AN ANALOGY.
ONLY IF YOU
TRANSLATE THE
QUESTION FIRST.
IN THE FACTORY ARE TWO TYPES OF WORKERS:
ONE TYPE ARE MARRIED COUPLES MAKING
SMALL WHEELS, THE OTHER ARE SINGLES
MAKING BIG WHEELS. THERE ARE TWICE
AS MANY MARRIED PEOPLE AS SINGLES,
AND TWO SMALL WHEELS ARE PRODUCED
FOR EACH BIG ONE AS REQUIRED.
X
THUS, ALTHOUGH NO EXCESS OF EITHER WHEEL
Size OCCURS SINCE THE PROPORTION OF
MARRIED COUPLES TO SINGLES AND THEREFORE
THE NUMBER OF MALL WHEELS TO BIG
REMAINS CONSTANT,  THE V(/MB£RQFPIE
SLICES EARNED DECREASES SO THAT A
SMALLER PORTION OF THE GIANT PIE
CAN BE EARNED IN A
GIVEN TIME.
YOU SHOULD
OF COURSE
SEE RIGHT
AWAY THAT
GUN CONTROL
LAWS WOULD
B€ THE
CONCERTED
INHIBITION
REPRESSOR
OF COURSE.
THANK YOU.
IT'S MUCH
CLEARER
NOW, SIR.
I   WONDER
WHEN THE
DEADLINE
IS FOR
COURSE
CHANGES.. Salt-Water Moon beams, charms
By C. P. KAPTY
The salt-water moon hovers
glowing in the mid-July sky, and
beams beneficently down upon the
two Newfoundland lovers, Jacob
Mercer and Mary Snow. This moon
encapsulates the substance of David
French's third work in the Mercer
Trilogy, Salt-Water Moon.
The moon has always been a symbol of romantic love, and saltwater, rather than blood, runs in
the veins of the two characters who
hail from Coley's Point, Newfoundland, a small fishing village
on the eastern seaboard.
Salt-Water Moon
By David French
presented by the
Vancouver Playhouse
At the Waterfront Theatre
The production is charming from
the minute you enter the theatre
proper. The set is a cross between
Disneyland and Newfoundland,
and fairytales spring to mind even
before the actors enter the stage.
Not that the actors in any way
lessen the atmosphere of true love
and happy endings, to the contrary
we are presented with two almost
perfect lovers. Jacob and Mary, as
played by Brian Mulligan and Leslie
Jones, are a handsome pair with
handsome manners, and wonderful
tste in vintage clothing. Jacob's tie,
in particular, is worthy of note.
This "love story", as it has been
sub-titled by the Playhouse, is very
simple in plot. Jacob returns to Coley's Point after a year away in
Toronto to claim the girl he left
without a goodbye one year before.
Jacob's herculean task is to wrest
Mary from the greasy grasp of the
local milksop teacher who has been
sniffing at her door since the moment Jacob left a year ago.
The stew is thickened by the
revelation that Jacob left in the first
place because of the shaming of his
father by the father of Jacob's
rival. Mary is torn between material
comforts and a home of her own,
offered to her by the school teacher,
Jerome, and the passion and
romance of real love that is hers if
she chooses our hero Jacob. Gasp
— what will Mary decide?
Which brings us to the least
satisfactory part of the evening's
entertainment. The ending. Like all
good westerns, the- hero comes
riding up, like Tom Mix on his
black stallion Tony, sweeps up the
bride in his heavily muscled arms,
sneers at the cowering bridegroom,
and rides off into the evening. Of
course, this is a Canadian play, so
the scenario is more likely to include the likes of Dudley Doright,
the RCMPman, who always gets his
man, in this case, his woman.
The acting, however, cannot be
faulted. Brian Mulligan is more
than what you would expect for a
Newfoundland fisherman, fortunately, and endows the role with a
with and charm that is fully half the
attraction of the play. Leslie Jones
plays Mary Snow sometimes too
literally — white and pure as the
driven snow, Mary — and has a
tendency to put too much emphasis
upon gazing at the stars, but has
some lovely, fiery moments in
which she puts the cocky Jacob in
his well deserved place.
As a piece of literature, the play's
:>r
central weakness is the simplistic attitudes of the author and his
characters towards the questions of
life on this planet. The play's
greatest strength is the oozing
charm with which the story is told.
The   Playhouse   production   is
faithful, nearly to the letter, to the
author's script, and therefore both
weakness and strength can be properly laid at the author's door.
As an evening's entertainment,
there are only two requirements for
the theater-goer to get his or her fif
teen cents worth. Firstly, take along
either a Newfoundland/English dictionary, or a Newfoundlander to
translate, and secondly, be
prepared for a bewitching, moon-
filled spectacle best taken with a
dash of salt-water.
JACOB . . .   wants Mary back
Tattooed Woman requires irrational look
By EVELYN JACOB
As I sifted through the final
pages of Marian Engel's The Tat-
toed Woman, I was left with the impression that I had read 192 pages
of the private lives of a select group
of people which meant little, if
nothing to me. In fact, I thought
her collection of short stories to be
too far removed from the reader,
which made them painfully tedious.
But as I lay back and let her
stories sink into the dark caverns of
the unconscious, I suddenly realized
what Engel was doing.
I thought of the events of my own
life — events that would be trivial
and meaningless to others, but were
for me, profound and unforgetable
moments. At this point, I finally
understood what Wordsworth once
called those "little spots of time,"
the unique and yet transitory
flashes of life. Engel's characters
too, have experiences; tell stories
which are highly personal, paradoxical, and sometimes absurd. But
their own hurts and joys we experience quickly; the stories they
tell, are as important as our own.
The wonderful thing about
Engel's writing is that she has the
ability to make human feelings concrete: in Share and Share Alike, for
example, her character tells us that
"happiness" is like "unpolluted
air: you forget what is is like when
it's gone.
A much more physical example
of this is found in her title story,
The Tattooed Woman. Here, a
middle-aged woman is caught between a past generation and the
demands of a newer, harder world.
To deal with her pain, she engraves
stars into her arms with razor
blades: these scars become the living proof of personal suffering
which we are made to see and feel.
Engel's aim, no doubt, is to touch
the unconstrained, that most
vulnerable strand of our emotions.
Although Engel's short stories
stand on their own, there is, nevertheless, a variety of themes which
draw them together: the notion of
being trapped within an unfulfilled
life; the never-ending conflict bet
ween man and woman; and most
significantly, the pain of being different. Engel admits that "it is
easier to live without an imagination."
As a human being and writer,
Engel was unconventional indeed,
and her characters reflect the
paradox of what it means to be un-
traditional. In The Life of Bernard
Orge, Engel's character tries
desperately to fit into society by
buying a new nose; however she is,
ironically, fired by her employer
because he doesn't approve of her
"new look."
Within Engel's humanistic and
sociological concerns lies a disturbing sense of anger — a contempt for
lost youth, lost identity, and the
stereotyping of women. While some
of her characters come to terms
with these conflicts, others do not.
In the end, Engel puts forth the
philosophy that we should always
be free to follow our own dreams
and aspirations rather than the
wishes   of   family,   friends,   and
psychiatrists. She delightfully portrays this in Gemini, Gemino. But
at the same time, Engel never permits us to forget who we are:
forever children in adult clothing.
