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The Ubyssey Mar 4, 1986

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Array UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 41
12
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 4,1986
228-2301
Province approves building loan
By CORINNE BJORGE
UBC will have 158 new units of
family housing by the summer of
1987 following provincial approval
of a $13.5 million loan.
Ihe $10 million Acadia Phase
Two housing project will include 15
one bedroom and study units, 117
two bedroom and study units, and
26 four bedroom units located to
the southeast of campus.
And money will cover already
completed construction for campus
parking and food service facilities.
Thirteen 1940's vintage army
huts now used for family housing
and 20 per cent of UBC's daycare
capacity will be demolished to make
room for the new project.
The recent construction of Gage
and Fairview residences for single
students means family housing was
due to be "next in line on a long
waiting list," Mary Flores, director
of student housing services, said
Monday. She added the project
now awaits final approval from the
board of governors before it can be
put to tender.
At a board meeting in October
where the Acadia plan got first approval, the board also established a
requirement daycare be built to
cover additional demands placed by
expanded housing. This project will
include enough daycare to cover the
increased demand.
The remaining $3.5 million will
go towards paying off current debts
incurred through renovations in
parking and food services. Bruce
Gellately, vice president of finance,
said the university could save about
one per cent ($400,000) off their
debt by playing the prime lending
rate off against the lower world
market rate.
Financing for the loan will not be
made through the University budget
said University Council of British
Columbia  (UCBC)  chair  George
Morfitt.
He said all three projects are in
the category of self-funded auxiliary operations. The repayment of
loans would be guaranteed with in
come from the projects rather than
from the university's budget.
UCBC secretary Lee Southern
emphasized the project is a loan,
not a grant. "The loan will not be a
drain to the taxpayers," he said.
Illiterate dollar
By GORDANA RASIC and
Canadian University Press
The fallen Canadian dollar has
severely lowered UBC's libraries'
book buying power.
"Everywhere we deal with,
materials are costing more," said
assistant collections librarian Anthony Jeffreys Monday. The library
spends half its budget on materials
from the United States but the
American dollar is worth six or
seven per cent more than a year
ago, he said.
But compared to the Canadian
dollar western Europe and Japanese
currencies are up 40-50 per cent
from last year rates.
"We'll be buying a lot less unless
our budget goes up, though I can't
say if it will or not," said Jeffreys.
He said substituting puchases of
more U.S. books for even higher
priced Western European books
might save some money, but it can
only be done to a slight extent.
"This might work for a place like
Sedgewick, but when it comes to
such things as the languages we
have no choice," said Jeffreys.
University librarian Douglas
Mclnnes said that the university
hasn't stopped buying, but will be
in a poorer position next year.
"Materials bought now will be on
next year's budget, and this means
that we may run out of money
sooner next year," said Mclnnes.
"It won't, however, affect our buying from now until March."
The current slump of the Canadian dollar has limited the purchasing   power   of   other   University
Labs privatize
By JOHN GUSHUE
Science and Technology Writer
of Canadian University Press
OTTAWA (CUP)—University
researchers may be trading in lab
coats for business suits following
the Feb. 26 budget recommendations of increased private sector
financing for campus labs.
While the county's three research
granting bodies — the Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council, the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council, and
the Medical Research Council —
have all been given sustained funding for five years, they have all
been told to attract more funding
from private industry.
In his budget statement, Finance
Minister Michael Wilson said an extra $300 million dollars over five
years will be allotted to all three
councils, and that the government
will match dollar for dollar all
See page 2: RESEARCHERS
libraries.
The University of Waterloo
decided in January to stop buying
books for its library because its purchasing budget has run out.
Waterloo librarian Murray
Shepherd said the price of printed
material has risen 12 to 15 per cent
this year — much faster than inflation (currently four per cent) and
the library's budget increase of 2.2
per cent.
"Students .and faculty can cope
with the situation in the short run,"
he said. "But in the long run, I
don't see any relief."
Librarians and bookstore
managers said about 80 per cent of
their material is from outside
Canada.
McMaster University librarian
Victor Nunn said although the
situation there is probably better
than elsewhere, "we're not buying
any extra books and we're not buying any archival material." He also
said the rise in the cost of serials is
the most striking price increase.
Students will also pay more at
university bookstores. One
bookstore manager said the
wholesale prices are going up five to
11 per cent. Another said the cost of
paperbacks has risen 20-25 per cent
in the past six months.
University librarians and
booksellers blame the devalued
Canadian dollar for the large increases, but also list general inflation and possible increased costs for
publishing companies. Worsening
the problem is an increase in the
number of books published and the
declining support universities are
able to give their libraries.
The Canadian dollar, hovering 70
cents (U.S.) is "the straw that broke
the back", according to Waterloo's
Shepherd.
— edward moti photo
UBC student decides best way to approach in homogeneous poisson equation
New budgef gives $50 fo sfudents
By PETER KUITENBROUWER
Of Canadian University Press
OTTAWA — Fifty dollars.
That's what Finance Minister
Michael Wilson's Feb. 26 budget
will mean to most college and
university students.
The $50 is a refund on federal
sales tax the government will send
this spring to every student who
files a tax return and whose annual
income is under $15,000. Most
students fall into this category.
Apart from this, the budget contains little good news for students
over the short term. While Wilson
boasted in his budget speech that
"restraining the rate of growth of
transfer payments to the provinces
for health care and post-secondary-
education" showed his government's comittement to reducing the
federal deficit, he did not announce
any new funding or tax measures
that will benefit students or impoverished institutions of higher
learning.
In fact, students who benefit
from federal programmes will be hit
with the same restraints as all other
sectors by a two per cent reduction
in spending on all government programmes not covered by law. "Particular emphasis will be placed on
grants and contributions, capital
and general operations and
maintenance (in the spending cut)"
according to the budget papers.
Among affected programmes
that benefit students are federal
summer employment schemes, the
Canada Student Loan Programme,
and a large number of programmes
in multi-culturalism and employment and immigration that provide
subsidies for study and training. By
1987, the government plans to
spend less on these programmes
than in 1984.
On top of this two per cent
government-wide cut (which does
not apply to national defence or international assistance spending) the
government will reduce spending on
the Canada Jobs Strategy from
$900 million this year to $800
million next year.
The Job Strategy is the federal
Men rule women in conversation
By SARAH MILLIN
Men silence women repeatedly in conversation and
print said Dale Spender, feminist and author of the
book Man-made Language Friday night.
Spender who holds four degrees including one in
socio-linguistics, told a crowd of 300 in Woodward
IRC 2, that men monopolize conversations.
Spender said,in her studies of taped conversations,
where both men and women were present, women
were the ones likely to remain silent.
"For a women to get half the time in a conversation is very hard," Spender said. She added if women
speak for more than 30 per cent of the time men consider them rude and dominating.
She encouraged all women to use a stopwatch in
their own daily conversations to prove her findings.
Spender also found from researching her book
that conversation topics are usually determined by
men.
"The only topic that are talked about are the ones
acceptable to men," she said. "For the woman to get
half the time in a conversation is hard."
And she added 90 per cent of interruptions in conversations are caused by men. "The most common
statement is "what you mean is . . ."
Spender, who also examined the Oxford Dictionary, said the number of words which describe
women negatively greatly outnumber the number for
.men.
"There are 220 words about sexually promiscuous
women and only 20 for promiscuous men," she said.
"Most of them represent women's availability."
"What men have done is sit around, decide they
have a sexuality, and have given themselves some
nice words for it," Spender said.
Spender said gender parity does not exist in the
English language and added words which should differ only in gender are often pejorative to women.
