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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 2014

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Array  // Page 2
EVENTS THIS WEEK, CHECK 01
BENEFEST FOR TIBET
6:30-11:00 P.M. ©THUNDERBIRD SPORTS CENTRE
A performance benefitting the Tibetan Resettlement Project, Benefest for
Tibet features acts such as K-OS, Brevner, The Zolas and Delhi to Dublin. All
proceeds are donated to charity. Tickets $34
FRIDAY '   24
JUNGLE FEVER Y2K
9:00 P.M. @6-2880 WESBROOK MALL/ALPHADELTAPHI HOUSE
Alpha is hosting a throwback party to "a time... where every romance was
CH EMICAL, and when people spent their hard-earned money buying Soulja
Boy ringtones to play on their 16-bit Nokias." Tickets from $10-20
SATURDAY ' 25
TEDX TERRY TALKS
9:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. @ LIFE SCIENCE CENTRE
Come and listen to your fellow students and alumni speak about the subjects
they know best at this UBC version ofthe world-renowed TED Talks. Topics
range from "Bi the way, we exist" to "A story of obedience." $12
Shedding light on UBC's study.
-Illustration Nick Adams
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
OCTOBER 23, 2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXVII
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=HOTOWIFFMCDONAFD/THE UBYSSEY
The scoreboard operators have to keep the board up-to-date regardless of the outcome.
Amy Roneki and Kirianna Crowe are UBC
Athletics people behind the scenes
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
With the support for the T-Birds
on the rise each year, it's definitely time to get to know those
behind the scenes. That's right —
UBC athletics isn't all about the
talented athletes and hardworking coaches. Without a dedicated
support team, our experiences at
football, basketball, volleyball,
soccer and hockey games would
be massively different.
Amy Roneki and Kirianna
Crowe are involved with the
operation ofthe scoreboards in
almost every sporting event at
UBC. With the huge number of
varsity teams, there's no way
they can do all the work themselves, so they have been training others to keep track of each
and every element ofthe game.
Crowe, a Land and Food
Systems fourth-year student,
stressed the importance of accuracy within the roles.
"The records of each game go
to both the coaches and it goes to
the CIS, so we have to be good at
it or the university will get fined
if there are any mistakes."
Both girls found themselves in
their roles almost by accident.
"I started because I played
soccer here for my first two
years and they just wanted
people to come and help out
with security and stuff at the
games, standing at the door and
— once I got a chance — to sit on
the table," explained Roneki, a
fourth-year Kinesiology student.
"Once I proved I was confident
and able, they kept putting me
back there." And it seems she's
never looked back.
For Crowe, the induction into
the scorekeeping world followed
a similar path.
"I played rugby for a year,
and our boss just wanted people
to come and help out. When
she realized I could score-keep
because I played basketball
through high school, I just kept
going."
"I live with athletes,
so I like to think I'd
be coming to the
games anyway and
supporting them —
this gives me a front
row seat.
Amy Roneki
UBC scoreboard operator and
fourth-year Kinesiology student.
The support of varsity athletes
between teams has always been
strong, and Roneki considers
the job another way to go and
support her friends.
"I live with athletes, so I like
to think I'd be coming to the
games anyway and supporting
them — this gives me a front row
seat," Roneki said.
Working between 10 and 15
hours a week, usually on Friday
and Saturday nights, scorekeeping is a big commitment. As part
of UBC's work-learn program,
both girls are learning to work
in professional environments
in a situation which complements both their studies and
their interests.
When asked about the future
of UBC sport and athletics, both
Roneki and Crowe have similar
views.
"It's really entertaining to
come and watch these games,
and I think people would really
enjoy the culture a lot more if
they created a sporting culture,"
said Roneki.
"These people are extremely
athletic, it's really, really good
entertainment to watch," said
Crowe. "These people are really
serious about what they do."
It seems as though there are
few better ways to get involved
with sport at UBC. Both girls
definitely seem to love their
role with UBC Athletics. Roneki
acknowledged that her position
with the T-Birds is ideal. "We
have a great job — a really great
job."
"The people we work with are
all our friends," said Crowe. "It's
unreal." tl
U&—°"-Can // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
FEES»
RESEARCH»
Board of Governors student representatives on tuition and residence fee increases
Chris Roach and Nina Karimi comment on UBC's proposals and the #IAmAStudent movement
UBC economics prof
wants companies to
give bereavement
leave for breakups
UBC's Board of Governors' meetings take place within the Gage commonsblock.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
UBC's proposed tuition and
residence fee hikes are a hot
topic for the Board of Governors
student representatives.
Christopher Roach, who is
currently pursuing his Ph.D. in
genome sciences and technology
while serving a term as Board of
Governors student representative,
said that he hopes the university will take more active steps
towards helping make education
more accessible for students.
"As a UBC student and a scientist, I would like the provincial
and federal government to more
adequately support post-secondary education and for student's
time at UBC to be as economical
[and] affordable as possible,"
said Roach.
Still, Roach also said that the
increased fees could be a last resort
taken by the university in order to
provide more opportunities and
services for students.
"I know the university is trying
to improve both the quality of
education and student experience
at UBC," said Roach. "Taking into
account the current government
funding situation, increasing tuition
is one ofthe proposed ways for the
university to pursue these improved
opportunities for students."
Nina Karimi, who is a fourth-
year political science student and
other Board of Governors student
representative, also said that
post-secondary education needs to
be made accessible to all students.
"My personal belief is that education should be free and accessible to
all, but the reality is, UBC is operating in a system largely determined
by the provincial government, and
this is currently not plausible,"
said Karimi.
Karimi said that she would like
to see the current proposal change
after undergoing student consultation. As such, Karimi will continue
to advocate for the students' opinions on the proposed increases to
the Board.
"Students are very upset, not just
with the increases, but by the way
in which the increases have been
presented," said Karimi. "I will
make sure their voices are acknowledged at Board."
Roach and Karimi are currently
meeting with different student
representatives and campus groups
to get a clearer understanding of
where students stand with the
proposed hikes.
Roach said that it is especially important for students
PHOTO GEOFF FISTERffHE UBYSSEY
to come out to the discussion
sessions scheduled in the
upcoming weeks.