Engel is able, in her short stores,
to draw and quickly immerse the
reader into the lives and conflicts of
her characters. In the small space
that she has to work with, Engel
succeeds as an artist of the short
story form. Some of her stories,
however, such as Can I Have Found
A Better Love Than You?, tend to
bury their subjects in rambling,
"Proustian" paragraphs. In addition, the shattering of the linear
plot line in which the reader may
become lost from time to time, may
prove rather disconcerting.
But in order to experience the
most of Engel's works, one must
give oneself up to the irrational,
which remains a constant reminder
of humanity itself.
Marian Engel died this year- of
cancer at age 51. She will be sorely
missed by the Canadian literary
community and undeniably by the
world at large. reviews
reviews
Women react through art
Dance performance
lacks vital energy
Serious Experimental Dance and
Music [EDAM] watchers know that
Friday's show at the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse was not quite
up to par but it was an exciting
evening of dance and music.
The main problems with the show
were lack of energy in a few of the
pieces - one dancer fixed his hair
twice during a duet; and a sense in
places that the show was not quite
"tight", one of three new works
that was introduced, Cybernetic
Solitude, a structured improvisation by Jay Hirabayashi, incorporates the Edam Movement Sensitive Sound System.
A camera set in the ceiling
transmitted the dancer's
movements to a synthesizer programmed by Douglas Collinge and
Stephen Parkinson. Each movement of Hirabayashi's triggered a
sound, ranging from extremely high
bell-sounds to bass drums. In this
way, the dancer can create a sound
accompaniment that completely
complements the dance.
Unlike some other technology-
struck groups, Edam kept the
equipment off the stage - unless you
read the program carefully, you did
not realize that the sound was actually triggered by Hirabayashi's
movements. That is because Edam
sees the system as,a tool for expression, but the art is the dance itself.
Hirabayashi did play with the
system, though, causing a few
hilarious moments when he tried to
move, and make a sound.
In all, this piece fell short of my
expectations — I felt that more
could have been done to make the
work more interesting, aurally and
visually, but this is a new
technology, only four sounds were
programmed into the system, and
the dance was improvised.
Another new piece was
Labyrinth, choreographed by
Robert Desrosiers. It featured Lola
MacLaughlin in a crazy white suit
that looked like a cross between a
robot, a fairy and a shell-fish. She
was at the mercy of the music, full
o.f fast changes which had her marching, being chased, swimming like
a blowfish, and going down with
the ship behind a box, to re-emerge
in a martial-looking headpiece, to
sounds of gun-fire and explosions.
She walked slowly to the front of
the stage, clapping together reflective boxes on her hands, and slowly
bowed grandly several times as the
curtains closed.
Two of my favorite pieces of the
evening were choreographed by
Barbara Bourget. One, Impending
Death, was a 1982 work that had
her, feet rooted to one spot, dancing with only her upper body. She
conveyed a sense of strength and
calm, and seemed to be gathering
the earth to her, so the message
about death was only that it is inevitable, so we might as well live as
best we can.
The other was the finale of the
night, entitled The Hopes of the
Bald. It dealt with themes of alienation. A dancer, Sandra Acton, who
for some reason reminded me of
Sissy Spacek [she has that same
quality of otherness that Spacek
had in Carrie] was at first out of
sync with the three other female
dancers and the one male [Jay
Hirabayashi]. She begins to walk
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SIX CONCERTS (Series one) $80.00
Martin in the Fields Octet
Academy of St
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Salomon Quartet (England)
Bartok Quartet (Hungary)
Cascade Soloists (U.S.A.)
Alexander Quartet with Michael Newman,
Guitar
Tokyo Quartet (U.S.A.)
October 1,1985
November 12, 1985
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February 25, 1986
March 11,
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1986
1986
THREE CONCERTS (Series two) $40.00
Beaux Arts Trio (U.S.A.) October 22, 1985
Prazak Quartet (Czechoslovakia) February 11,1986
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COMBINED SERIES $100.00
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away from the others, but is
brought back by the man, who is
rounding up the women. They fall
in love [coy giggles] and, after some
intense dancing in which the man's
relationships with the other women
are explored, but during it he
always comes back to her, we again
see her walking away from the
group, this time carting off the
man, who is bewildered, but seeming to enjoy himself.
Another highlight was the music
of Tom Hajdu, a Vancouver composer. His Stone and Shell, a piece
for one percussionist, opened the
show. It was a strange, evocative
piece of music, that started as quiet
bell washes, and built to a tremendous climax of tribal rhythms.
Edam always puts on a show
worth watching. They will be at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre in
December.
EVA AND CHRIS
illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
unnervingly perverse
pilllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIfllllll
| A Woman in Flames stirs emotional (
ianarchy, jealousy and sexual energy |
By NORM RAVVIN
A Woman in Flames is a film that
is bound to seem less impressive
when it is described than when it is
seen. Its power does not rise from
its lot, its theme, or its political
ideology, but from the immediacy
and depth of the confrontations it
places on the screen. The film has
the rare ability to draw viewers out
of themselves, and strand them
somewhere amidst the conflicts that
concern the movie's characters.
A Woman In Flames
at the Vancouver East Cinema
3290 Commercial
Director and screenwriter Robert
van Ackeren builds these conflicts
around issues that have been topical
and contentious since the sixties.
But he does this without being explicitly political, and his comment
on sexual politics and the state of
European bourgeois mores is sharp
without being heavy-handed.
The central figures in A Woman
in Flames are two high-class prostitutes — one male, one female —
who try to maintain their personal
intimacy alongside their business
partnership, which has them each
entertaining tricks in their rather
Si!
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ORPHAN
Sunday Sept 29 • 7:30 pm
UBC War Memorial Gym
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Info 280-4411 • Charge by Phone 280-4444
Produced by MCM
swank flat, turned split-level
bordello.
Van Ackeren does not play this
situation for laughs or cheap thrills.
The Johns that visit Eva are unnervingly perverse in their desire to be
bound and mistreated. And the
women who visit Chris are not
stereotypic but pathetic and
desperate in their need for affection. Van Ackeren uses misdirected
sexual energy as the barometer for
the unhappiness and flabbiness he
sees in bourgeois society. In an affluent middle-class society peopled
with women who are sick 'Vf
perversion at home" and men
whose skewed self image leads them
to pay more the worse they are
treated.
Eva and Chris appear at first to
have the good fortune of a ready
market and a relationship with
enough' respect to ward off
jealousy.
But van Ackeren denies them
such heroic status. A sort of emotional anarchy — stirred by affluence, jealously and more
misdirected sexual energy — embroils them in a climax that makes
the film's title more than a
throwaway phrase.
Van Ackeren mercifully declines
to philosophize or to imagine any
solutions for the chaos he depicts..
And his film never becomes gloomy
or accusing. Though it is about confrontation and abuse, A Woman in
Flames is an enticing film, like a
black mass with some irresistible
center.
59
By LAURA BUSHEIKIN
"VoiceOver", at the Contemporary Art Gallery, is an exhibition
of the works of three self-professed
'feminist' artists. As the title indicates, the three artists use words
as well as images in their art.
Ingrid Koenig's charcoal drawings of women artists and "cultural
workers" (as they are described in
the catalogue) were conceived in
reaction to the male domination of
the world of art throughout history.
Under each drawing is a paragraph
describing the subject. There is also
a series of panels interspersed between the drawings with a text by
Koenig expressing her feelings
about being a woman artist.
The drawings are strong and
likable. Especially memorable are
the drawings of Lillian Allen and
Murisia Bociurkiw. These are full
of the strength and energy of their
subjects, as well as the obvious love
and admiration the artist feels for
them. They are a joy and an inspiration to behold.