"To talk about a spinster and bachelor is to talk
about two different lifestyles," Spender said.
training programme designed partly
to "help youth and women make
the transition from school or home
to the labour market."
An official of the finance department who asked not to be named
said Canada Jobs Strategy funding
is less urgent because the unemployment rate is dropping and provincial and private participation in the
training scheme is on the increase.
But the official said the government's good news for students is
that their odds of landing a job on
graduation are increasing. Wilson
projects unemployment will drop to
nine per cent from a current 9.8 per
cent in the next 20 months.
The government will cut total
spending on job creation by $300
million in the next two years.
The official said "the best thing
the government can do for students
is to say they won't have to pay incredible taxes on the debt" when
they do get a job.
Still, the budget's challenge to
private industry that it will match
any business' grant to the three
federal research councils dollar for
dollar up. to six per cent of the council's budgets may mean more
research money for some graduate
students.
"If they (business and the granting councils) get it together, they
may well oversee one of the fastest-
growing programmes in the government," according to Robert Rand,
another finance official.
"I mean, everything else has bee
screwed down very tight, as you're
well aware," the official said.
Students will soon know more
about the federal government's
priorities in cutting programmes in
education and research, which cost
$6 billion this year. Review will be
made public March 11. The study
team on education and research,
formed last fall, had a mandate of
seeking out "waste and
duplication" in programmes. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
£   ""iff.
Tuesday, March 4, 1986
Researchers turn
to industry
From page 1
private sector contributions to each
council, to a maximum of six per
cent. He said he was confident the
scheme would work, and that" ,on-
tact between the business and
academic communities would be
improved."
Canadian University Press asked
Wilson how he knows business will
answer the challenge and invest
money in the councils.
"This is an experiment," Wilson
said. "I've talked to a number of
people. They are giving a great deal
of support (to this plan). We believe
they will rise to the occasion."
"We don't want the private sector going off (quietly) in their own
corner doing their research and the
granting councils in their corner."
"We're trying to build a greater
degree of co-operation. We want to
see how this evolves but there is a
potential of raising $1 billion for
research and development," Wilson
said.
Initial reaction from NSERC and
SSHRC, who submitted comprehensive five-year funding plans
to the government last summer, is
hesitant. Both councils had asked
for much more than the government has provided saying their requests were the minimum needed
for sufficient research and development in Canadian laboratories.
"The research community
shouldn't get overly enthusiastic,"
said NSERC president Gordon
McNabb. "We're starting this exercise with a fall — we need $14
million just to bring us back up to
the level of last year's funding."
He said the $300 million allotment will not satisfy each council's
needs. "NSERC alone needs $380
million (to match last year's levels)
— I don't know how we're going to
manage this. There are an awful lot
of questions," he said.
McNabb is pleased the government has made a long-term commitment to university research. "Given
the economic circumstances, it's
not too bad. I think we're being
given preferred treatment, and for
the first time, we've been given
assured multi-year funding," he
said.
But he doesn't think the government accounted for inflation in its
grant. "I can only conclude that the
secure base of funding that we've
been given does not include inflation protection," McNabb said.
McNabb also said NSERC is not
prepared to recruit industrial investment for university researchers.
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If you're graduating this year and you've
■ accepted career-oriented employment
at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
the American Express Card.
That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
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Why is American Express
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get the Card right now? Well,
simply stated, we recognize
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Of course, the American Express Card
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So you are too.
So call 1-800-387-9666 and
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ask to have a Special Student
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Don't leave school without it™
American Express Canada, Inc is a registered user of the trade marks owned by American Express Company 'OCopynght American Express Canada, Inc. 1986 All Rights Reserved Tuesday, March 4,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page3
Birds fly away with Huskies trophy
By KRISTI BLOCKER
Our men's volleyball team surprised a lot of Saskatchewan people
this weekend by travelling to the
home of the # 1 ranked University of
Saskatchwan Huskies and taking
away the Canada West Championship trophy right from under their
noses. This will give the Birds the #1,
seeding going into the CIAU National Championships in Moncton,
New Brunswick on March 13-15.
After losing a squeaker to the
Huskies at UBC one week ago the
Birds turned the tables on the
Huskies Friday night defeating
them 3-2 (12-15, 11-15, 15-5, 15-11,
15-11).
After falling behind 2-0 the
Birds cleared their way back beating
a stubborn Huskie squad 15-11 in
the fifth game. Thunderbird coach
Dale Ohman said "the fifth game
was tied 10-10, the match was
anybody's, and our guys simply
were stronger when it counted."
The offense was keyed by
Canada West Second Team All-star
Greg Williscroft's 29 kills and
Canada West First All-star Chris
Frehlick's 23 kills. The defense was
led by Frehlick, rookie Kelly
Bukowski and Canada West First
Team All-star Brad Willock who
each had five stuff blocks as the
Birds dominated at the net.
Coach Ohman said, "The match
seemed to start to turn around with
the insertino of two of our younger
stars, Bukowski and sophomore
Greg Solecki. They added a spark
and Saskatchewan could not stop
them." Bukoski scored a season
high 14 kills and Solecki serve
received at a 90"% clip.
On Saturday night the Birds fell
3-1 (15-3, 3-15, 16-14, 15-7) to the
fired up Huskies. The Birds came
very close to sweeping the final
series two straight except for a
crucial let down in game three. The
Birds, led the pivotal third game
13-7 and 14-10 but couldn't score
the decisive point.
"We had six serves for game
point and with each missed opportunity the Huskies and their fans
got stronger and louder," said
coach Ohman. The Birds got 18
kills from Frehlick, 17 from
Williscroft and 16 from Korean
Han Joo Eom who seems to have
recovered from his bout of knee
tendonitis.
The pivotal third match took
place on Sunday afternoon and
there were great expectations from
the Saskatchewan press, fans and
team. However, it was the Birds
who celebrated winning the match
3-1 (15-7, 15-10, 13-15, 15-9).
The Birds almost swept the match
in three straight as the game from a
9-14 deficit to 13-14 before losing.
However that momentum lifted the
birds to a 13-5 lead and eventual
15-9 final game win. The Birds net
play was led by captain Frehlick's
22 kills, Williscroft's 14 kills and
Eom's 13 kills. Top blockers were
senior Norm Hanson and Willock
with four stuffs each.
The Birds now prepare to retain
the National title which they last
won here at UBC in 1983. It is
highly likely that they may once
again play Saskatchewan in a one
match showdown at the CIAU's in
Moncton on Saturday, March 15
(shown live on TSN at 1 p.m.
Pacific Time).
Birds clinch title
— kent kallberg-photo
A FIRST TEAM Canada West basketball all-star MDA student Ken Klassen has a chance to be named All-
Canadian player of the year next week when voting is held.
UBC Birds dean up in California
Though the UBC rugby team
won all three games in California
this weekend, injuries may ruin the
rest of the season.
Birds cleaned up on U.Cal-
Berkeley last week in the first game
of the series beating them 21-6.
Kicker Steve Rowell picked up a
shiner during the match when he used his eye to inflict some heavy duty
punishment on an opposing
player's fist. The opposing player
then retaliated by using his head to
break Ian Scholnick's hand as play
continued on.
The game was by far the roughest
in the series as Glenn Ennis and Jeff
Knauer picked up charley horses,
Pierre Duey an ankle sprain and
John Devlin a hamstring pull. UBC
than went to beat Santa Barbara
24-13 and a tough Southern
California under 29 rep team 24-10.