"I want to emphasize how crucial it is for students to become a
part ofthe campus-wide conversation and I encourage everyone
to do so," said Roach.
Both Roach and Karimi said
that, as the final proposal on the
increased fees has not yet been
presented to the Board, they are
unable to comment on how they
are planning to vote.
Karimi also said that she is
happy to see that student activists are speaking up against the
proposed changes.
"The students that are organizing a movement against the
increase have my full support at
this time, and I am proud to see
student activism alive on campus," said Karimi. Xi
PROTESTS»
The Dalai Lama's arrival at UBC sparks demonstrations from both protesters and supporters
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The Dalai Lama's arrival at UBC
has been met with many supporters and a handful of protesters.
On Wednesday, October 22, His
Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama came
to UBC to lead a panel discussion on
the importance of teaching empathy
and compassion to young children
and future generations.
As students crowded into the
Chan Centre for the Educating the
Heart in the Early Years: A Dialogue
with the Dalai Lama panel, opposing groups from the International
Shugden Community (ISC) and
Global Tibetan Volunteers For The
Truth (GTVFTT) stood chanting
outside the concert building.
The ISC, which is made up of
various Buddhists from around the
world, held up signs that read "False
Dalai Lama give religious freedom."
Demanding that the Dalai Lama
oppose the ban on worship ofthe
Dorje Shugden school of Buddhism,
the protesters handed out brochures
criticizing the Tibetan government
to passers-by.
"Throughout the Tibetan Exile
Community, both in India and overseas, Tibetans have been required to
take public oaths to abandon their
Shugden Buddhist faith and to also
not associate with Shugden people.
Those refusing to take such oaths
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNFTHE UBYSSEY
Both supporters and protesters could be found in front of the Chan Centre during the Dalai Lama's panel dialogue on October 22.
face ostracism and widespread
discrimination," read one ofthe
brochures handed out by the ISC.
Meanwhile, members ofthe
GTVFTT stood across the street
from the ISC, all while chanting, handing out pamphlets that
denounced the allegations made by
the ISC and holding up signs that
expressed their support for the
Dalai Lama's teaching.
"We strongly condemn all the
uncalled protests, and unsubstantiated writings circulated by
the Shugden followers," said the
GTVFTT in a statement about the
string of ISC protests. "We request
people around the world not to fall
in their trap by listening to their
unfounded allegations, which are
full of lies and backed by Chinese
government machinery."
Members ofthe ISC also protested at John Oliver Secondary
School and the Vancouver Convention Centre, where the Dalai Lama
led discussions on human kindness and compassion on October
21. The protesters are planning to
make another appearance at the
Dalai Lama's all-day empowerment teaching on October 23 at
Thunderbird Arena. Xi
FFUSTRATIONTARIQVIRAFTHE UBYSSEY
How would you like to be able to
take a few days off work to nurse a
broken heart?
Marina Adshade, a UBC economics professor, believes that
companies should consider giving
their employees bereavement leave
after a breakup.
In a recent article in Time
magazine Adshade suggests
offering bereavement leave for
breakups in order to encourage young adults to search for
long-term relationships.
According to Adshade, there are
studies that compare the reaction
of co-workers who are both enduring and observing the breakup in
the work environment. Managers
and co-workers tend to view the
grieving workers as lazy and having
less focus committed to their tasks.
"Employers should care about
their employee's mental health, and
it is possible that bereavement leave
will improve that as well as encourage employee loyalty," said Adshade.
In practice, heartbreak leave
would work similarly to the bereavement leave that is currently offered
by companies to employees who are
mourning the loss of a loved one.
Adshade also said that workers
would not be likely to abuse this
type of leave, as the risks of dishonesty would be too high.
"When you are in the workforce
your employer will not verify absences from work because the risk of
losing your job is too high for people
who are dishonest," said Adshade.
Still, Adshade does not give
extensions on assignments to compensate the suffering of newly single
students in her own classes because
such claims are difficult to verify.
Adshade said that this policy
is not meant to dissuade students
from pursuing committed relationships. In fact, she feels that university students have more time than
they will perhaps ever have again
to pursue their romantic interests.
"I can see really serious students saying [they] don't want to
deal with the hassles of being in
a relationship," said Adshade. "It
doesn't really get any better when
you finish school."
Adshade said that if companies
offered bereavement leave for
breakups, this stress could be
lifted off of young adults altogether. She believes that adults
should not have to risk their
careers in order to enter into a
long-term relationship.
Though Adshade does not see
companies offering bereavement
leave for breakups in the near
future, she still believes that
pursuing romantic relationships in
university is a worthwhile risk.
"You really have more free time
right now than you ever will in the
future," said Adshade. "And you
maybe get a little bit more sympathy right now." Xi NEWS    I   THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014
RESEARCH»
#IAMASTUDENT»
UBC-O to open centre   UBC students in opposition to tuition and residence cost hikes hold general assembly
to research survival       Students involved in the #IAmAStudent campaign are formulating a plan to prevent the proposed fee increases
in extreme conditions
FIFE PHOTO GEOFF FISTERFFHE UBYSSEY
The centre will be based at UBC-O.
Anuja Kapoor
Contributor
A $3.8 million grant will help
launch a UBC centre dedicated
to research ranging from making
better helmets to improving technology for drones.
The facility, called Survive and
Thrive Applied Research (STAR)
was established to develop
enhanced strategies of human
protection, survival technologies
and functionality in remote and
extreme conditions.
According to Gord Binstead
UBC-O's vice president research,
the centre has made the most
headway on a project to develop
a sports helmet that is better
at preventing concussions. The
project is a partnership with a
British company, as well as faculty at both UBC's Okanagan and
Vancouver campuses.
"This is a good example where
you have small companies, a number of researchers, all working on
a project that comes together,"
said Binstead.
Other projects include new
sensors for drones.
"The question is what sensors
can you put on a UAV (unmanned
aerial vehicle) to have it fly over
crops and tailor for example,
how much water each area of a
field is getting, by having sensors
that detect how much moisture
is in the soil. This is another
example, and the same thing goes
with flying over forest fires,"
said Binstead.
