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The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1963

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Array 'Just imagine him in his underwear'
By RON RITER
Be  unorthodox  if  you  want  to   get
job.
Don't take aptitude tests; tell the boss
to write them himself to see if he's good
enough for you.
Run the interview yourself. Embarrass the interviewer by asking him tricky
questions about his company or divert
him to extraneous topics.
Approach the interview with the attitude you won't get the job. This relaxes
you.
Have a sense of humor regarding the
whole idea of the job.
That's the way Robert Philips has gone
through 18 jobs in 30 years and didn't
starve doing it.
Philips, investment dealer and president of the Vancouver Opera Association,
revealed his unorthodox ways of getting a
job Friday to an audience of 75 students.
He advised "not to be remembered"
in an interview "for a job you don't want
anyway."
"I'd sooner starve than do a job I
didn't like," he said. "But you won't
starve if you don't get it."
Jobs the American-born ex-chartered
accountant has held range from an officer in the British Navy to manager of the
Vancouver Symphony.
*       *       *
A tip on handling a belligerent interviewer: "Imagine him in his underwear
—the humorous view helps you relax."
"I feel the best sense of security comes
from being insecure," he said.
And always find some 'way to make
the interviewer remember you above all
the others, Philips advised —- by having
confidence, humor, and the guts to expect
a "no".
THE US YSSSV
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  TUESDAY,  JANUARY  22,   1963
No.  42
.3SHI 4&\
Canucks give
Birds lesson
By GEORGE RAILTON
Thunderbird hockey club had a bad case of battle fatigue
1 ist night as they dropped a 9-2 exhibition game with the
Vancouver Canucks.
Birds had just returned from a two-game series with
ihe Saskatchewan Huskies.
The Canucks leaders of the Western Hockey League north-
t rn division, took an early four-goal lead in the first period and
never let go.
—Don  Hume  photo
CONSTRUCTION COACHING is new sideline for Thunderbird
hockey mentor Rev. David Bauer, who checks over progress
on new Winter Sports Arena. Arena, located south of C-lot,
should be ready for Father Bauer's pucksters by next September.    It will seat 1,500 and include six curling sheets.
Mid-term break a good one
agree student councillors
Only "non-official" students council opinion supports a
mid-term break for UBC.
AMS President Doug Stewart has no official opinion,
but is personally in favor of the proposed holiday, he says.
Peter Shepard, AMS vice-president, thought the idea
was "good in theory".
Aggie Undergrad Society President Frank Millerd favored the idea, as did Frosh President Paul Danyliu. "People
will have a good rest even if they don't use the time to study,"
Millerd said. .•"•■.
■■ -The idea of a three-" or four-day break about the be
ginning of March was proposed in a recent Ubyssey editorial.
B.C. gets
another
university
(Special  to The  Ubyssey)
VICTORIA— Victoria College
•vill become the University of
Victoria this spring.
This promise    was    made by
Premier W. A. C. Bennett at the
npening  of the college's Cleari-
ue Building last Friday.
The new university will also
r eceive a nativity gift in the form
)f an unprecedented, outright
- a.pital grant. At present Victo-
ia College is affiliated with
UBC and cannot grant its own
degrees,
"The time is right    for    this
>iew university,"    the    premier
-aid.
STIMULUS
He said his government would
_;ive financial stimulus to the
newborn university's growth.
"In the coming year Victoria
College — or the new university, I should say — will get
money outside the existing cani-
ta.1 grant."
But he refused to say how
much these grants would be.
"It isn't the amount but the
principle involved," he told the
Victoria student paper, Tne
Martlet.
He reassured Dr. John Macdonald that UBC would not suffer financially as a result of the
new university.
"Both will receive more money, not less," the premier promised.
STRONG HINT
"You can take my remarks
today as a little preview — a
strong hint," he said.
The Premier refused to anticipate Thursday's Throne Speech,
but said: "The premier's and the
president's views on higher education are very much the same."
Defenceman Terry O'Malley
starred for the Birds as he scored
the first goal single-handed and
assisted on Peter Kelly's third-
period shot.
Birds had been rated as a defensive team and this was
evident as they continually
broke up Canuck plays but
never seemed to mount an offence of their own.