UBC coach Barry Legh said,
"The rough stuff is a part of rugby
but the team kept their discipline to
win each of the games. Our players
should be back fairly quickly and
ready for the rest of the First Division season."
Looking ahead, the Canadian national team trials will be held at
Thunderbird Stadium at the end of
this week on Friday, Saturday and
Sunday. UBC players with a good
chance at making the national
squad include John Devlin, Pat
Palmer, Roy Radu, Matt Kokan
and Glenn Ennis.
Upcoming events for the national
team   include   the   7-a-side   tour
naments in Hong Kong and
Australia, two games with Japan in
June in Victoria and Vancouver, a
possible tour of Ireland in the late
summer or early fall and, of course,
the World Cup of rugby to be held
in Australia in the spring of 1987.
By JOEL SIVERMAN
Amid controversy and stiff competition from the Cowtown Dino's,
the UBC track team won the
Canada West title for the fourth
consecutiver year.
Outstanding contributions to the
team victory included Simon
Hoogewerf handily winning the
1000 metres in 2:25.78 and Dave
Wilkinson's win in the 60m hurdles
in 8.27 seconds.
Two other individual wins, Jim
Gamlin in the hijump and Boyd
Mason in the pole vault, proved to
be especially critical to the team victory. Gamlin's personal best jump
of 2.07 metres allowed the team's
poinrtotal to gain an edge over U of
C.
Mason's vault, the last event "of
the meet, proved to be the deciding
points in the team championship.
His personal best of 4.81 metres
secured the victory for the run and
jumps bunch.
This after the meet director has
already declared U of C the winners
on the basis of omitting Mason's
UBC takes play-off spot
The UBC A field hockey team caused a minor upset on Saturday by tying
league leading India Club 3-3. The one point was enough to put UBC into
the top four, and secure a play-off spot, in the First Division of the Vancouver League.
Despite missing several regulars UBC played a spirited game led by their
captain and goalie Cam Lusztig, who saved two penalty strokes. Scoring
for UBC were Chris Gifford and Ian McKenzie.
Next Saturday in the first round of the play-offs UBC meets second place
Vancouver Rowing Club Jokers at 1 p.m. at Winona Park (E. 59th and
Columbia St.).
result from point totals. The confusion and panic was negated after
assistant manager Carmen James
had pointed out the error.
Highly competitive third and
fourth place finishes in the 4x200
metre and 4x400 metre relays were
capped off by a dramatic come
from behind silver medal in the
4x800 metre.
From a deficit of 75m Simon
Hoogewerf pulled to within 5m of
leading U of C at the finish.
Hoogewerfs split of 1:49.06 capped off a great segment of his running career as it is his final year at
UBC.
The women's team had one of its
strongest results in some years. On
the strength of their hijump,
hurdles and relays they wound up
the meet in fourth place.
The jumps squad was led by
Tami Lutz. After a winter of recurring knee problems, her win (1.80
metre) this weekend was especially
sweet. "It has been a tough year,"
said Lutz. "It makes this win so
much more satisfying." Lutz is
another member of the team headed
for a professional career.
Second place in hijump was taken
by Jeannie Cockroft and fourth by
Heather O'Doyle. These results
lend credence to UBC's bid to
establish itself as a national jumps
center.
Joanne Gaspard was indeed the
class of the field as she blew away
the other competitors in the 60m
hurdles. Her win in a time of 8.86
seconds put her in an excellent position to win the CIAU.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 4, 1986
iwrtw, Marcos' Island
WRe SupfofcD To
INFILTRATe NICARAGUA,
tXJ IDIOTS».... ,
N-l-C-A-R-A-G-U-A1.
mi
Letters
Forum for porn offensive
In response to Iain Blair's letter
in the Feb. 25 issue of The Ubyssey
"Prejudice and unquestioned fear
subverts facts", I would like to
make two points:
Firstly, The Ubyssey should not
be a forum for porn of any type,
hetero- or homosexual. I find
graphic pornography, like that contained in The Ubyssey, offensive
and I feel it should not be published
in a university publication that is
made widely available to unsuspecting readers. If the people at The
Ubyssey feel that for the sake of
public awareness they should
publish such disgusting garbage
they could put it in a separate
publication with fair warning of the
contents on the cover. I'm not condoning such a publication nor do I
wish to see my money go towards it;
I'm just suggesting a less offensive
alternative.
Secondly, Valentines day is a day
dedicated to romance and love. It is
not a day of lust nor a day
dedicated to homosexuality as
recognized by the majority of the
population. Nor should it be. For
one day out of 365 it seems
reasonable that we could see words
of romance and" love in print
without offending people who (deal
with it, Iain) are going to be offended.
I do not wish to deny the right of
any minority to be heard and
understood. However choosing the
right time to speak and the right
words to say is essential to com
munication. Hint: Valentines day is
the wrong time and graphic pornography are the wrong words.
Liz Robertson
mech 2
Mary Desbrisay
mech 2
Marcos and his 55 member entourage may find themselves
castaway on Gilligan's Island.
A more fitting island for Marcos would be Alcatraz. He is a liar,
embezzler, extortionist and murderer.
His crimes against the Filipino people should not be rewarded by
granting him refuge in a tropic island nest.
The U.S. has taken a small step to cure some of the ills it caused
by perpetuating the dictator's twenty year rule — more than half of
which was under martial law.
If the Reagan administration were sincere in its effort to establish
democracy and justice in the island nation, it would return Marcos
to the Filipino people to be tried for his crimes.
Editorialize
Debbie Lo and Stephen Wisenthal have steered the good ship
Ubyssey on its rocky course since last spring. But all great things
must come to an end and the time has come for a new crop of
idealistic young waifs to take the helm.
So the gangplank is outfor the editorial collective for 1986-1987
to walk on board.
The successful applicants will be prepared to devote 40 to 60
hours a week and their entire soul to the cause of the vilest rag
west of Bianca. And knowledge of UBC, writing and handling
unruly reporters are necessarily, but not necessarily sufficient conditions for the positions.
Anyone on campus can run but the final decision is made by
democratic vote of the paper's staff.
Eager candidates should list their qualifications, reasons for running, and ideas for next year and submit their applications to the
Ubyssey office (SUB 241k) by noon, Wednesday, March 5.
Intensive screenings (endless searching questions about
qualifications, ideas and the causes of inflation) will greet candidates on Friday, March 7.
Letters
Expo 86 gives pains to DERA-ere
Mona and the children
show inspiring heroism
The first time I heard the song
"Mona with the children" was in
the summer of 1984 where Doug
Cameron was performing in a
Baha'i youth conference in London, Ontario. Finally after the third
attempt of singing the song, he
overcame his emotions and began
to sing, his voice shaking less with
each word.
The song was about Mona, a 17
year old Baha'i girl who was executed a year earlier in Shiraz, Iran.
It was Doug Cameron's attempt to
sing a happy song about Mona,
even though he did it with tears.
Last May, the single "Mona with
the children" was released on the
CBS lable. Seals and Crofts had
taken over the backing vocals in
their first come back after many
years. With the single also came a
moving video based on actual accounts of Mona's imprisonment
and exectution. The video starts
with revolutionary guards destroying a Baha'i cemetery.
In October 1982, revolutionary
guards broke into and ransacked
Mona's house. She and her father
were arrested and held separately in
prison. Mona spent the remaining
nine months of her life, in that
prison, enduring great hardships
such as witnessing the torture and
execution of many others, including
her own father.