The facility will be based at
UBC's Okanagan campus.
"Because ofthe relative newness of our campus, it means that
as these things come in, projects
like this we can respond at a
timeline that a large institution
like UBC Vancouver couldn't.
There is no way to turn a ship
that size that quickly. So our campus is the right size to respond to
projects," said Binstead.
According to Binstead, 90
per cent ofthe funding will go
towards research equipment.
"STAR is an example of what
the long term plan for our campus
is; which is to make our campus
more embedded and integrated
with the broader community,
both profit and non-profit. So
hopefully, one ofthe core outcomes of STAR will be a marked
increase in the degree of interaction both in private research
projects, but more broadly with
small and middle sized businesses," said Binstead.
"I think really the facility
is essentially an example of an
ongoing goal for innovation in
the interior and having UBC
partner with both small business
and other institutions. It is just
an example of that agenda, and
hopefully it won't be the last."
-With files from Will McDonald Xi
=HOTOWIFFMCDONAFDFFHE UBYSSEY
At the assembly, students shared ideas, made posters, buttons and badges, discussed future social media campaign strategies and planned the movement's next events.
David Nixon
Senior Staff Writer
Students are considering walk-outs
and legal action to combat UBC's
tuition and residence fee hikes.
Following the October 14 teach-
in, roughly 100 students showed up
for a general assembly on the night
of October 22 in the SUB ballroom
to make concrete plans to ensure
UBC hears their voice and takes
notice ofthe UBC Students for
Fairness in Tuition and Housing
Prices movement.
"At the core of it we have a very
hierarchal, non-participatory,
non-democratic organization
that's in charge of students ... and
it's making this a less desirable
campus," said Iain Marjoribanks,
a Geography student who helped
organize the assembly.
UBC has proposed a 10 per
cent increase to tuition for next
LAW»
year's international students.
They have also announced a 20
per cent increase to eight-month
residence contracts.
Students formed groups to
create posters, buttons, organize social media strategies for
#IAmAStudent, and to make red
squares that students can pin on
their clothes to show they disagree
with the fee increases. There was
also a direct action group, which
split into three sub-groups.
Students attended for a variety
of reasons. "I was hoping to share
ideas with other students and
come up with a better argument
for myself other than having it
solely based on emotion," said
Simone Williamson, an arts
student from the U.S.. "A lot of
it is 'hey, this isn't fair'... but we
need to be able to come up with a
cohesive argument."
The next protest will be a
march through campus on Friday
October 24. An addition to that
was organized at the assembly — the march will end at the
Martha Piper Plaza Fountain,
where students armed with rubber duckies and brushes will be
mock-bathing to symbolize the
rising costs that could make students unable to afford everyday
items like bathing supplies. No
soap though, they don't want to
do any damage or cause work for
the janitorial staff.
The other proposals were in anticipation ofthe AMS Annual General Meeting (AGM) on October
28, where they would be able to
propose steps for the AMS to take
on behalf of students. The sense
that something big was needed
was prevalent — the recommendations included a walk-out and
having the AMS sue the UBC
Board of Governors for Charter of
Human Rights violations based on
the steep fee increases.
The need for a big show in
opposition to the fee increases
came from a worry that the student voice will be ignored, which
many students spoke to during the
discussions. The students present
also hoped to make the assembly a
weekly occurrence, in order to keep
their voice organized and strong.
If students pursue the proposals
they came up with at the assembly,
the reality ofthe walk-out proposal
or the civil suit will be decided at the
AMS AGM on Tuesday October 28.
"The people who are in the
position to listen to the students
and the stakeholders are not doing
that," said Marjoribanks. "No one
is as smart as everyone, [but] I
think that's lost on UBC." Xi
Embezzler sentenced to house arrest
FIFE PHOTO GEOFF FISTERFTHE UBYSSEY
Former accountant Janet Bayda embezzeled $1 million from a UBC-based law group.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Janet Bayda, who embezzled $1
million from a UBC law centre, has
escaped jail time.
Bayda, whose first offence dates
back to 2004, pleaded guilty to nine
counts of fraud from UBC's International Centre for Criminal Law
Reform and Criminal Justice Policy
(ICCLR), where she worked as an
accountant from 1993 to 2011.
On Monday, October 20, Bayda
was sentenced to two years of house
arrest and two years probation by
Judge Reg Harris at a court hearing,
according to B.C. court records.
According to The Province, Bayda
wrote fake cheques to build a new
house and pay credit card debts.
The ICCLR is a registered
charity that strives to bring law,
democracy, human rights and
good governance to the justice
systems both in Canada and
internationally.
The court heard that Bayda had
previously suffered from alcoholism, depression, an eating disorder
and a shopping addiction. Judge
Harris ruled that, alongside continuing to undertake mental health
counselling during her house
arrest, Bayda must also complete
250 hours of community service.
$825,000 ofthe losses sustained
by the ICCLR have already been
recovered, with Bayda currently
making payments on an additional
$550,000 civil action judgement. Xi
the kaleidoscope
mental health support group at UBC
student run
confidential
all welcome
www.the-kaleidoscope.com
info@the-kaleidoscope.com | Twitter @empowrchange // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
FFUSTRATIONJUFIANYU/THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
BREAKUP LEAVE HAS
LEFT US BROKEN UP
So a UBC prof wants to make
"breakup leave" a legitimate reason
to get vacation time. But that can't
be a serious proposition.
It seems a little ridiculous that
when someone goes through a
breakup they're afforded the luxury
of taking time off. This doesn't
seem particularly fair to those
who manage to stay in long-term
committed relationships and,
thus, have fewer breakups and get
less time off. Should they not be
rewarded for being able to maintain
meaningful relationships?
In all honesty, this would be a
frighteningly easy policy to manipulate. Suddenly, companies are
being flooded by employees whose
partner-of-two-dates dumped them
and now they want time off because
they're an emotional wreck. How
would a company even check to
make sure that you were even in a
relationship to begin with and then
that it had ended? That sounds like
a huge breach of privacy. In fact,
the last person that we would want
to know that we got dumped is our
boss. Can you imagine that awkward conversation?