Last weekend the team thundered into Saskatoon and stole
two victories from the Saskatchewan Huskies,
The 4-2 and 4-1 scores place
the Birds in a first-place tie with
Alberta Golden Bears, who beat
Manitoba 7-4 and 10-3.
This is the first time in the
last four years UBC has found
itself in first place.
The'Bird attack was led by
Peter Kelly, who centres Mickey
McDowell on right wing and any
one  of three left wingers
Kelly piled up six points in
the series with two goals and
two assists Friday and two assists  Saturday.
In both games, Huskies took
the lead first. Friday thev
scored twice in the first period
and Saturday their only goa'
came in the first period
KELLY  STARS
Kelly's first goal came in the
second period of Friday's game
A third period rally initiated by
McDowell's tying goal gave UBC
the win.
Kelly came through with the
winner at 6.45 and forward
Mike Smith tallied the insurance
point with less than four minutes remaining. Kelly was in on
the play for the assist.
The three final goals came
from wild scrambles at the feet
of Vic Adamache, the Huskie
goalie.
Saturday, Saskatchewan took
the early lead and held it until
the second period when Kelly's
line came through with three
goals to give UBC the game.
McDowell picked up the first
two and Stu Gibbs the other.
Smith fired the finel marker in
the last period.
BIG  FANNY   STORGOFF
. . . she sings, too
Big Fanny,
Sons choir
here today
Big Fanny comes to campus today.
She is bringing a friend.
And she's bringing the
famed Doukhobor choir.
Fanny, her friend and
the choir perform at noon
in the Armory.
With Fanny will be Sons
of Freedom spokesman,
Maria Slegoff.
They will speak on the
Doukhobor problem.
Then a panel of four students: Denis Stanley, Ed
Lavalle, Barb Bennett and
Sharon MacKinnon, will
ask questions.
Special Events Committee, which is bringing the
Sons to campus, he.s ordered RCMP protection for the
meeting.
UBC faculty
shuns police
questioning
UBC's faculty association does
not want to answer the RCMP's
questions.
At its next meeting, the association plans to bring up a "resolution calling for members to
refuse to answer any police
questions of a political' nature.
Dr. Kalevi Holsti, of the department of political science,
said: "It is perfectly appreciate
for the RCMP to investigate
someone looking for a sensitive
government job."
"But it is completely improper
in any other cases to investigate
students' political beliefs."
Holsti said he wouldn't be inhibited by having an RCMjP man
sitting in his class. "I wouldn't
feel restricted at all. In fact,
the RCMP man might learn
something."
Holsti said that even if a student is being cleared for a government job, the RCMP should
ask questions only about his
marks, his personality, and his
associations.
"Asking if he is 'loyal' or 'subversive'   is  meaningless."
A survey by The Ubyssey last
week revealed that a number of
students had been questioned or
had seen disguised RCMP officers on campus. Page 2
THE UB YSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy, 1961 and 1962
Winner of the Bracken Trophy, 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star Trophy, 1962
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published  three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alum Mater -Society, University of B.C.   Editorial  opinions expressed
are those of 1 he   Kdi tor-in-Ch ief of The   Ubyssey  ami not  necessarily those'
of the Almn   Mater  Society or the University  of B.C.  Telephone CA  4-3242,
Locals:   Kditor—25;   News—2:!;   Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief:  Keith Bradbury
Managing Editor  Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor  Mike Hunter
City Editor  M. G. Valpy
Picture Editor     Don Hume
Layout  Editor    Bob  McDonald
Sports Editor   Ron Kydd
Features Editor Mike Grenby
CUP Editor   Maureen Covell
Editorial Assistant Joyce Holding
Layout:    Bill Millerd and Sharon Rodney
REPORTERS: Pat Horrobin, Richard Bobsey, Gary Sealey,
Ann Burge, Graeme Matheson, Lorraine Shore, Heather
Virtue,. Ian Cameron, Ron Riter, Krishna Sahay, Gail
Kendall.
THE      UBYSSEY
EDITORIALS
Tuesday, January  22,   1963
The Sons: a series of stunts
Big Fanny Storgoff comes to campus today to tell students the Sons of Freedom side
of the story.
Joe Podovinikoff, the sect's unofficial
spokesman, was scheduled to be with her.
But he won't be here because he made a public statement to the effect that the trek to Vancouver was just a publicity stunt.
Big Fanny said she wouldn't appear at the
same time as Joe because of this. So Joe
decided not to come.