She was interrogated four times,
each lasting up to 10-12 hours dur
ing the night. In those interrogations, she refuted the false charges
of "Zionism", "spying",
"misleading Moslems", etc. It is
reported that her strength, courage
and calm spirituality moved,
frightened and infuriated the
Mullahs who saw that they were
powerless to force her to recount
her faith.
Mona was finally executed with
nine other Baha'i women on June
18, 1983. In a final effort to break
their will, the authorities hanged
them one at a time, forcing each to
watch. It is said that Mona asked to
be the last to be hanged so that she
could pray for the strength of each
one who came before her.
Mona's video will be shown at
12:30 lunch time; Mon., Mar. 10 in
SUB auditorium. The purpose
behind the showing of the video is
not telling another story of persecution and death, but to share an inspiring story with Mona's own
generation. Mona was just an ordinary girl, but because of her circumstances and how she chose to
respond, she became a heroic example of what all people can do —
pass their tests and meet their
challenges. Mona's tests were different from ours, they may also be
more difficult to identify: apathy,
materialism, dishonesty, drugs, etc.
Foad Azizi,
chairman UBC
association for Bahai studies
On Sun., Mar. 2, a large public
meeting was held in Vancouver's
East Side. This meeting was
organized by C.R.A.B. and by
D.E.R.A. in order to protest two of
the numerous negative side-effects
of EXPO 86:
• the Harcourt-sanctioned parking lot to be constructed in the area
of the proposed park for the Vancouver East side, struggled for by
C.R.A.B. for several years,
• and the forced relocation of
elderly from old hotels being quickly renovated for EXPO.
Don Larson, representing
C.R.A.B., pointed out that elderly
have begun to commit suicide
rather than move. Daniel Stephen
Ponak, fifty years old, threw
himself out of his hotel this week,
falling to his death, within days of
his eviction notice.
D.E.R.A., Jim Pattison, and Bill
Ritchie   (Municipalities   represen
tative) are meeting today to decide
whether there can be an eviction
freeze until after EXPO. If no
freeze is forthcoming, there will undoubtedly be picketing outside of
the hotels where these elderly people live.
If you wish to get involved in this
issue, call D.E.R.A. (Jim Green) at
682-0931. If you wish to support
C.R.A.B.'s struggle for a park,
especially NOW when the East Side
is going to become full of tourists
and cars, call C.R.A.B. (Don Larson).
Other actions are planned in
response to EXPO 86. There is a
People's Free Expo planned for
May 3 at Thornton Park, at the
East gate of EXPO. This activity
will include music, poetry, storytelling, theatre, workshops.
Should you be interested in helping to make this event a success you
can   either   call   254-9962   (or
Geography club boxed in
As a member of the Geography
Undergrad Students Association I
would like to sincerely thank the individual who made off with our
coffee box and the funds therein.
You solved many a problem for us.
You removed the box completely
from the wall, thus, relieving us of a
place to put our quarters for coffee.
And besides, it was a damned ugly
box anyway.
You also relieved us of the
burden of counting out all those
quarters; such a waste of valuable
time! You relieved us of the decision whether or not to use those
funds to pay for the next batch of
coffee. Who wants to break even?
Why not go into debt? You did a
fine job of screwing up a well run
and very popular service, as well as
jeopardizing our club's funding.
But hey, a non-profit organization
can take that kind of loss, right?
That's probably what you think.
If you are reading this — and I
hope you are — pat yourself on the
back for a job well done.
Sociopaths generally feel no
remorse or guilt for their actions.
You might even be suprised to see
this letter, I mean, how could a little
thing like this raise such a fuss?
If you get caught one day, I'm
sure you will wonder what it was
you did wrong. I only hope your
peers care as little about you as you
do about others. Craig Chatfield
geography 4
255-0160), or you could attend the
People's Free Expo benefit at La
Quena 1111 Commercial Drive,
Sat., Mar. 22, 8 p.m. $3 employed,
$2 unemployed.
Suzanne M. Rose
RHME 3
CRAPrenough
I'm glad someone else noticed
this atrocity on campus. We at
CRAP (coalition of really active
painters) feel that the pressures of
university are enough without the
stress resulting from shoddy painting techniques.
Few people realize that 0.01 per
cent of all university drop outs are
due to railings and garbage cans
peeling paint.
In fact last week, a student
stumbled on a staircase in Henn-
ings. Grabbing on to a handrail
would have saved him but he was so
horrified at the sight of peeling
paint, he pulled his hands away in
reflex and impailed himself on a
gelled mowhawk of a passing anarchist club member.
It's about time that the university
and government of B.C. addressed
this problem with the action it really
requires.
C.R.A.P. (U.B.C. chapter)
John Crowley, president
science 4
THE UBYSSEY
March 4, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Oh no said she. Not that, not the horrible no-contrast picture. Yes, yes said Steve Wou in modest
agreement. Gray, gray and not so subtle overtones of overexposure. Hee, hee laughed Michael
Groverman. My picture looks almost just exactly like me: not blue and not at all furry. Just then, Cor
inne Bjorge arrived. Y'know Corinne, the fevered journalistic hack and part-time bike gang leader. Ho
ho smiled Ed Mou broadly. I'll waste her gang any day on my Interceptor 500. Icksnay Zoot. Debbie Lo
looked up from her typewriter, and nodded in agreement. I'll have a combination and a white wine said
she quizzically, or was that quixotically. Steve, 1 mean Svetozar is looking pretty mysterious today.
Must be the sarma offered Gordana Rasic. No no, said Stephen Wisenthal, it's to do with other
people's karma always running over his dogma. Is that so? asked Amy Lam. I think so, I must say, said
Camile Dionne. Or was that the other way around asked Steve Chan. Sarah Millin walked in carrying a
can. It contained carbonated water, sugar, and a bunch of other stuff Caffeiene kilts. Aspartame
hurts. Keep away kids. Don't do it. Tuesday, March 4,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
McGill to raise fees
By CATHERINE BAINBRIDGE
of Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP)—Welcome
to the university of the future. At
this private or semi-private institution, tuition fees will range from
$10,000 to $15,000, 'A's will be
rare, the sons and daughters of
alumni will get special attention for
entrance and undergraduate
students will prepare for life with
joint degrees in arts and science.
Harkening back to principles and
practices of the good old university
days before the 1960s, a think-tank
of more than 20 McGill professors
has developed numerous recommendations for the university's
future.
The Future Options Group
(FOG) of professors from different
departments was formed to save the
university before its present state of
mediocrity sets in for good, according to professor Stores McCaul.
"The writing is on the wall.
There is very little hope left that
governments will adequately
finance universities," said McCaul.
"You can't run an excellent university when you are at the mercy of
every government economy drive.
We must acknowledge this as a fact
of life and prepare for it."
McCaul said all the "great'
universities in the world have their
own sources of funding and McGill
must do the same. The FOG report
calls for gradual financial independence from the government,
unless a radical change in education
funding takes place.
"For example," the report reads,
"the Faculty of Medicine might
become private, charging full fees,
and serve as the 'founding faculty'
of an evolving private university if
the experiment proved successful."
The report called for a minimum
100 per cent raise in tuition fees.
"We have a good conscience
about raising fees," said McCaul.
"Ninety-nine per cent of the faculty
and staff here support it."
The report says if the Quebec
government is unwilling to raise fees
for political reasons, then it might
conceivably allow universities to
collect fees themselves.
"This is politically easier for the
government because criticism will
land on the universities' shoulders
and not theirs," he said. "We are
quite willing to bear the approbation from students and the public
on this issue."
Giving preferential admission to
children of alumni is another
money-making scheme suggested in
the report.