If you have a hard time dealing
with a breakup, take your regularly
assigned vacation time and go to a
tropical island, alone — because you
got dumped.
UBC CHERRY-PICKED
THEIR HOUSING FIGURES
UBC has insisted for years that their
housing rates are affordable for
students. They argue that the rates
are below market value and that the
growing waitlist to get into campus
residences shows students think the
costs are reasonable.
UBC recently tried to reinforce
this line of reasoning based on a survey they had a consulting firm perform. They took the 164-page survey
report and were kind enough to
condense all the data into one neat
slide they presented to a number of
student leaders (and to The Ubyssey).
For the slide, they conveniently
reworked the numbers from the
survey and added $60 to the average
private rental price (for utilities)
to make a map showing how much
more affordable UBC is than other
surrounding neighbourhoods.
However, UBC left out some
more interesting data from the
survey that wouldn't have looked
so nice in a slideshow. The survey
showed 47 per cent of students who
live on campus have their parents
paying all of their expenses. Only
32 per cent who live off campus
had that luxury. The study also
found that students who live on
campus list convenience as the main
factor for their decision, while the
number-one reason for living off
campus was price. While UBC can
make the numbers say their housing
is affordable, students who actually
have to pay for it clearly have a
different experience.
STUDENT BOG REPS.
SHOULD REPRESENT
STUDENT INTERESTS
Chris Roach and Nina Karimi are
the folks who represent the voice of
the students to the Board of Governors. As such, it is extremely important for them to make sure that
the concerns students have about
the proposed tuition and residence
fee increases are actually heard and
listened to. They are definitely on
the right path with meeting with
different campus groups and gathering opinions, but we would also like
to see a more drastic response to
such a drastic proposal.
Perhaps more than any other
university issue, the proposed
tuition and residence clearly matter
to both incoming and current UBC
students. While it is extremely
unlikely that whatever Roach and
Karimi advocate to the Board will
have any real impact on UBC's final
decision, quiet disapproval and
it'd-be-great-ifs are not the way
to go when it comes to arguing for
housing and education accessibility.
And that goes for both students and
student representatives. XI
ADVICE »
Ask Natalie: On how to make it
through midterm season
Generally, it is important to
actually do your readings. But
listen to your prof and read your
syllabus. Is your midterm based on
the readings, the lectures or both?
This can help you study. If it is your
readings, check if your textbook's
chapters have summaries or "key
points" sections at the end. If you
woke up today and realized you had
a midterm tomorrow, this may be
your best option.
From now on, even if you don't
take notes, go to your lectures and
listen. It's a lot easier to recall information from a previous class than
to make up something that seems
right. Get a study group going and
hopefully you can catch up. It is not
too late to ace your classes, especially if there is multiple midterms.
These study practices may seem
less than ideal, but — believe it or
not — there are students who do all
of their readings and homework. I
once heard of someone who finished
an essay a week before it was due so
they weren't stressed and had time
to edit it properly.
If you do all of your readings
and are just stressed by midterm
season, here's some advice for you:
calm down and take a minute. You
have studied. You know the stuff.
But you're going to get worry brain
during the midterm if you stress
out. Take a big breath and rock your
midterm.
Good luck, and remember, finals
are coming faster than you think.
Need advice? Write to Natalie at
asknatalie@ubyssey.ca and have
your questions answered in an upcoming issue. Xi
ASK NATALIE"
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"MIDTERMS! How do I survive?"
You will survive! Midterms, like
terrible group projects, are an
inevitable part of college. And like
terrible group projects, you're just
going to have to bite your tongue
and push through.
In the beginning ofthe year it's
very easy to ignore your readings
and sleep through classes, but
midterm season is the time of
the year where you regret that
and promise yourself you'll catch
up on everything and go to all
your classes (even that one with
the prof whose voice makes you
sleepy). Whether or not you actually do is up to you.
Drinking Pumpkin Spice Lattes doesn't make me basic or bitchy
RACHEL LEVY-MCLAUGHLIN
Letter
I'm a 20-something white girl.
Yes, I wear brown (faux) leather
boots, scarves, and sometimes
leggings and am frequently seen
with a coffee in my hand. Yes,
sometimes it's even a Pumpkin
Spice Latte. I am going to own
up to this, even though I feel absurdly ashamed of it recently.
Since Pumpkin Spice Lattes
rolled out at Starbucks this
month, my Facebook news-
feed has been filled with posts,
quizzes and memes about "basic
bitches", like Buzzfeed's post:
25 Things Basic White Girls
Do During the Fall (#1 is, you
guessed it, drinking a Pumpkin
Spice Latte).
I have been called a basic bitch
too many times this month.
These people probably aren't
meaning to insult me, let's just be
clear on that. But it is insulting
to me. And pluralistic ignorance
tells me that it is to lots of other
twenty-something white girls
who believe that they are neither
basic nor bitchy because they enjoy
some PSL every now and again.
Lots of my other 20-something
white girl friends have been on Facebook lately telling the world that
they do not like Pumpkin Spice
Lattes. By denying any affinity to
PSLs, these girls are trying desperately to peel that "basic bitch" label
off their foreheads. These girls are
trying desperately to not be judged
by others for completely mundane
life choices.
Basic bitch is not a nice term,
folks. Just look at it. No one has
ever said endearingly, "wow,
you're such a bitch," or "dude,
	
what you did was so basic." No
matter how you swing it, those
are not nice words. And they are
not any nicer when combined.
I like Pumpkin Spice Lattes.
They taste fatty and fake, but I like
them.
This does not make me a bad
person. Sure, maybe I have bad
taste, but I don't deserve to be degraded as a human being for having poor taste in coffee beverages.
Let's leave unpleasant stereotyping out of our coffee cups,
okay?
Let me and every other
20-something white girl drink our
Pumpkin Spice Lattes and Insta-
gram the fall leaves on Main Mall
in peace.
Rachel Levy-McLaughlin is a
fourth-year English literature student and a volunteer contributor to
The Ubyssey. Xi
' The most certain way
to succeed is always to try
just one more time."
Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved
on to invent a little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else,
or have a scheduling conflict, come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized
online courses, then move on to bigger successes.Talkabout a light bulb moment.
open, online, everywhere.