Koenig, unfortunately, is a better
artist than she is a writer. The texts
describing each subject fail to
engage the reader's emotions or to
illuminate the pictures. Each text
begins with a long list of the subject's accomplishments; these lists
are so long and full of jargon that
they alienate, rather than impress,
the reader. The panels of personal
narrative are generally unimpressive, except for the first which
deals with the role (or rather lack of
it) of women in the history of art.
Because the written information
is there, we must react to it. Unfortunately this interferes with rather
than enhances our appreciation of
the pictures.
Koenig writes that "In every
phase of-our daily life we are engaged in warfare"; since she believes
this, there is little doubt that every
phase of her life will become a state
of warfare. Her words are negative
and destructive whereas her art is
positive and constructive.
Kati Campbell's exhibits are
photographic constructions. "Corpus: desperate mutations" is a
series of box-like frames containing
photos of mouths behind fragments
of printed text. The catalogue explains that Campbell is "distancing
what we know from what we want
to know . . . The female voice
yearns to articulate its "fictive identity" and name itself ..."...
Hmm . . . Indeed . . . Well, perhaps
this is interesting as a sort of mental
tease, but that is all.
French film festival examines
society at the end of its tether
*••*••*•••**•••*••*•*•*****
By RONALD STEWART
French society, before, during, and after World War Two
was quite different from what many people think.
Two French films shown Saturday by Pacific Cinematheque as part of its series France Before and After the Second
World War proved this. The films are also two of the most
important and fascinating works in the history of French
film.
La Regie du Jeu
Directed by Jean Renoir
Hiroshima, Mon Amour
Directed by Alain Resnais
At the Pacific Cinematheque
The first, La Regie du Jeu (The Rules of the Game, 1939),
was directed by Jean Renoir. Renoir took a conventional
comedy of manners, complete with multiple love triangles
and mistaken identities, and twisted it for the purpose of
social criticism.
As Cinematheque programming director Mark Harris said
in his introductory remarks, the film explores "a society at
the end of its tether" and "captures the spirit of the age".
The film's critical edge is so sharp that it caused political
riots in Paris when the film was first released.
The reason for this uproar is obvious. The characters,
Campbell's other piece,
"Possessed, Possession" is a series
of photos depicting a woman's
reaction to a peeping-tom. She
hangs a series of signs out of her
window with such messages as,
"We know who you are: we watch
you ... we know your every move,
when you operate, IT IS YOU
WHO IS BEING WATCHED",
and "YOU'LL PAY FOR IT, YOU
PRICK!" Here we have a healthy,
assertive, and humorous outpouring of anger. As the title suggests
(the two words are actually printed
one on top of the other) the tables
have truly been turned on this man;
his secret spying has been made
blatantly public. Still, the work's
value is more like that of a comic
strip, which it indeed resembles,
than a lasting piece of art.
Amy Jones's work consists of
three lifesize mother-and-child
.figures set on a stage. The figures
are white and shrouded in drapery.
This, as well as the simple stage setting, is reminiscent of classical
statues. The figures have their own
quiet eloquence, which renders unnecessary any direct, verbal, intellectual statement. There is a
recorded conversation which
emanates from within the figures;
the voices seem to be talking about
life and motherhood, but the sound
is muffled and unclear.
These sculptures convey both the
predicament and the strength of
women. The figures are faceless,
stifled, and hidden by their clothes,
just as women are hidden and trapped by the expectations and limitations of society. They stand alone,
on a bare stage, with their children;
just as women, especially those with
children, are relegated to the
sidelines of society. Yet they stand
proudly upright, their chins
uplifted, facing forward, displaying
a confident strength and courage.
The fact that they are speaking,
even though it is mostly unintelligible, is nice — we realize with a sort
aristocrat and servant alike, go through the motions in their
relationships with each other and the world; none are certain
of their feelings, they merely feel impelled to play the game.
Renoir reinforces the chaos with kinetic camerawork and
the alienation with deep focus shots isolating characters
within the frame. Renoir was one of the first directors to effectively use comedy for commentary was well as entertainment.
Hiroshima, Mon Amour [Hiroshima, My Love, 1959],
directed by Alain Resnais, was one of the first French new
wave films.
The screenplay by novelist Margeurite Duras examines the
experiences of two lovers scarred by the war: a Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) whose family died in Hiroshima, and a
French actress (Emmanuelle Riva) who fell in love with a
German soldier.
Resnais makes the audience feel for the characters in spite
of their moral ambiguity (both are married as well). He also
uses inserts (later a hallmark of new wave cinema) to symbolically bind people, memories, and places. Resnais cuts
between shots of the lovers entwined and the survivors of
Hiroshima; the architect and the dead soldier; and
Hiroshima and the actress' hometown in France.
In this way, the film explores the ambiguous effects of
time and place on memory and feeling. The constantly shifting narrative and thematic perspectives make this film enthralling and stirring.
MEREDITH BELL. . .feminist artist
of surprise that they have
something to say. Here our expectations that a sculpture should be
silent is much like society's expectations 'that women have nothing to
say.
These are by far the best pieces of
the show. Here, ideas and aesthetics
blend harmoniously. One needn't
know that one is seeing a feminist
art show to absorb a sensitive and
relevant statement about women.
This statement is inherent within
the artwork itself.
Political/feminist art works best
when the artwork embodies, rather
than explains, or makes statements
about, the artist's beliefs. Otherwise, the politics interfere with the
art, and the art does not necessarily
illuminate the politics.
S"
I WANT YOU
to
JOIN A CLUB TODAY!!
Get Involved
CLUBS'DAYS!
©
i
Monday, Sept. 23 & Tuesday, Sept. 24
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
First and Second Floors—9 a.m. to 4 p.m,
rA
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 reviews
Talking heads offer sparcer, more traditional album
By TONY ROBERTS
David Byrne, the prophet of
paranoia and brains behind the
Talking Heads has.left the world of
drugs and psycho killers to
discover, of all things, babies.
On Little Creatures, the Talking
Heads' sixth studio album, the
band has abandoned the African-
influenced rhythms for a sparser
more traditional sound.
The songs from Creatures are
simple melodies but usually contain
some curious twist, either musically
or lyrically. On the surface
Creatures of Love is a warm country and western ballad with a drawling steel - pedal guitar. Yet its subject is people sleeping together who
produce a bunch of, uh, little
creatures . . . from the moment of
LSAT&
GMAT
PREP TRAINING
Weekend Courses
a\
(h
(Sexton &
Educational Centers y
414 - 1200 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6Z 2C7
(604) 684-4411
\C7 ■
SOPHISTICUT
Special Offer
20% Off
Any Hair Service
With Student AMS
Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
VACANCIES
FOR
WOMEN
in
TOTEM PARK
RESIDENCE
(Room & Board)
Commencing: September 1, 1985
to: April 30, 1986
Rates: Single room - $2,986.96
Double room - $2,732.86
Please Contact:
PONDEROSA
HOUSING OFFICE
2071 West Mall
Tel: 228-2811
passion/now they cover the bed
(from Little Creatures 1985).
In Stay Up Late, Byrne gives an
affectionate salute to a cute little
baby boy that conjures up images
of Big Brother Byrnie exchanging
spirited squeals and pig snorts with
the puny papoose.
By the time Walk It Down clocks
in, the band overcomes the diaper
rash for a skin tingling stomp with a
catchy, robust chorus.