"It really comes down to dollars
and cents," said McCaul. "Our
research shows that particularly in
the case of American universities,
where this kind of preference is
given, the universities develop a
devoted band of alumni which is
necessary for their financial support."
ja/WA/y
li^liOr. htid
?? flW hoA op WW
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
1.
l/2 price
after 10:00 p.m.
29U l/uesr4TH. Avenue
The report says education quality
calls for downgrading of marks,
tougher requirements for tenure,
and more temporary lecturers to
leave room for certain professors to
spend more time as researchers.
"Over the last 15-20 years there
has been grade inflation in some but
not all departments. This represents
a false democratisation of the process of student evaluation," the
report reads.
Marks have lost their meaning,
said McCaul. "Compared to marks
in the 50's, an A was a rarer thing.
Now A's are very common and
C's are all too rare."
The report also recommended
that, for promotion to full professorship, superiority in research
or scholarship be the requirement
and not the present criteria, which
also includes teaching and community or administrative work.
The report discussed establishing
a special class of professors whose
only activity is research. The report
said the advantages include attracting brilliant researchers who have
no interest or talent in teaching. A
compromise was suggested where
certain professors would be given
minimum teaching loads and temporary lecturers would pick up the
slack.
Joint degrees in arts and science
should be offered to the
undergraduate student, the report
recommended. "There will always
be a tension between this and those
who want," said McCaul. "But this
can leave you blinkered for the rest
of your life."
McCaul said the new trend
among companies was to hire
managers with a general arts education.
"After all the British believed
that if you really knew your
classical history and literature you
were fit to go out and rule India,"
said McCaul.
VpRPSL WEEK
MARCH 3-7
Schedule
ISRAEL TABLE IN SUB CONCOURSE
Videos, Brochures, and Displays
Wed., Mar. 5, & Thurs., Mar. 6
11:30-2:00
Tuesday, March 4
12:30 Buch B 314
Wednesday March 5
12:30 SUB Party Room DANCING
All welcome!
DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED: ARAB-
JEWISH RELATIONS IN ISRAEL
Speaker:   Ami   Ruzansky,   Israel   Aliyah
Representative
FALLAFEL
LUNCH   &   ISRAELI
Thursday, March 6
12:30 Buch B 214
N&r
^^   VAN'
DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED: INTEGRATION AND DISINTEGRATION IN ISRAELI SCHOOLS
Speaker: Dr. Zemira Mevarech, professor of education at Bar Ilan University Israel, visiting professor University
of Alberta.
DEMOCRACY IN ACTION
VANCOUVER B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
■S
Norih American
Jewish Students
Network
224-2512
.= <*
Canada Pavilion
= EXPO 86
May2-October13,l986
An entertainment company is
seeking to hire five performers to
play the part of an astronaut. The
part requires that the character be
male, between 5 foot 9 inches and
5 foot 11 inches tall and weigh between 150 and 175 pounds. The
performance requires that the performer be strong, agile and be able
to endure the wearing of a complete space suit, while suspended
for lengthy periods. Must be willing
to work rotating shifts.
Term of employment and compensation to be negotiated.
Auditions will be held March 11th
and 12th in Vancouver.
Resume should be submitted immediately to:
MR. RICHARD G. LOTT
_^.      ExhibitDesignCoordinator
|W   Canada Pavilion-
" T     Expo 86
1700-200 Granville Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C1S4
TM © Canada Harbour Place Corporation 1984
CANADA RACE VANCOUVER
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
•HAG2. tsE^kSW
for Men & Women
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDRY
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
(reg. 12.95)
3621 W. 4th A ve. 733-3831
Vancouver International Film Festival
SPECIAL BENEFIT SCREENING
Thursday, March 6, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
at the Varsity Theatre
A new film by New Zealand director GEOFF MURPHY.
Starring BRUNO LAWRENCE.
Opening remarks by JIM BOHLEN, Nuclear Issues.
Co-ordinator and co-founder of GREENPEACE.
Advance tickets at:
Vancouver Int. Film Festival: 111-2182 West 12th Ave.
Greenpeace Office: 2623 West 4th Ave.
Mountain Equipment Co-op: 428 West 8th Ave.
$5/Film Festival Members $6/Non-members
Info: 738-0400
"BEST SCIENCE FICTION FILM OF THE
'80's-L.A. Daily News
MATURE-Warning: Occasional nudity and violence. BC   Director
"The creations of our mind should be
a blessing, not a curse to mankind."
-Albert Einstein Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 4, 1986
%^UJZ£&
TODAY
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on obstetrics with guest spesker Dr.
Gomel, noon. Wood 1.
UBC 8AIUNG CLUB
Spring cruise meeting postponed until Merch 5.
THE UBYSSEY
Deedline for position  papers for  next years
editorial collective. SUB 241K.
AMS ROCKERS
Meeting and nominations, noon, SUB 241E.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
any or all for M6L noon, SUB 208.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Letter writing to Prime Minister Mulroney on
NORAD renewal, noon, SUB 215.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 211.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall X2.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Nominations for 1966-87 executives must be in
by today at 1 p.m., SUB 249G.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops:  in
troduction  to  belly dance,   March   15,   limited
space. Register 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.. Interna
tionat house office.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
NETWORK
"Arab-Jewish relations in Israel" Ami Ruzansky,.
noon, Buch B314.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorials. 5:30 - 6:30 p.m., Brock hall 350.
WEDNESDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, festuring John Gould, gutter,
8:30-11 p.m.. Graduate student centre, garden
room lounge.
NETWORK
Israel info table, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Spring cruise meeting, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
THE UBYSSEY
Photo seminar with award winning photographer
Neil Lucente, 3:30 p.m.. SUB 241K.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: "Intuition, the sixth sense," guest
speaker Dele Maranda, noon, Buch B221.
SLAVONIC STUDIES AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
- Lecture: "Strategy for peace and freedom: the
significance of Eastern Europe", Eugene Loebe,
prof,   emeritus,   Vassar  college,   noon,   Buch
A206.
WORLO UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Nicaragua * slide/tepe show 'Report from the
front', Judy Harper of OXFAM, > noon,  Buch
A205.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registrstion for cultural dance workshops: Introduction to belly dance, March 15. Registration
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., International house office.
JSA/HILLEL
Fallafel lunch and Israel dancing, noon, SUB party room.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Doug Ross speaks on Soviet presence in Pacific
Rim, noon, Buch B212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dsnce classes,
any or all for M6, noon, SUB 208.
AMS ROCKERS
Organization meeting for Saturday's party,
noon, SUB 241E.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge.
UBYSSEY PHOTOGS
Lost in the dsrk? Neil wents to show you the
way. Photo seminar wilt cover developing and
printing for newspaper reproduction. Also: basic
exposure, pushing film, using flash, composition, 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, SUB 241K
(Ubyssey office).
THURSDAY
CHINE8E STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
NETWORK
"Integration end disintegration in Israeli school",
Dr. Zemira Mevarech. noon, BUCH B214.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops, introduction to belly dsnce, March 15,  limited
space, registration 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.. International houss offics.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30-6 p.m., Asian centre
604.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Group presentstion,  come end leugh,  noon,
Scarfe 209.