Learn more @ athabascau.ca/edison NEWS    I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014
HOUSING
STATS
By Will McDonald and Peter Siemens
UBC Housing recently announced a 20 per cent increase in student housing costs starting next year. UBC
says their rates will still be below market value in Vancouver. The university backs this statement up with
a 2014 survey from a consulting firm. We conducted our own survey of student renters to see how the
numbers compared.
UBC's survey had 6,628 student responses, including 3,831 students living off campus, and 1,431 living at home.
The Ubyssey's survey had a total of 2,243 responses, but the data below is based on the 1,992 responses we received from student renters. Here's what we found:
Ubyssey
UBC
In a presentation from UBC housing justifying the fee increases, they presented a map with the average market
rates students pay for housing based on their commute time to campus. The slide from UBC's presentation took
the market rates from UBC's survey and added $60 to each average rental rate to account for the cost of cable,
internet and utilities. The map above shows UBC's numbers without the addition of utility costs. Within this map,
our survey found the average student pays $714 in rent. UBC's survey found students in these areas pay $781.
Visit ubyssey.ca for an interactive version with more information and statistics. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014    |    NEWS
33.8%
of students live
in Kits
79°/
live less than
30 minutes
away
$1173
highest average
rent per month
In UBC's presentation ofthe housing fee increases, they cited McGill and the University of Toronto's higher
housing costs as evidence their housing rates are relatively cheap. Below is a table that gives a little more context. The chart shows the cost of a single dorm room per month at the major universities across Canada before
the 20 per cent increase, UBC is the 14th most expensive ofthe major schools across Canada. After the fee
increase, UBC jumps to the seventh most expensive.
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II Culture
LM»
There's a rhyme and a reason to your Halloween film fest
Watching scary movies is a staple in Halloween celebrations, but there's more to the process than you think.
Miguel Santa Maria
Contributor
When it comes to Halloween,
university students not interested
in partying or pulling pranks don't
have that many options for what to
do for the night. However, there is
one thing that those uninterested
in Halloween festivities can fall
back on, and it's inviting some
friends over, brushing off the Blu-
ray player and having a good ol'
Hallow's eve movie night.
But what makes a good, if not
great Halloween movie experience?
After all, if one intends to have
peers soil their pants, it should at
least be worth it.
According to Film Studies
professor Ernest Mathijs, the ideal
scenario would be a mix of having
good fun while simultaneously
pushing your limits.
"I'd like to think of it as double
bill — you have to watch two movies; not just one," said Mathijs.
"The first would have to be a
scary movie that startles you and
that sort of scares you at the appropriate moments but would other-
Roll for Damage isn't
just about D&D
=HOTOCOURTESF ROLL FOR DAMAGE
Roll For Damage is a part of this year's CBC ComedyCoup competition.
Jasmine Cheng
Contributor
It is an exciting time for comedy
shows across Canada as CBC's
ComedyCoup is underway. It's
mission: to launch the funniest and
most original project into comedy
stardom with $500,000 in funding
and a 30-minute CBC prime time
special broadcast slot which will be
airing in 2015.
Already, over half ofthe original
285 submissions have been cut
during the first round of selections.
Ofthe top 110 teams, one project
has caught the eye of many and impressed fans immensely — despite
being a relatively new creation.
Roll For Damage is a comedy show
brainstormed by three talented
comedians. Max Mitchell is a producer, writer, director and editor; a
jack-of-all-trades. Adam Pateman
is an actor, stand-up comedian,
writer and authentic funnyman.
Brian Fukushima is the group's
graphic designer and prolific pen-
and-paper gamer who ensures the
project scripts remain true to the
game it pays homage to.
Mitchell and Pateman are both
UBC alumni who attribute much
of their success — and where they
are now — to their time spent as
students at UBC.
"For me, taking the theatre program here at UBC was tremendously advantageous," said Pateman,
who has since then gone on to have
a video featured on FunnyorDie.
com, co-create a popular web-series and host his own half hour
comedy special on CTV and the
Comedy Network.
For Mitchell, his years as a student on campus were full of opportunities to learn, create, produce
and hone the skills that would later
on become crucial to his path as a
video-producer.
Equipped with these skill sets
and their sense of humour, the
pair with the help of their friend
Brian Fukushima created Roll For
Damage from the ground up. If you
haven't figured it out already, a significant theme ofthe show is based
on the popular tabletop role playing
game Dungeons And Dragons,
abbreviated D&D, and the title references the damage roll, a common
play ofthe game that determines
the amount of damage a player
inflicts with an attack. The concept
revolves around five friends who
get together once a week to play a
pen and paper world campaigning
game to escape their daily lives,
which inevitably seep into the
game and are slowly revealed along
with their individual psychologies
and personalities.
"This is a show about relatively
normal people, although everyone
has flaws, doing something that
has the stigma of being nerdy, but
they're not playing it up as nerdy
characters at all. These are not nerd
characters we've written; they're
normal people characters who happen to have interesting lives that
you could relate to," said Pateman.
"We use the D&D one, as a way
to bind them all together, and two,
as a way for them to explore the
psychology ofthe characters. And
to show some really cool pictures
of dragons and stuff like that," said
Mitchell.
So far, the concept has been a
raging success both as a contender
in the ComedyCoup, as well as with
fans of online forums and social
media like Reddit and YouTube.
"We've got a lot of pipe dreams
about this project, but really I
would say that if anybody who is
interested in a show like this taking
fruition, right now is the absolute
best time to get involved in following this project." Xi
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
wise be fairly safe and acceptable,"
said Mathijs, with such classic franchises like Halloween and Friday
the 13th being surefire selections.
"The good thing about that is,
it's like the character Randy says
in Scream, 'It's a formula, everybody knows it,' but then there are
slight deviations on that formula,
and those are the components
that actually help you have fun. So
anything that's franchised is good
for the first part ofthe double bill,"
said Mathijs.
The second part, according to
Mathijs, should be testing out your
grossness endurance. With movies
such as the Texas Chainsaw Massacre or Gingersnaps, a Canadian
werewolf film that apparently does
not limit its gory boundaries like
Hollywood does.