Television Man, about a guy who
has a proud obsession for watching
T.V. is a bump and tumble masterpiece that bridges into a hypnotic
calypso-talkback chant. The song is
funny in an unsettling kind of way.
Everyday the Television Man's living room becomes a glazey
microcosm of society, an insular
world where reality is defined by the
turn of the dial.
Besides the relentless Byrne, the
rest  of the  band  rests  on  solid
shoulders. The husband and wife
rhythm section of Chris Franz
(drums) and Tina Weymouth (bass)
are as thumpy as ever, and keyboardist/guitarist Jerry Harrison provides Creatures with glistening
chords that have a distinct warbling
effect.
On Little Creatures the Heads
have created a unique sound that
bends and blends several musical
forms, yet at the same time defies
whatever is currently fashionable.
Their music is defined by constant
change and adventurous eccentricity. A great band. A great album.
Little Creatures must be one of the
year's best.
| UBC DANCE CLUB
I
I
X
FREE
INTRODUCTORY
JIVE LESSONS
Fri   Sept. 20 SUB Party Room
Fri., Sept. 27 12:30-1:30
Contact: UBC Dance Club, SUB 241G (228-3248) or
see us during Clubs Days!
i
U.B.C. BURSARIES
DEADLINE OCTOBER 1, 1985
Applications for general bursaries are now available
at the Awards Office, Room 50, G.S.A.B. and
must be returned to the Awards Office no later
than October 1st, 1985. To be considered for these
bursaries, students will be expected to have applied
for Canada Student Loans.
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20,1985 Friday, September 20, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Time running out for UBC daycare
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
UBC's daycare is thriving but
time is running out to find a new
place to put it.
The childcare at UBC is known
across North America and beyond
but the 1940 vintage army huts that
keep the rain off the children's
heads will have to be abandoned in
two and a half years by order of the
fire marshall.
But if Don Holubitsky, a UBC
graduate student and daycare fundraising committee of one, is correct, UBC should have a $1 million
daycare centre by early next year to
replace the decaying huts.
Holubitsky, who also sits on the
Board of Governors and the AMS
Capital Projects Acquisition Committee, says the AMS has already
guaranteed $350,000 for new
daycare buildings from the CPAC
reserve fund and he expects the
other $650,000 from various
sources to be raised within the next
few months.
Acadia Daycare co-supervisor
Judy McMurter likes the large, colourful complex of remodelled army
huts with a big yard where she,
along with three other co-workers,
looks after 25 three to six year old
children.
"I think this is the best (facility)
in the city," she says, adding the
ample inside and outside space
makes it ideal for looking after active kids and probably couldn't be
replaced in a new building. "I personally like the old facility better . .
. when you want to stick a nail in
the wall you can."
The building she is in, which only
passes fire inspection because of
special expensive fire retardant
paint on the walls, will be among
the first daycare units demolished
BUDDING JOURNALIST. . .eyes future tool of the trade at daycare.
olds and an after school centre for
University Hill school students. Of
the approximately 275 students in
centres she manages, about 225 are
in buildings which will have to be
abandoned by 1987.
"Parents who are paying $300 to $500 a
month for daycare cannot raise enough to
build a new building. "
when construction starts this fall on
a new student family housing
development on the site. The housing project will replace 20 existing
units with 164 new ones with up to
216 more children, not all of whom
will use daycare.
Another Acadia co-supervisor,
James Hutchinson, also likes the
daycare building he works in, one
of several in the same area to the
southeast of campus. He appreciates the custom work such as
half walls and other play areas
which parents have built over the
years but still wants to see it replaced.
"They're falling to pieces," he
says. "It would be nice to have new
buildings."
UBC Daycare coordinator Mab
Oloman looks after 11 separate
daycare units including four centres
for children 18 months to three
years old, five for ages three to five,
a pre-school for three to four year
She describes the cooperative
management and separate individual identity of the facilities as a
crucial factor. "I'm concerned that
we maintain that individuality,"
she says.
"That's the reason why some of
them are considered the best in the
city," she says. "Our staff are very
good and they like working here;
there is a low turnover."
She adds the location by the endowment lands is ideal for bud and
tadpole hunting expeditions which
enrich the day for children.
She has her own list of problems
with the existing facility, starting
with the plumbing which has no
pressure. "You can't clean your
hands and brush your teeth at the
same time," she says.
Last December the staff in some
of the daycares found rats eating
the corners off the.mats, added
Oloman. She says she is "really
grateful to the AMS for taking up
the challenge of (raising funds for)
daycare," adding she hopes other
parts of the campus such as alumni
and staff will help.
"Parents who are paying
$30O-$5OO a month for daycare cannot raise enough to build a new
building," she says.
Holubitsky says the current push
for new daycare buildings started
after 1983 when the fire marshal
gave the buildings a "five year only
extension" following $200,000 in
work to bring them closer to fire
code.
Daycare first appeared at UBC in
1967 when parents set the precedent
of forming a non-profit society
under the provincial childcare act
called UBC Kindercare Society.
This was followed by Acadia, Units
I and II, Canada Goose, Tillicum,
Summer of '73, Lilliput, and Pen-
tacare daycares and finally University Hill after school care, founded
in 1976.
"Since 1976 no new daycare
facilities have started on campus
even though the need has continued
to grow. There has been a move to
build more daycare ever since
then," he says, adding for the last
several years UBC daycare has been
completely full with a long waiting
list equal to the number of spaces.
For the moment he is sticking to
fundraising to replace the existing
daycare.
"What we are trying to do is
within a limited budget of $1
million replace all the existing
facilities in the simplest construction that will be fully functional,"
he says, adding money for expansion can be raised later.
See page 12: DAYCARE
JOIN THE
UBC
SKI
CLUB
Come and Visit Us on Clubs Days or in SUB 210
and get . . .
• cheap accomodation at
Whistler
• discounts on ski tickets
• discounts at local ski
stores
• beer gardens
• fun and frolic
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1986 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resume to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by October 3,
1985.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted
on or about October 11th regarding campus interviews
which take place during the week of October 21st. Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
The English Composition Test Will Be Held On
Thursday, September 26, 1985
from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Every student must attach to the examination booklet EITHER a "Fee
Waived" sticker (obtainable from the Registrar's Office by those taking the
exam for the first time), OR a "Fee Paid" sticker ($10.00), which must be
purchased from the DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE.
University regulations state, "each person taking the exam should be
prepared to produce, upon request, his or her Library/AMS Card".
Students are permitted the use of a dictionary.
Students who are not able to start the exam at 4:30 p.m. because of officially
scheduled classes or labs should phone the ECT secretary (228-4077) before
Wednesday, September 25. The ECT will next be given during the December
exam period.
NOTE: This sitting is not open to students currently enrolled in
ENGLISH 100. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
Daycare facilities known for excellent work
From page 11
He says less than one per cent of
students have a child in daycare at
any one time but it is still a worthwhile student project.
"I think students can support it
because it's a socially enlightened
project."
Sixty per cent of children in
daycare have student parents while
20 per cent are faculty children and
the remaining 20 per cent are
children of staff.
"I have asked the faculty association and the unions to become involved in funding the daycare," he
says.
He says he thinks the funding will
be in place this fall.
"One of the main support groups
has been the Alumni Association.
They are considering the proposal
of funding daycare with matching
dollars to the ($350,000) student
contribution," he says.
AMS designer Michael Kingsmill,
a UBC architecture student who has
been working with daycare designs,
is enthusiastic about the potential
of the daycare project.