UBC PRE-DENTAL CLUB
Dr. Leung is speaking on periodontics, (election
nominetions coming . . .), 1-2 p.m., IRC 5.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
1968-87 elections, noon, Buch B214.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speeker: Gey alcoholics anonymous, noon, SUB
206.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dence classes,
any or all for $46, noon, SUB 208.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hockey night, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Osborne gym F.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Spesk to your government,  11:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m., SUB 213.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Lecture: Dr. Andrew Thompson, "A new ap-
proech to environmental regulation," noon,
geography 212.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Speaksr: Jim Kershaw, "Taxation and your
small business", noon, Angus 325.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Speak to your government, noon, SUB concourse.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Speeker: Jessie Duerte, South African, speaking
on the woman situation in South Africa, noon,
SUB auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
NETWORK
Isrsel info tsble, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
OXFAM
Guest speaker: Jessie Duarte, federation of
Trsnsvaal women, noon, SUB auditorium.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time meeting, noon, Brock hall 302.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, elections, noon, SUB 119.
FRIDAY
DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC AND ITALIAN
Spanish play to Carlos Muniz, "Las viejas drficil-
ed,"   admission   is   free,   noon   and   8   p.m.,
Graduate student centre.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, come and see the thrilling story
of Mona as presented by Doug Cameron in his
-the
DEQ
 cafc-
• ••••
FINK ARTS VIDF.O & KSPRKSSO BAR
*•*••••••
*
3420 W. Broadway
734-2233 OPEN EARLY. OPEN LATE!
$5.95
VCR & 2 MOVIES
SUN-THURSDAY
20%
OFF
ANY MENU ITEM(S)
(With UBC or AMS Card)
VALID UNTIL MARCH 20/86
>
(0
o
FREE
TUDIO
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
•  For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1986
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
•  UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1986 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
TUDIO
O
"5"
V
in
0)
<
CD
PHOTOGS
LOST IN THE DARK?
Neil wants to show YOU the
way. Photo seminar will cover
developing and printing for
newspaper reproduction.
Also: basic exposure, pushing
film, using a flash, composition. 3:30 p.m. Wednesday.
SUB 241k (Ubyssey office). Be
there or be out of focus.
006
dojds&op&uno/i
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
*i-  f&Vi
oeiaiA/AC
?<%£ \Hesr4m. Avenue
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut $20 Color $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St.
Vancouver,
738-0519
Our Art  Director is also interviewing hair models with potential for
photographic and demonstration work.
rock video "Mona with the children", noon,
SUB auditorium.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Open gym, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne gym B.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff   meeting,    screenings   for    next   year's
editorial collective, 3 p.m., SUB 241K.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
any or all for M6, noon, SUB 208.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLU8
The bible and government, 7-8:30 p.m., SUB
215.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Special outreach — contact staff or students if
interested for more info, 6:30-9 p.m., downtown
Vancouver.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshop, introduction to belly dance,  Merch  15,  limited
space. Registration 8:30a.m.-4:30p.m., International house office.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Dianne DeMille: How to influence Ottawa, noon,
SUB 206.
UBC NDP
NDP house leader lan Deans — on the budget,
noon, SUB 207.
'THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c Additional days, $4.00 and  65c
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial    80 - TUTORING
NEWLY OPKNED
Village Antiques
& 2nd Hand
4231 Dunbar St.
228-8787
WE BUY & SELL.
10^0 off with this ad or student card.
15 - FOUND
EARRING in Woodward bldg. »5 lecture hall.
Call Yung-Tsin, 224-9444. Bring other one
of pair.
20 - HOUSING
INEXPENSIVE room and board, located on
campus. $3507month (double occ).
$400/month (single). Includes TV, VCR,
washing facilities, IBM computer and a
sauna. Call 222-4470. Ask for lan.
FURNISHED ROOM for rent for n/s female at 26th & Dunbar. Laun. fac. avail.
Mar. & Apr. only. $237.507mo. util. incl.
Questions? Call Shannon, 228-9085.
40 - MESSAGES
PLAY DOUBLE-UP. circular 2-man strategy
game. Tournament possible. For free instructions write: Double-Up Club of Montreal, Box 54S3, Station B, Montreal,
Quebec, H3B4P1.
ANNABELLE: Feelin' fast the french way?
Much success swimming at CI's.
70 - SERVICES
PARTY??
Complete Music & Lighting
System for only $175.   For
more information call
Skylines Mobile Music
324-4983
FEMALE VOLUNTEERS
REQUIRED FOR DEPT. OF
MEDICINE STUDY
If you are taking oral contraceptives and are willing to
come to VGH for six appointments, we will pay you
$45.00. Ail records are strictly
confidential. For info call
Karen or Anita at 875-4588
M-F.
GOT A PROBLEM? Need to talk, Drop by
Speakeasy on SUB concourse or ph.
228-3700. Confidential, anonymous.
20% OFF USED BOOKS (floor models) from
now until 4th April. When the Prop" will
close for 5 months while the manager buys
in Europe. Proprioception Books, 1956 W.
Broadway, 734-4112. Open 2-6, Mon.-Sat.
Park in rear betw. Maple & Cypress.
"SHAME THE DEVIL" by Lyn Morrow is a
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press gallery, politics! publicity, using well
known characters. ISBN 0-9692-0-2820-1,
515.95 postpaid. Lynmor Publishing,
Osoyoos, B.C. V0H 1V0.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
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596-6685.
PANASONIC 21" colour TV. Good cond.,
& bamboo blind, maroon colour, 6'x5'. TV,
$175; blind, $20. Ph. 732-7216.
ARE YOU A TUTOR?
Want to Earn Extra Income?
For Contacts Unlimited
Send Resume to:
G. Er C. ASSOCIATES
#110, 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 1E5
Phone 738-3399
NEED A TUTOR?
Achieve    goals    you    thought
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G. & C. ASSOCIATES
#110 - 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V6H 1E5
TUTORING IN
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Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S. Parker, B.A., M.A
733-4534
85 - TYPING
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write,  we type theses,   resumes,  letters,
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EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
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IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
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JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U & Del. on
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WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: wordperfect. Call
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TYPING — fast, accurate — reasonable
rates. 734-8451.
ACCENT word processing / translation
French - English - Italian — $18/hr. Del. on
campus. 536-7172/536-9214.
WORD PROCESSING TYPING. Special
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papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
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25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statistical. 271-6755 Richmond.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Mlcom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
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876-5333      Ihrs. 9-4:30 p.m.I
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703 Tuesday, March 4,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page?
Rethink NORM
By MARK FETTES
When Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney visits the White House
later this month, he is expected to
sign a renewal of Canada's 28-year-
old NORAD defence agreement
with the United States. Yet how
many Canadians know what
NORAD is or to what extent it
enhances (or undermines) our
security? Likewise, how many
know what the proposed NATO
training centre in Labrador will be
used for, or what the current
NATO defence strategy is in
Europe?
Canada's defence policy has not
been the subject of public debate
for years, if not decades. The last
Defence White Paper (a statement
of government policy approved by
the Cabinet) was published in 1971,
and the opportunity for public input then was limited. The Tories are
currently trying to put together a
White Paper of their own with no
public input at all. Meanwhile many
of the basic concepts and assumptions behind Canada's defence
policy go unchallenged, although
the circumstances which gave rise to
them have long since altered beyond
recognition.
perspectives
That's why, on Sunday night, I
watched with great interest the first
episode of Gwynne Dyer's new
three-part series, "The Defence of
Canada". Dyer is of course well
known to Canadian audiences
through his acclaimed "War"
series, which won him several
awards and an Oscar nomination.
His new documentary takes a searching look at the rationale behind
Canada's armed forces and our
defensive alliances.
This first program in the series
focussed on the history of Canada's
involvement with war. As Dyer
pointed out, after a few skirmishes
with the Americans (the last, known
as the "Pig War", taking place in
the San Juan Islands over the
astonishing period of three years),.
Canadian soldiers have fought (and
died) exclusively overseas.