"This is not the suburb that
Jamie Curtis usually wanders in,
this is not I Know What You Did
Last Summer... There are issues of
boundaries and frontiers that only
a Canadian film can explore that
American contemporary cinema
can't understand. So I would say
Gingersnaps is a perfect example,"
said Mathijs.
That said, it's also important to
not to get ahead of yourself and
load up something too psychologically traumatizing like a disturbing
European avant garde film.
"There's an overlap between
where horror gets really gory and
where independent or art house
experimental cinema reaches out to
that gory part and 'experimentalizes' it," said Mathijs. "I think that's
a really exciting overlap, but I don't
think that Halloween is the right
time."
Given this advice though, horror
films are not necessarily obligatory
when it comes to the Halloween
movie — nor are generally well-
made films either. In fact, two of
Mathijs' favourite films to watch on
Halloween are Donnie Darko and
Friday the 13th: Jason Takes Manhattan; the former being more of
an independent sci-fi drama while
the latter being considered one of
the silliest sequels in the Friday the
13th franchise.
It is important not to watch
alone, Mathijs added, not just to
cower behind someone's back, but
because peers can be the quintessential part ofthe viewing.
"You should be able to share
with your fellow human beings
your anxieties your joys, your
ability to comprehend fear and
poke fun at it," he said. "They
might be fleeting relationships but
essentially what you consume that
evening, what you establish that
night, and in different cultures and
even in our own society, it's not just
Halloween," said Mathijs.
Ultimately though, what matters
is that everyone has their fair share
of morbid fun by the end ofthe
night.
"Having fun about it is an important component because it demonstrates that you're, if you see this
as a sort of a rite of passage, then it
demonstrates that you're maturing
that you're becoming responsible,
that you're coming [to] grips with
the anxieties and the fears of life.
And the horror movie is as good
a test for that as anything else,"
said Mathijs. tJ
THEVANCOUVER INSTITUTE PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH UBC'S 13™
PRESIDENT
Dr.Arvind Gupta
Saturday, October 25,2014,8:15pm
LECTURE HALL # 2,WOODWARD IRC,
2194 HEALTH SCIENCES MALL
www.vaninst.ca THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014    |    CULTURE
RECIPES»
Halloween desserts that will get you in the festive mood
Delicious spooky cupcakes
Cupcakes are delicious. End of story.
Natalie Morris
Staff Writer
Take your basic cupcake recipe and
dress it up. Use your own recipes or
these:
Ingredients
Chocolate Cupcakes:
Vi cup butter or margarine
1 ounce (3 squares)
unsweetened chocolate
2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup boiling water
2 Vi cups all-purpose flour
11/2 teaspoons baking soda
Vi teaspoon salt
Vi cups milk
1 Vi teaspoons distilled
white vinegar
DALAI LAM A »
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSU WHE UBYSSEY
Instructions
1. Preheat your oven to 350°F
2. In small saucepan, melt chocolate and butter together and
set aside.
3. Cream together sugar and eggs
then add chocolate and mix well.
4. Add boiling water and blend well.
5. In a separate bowl, mix together
flour, baking soda, and salt.
6. Add flour mixture to chocolate
mixture and mix until smooth.
7. Mix milk and vinegar together
then add to chocolate batter.
8. Pour into cupcake molds and bake
for about 20 minutes or until done.
Vanilla Buttercream Icing:
Ingredients
V2 cup unsalted butter, at
room temperate
11/2 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups icing sugar (also called confectioners' sugar)
2 tablespoons milk
Food colouring
Instructions
1. Cream butter until smooth
and fluffy.
2. Slowly add icing sugar, then beat
in vanilla.
3. Add milk and beat until extra
fluffy
To decorate
1. For multiple colours, make your
own piping bags — a sandwich bag
with a corner snipped off will work
— and put drops of food colouring
into them.
2. Add desired amount of icing into
each bag, close, and squish icing
with colouring until the colour
is consistent — you can add more
colouring if needed.
3. Cut a small opening at a corner
ofthe bag (the smaller the hole the
more control over the icing you
have).
4. Push icing towards the opening
and go crazy. Icing can also act as
glue for candy. tJ
Dalai Lama discusses childhood development and love
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
The Dalai Lama came to UBC this week to empartsome of his wisdom and teachings onto the future leaders ofthe world: students.
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
There are a few opportunities
that most university students
never have. One of these opportunities is having the luxury of
sitting in the Chan Centre with
the Dalai Lama for an intimate
panel discussion. The 800 students who had this very chance
were not disappointed.
His Holiness the XIV Dalai
Lama appeared on a panel on
Wednesday morning to discuss the importance of early
childhood development and the
environment children are raised
in. The panel discussion titled
Educating the Heart in Early
Years: A Dialogue with the Dalai
Lama was a sold out panel discussion presented at the Chan Centre
Wednesday morning. The Dalai
Lama was joined by Anthony
Phillips as the moderator, Kim
Schonert-Reichl, Hillel Goelman,
Kiley Hamlin and John Helliwell
whose research overlap in the
field of child development.
The purpose ofthe event was
to create a dialogue that highlighted the importance of western
science and eastern spiritual
traditions in child development
and to showcase where these
two traditions overlap in current
research. One example of such
research is Hamlin's research on
where goodness starts in toddlers
and infants. Infants as young as
three months, as Hamlin showed,
begin to show signs of understanding and interpreting "good"
behaviours, such as sharing.
Goelman's and Schon-
ert-Reichl's research focused
on the factors that contribute to
early childhood development.
For the Dalai Lama, love and an
environment without fear and
anxieties contribute to a child's
overall happiness. He mentioned
a personal familial experience
with his mother who used to
carry him on her back as she
worked, exemplifying the importance of love and closeness to a
child's development.
Though the focus was on the
presentation of current research
being done at UBC, the words of
the Dalai Lama were not muted
or weakened. The messages that
he was emanating were on the
importance of love in the family
and creating an environment of
peace within the family.
"Their source of happiness is
human love." Xi
Halloween Rice Krispies squares
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Rice Krispy Squares are an easy, but delicious, shareable dessert.
Natalie Morris
2. For Oven: In large pot, melt but-
Staff Writer
An easy Halloween twist on a
classic.