"It's probably the most exciting
project I could imagine," he says.
"Its parameters are being a child."
He has done extensive research
into design requirements for
childcare and praises the quality of
care at UBC.
"It is a facility of high renown
and you have to do equal or
better," he says. "You can't just
put up ATCO trailers."
He says the provincial law calls
for three square meters per child in-
We
request
that
our readers refrain
from
buying
pro-
ducts
from
com-
panies
>    associated
with
the    S
outh
African status
quo.
T'D3
Fcicf Frppl Lubavi_t«.-h van.
A {Idl A IvLi couvcr invites all
Jewish People lo Yum Kippur (Day of
Atonement) Services to be helclon Tucs-
dav Sept. -'I (Kol Nidrei) (>:(;> pm and
Wednesday Sept. 2"> 10am to 7:.),"> pm at
Cliabad House. )7.)0 Oak Street Vancouver. Break Fast snacks served free at
the conclusion of services. Prayerbooks
available with Faiidish translation.
Accommodations available on request.
Call 2(.(.-l.il:t.
J'        T      |  Sinichat Torah Cele-
U1I1   lilt   bration. It's a tradition
at Chabad House!
To be held on Monday October 7 at 7:00
pni. Join in for Food! Lc'C.hayim!
Dancing cV Sinking!
Chabad House. :>7:>0Oak St.. Vancouver.
Call 266-2.'Jl.'i for more information.
BAYS
ft
LESBIANS
OF U.B.C.
Invite You To
A
coming our
Sat., Sept. 21
8:00 p.m.
SUB Party Room
Come Out &
Celebrate
side and seven outside but he is "using a design standard of almost
three times that."
The space for daycare is a long
rectangle about the size of a half a
city block along Acadia road and
each daycare unit will be 1800-2000
square feet in inside floor area,
roughly the size of a three bedroom
house. By law each 18 months to
three years unit must have no more
than 12 children and at least three
staff and each over three unit can
have 25 children and four professional staff.
The law won't allow more than
three units to be joined together
and Kingsmill says he wants to keep
all the units separate so they can
maintain their individual identity.
He wants to maintain the involvement of parents in the management
of their own daycare. If the
building is "like an institution it
promotes an attitude that whenever
there's anything wrong you just
look to the big caretaker," he says.
One plan he mentioned is to
create a street pattern through the
site with different buildings along
the way.
"We could develop one house as
a town hall . . . another as a fire station in an environment that is a safe
replica of the real thing."
Kingsmill doesn't see starting immediately and points out no final
design decisions have been reached.
Alumni Association executive
director Dan Spinner said he is
delighted with the daycare proposal
and his organization is quite interested in the project but wouldn't
decide exactly what to do until a
committee meeting this month.
He said he had received a letter of
encouragement about supporting
daycare from President pro-tem
Robert Smith but added it would be
better if users and connected bodies
such as faculty and staff chipped in.
"It's a lot easier for us to raise
money when we know the users are
contributing," Spinner says.
Faculty association president
Sidney Mindess said his association
supported the principle of providing money to fund daycare but
wouldn't be committing any funds.
"It's not one of the highest
priorities we have as a faculty
association," he said. "We are not
doing anything on it."
Daycare committee chair Neil
Risebrough, UBC associate vice-
president student services, says
"within two months we should have
the final (funding) committments
that we need."
"If it wasn't for the students taking the initiative here then we would
be having a very difficult time."
He says he is certain alternate
facilities can be found for the
Acadia daycare when they lose their
building in the fall.
He pointed out UBC has the
largest daycare of any university in
Canada.
Graham, a child at Acadia
daycare, said he likes the saws, the
hammers and the wood axe at the
centre.
His mother said, "I'm really sad
this building is doomed," adding
she had only been associated with
Acadia for a few months and was
very impressed.
CHILD. . .patrolling daycare
a
QtsJtSTOJOjy^
Almost a litre
of that dear*, smooth
taste in an all new aluminum can. Friday, September 20, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Intramural
sports
listings
SUPER SPORTS WEEKEND
The Intramural Super Sports
Weekend is September 27, 28, 29
for softball, cycling, basketball and
a 13 km road run events which will
take place on campus and are open
to all students, faculty and staff.
THREE ON THREE
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
Sign up for Division I, II or III by
3:30 p.m. today. Last year, the
Betas won both Division I and III,
while Mechanical Engineering
dominated Division II. T-shirts.
EDGE OF THE RAINFOREST
ROAD RUN
A 12.9 km road run through campus at 10 a.m. on September 29th.
Runners should report to SUB
Plaza, race centre 30 minutes before
the race. Last year's winners:
Women — Karen Warner, nursing
(1:01:19); Men — Lindsay Eltis,
biochemistry (42.59). T-shirts.
CYCLE CRITER1UM
A 25 km race (men and women)
or 40 km race (men only) on Saturday, September 28. Winning times
in last year's rainy conditions were
25 km: Women — Tanis Purssell,
engineering, 46:09; Men — Steve
McMurdo, Phi Delts, 42:21. 40 km:
Men — Tim Rode, St. Andrews,
1:00:59. All cyclists must meet an
equipment safety check prior to the
race. T-shirt.
CYCLE SPRINTS
A 1.0 km cycle sprint along old
Marine Drive at the novice or advanced level; new this year. Both
men's and women's heats begin at
1:00 p.m. and each winner receives
a T-shirt.
CYCLE HILL CLIMB
On October 3, individual cyclists
compete in a test of endurance up
hills near Locarno Beach/Spanish
Banks. This is a new event, so get
out and set a record time.
Note: Intramurals is looking for
an aggregate winner for the above
three cycling events.
AT AG
LAr
\ICE
■       ■
UPCOMING EVENTS                             REGISTRATION DEADLINES
UPCOMING EVENTS                                 REGISTRATION DEADLINES
SPECIAL EVENTS
Fn., Sept. 27
Greek Toga Trot
Drop-in
Heats: Sat., Sept. 21
Logan Cycle "200"
Sept   16-20
SUB Plaza - Race Centre
Finals: Thurs.,
Harry Logan Track
3.0 km, 5.5 km - 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 26
1:00-3:00 p.m., 12:30 p.m. (Thurs.)
LEAGUE SPORTS
SUPER SPORTS WEEKEND
Season: Oct. 1-
Fort Camp Hockey League
Sept. 16-20
Fri. Sat., Sept. 27 28
Bookstore 3 on 3 BasketbaU tourn't
Sept. 16-20
N iv  28
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
for Term 1
War Memorial Gym   10:00 a.r-i. 600 p.rr.
Season: Oct   6-
Nitobe Basketball League
Sept. 23-27
Sat., Sept. 28
Sept   23-27
Mar. 9
Entire Season
Football Stadium on Stadium Road
Playoffs: Mar. 10-25
War Memorial Gym
25 km, 9:00 a.m. 40 km., 10:00 a.m.
Season: Oct   7 IV
ar. 10
Cross Volleyball League
Sept. 23-27
Sat.-Sun., Sept. 28 29
Softball Tournament
Mclnnes Feld, Osborne Field
Sept. 20
Playoffs: Mar. 11
25
Osborne Centre/War Memorial Gyrn
CYCLE SPORTS
Entire Season
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 3
Cycle Hill Climb
Sept. 23-27
Sat., Sept. 29
Edge of the Rainforest Run
SUB Plaza - Race Centre
12.9 km - 10:00 a.m.