Bv the time World War II ended,
Dyer concludes, Canada had acquired the habits of thought of a
Great Power; habits which were
slower to disappear than our
600-ship navy and our military industry. Canada's commitment to
NATO when the latter was formed
in 1949 was almost a reflex reaction,
and the rationale for our continuing
involvement has not been seriously
debated since.
Having thus set the scene, as it
were, it seems to be Dyer's intention
to look at Canada's present-day
commitments to NATO and
NORAD in the next two programs.
I suspect that many people, including some of those he interviewed for the series, will simply
disagree with his perspective on the
role of alliances in Canada's security: it goes against the grain of Canadian defence policy since the beginning of this century.
Anyone who believes in the importance of an effective defence
policy for Canada should make a
point of watching the remaining
two programs in the Dyer series. In
addition, some of the issues he
raises are discussred in a brief by
Students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament, called "Security in
the Nuclear Age: A Canadian
Foreign Policy for Peace", which
we submitted to the Special Joint
Committee on Canada's International Relations last month.
Drop by the SPMD literature
table in the SUB concourse during
Nuclear Awareness Week, March
10-14, view copies of the brief. To
mark the International Year of
Peace, we are also showing a series
of videos and films over the same
period, including three episodes
from Dyer's "War" series and the
classic film "The Atomic Cafe".
For details watch the Tween Classes
section in The Ubyssey.
Mark Fettes is a UBC graduate student who is active in advocating
nuclear disarmament.
AT A GLANCE
SPECIAL EVENTS
March 17-20
Storm the Wall
March 10-14
12:30-4 pm
TOURNAMENT
Thurs., March 13
Bookstore Tam Tug-o-War
March 3-7
SUB Plaza
12:30 pm
Sat. and Sun.
Red Roughensore Rugby Tournament
March 3-7
March 15-16
Thunderbird Stadium
10 am-4
pm (men and women)
RACQUET SPORTS
Sat. arid Sun.
Buchanan Badminton Grand Prix
March 3-7
March 15-16
Round III
Gyms A and B Osborne Center
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Tower Beach Suicide Run
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
Thursday, February 27,
1986
AS OF WED.. FEB
j»/m
Men's Results
Div. 1
1.  Peter Holdsworth, Physics Staff
27:05
W                 I
2. John Nelson, VST
27:34
1. P.E.
23                 7
3. Paul Quinn, Betas
28:06
2. Recreation
16                11
4.  Reidar Zapf-Gilje, EUS
28:12
3. Commerce
14                13
5.  Peter Lewis, Geology
28:40
4. Phrateres
13                14
6.  Seamus Parker, EUS
28:68
5. Nursing
11                13
7. Stephen Chu, EUS
8. Andy Zalkow, ZBT
29:14
29:15
6. Japan Exchange
11                 16
8                19
9.  Marc Forest, Forestry
29:33
10.  N. Smith, Forestry
29:46
Div. II — after all subtractions of games against
teams out of league made.
1.  Janine Toneoff
EUS
1. Delta Gamma
12                  0
2.  Carolyn Daubeny
Phed
2. EUS
4                 8
3. Theresa Godin
Science
3. Alpha Gamma Delta
2                10
4.  Sherry Wright
Phed
Div. Ill
5.  Irene Strucel
Forestry
1.  Phrateres
18                 9
6.  Pat Good
Rowing
2.  Forestry
17                10
7.  Elizabeth Hasegawa
Nursing
3. Kappa Kappa Gamma
14                10
8.  Tracey
Arts
4.  Gamma Phi Beta
13                11
9.  Debbie Janning
Forestry
5.  EUS
10.  Mela me Basso
Nursing
6. Delta Gamma
5                16
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
SUB SECURITY TEAM
Three positions are available. The Wednesday
Night Security Team will be responsible for patrolling the Student Union Building and enforcing SAC
policies throughout SUB.
Applications may be obtained from the Administrative Assistant's office, SUB Room 238.
Submit applications to SUB 238 no later than 4:00
p.m. on Friday, March 7, 1986
Intramural Sports 1986-87
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Apply by Friday, March 7, 1986
Intramural Office Rm. 66,
Lower Sub Plaza
Sports Program Positions
Student Directors (4) Sport Writers
Assistant Directors Program Assistants
Promotion Managers Coordinators
Sport Editor
An opportunity to work in one of the following
leagues/programs: Fort Camp Hockey League, Runs/Cycle
Program, Cross Volleyball League, Co-Rec Program, Nitobe
Basketball League, Contract Program, Handly Cup Soccer
(Term I), Floor Hockey League (Term 2), Racquet Sports
(Tennis, Squash, and Badminton, or Special Events).
Administration Positions
Finance Director Sport Publication
Awards Director Editor in Chief
Advertising: Marketing Director     Assistant Editors (2)
Journalists (3)
Assistant Director (Marketing Research)
Photographers (4)
Advertising Production Personnel (4)
Graphic Artists (2)
Sport Ventures Positions
(Merchandise Department)
President Finance Manager
Vice-Presidents (4) Promotions Managers (9)
Marketing Manager
Details on all positions and honoraria available may be obtained from
the office.
(4BC //thmcm&...       ifet, good Moril
f
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^
I       DO YOU EXPERIENCE       |
| EXAM ANXIETY? |
I Workshop for practical ways of reducing exam anxiety |
1 will be offered by the i
I STUDENT COUNSELLING & J
I RESOURCE CENTRE I
| BROCK HALL |
|j Dates: March 13, 20 or 27 (choose one) =
| Time: 12:30-2:30 p.m. |
H Space  is  limited,  so  please  register  early  with  the =
| receptionist in Brock 200. =
H There is no charge for these workshops =
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'*j ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co. ltd.
SUNTANNING
10 Sessions 20 Sessions
'SUNTANNING   Reg. Price   $49 $79
Wolf Systems     _    _ • «*.*».
Beds NOW  $39 !¥
Share Sessions with a friend
HAIR STYLING
15% Discount
on any hair care services
or
pay regular price for your hair service
and receive TWO FREE TANNING SESSIONS
5784 University Blvd.
(in UBC Village) % Blk. away
Valid with presentation of this ad
224-1922
224-9116
Expires April 15. 1986
INTRODUCTORY
LECTURE*
"HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE 1986
FOREIGN SERVICE COMPETITION"
Getting into Canada's diplomatic service is difficult. The
exam and interviews demand solid advance preparation if you
want to excel. You are invited to a FREE, 90-minute lecture
by a former Foreign Service Officer previewing the kind of
coaching you can expect in the only seminar designed to improve your performance in the Foreign Service competition.
TOPICS COVERED
• the multiple-choice and precis exercises on the
exam
• time-saving tips on what to read
• how to prepare and practise for tfcje interviews
• how candidates are evaluated
• the activities of a  Foreign  Service, Officer in
Canada and abroad
FREE LECTURE:
Wednesday, March 5
8:15-9:45 p.m.
Student Union Bldg.-Rm. 212
UBC
PAID SEMINAR: SUNDAY, MARCH 9
9:30-3:00 p.m. SUB 207
*Sponsored by the Alma Mater Society
FOREIGN SERVICE EXAMINATION AND CAREER
COUNSELLING, INC. SUITE 508,404 LAURIER AVENUE
EAST, OTTAWA KIN 6R2, (613) 232-3497 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 4,1986
rams
[Tims
ATTENTION!