Ingredients
6 cups of Puffed Rice Cereal
(most commonly Rice Krispies)
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
4-5 cups of white marshmallows
(no matter ofthe size)
Icing for decorating
Candy to decorate
Food colouring of your choice
Optional: A dash of vanilla
Instructions
1. Measure out puffed cereal beforehand and set aside.
ter and add marshmallows.
3. For Microwave: half or quarter
the recipe and microwave until
melted, stirring every minute.
4. Once melted completely add
vanilla and food colouring meant
for treats, stir in completely and
remove from heat.
5. Quickly add cereal and stir until
everything is covered.
6. Shape treats to desired shape, or
if using a cookie cutter, press into a
greased pan.
7. Allow to cool and decorate as
Halloween-y as possible. Xi
Want to write
for Culture?
culture@ubyssey.ca
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EDITOR JACKHAUEN
DIVE»
Mormei Zanke
Contributor
I had this conversation in early
September with a friend who was
mildly obsessed with the idea of
scuba diving. He had a collection
of scuba-related tales that he swore
were all true. He knew a guy who
saw an octopus devour a lingcod,
on the Discovery Channel he saw
a jellyfish dance around a seal —
and did I know that crabs mated
underwater?
Regardless of whether his
stories were true, I was hooked.
I wanted to scuba. I wanted to
achieve that state of complete
weightlessness. I wanted to see a
jellyfish dance around a seal.
For people tickled with the
grandiose idea of space and floating in a vast expandable never-ending arena, scuba diving is your
game. I too have always had that
desire to strap myself to a tin can,
rocket up to the moon and do a few
somersaults in zero gravity.
Then I realized, instead of strapping myself to a tin can, I could
strap a tin can to myself and jump
into the ocean.
Essentially, that's what scuba
diving is.
It was fun as a prospect, but I
had no idea how to make it more
than that. It wasn't until I stumbled across the UBC Aqua Society
that scuba diving became more
tangible.
I signed up for their Open Water
course, which is split into three
sections over the span of two
weeks: classroom dive theory, confined pool sessions and open water
dives. Before you can actually dive
in the ocean, you have to learn the
basics and get comfortable with the
equipment and safety procedures.
Before the course, I thought of
scuba as something you could learn
in a day, like riding a bike. I figured
they would give me an air tank;
show a brief video and say, "Okay,
you're good to go."
I learned that scuba diving
is vastly complicated. You need
to take into consideration every
detail, know the ins and outs of
your equipment, be conscious of
the environment and know what
to do in the worst-case scenarios.
The first thing they teach you
in training is to breathe. That's
the most important rule: deep,
continuous breaths. People can
panic underwater, something
could go wrong. Then, your biggest problem is your own anxiety.
I found it surprising that there
would even be a psychological
aspect to scuba diving, but I am
embarrassed now to think I ever
thought otherwise.
After the classroom sessions
where we would learn what to do
in theoretical situations (what
do you do if your buddy runs out
of air? If you dive for 30 minutes
at a depth of 20 feet how long is
your surface interval?), we would
head out to the pool sessions.
These started off with basic
skills like swimming 250 metres,
how to recover your regulator
if it falls out of your mouth, and
communicating to your buddy
how much air you have left in your
tank. After the four sessions, I was
feeling pretty good about my skills.
I felt like a badass suited up in my
gear. I was pretty confident that if
it came down to it, I could totally
arm wrestle a shark and come away
with only minor flesh wounds.
Then, it was time for the ocean
dives.
The plan was to drive out to
Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver
and complete our dives over the
weekend. The park is home to a
beautiful inner cove that's popular
for beginner undersea diving. It
also harbours a family of seals, who,
if you're lucky, will pay you a visit.
We started our trek at 8:00 a.m.
We loaded five cars with all our
gear and headed out on the road,
crossing the Lions Gate Bridge
RSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014
and zipping through Stanley Park
on the way. You know you're close
when the road starts getting windy
and the trees slant off cliffs like a
Tom Thomson painting.
There was good weather that
first day and the water was deep
blue. We waded into the water,
inflating our BCDs (Buoyancy
Control Devices) and fastening our
masks on over our hoods.
To me, floating in scuba gear
feels like bobbing up and down like
an ice cube. Every movement is
exaggerated, and you have to work
really hard not to tip over.
We swam out to a buoy and were
briefed on the skills we were about
to perform underwater. We were
to do the same ones we had in the
pool, then take a tour ofthe cove.
Once underwater, you are struck
by the drastic change in visibility.
Not only is it darker, it's grainier
too. Sand gets kicked up by fins,
waves work against you and at the
depth we were at you couldn't see
further than three metres in front
of you.
In some ways, scuba diving is
like walking onto another planet.
It's unfamiliar, the terrain is completely different and you aren't the
dominant species. You are the alien,
and that's what makes it so exciting.
I performed the various tasks
for that dive, preoccupied by the
fact I was actually doing what I had
waited so long to do. Afterwards,
we swam around the cove, and I
was reminded of that scene in Titanic where they take underwater
footage ofthe decaying skeletal
ship. There is a constant feeling of
discovery and curiosity in the ocean
that you just don't get in the pool.
After three similar dives over
the course ofthe weekend, it was
time for the final dive that would
determine if I pass the course and
get my dry suit certification and
scuba license.
The last task I had to perform
was releasing my dry suit hose
from my suit and replacing it.
This is no small feat. The hose is
attached by a metal clip you have
to push back for it to come loose.
Plus, with gloved and water logged
hands the clip proves to be difficult
to loosen.
I think I spent five minutes
trying to do this task. I pulled and
twisted and silently cursed into
my regulator, which sputtered out
bubbles furiously. Finally my guide,
Meagan, demonstrated how to do it
properly. I repeated her technique
on myself and was surprised by
the ease the hose came off and slid
back on.
I was done. I had my license.
Breaching the surface, I couldn't
believe it. What started out as
being a faint aspiration had turned
real. I had done my training. I had
completed my dives and I was now
certified.
Now I could be the person with
the crazy diving stories somebody
tells their friend (none yet, but I
did see an octopus).