Drop-in
Spanish Banks, 12:30 p.m.
CO-REC PROGRAM
Sun., Sept. 29
Cycle Sprints
Old Marine Drive behind Totem Res.
5ipt   23-27
Oct. 6 Dec. 1
Cross Volleyball League
Osborne Centre
Sept. 23-27
1 p.m.
Oct. 7-Nov. 25
Inner Tube Water Polo League
Sept. 23-27
NOON RUNS
Sept. 19-Dec. 1
UBC Aquatic Centre
Drop-In Badminton
Drop-in
Fri., Sept. 20
Inaugural Road Run
Drop-in
Osborne Center
SUB Plaza - Race Centre
Sept. 19-Dec. 1
Drop-In Volleyball
Drop-in
2.8 km - 12:30 p.m.
Osborne Center
SLO-PITCH SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT
Softball, Saturday and Sunday,
Sept. 28 & 29. Register a Men's or
Co-Rec team. Each team must consist of 10 players with Co-Rec teams
having a minimum of three women.
Mclnnes Field.
LOGAN CYCLE "200"
Fifty to 60 five person teams cycle a total of 100 laps in the qualifying heats and 200 laps (100 for
women) in the finals. Teams to beat
this year are Engineering (M), 200
laps (2:07:06) and Rowing (W), 100
laps (1:13:24).
STUDENT SPECIAL
QUEEN SIZE FUTON
$99
DOUBLE SIZE FUTON
$88
WESTERN FUTON & FABRIC
4388 WEST 10th
(at Trimble)
Phone 222-1277
1
THE
% MILLION
DOLLAR
tflOUND THK WOPto
'N I IC3H IY \WAVS
ATE MEAL STEAL
Fogg n' Suds recent ATE MEAL STEAL (AMS) Card on the inside cover
of the INSIDE UBC magazine, issued to you at registration, offers all
UBC students ONE FREE McFogg Burger for each month of the 1985-86
school term . . . that's EIGHT FREE burgers for each UBC student, or
$748,000 worth of McFogg Burgers! So grab the INSIDE UBC magazine,
bring in the Fogg n' Suds AMS coupon and will be UBCing you soon!
FOGG on 4th
3293 West 4th
Ph. 732-3377
FOGG on the BEACH
1215 Bidwell Street
Ph. 669-9297
SPORTS
UBC FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
MEN
MEN
Needed for MEN
By William Congreve
November 6-16
Directed by
Arne Zaslove
Please Contact the Theatre Dept. for Audition
228-3880 or Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
COMMUTING?
Bike
to the
Co-op!
For
the best deals
on cycling accessories
in town!
Blackburn AR-1 Rack $35.00
Kryptonite K4 Lock $39.50
Espa Touring Shorts $22.50
Zefal HP Pump $12.50
Plus Bell helmets,
wool tights, safety vests, and
more at low Co-op prices.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
On 8th Ave. between Cambie and Yukon. 872-7858
Bring this ad in for a FREE catalogue. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
'taeofi
TODAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Free jive lessons, noon, SUB ballroom.
UBC WINDSURFING
Get blown away, partici-windsurfing, no(
57
SUBFILMS
Film,   Desperately  Seeking  Susan,  7 a
p.m., SUB auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible teaching, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Coming Out dance, all welcome, bar, 8 p.m.,
SUB partyroom.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Welcome back dance, 7 p.m   to 1 a.m., Grad
centre ballroom.
UBC JUDO
Judo every Saturday, 11.30 a.m., Osborne gym
E, contact room 23, War Memorial gym.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Worship service, 10 a.m., Lutheran campus cen
tre.
DANCE HORIZONS
First rehearsal, free admission, everyone
welcome, noon, SUB plaza, for more information come to SUB 208.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
CUP 48 committee meeting, 2 p.m., 105-1169 Pacific
St.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC daycare gym.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Soccer for all staffers,   11:30 a.m.,  25th and
Crown.
MONDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Mahlzeit, noon, BUCH B 224.
UBC WINDSURFING
Join the club, noon, SUB 57.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration, 10:30 to 3:30, main concourse.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice time, noon, SUB partyroom.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Club's day, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., main concourse SUB.
TUESDAY
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Discussion of boycott policy, and photographers
meeting, noon, SUB 241k.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration, for more info, come to SUB 208,
10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB main concourse.
UBC JUDO
Every Tuesday, 8:30 p.m., Osborne Gym E,
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, Brock Hall room 304.
/ G>2.^E At rT^Tsr^rT
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
>
UBC
r-i-i (E-X-C-E ■ L- L- E-N"D x r
Th e   eat e r Y
1 FREE BU
PURCHASE 2 BURGERS AND RECEIVE THE LEAST EXPENSIVE FREE. DINING IN ONLY: ALL BEEF & TOFU
BURGERS ONLY. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER
COUPON.
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
f
uncheon Smorgasbord
'Thpiytic Chinese Cuismv
228-9114
10°r DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
VIimi  Fri    11  30 S 00 p  r>-
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00 p m   9 00 p in
2142 Western Parkw.iv
UBC Village
CITR MOBILE SOUND
What You Want, Where You Want It!
From Neanderthal cave stomps
to the latest computer chip
cha-cha, CITR can deliver
it right to your next party
with its Mobile Sound System.
And the rates are great!
CITR MOBILE SOUND  228-3017
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
• specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial -
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
20 - HOUSING
70 - SERVICES
The Friends of the
Richmond Public Library
are holding a mammoth BOOK
SALE on Sunday, September 22nd,
1985 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Minoru Sports Pavilion, 7191 Granville Ave., Richmond.
QUIET CLEAN responsible arts student
seeks shared accom. west side tor Oct. 1.
Call Martin 732-9663.
25 - INSTRUCTION
FAST, EFFICIENT, professional writing/'
editing/typing services. Excellent results.
Reas. rates. 734-0154.
\\\ Oh What A Fun III
%%% PLACE TO BE  HI
(Home of the Frosted Mug)
\Loz Burger on a 1U    Bun
(Share it with a friend)    C m    75
yju-yNr^JT^JL, Overlooking English Bay
--^^^ttffijttiMbr: Corner Davie & Denman
"^w^^TfteSea (Valet Parkin9)
AMS ART GALLERY
Showings of works by:
GARY DENNIS
Sept. 16-20
HINDA AVERY
Sept. 25-Oct. 4
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
SUB
MAIN CONCOURSE
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
Graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
321-4809
30 - JOBS
JE CHERCHE quelqu'un pour parler
Francais au telephone pendant 15 min. un
soir par semaine a un garcon de 14 ans.
Helen 224-9333.
35 - LOST
SM. SIZE gold ring, blue sapphire stone.
Sept. 16 betw. Buch., SUB, Scarfe bldg.
Reward. Pis. phone 224-9066, F. Harrison.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings
at 10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouve School
of Theology.
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
11 - FOR SALE- Private
1979 SUZUKI GS 850 Vetter Windjammer
Fairing, Vetter Saddlebags. Excellent cond.
23,000 km. $1700 obo. 222-2284.
WATCH. Men's gold Seiko watch, black
watchband, lost at Doug and the Slugs
concert. Phone Ken at 224-3846.
40 - MESSAGES
ANY UBC STUDENT, staff, faculty wishing
to write about peace/disarmament for The
Ubyssey please call James at 734-4128.
ADVENTUROUS? Two buddies meet two
buddettes. Excitement, intrigue &
suspense. DISCOVER DOUBLEDATE for
$20/year. 736-4444.