ALL GRADUATING STUDENTS
Annual Grad Class Meeting
March 5, 1986
12:30 p.m.
at
BUCHANAN A106
THE FOLLOWING APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION GIFTS WILL BE VOTED ON:
(MAXIMUM DONATIONS WILL NOT EXCEED $7000.00)
Name of Group:
Library and Archival Studies Students' Association
Description of the Project:
A one thousand dollar donation to the Samuel
Rothstein Distinguished Lecture Series.
Budget:
$1000
Summary: We propose to make this donation as a
Grad Class gift for several reasons. Dr. Rothstein,
for whom the lecture series is named, is the founder
and first director of the UBC School of Library and
Archival Studies.  He is a scholar of international
reknown in the area of Librarianship. Dr. Rothstein
has had a long and fruitful association with UBC. He
received his BA and his MA here and served as
University Librarian while founding and directing
the school. He resigned the directorship in 1970 to
return to full time teaching. 1986 will see both the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the school's inception
and the retirement of Dr. Rothstein. We feel that the
library is an integral part of the university community, and Dr. Rothstein's contribution to it both as a
librarian  and as an academic,  merit  the highest
recognition.   In   supporting   the   Lecture   Series
established  in   his  name,   the   Graduating   Class
recognizes   the   important   contribution   of   one
distinguished individual and has the opportunity to
provide a lasting benefit to the university community as a whole.
Name of Group:
Zoology Graduating Class of 1986
Description of the Project:
Biology 2000 Projector Project
Budget:
$500
At UBC there are only a few lecture halls with a
large enough capacity to allow for lecturing to large
classes or presentations by guest lecturers. Biol.
2000 is one such room.
Unfortunately,   Biol.   2000   lacks   some   of   the
necessary for its use; namely, a carousel projector
for slides. To bring Biol. 2000 up to an acceptable
standard,  the Zoology Graduating Class are requesting a gift of $500 to purchase this much needed equipment.
As you know, budget cutbacks have made our funding resources very scarce, and we are afraid that
we may not get this equipment without your help.
Your assistance would be greatly appreciated, and
would not be forgotten by future generations of
students.
Name of Group:
The Alma Mater Society of UBC
Description of the Project:
The AMS Student Bursery Fund
Budget:
$2000
A $2000 donation to the AMS  Student  Bursary
Fund is a method by which the graduating class can
establish a self perpetuating gift to the universities
major resource, its students.
As the bursery programme is still in its infancy it is
these initial donations which are most important as
the fund builds upon itself. Currently the bursery
fund gives out 4 awards to needy students. This
donation will boost the number of awards by 2 for
next year, at current interest rates and for future
years it will establish at least one in perpituity.
Name of Group:
World University Service of Canada UBC Local
Committee
Description of the Project:
Twenty five people working on the project of which
two refugee students will be the direct beneficiary.
Budget:
$3000
January 1985 WUSC held a referendum to increase
tuition fees by 50c in order to sponsor two refugee
students for a period of one year. These students
are United Nation defined refugees who would be
unable to continue their studies without our support.  These students have fled their homes and
families  due  to  direct   pursecution   by  domestic
government, due to their membership in organization,  religious groups  or  simply  having  opinions
which differ form government policies. WUSC is
the only non governmental organization in Canada
which   presently  sponsor   refugee  students.   The
WUSC AMS refugee sponsorship program allows
these individuals to continue their studies at UBC in
order that they might be able to return to their country with their acquired knowledge. At the same time
UBC is the direct beneficiary of their experience
which aids the process of sensitizing students on
issues which relate to developing countries. It is a
process whereby students can directly help other
students which are less fortunate.
Name of Group:
Biology Graduating Class
Description of the Project:
The handicapped access to SUB Auditorium
Budget:
$3,000
The need for providing handicapped access at UBC
is of growing concern to all UBC students. Many
buildings currently lack the facilities for providing
even rudimentary services to handicapped students.
The Student Union Building Auditorium needs funding for the purpose of providing handicapped access to the theatre (by providing an elevator and
theatre seat modification).
As such, during these pressing times, a donation by
the graduating class of $3000 would ensure that
there are sufficient funds in an already established
AMS account for the completion of this project
(total cost $12,0001.
Name of Group:
International Relations Students' Assoc. (IRSA) and
International House
Description of the Project:
WASAIL  (Work and Study Abroad  Information
Library)
Budget:
$3000
As a reading resource library, the material on file will
be of benefit and interest to all students in Canada,
the United States and abroad, from every discipline.
Cultural information with respect to travel, career
opportunities and graduate studies will be readily
available. At present, this resource library is only at
the stage of infancy.
The hours of operation will be from 9:30 to 4:30.
Monday to Friday. These facilities will also be open
during the summer months. A permanent secretary
is on duty during the above hours. In addition, an individual (on a voluntary basis) comes in twice a
week to deal with matters as they arise.
1 have been in touch with Dr. M. Westwood, the
Acting Director of Brock Hall, and serious consideration is being given to coordinate services with
respect to funding in the future,  there may be
money forthcoming from the resources of Brock
Hall. In addition, other sources of funding will be actively pursued. Additional funds made available by
way of a grad class gift would considerably augment
the already existing information significantly.
The fact that WASAIL will be an ongoing concern
and will be useful to the university in general, constitute a  worthwhile cause for the  Grad  Class
Council.
Name of Group:
Commerce Undergraduate Society.
Description of the Project:
Creation of an Asian-Pacific Business collection for
the David Lam Management Research Library.
Budget:
$3000
The Graduating Class of 1996, from the Faculty of
Commerce   and   Business   Administration   is   requesting funds to be donated to the David Lam
Management Research Library.
The David Lam Research Library at the University of
British Columbia opened on June 6,  1985. This
facility augments the University's library and serves
as a centralized research resource available not only
to faculty and students, but to members of the community as well.
The library maintains collections in all facets of industrial   and   commercial   activity   not   available
elsewhere on campus. Because of the geographical
location of our city and university, the David Lam
Management Research Library will include a strong
focus   on   Pacific   Rim   economic   activities   and
development.
Commerce is requesting $3000 to create an Asian-
Pacific business collection in the David Lam Library
to augment their Pacific Rim focus.
Name of Group:
Greater Vancouver Law Students'
Legal Advice Society
Description of the Project:
Sufficient funds to enable the Society to be able to
purchase an office safe and an electronic typewriter.
Budget:
$2,950     •
The Greater Vancouver Legal Advice Program offers
free legal advice to persons who normally cannot afford a lawyer. The University community has greatly
benefited from the Students' Union Building clinic
which runs every two weeks, as well as through the
opportunity to attend  one of  18 evening clinics
throughout  Greater Vancouver.  As our program
serves such a great number of people in the low income bracket, our program spends a great deal of
time drafting  demand  letters,  small claim summonses, and wills. We are proud of our 15% to 20%
settlement  ratio  in  small  claim  cases;   however,
because of the volume of people we assist our current office capabilities are approaching their limit. A
donation by the Grad Class Council to allow us to
purchase an electronic typewriter and an office safe
would benefit the university community by increasing our efficiency at the SUB clinic, as well as easing
the strain on our current volunteers.
Therefore it is urged that the Grad Class Council
consider granting us the necessary funds to purchase an electronic typewriter and an office safe.
NOTICE FOR THE LOCATION
THE 1986 GRADUATING CLASS
OF
TREE
TWO (2) LOCATIONS HAVE BEEN NOMINATED FOR
THE SITE OF THE 1986 GRADUATING CLASS TREE.
THESE ARE:
The eastern portion of the Meridian, located in
between the UBC Bookstore and CPAX (the old
Home Economics Building).
South of the new Administration Building and to the
east of War Memorial Gym.

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