After the dives I had a chance
to talk with Meagan and Brendan,
two dive instructors at the Aqua
Society who have been diving for
years. I asked them what advice
they had for beginners.
"It can be technically unnatural,
but once you get more experience
you get comfortable, and then
you can appreciate it. It becomes
second nature," said Brendan.
Meagan's advice is simple: "Dive
as much as you can. Keep diving."
Of course you are always diving
with a buddy, but the silence
underwater, the relationship you
develop with the things you see
and the way you are aware of each
breath you take is something that
can't be shared with anyone.
It turns out my friend was right.
Underwater, you can reach a state
of complete weightlessness. Xi THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
VIBRANT VEGETARIANS
1. What was your main reason for becoming a
vegetarian?
2. How does being vegetarian affect you as
an athlete?
I did it because meat
tastes gross.
Ittendstogetmeintrou-
blewith my coaches.
The main reason is
because my girlfriend
made me.
It hasn't affected me
as an athlete much; I'm
just glad I don't have to
eat a tuna concoction
aftergames like the rest
of my teammates.
I started at first just
because I did not like
the idea of eating dead
things. I now also have
environmental and
political reasons.
Not too much. All athletes have to keep on top
ofwhat they are eating. I
justdo that and don't eat
meat.
Sympathized with the
beef cattle in my rural
neighbourhood...and
wanted to lessen that
environmental footprint.
If I keep a high protein
and nutrient-rich diet
have improved energy
levels forall athletic
endeavours.
I'm a vegetarian because
I don't agree with the
way they treat/slaughter
animals.
find it somewhat hard
as an athlete to get
enough protein and iron
andjust to feel satisfied
andfullaltera meal.
3. Athletes generally need to eat a lot of pro
Protein shakes, almonds
Beans, beansthe magi
Protein is pretty abun
Meals combining nine
1 still eat wild caught fish
tein. How do you accomplish this?
and beans... lots of
cal fruit ...
dant in a lot of foods
essential amino acids,
for protein. Also eggs,
beans.
otherthan meat, it's a
complete proteins like
cheese, Greekyogurt,
good thing 1 am not veg
hemp hearts, quinoa,
lentils, beans and lots of
an because 1 eat Greek
dairy products and
nuts/seeds and protein
yogourtbythetub.
eggs.
bars.
4. What's the best place to go for a vegetarian meal on or near campus?
The Naam.lt has so
many options!
Graze is delicious! Although it's not really near
campus...
East is East has a lot of
good vegetarian dishes.
And on campus, the
Agora Cafe has some
really good stuff for
cheap.
Greatest thing is you typically end up at the more
creative venues: meals
with flavour, colour,
spices. The Naam on
West 4th anytime!
The Naam, hands
down.
5. If you were a fruit, what kind of fruit would
An orange, because it
A tomato because three
APIuot. It is a confused
Lemon: great in hot
Banana!
you be?
would match my hair.
minutes exposed to UV
fruit. No one is really sure
water, great in cold
equals a sunburn of epic
if its more plum ormore
water. Great with salt and
proportions.
apricot and neither is it.
lean relate to its indecisive struggle.
tequila. In fact one ofthe
onlyfruitsthatthrivesin
asaltyairenvironment.
SOCCER»
'Birds tie up the end of regular season       tfn/JlenuyUam/
The 'Birds have just one win in their last four games.
Soren Elsay
Senior Staff Writer
The Thunderbirds closed out their
regular season with a 1-1 draw on
Sunday against the Trinity Western
Spartans. With the number one seed
for the playoffs already clinched,
head coach Mike Mosher was able
to rest many of his key players in
preparation for next week's Canada
West quarter-finals.
UBC got off to a sluggish start,
eventually conceding the opening
goal in the 33rd minute. A looping
free kick played into the UBC box
was not cleared properly and the
ball eventually found its way to
Spartan midfielder Mitchell Rohla,
who guided the ball inside the near
post from six yards out for his first
goal ofthe year. The Thunderbirds
had to wait until the 84th minute to
find the equalizer through second
half substitute Sean Einarsson. Mi-
lad Mehrabi's free kick was headed
back across goal by Bryan Fong
directly into the path of Einarsson,
who headed in his seventh goal of
the year.
The Thunderbirds, who started
the year with eight straight victories, closed the campaign with only
one win in their last four games, including a pair of defeats. Despite the
recent run of poor results, Mosher is
"not overly concerned."
"We weren't particularly sharp
against Victoria [a 2-1 loss on October 17], but I think a little bit of it is
just waiting for the playoffs to get
going... we're looking forward to
getting on with the important part
ofthe season."
While UBC does not enter the
playoffs on a winning note, they
possess a healthy, well-rested lineup
thanks to their fantastic start to
the season.
"Because we've been in such a
good situation [in the standings]
we've been able to rest players over
the last couple weekends so that
we're fresh going forward, because
as soon as the [playoffs] start, games
can come pretty fast and furious,"
said Mosher.
The Thunderbirds finished the
regular season with 33 goals for,
while conceding only 7, which is
easily the top goal differential in
the division. The road back to the
national championship, however,
will not be an easy one. First up is
the surprising University of British
Columbia Okanagan. The newest
members ofthe league clawed their
way into a playoff spot and have
played well against the Thunderbirds' in both meetings, including a
tight 2-0 UBC win on Thunderbird
Field on October 4.
The Canada West quarter-finals
begin October 24, when the top seeded
Thunderbirds take on the University
of British Columba Okanagan Heat at
Thunderbird stadium at 7p.m. Xi
"They're intelligent, charismatic creatures that express
happiness, pain and grief. They make you feel what
they are feeling."
- Angela Maldonado, primate conservationist
Who Knew?
UBC makes extensive use of a colony of non-human
primates in highly invasive neurological experiments
that one leading veterinary expert described as "cruel
and shocking".   Our grassroots campaign is calling
on UBC to disclose the extent of its research on all
species and to explain why it is harming and killing
animals when exciting and effective alternatives exist.
Please contact new UBC
President Arvind Gupta
and express your
concerns:
presidents.office@ubc.ca zrtwmiM^wm
UBC ANIMAL RESEARCH
www.stopubcanimalresearch.org 1
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