85 - TYPING
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857,
224-7351.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814
1977 DODGE ARROW, hatchback, red,
76,700 km. Asking $2000. Call 683-4081 or
271-5960.
MEN'S 10-SPEED, 23" frame, $75; boy's
motocross, age 7-12, $50; 2 ukeleles, $5 &■
$20; flour mill, $250; 1936 walnut chest of
drawers, $300; 120 bass accordian, $350;
Gibson J50 acoustic guitar, $300, 926-2928
or 926-5630 (message).
GET CULTURED! See the Ntl. Ballet of
Canada and the Vancouver Symphony present ONEGIN. Q.E. Theatre, Sat., Sept. 28.
Best seats in house $25 each obo. Phone
Gail 687-5267 (evenings).
THUNDERTECH PERFECT TYPING. Com
puterized word processing system. Essays
resumes, etc. Stud, rates. 873-2062.
CALL VERNON GEARING'S friend Chris
that you met in T.O. at Carabana a.s.a.p.
Patti, 931-5026.
EXPERT TYPING - IBM Sel. essays, term
papers, letters, resumes, theses. Reas.
rates. 298-1147.
BICYCLES, 25" Chimo 10 speed, $150;
21" 10 speed, $120. Both are quite new and
in v. good cond. Stig, 731-5793.
SMITH CORONA electric Typewriter with
cast. Brand new condition. $249.00.
325-3888 after 6 p.m. Corrected number.
ARMCHAIR, reasonable condition. Free,
just come and get it. Jim, 688-3349.
RETURN   TRANSFERABLE   AIR   TICKET
Good for 1 of 6 Caribbean Islands. $500
obo. Travel must be done by Dec. 14/85.
261-1824.
20 - HOUSING
BACHELOR APARTMENT for rent. Kits
beach, $350/mo. Available Oct. 1.
736-3896, 732-9313.
VITA
See you at the GIL UBC coming out dance,
Saturday, 8 p.m. in the SUB Party Room.
Virginia
70 - SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING,   research.    Free   editing,
check, carbon copy. 926-7752.
spelling
1 RM. IN 3 BDRM. townhse Quiet,
sauna, whirlpool, shared food, etc.
$325/mo. 4100 Salish Dr. (5 min. from
UBC). Call John or Colin, 261-2013.
PERSONAL INJURY
ACCIDENT CLAIMS
Gerrit TeHennepe
Be -nster b Solicitor
683-6561
No Charge For
Initial Consultation
ADINA word processing. Student discount.
High quality work. 10th & Discover. Phone
222-2122.
90 - WANTED
SOCCER goalkeeper needed for 3rd
division, city league team. Contact Bruce
228-5582, 228-8246
SUBJECTS NEEDED
Physically active female subjects are required immediately for a study involving the effects of mild
iron deficiency on work capacity. Benefits to
subjects include iron status assessment, computerized dietary analysis, physiological assessment & iron supplemenTation. Interested?? Contact Ian Newhouse, 734-9662 or B.C. Sports
Medicine Clinic. 228-4046. Friday, September 20, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
HcVL£6
Desperately Seeking Susan, a life so
outrageous it takes two women to live it at the
Ridge (16th and Arbutus, 738-63111 7:30 and
9:30.
A Woman in Flames at the Vancouver East
Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455).
Starstruck and The Return of Martin
Guerre (French) at the Hollywood (3123
W. Broadway, 738-3211) at 7:30 and 9:30.
Adults and students $3.
Page 15
Cheap Sentiment, a musical tour de farce,
and production of Tamahnous Theatre, at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre, (1895
Venables, at Victoria, 254-9578) September
20-Oct. 12 at 8:30 p.m.
Goodnight Disgrace by Michael Mercer,
produced by the Vancouver Playhouse opens
at the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
(872-6622) Sept. 22, at 8:00 p.m.
Jacques Brel is alive and well and living in
Paris, plays at the Arts Club Theatre on
Granville Island (280-4444) from Sept. 24-28.
Showtimes are: Tuesday to Friday at 8:30
p.m., and Saturday at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Self-Accusation,   a  speak   play   by   Peter
Hanke, plays Saturday, Sept. 28 at the Black
Gallery.   Pitt  International   Galleries  (36
Powell St., 681-6740) at 8:30 p.m.
Next Time  I'll  Sing  to  You,  by James
Saunders,  plays at City Stage (688-1436)
Thursday, September 26, at 8:30 p.m.
Sythetic Energy, produced by Axis Mime
Theatre, plays at the Firehall Theatre until
September 21.
Jim Byrnes at the Jazz Bar (1400 Robson,
687-93121, Sept. 18-21.
Heather Bishop, a major figure in the Canadian folk scene, at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (1895 Venables, 254-9578),
Sept. 22.
Hugh Fraser at the Classical Joint (231 Car-
rail, 689-0667), Sept. 20.
Wild Bill Davidson and Jim Beatty with the
Lance Harrison jazz band at the Hot Jazz
Society (2120 Main, 873-4131), Sept. 20 and
21 at 8:00 p.m.
(^        Bcfukh
Rock   Angels   with   Shanghai    Dog   at
theRailway Club (579 Dunsmuir, 681-1625),
Sept. 20 and 21.
D.R.I, from San Francisco, with Green River
Social Menace at John Barley's (23 W.
Cordova, 669-1771), Sept. 25.
Albert Collins and The Icebreakers at the
Town Pump (66 Water St., 683-6695), Sept.
27 and 28 at 9:30 p.m.
John Rea, Rudolf Komorous: Composers
in Focus at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre  (1895 Venables  at  Victoria   Drive,
731-3511), Sept. 29 at 5:00 p.m.
Buddy  Guy  and  Junior Wells,   Chicago
Blues   and    Soul,    at   the   Commodore
Ballroom (870 Granville, 681-7838), Sept. 20
and 21.
Recollections: Ten Women of
Photography, the photography of ten
distinguished elders of the photographic profession, all who have made invaluable contributions to the art, at Presentation House
(333 Chesterfield Ave., N. Vancouver,
986-1351), from Sept. 5-Oct. 27.
Voice Over, the expression of feminist issues
by four women using different mediums, at
the Contemporary Art Gallery (555
Hamilton St., 687-1345), Sept. 3-28.
Gathie Falk A Retrospective, the largest
retrospective for an individual ever produced
by the Vancouver Art Gallery, includes
paintings,  drawings, and sculptures at the
VAG    (750    Hornby    St.,    682-56211    until
November 11.
The Plastimetric Connection, an exhibition
of drawings and sculpture by Josef Caveno
at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery, 1956 Main
Mall, UBC, Sept. 11-Oct. 18.
Bonjour    Monsieur    Lartigue,    125
photographs from 1902-1936, at the Surrey
Art Gallery, until September 22.
Paintings and Drawings by David Sloan,
an exhibition of this seldom seen B.C. realist's
oils and drawings at the Surrey Art Gallery
from Sept. 26-Oct. 20.
Henry   Goes   to   the   Met.,   by   Kathryn
Youngs, a budding youngish ceramic artist,
at  the  Black  Gallery,   Pitt  International
Galleries (36 Powell St., 681-6740).
Third annual storytelling marathon for
peace at the Quaker Meeting House (1090
W. 70th, 738-8429), Sept. 21, from noon until
midnight.
Author Sandra Butler, author of Conspiracy of Silence: The Trauma of Incest
at the Justice Institute (W. 4th, 874-1111),
Sept. 19-21 for a series of workshops.
SELF-SERVE TYPING CENTRE
Quick and convenient
We type or you type
Low hourly or daily rates
IBM Selectric Correcting Typewriters with a choice
of typestyles
Rental includes desk, paper, supplies, and a Xerox
copy of all typing done . . .
1215 DAVIE STREET
683-1433
Valid until October 31, 19
o
13 BUB KB
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ID
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TI-35-n
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Common.    Uncommon.
Anything you can do with numbers,
Texas Instruments can help you do better.
Every year of school or work brings
new problems, new challenges. And
having the right calculator for the job
will make solving these problems
easier, and faster. That's why
Texas Instruments makes so many
different kinds of calculators.
Take the TI-35 Galaxy Solar. This
62 function scientific student calculator
has an advanced keyboard design, with
new, patented display indicators that
show pending operations. Powers, roots,
reciprocals, logarithms, trig functions,
degree/radian/grad conversions and
others are at your fingertips. It even
comes with a guidebook that provide?
instructions, information, examples and
problem solving specifics.
For professional engineering, math,
and science applications, the TI-56
provides the most needed statistical
functions for better data analysis.
And the BA-35 is a complete business math system in one neat package.
No wonder Canada's largest-
selling line of scientific and financial
calculators is Texas Instruments.
The uncommon answer to your
everyday problems. By the way,
Texas Instruments calculators have
the common keys too. tL.
Texas ^*
Instruments
Creating useful products
an J services tor vou. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1985
Time to explain art
By DAVID McCULLUM
On Tuesday evening, CBC radio
featured a program on performance
art — a recent phenomenon in New
York where people get up on stage
in nightclubs, and, as they put it,
"do their own thing".
A featured performance of the
evening the reporter attended was a
British gentleman who appeared in
front of the intrigued spectators
dressed in his underpants and sporting a steel bowl strapped to his
chest. As he banged loudly on his
bowl with a spoon, he introduced
the members of his family. Each
family member was a doll, produced magically from his underwear.
"1 keep my family in my underpants because I can't afford a
backpack."
(freestyle)
Who are we to judge, but c'mon;
that's entertainment?
Another performer was
American social commentator Annie Liebowitz. She figured she
could entertain the masses by
reading portions of her new book,
and then answering questions. People asked if she played tennis, and
what newspaper she reads (pretty
high-brow crowds they get in
Manhattan).
"1 read the National Enquirer,"
said Liebowitz. "It's as accurate as
any other paper in America and the
newsprint doesn't come off in your
hands."
I bet some people laughed for
weeks. Not everybody, though.
"What'd you think?" asked the
intrepid reporter.
"It's awful," replied an obviously pissed off woman.
"What're you going to do?" said
the reporter.
"Leave" she said.
Wait a minute here. Think about
that one for a moment. How many
movies have you seen this year that
left you feeling cheated, nauseous,
or worse? How many of them did
you walk out of? Not one, I'll bet (I
know I sat through them all, even
Teen Wolf).
Why is this so? What makes us
the celluloid sheep willing to watch
120 minutes of pure garbage,
privilege? Shouldn't we do
something about this?
Now I'm the first one to admit
that voting with one's feet doesn't
do a thing to get one's money back
from the greedy or grubby hands
of the theatre chains (who by the
way, must have larger profits than
the oil companies we all love to
hate), but imagine the reaction of
the management when they open up
the doors to the cinematic cubicle
they have the nerve to call a theatre,
and find . . . Empty seats. That's
what these movies (and sporting
events and musical performances et
cetera) demand. In fact, they're
fairly crying out for consumer
avoidance.
If you're fed up with the quality
of much of the entertainment offered up for our ever-decreasing
buck, do what I plan to do when the
next Porky's sequel is released: vote
with my feet.
David McCullum is an energetic
new Ubyssey staffer who is mad as
hell and isn 't going to take second-
rate   entertainment   anymore.
Register NOW with the
UBC DANCE CLUB
and enjoy
Meeting People — Learning to.dance — Lessons
taught by professionals — monthly parties — and
much more.
at LOW, LOW Prices!!
Contact: UBC Dance Club-Upper SUB (228-3248)
JOIN THE FUN!!!
•Free Jive Lessons, Friday, September 20, 27 at 12:30 p.m.
SUB PARTY ROOM
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
at
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
THIS OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 30/85
f UPA) - Grey Soviet tanks rotted into the Persian Gotf yesterday, tending the greenback U.S. dollar — along with aft gray Western currency — to eft-time lows.
Riot* ensued in New York between Week* end whites and grey*, in Los Angela* between Hispanic* and whites greys. En Sen Francisco
between pink homosexuals and grey heteoroeaxuete, end to South Africa between everyone.
To salvage the world economy, the U.S. greyly announced H waf launching its grey nuclear arson*!; the U .S.S.R. responded m kind The
whole grey world Was destroyed, and everyone died. Except you.
Student discount 50% off
Enjoy Canada's better information source delivered
to your door at the special student discount of 50% off.
YeS, I would like to take advantage of this special student offer at 50% OFF.
Please deliver the Globe and Mail to the address below. Enclosed is my cheque or money
order or charge card authorization for u 3 months — $22.75 [I 6 months — $45.50
Name.
University
Residence.
Street	
Postal Code
 Room#_
 City	
_Telephone#	
_Campus _
.Province
Student I.D.#
This address is C On campus, or n Off campus
u Cheque or Money Order Enclosed □ American Express C Visa LJ MasterCard
Charge Card Expiry Charge Card#	
Signature	
(required to validate ofTen
The
444
Mm
Mail to:
Globe and Mail
Front St. W.
Toronto, Ont.
M5V2S9
Att.: Circulation Dept.
Note: Offer \ahd onl\ uhere
home deii\er\ I* awilahle       &
Offer expires ~Jg*
&
L
ORDER NOW AND SAVE 50%
DUTHIE BOOKS
4444 West 10th Avenue
Hours:
Monday-Thursday & Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday 10 a.m.-9 p.m. & Sunday 12 p.m.-5 p.m.
Fall has arrived, classes have
started and the new book season has
definitely begun. Some of the more
interesting September titles are from
old favourites like John Fowles who
is up to his old narrative and
philosophical tricks with A Maggot,
Anthony Burgess, with an interesting new study of D. H.
Lawrence, Flame into Being, and
Nobelist William Golding with An
Egyptian Journal.
Two fine new collections of short
fiction celebrating our city's centennial and its literary heritage have
just arrived in the store: Vancouver
Short Stories from UBC Press,
edited by Carole Gerson, and Vancouver Fiction from Polestar Press,
edited by David Watmough.
We are now carrying a wide selection of magazines and periodicals,
ranging from the Economist and the
Guardian Weekly to the Opera
Quarterly, Bon Appetit and
Decanter. We also feature a good
selection of architecture magazines,
including Domus, Abitare, A.D.
and Architectural Review.
Having trouble locating that certain book? We can help you find it
with or special order facilities or, if
it's out of print, we can do a book
search.
Finally, Duthie's would like to
congratulate Mel Hurtig on the
completion of his monumental project, the Canadian Encyclopedia,
which is already nearly sold out on
the first edition^
reduction on a single purchase of any amount on
lOvO   presentation of this coupon during the month of
September/1985.
This offer does not apply to the Canadian Encyclopedia
■ Valid only at 4444 W. 10th Ave.

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