But what Joe said was probably right.
The trek to Vancouver was an effort to bring
the problem to the place where it would get
the greatest reaction otherwise known as publicity.
Since the Freedomites evolved as the
group we know today, shortly after the death
of Peter "The Lordly" Veregin, the sect's antics
have been one long series of publicity stunts.
Disrobings, burnings, and refusals to send
their children to school by the Sons have
not taken the form of religious protestations
they are said to be.
Instead they are the Sons' fanatic form
of publicity-seeking.
The mass meetings, chanting and disrobing were invariably carried out where they
would attract the largest crowds.
And for years the Government of Canada
made concessions to the group—or maybe just
ignored it.
Emally, the government called the Doukhobor bluff and took the children away from
their homes and implemented the long-lost
laws of the land.
The Sons' protests were accelerated. They
demanded to leave for Russia. The government
gave its consent. But nobody went. They
(the Sons)  squealed louder than before.
With many of its elders in jail last summer on charges of conspiracy to intimidate the
government, the Freedomite organization fell
to pieces. The women burned their homes.
When the men returned the march began.
Publicity carried them to Hope. It carried them to Victoria and Vancouver. Publicity is carrying them to UBC at noon today.
But the only person who will stand up and
say so has been told not to come.
—D. S.
SPORTS:    Donna Morris, George Railton,  Danny Stoffman,
Janet Currie, Collin Sabell, Bill Willson, Glenn Schultz.
TECHNICAL:    Clint Pulley, Jo Britten..
Letters to the editor
The beaming semanticist of B.C.
It's Greek to Me
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Your recent editorial is most
interesting but I must take exception not only to your thesis
but also to many of your statements which have been disproved in recent years.
You state that the main reason so many fraternity and sorority members are active in
student government is to gain
prestige for their society. I
ask you to take note of the past
frosh classes and their eventual
membership in fraternities.
Students become campus politicians before they join Greek
letter societies. Of the 1960-
61 Frosh Executive of ten members, seven joined fraternities
or sororities. Afterwards some
of these people continued to
work up in the Brock hierachy,
but others channelled their interests into academic and athletic fields.
From personal experience I
can say that few people ever
suddenly become "AMS organization types" after they have
become affiliated with a Greek
letter society.
In your first editorial I question the facts surrounding your
implications that fraternity machines put people into office. I
assume by the term "machine"
you are referring to the individuals who help paint posters,
make banner-frames, and put
pins into name tags.
I would suggest that every
successful member of our present Council had people who
were willing to do this for him.
These people must be classed
as friends or supporters—those
who wish to help an individual
gain an office he personally desires. No one in his right mind
would ever allow himself to be
pushed onto Student Council
unless he really wanted to be
there. One gets his friends and
supporters from those with
whom  he  associates  on  social,
academic, athletic and sometimes fraternal bases.
I am sure many members of
your staff would be happy to
help you achieve any political
ambitions you might have.
Your assumption that all
Greeks support a Greek candidate regardless of his qualifications  was  disproved  by  two
Premier Bennett's act in Victoria the
other day was the nicest bit of grandstanding
we've seen since 1951.
Beaming Premier Bennett announced to
an ecstatic group at Victoria College that the
college would soon become a university. And,
as midwife, Premier Bennett would be happy
to throw in a little nativity gift to the foundling
institution.
"In the coming year," the smiling Bennett
proudly told his audience, 'Victoria College
—or the new university, I should say—will get
money outside the existing matching capital
grant for the first time."
Then turning to UBC President Dr. John
Macdonald, who was on the platform with
him, the Premier said reassuringly UBC would
not suffer financially as a result of the new university
That IS reassuring news.
UBC will not suffer at the hands of Vic-
present Councillors elected on   toria College but what's to guarantee we won't
continue to suffer at the hands of the Premier?
last year's second slate
You state that Greeks on this
campus collect their long list
of committee positions from patronage of their brothers. I
must suggest that most people
with long lists of committees
were well on their way long before they rushed.
I also must take exception to
your comments in regard to the
death of NBC. This group was
well organized, if not better,
than any other group on campus. If they had produced
qualified candidates, acceptable to the whole campus,
which you have pointed out is
less than ten per cent Greek,
they should have won the
election with a resounding victory. I do not think this is a
truly anti-Greek campus, but
one with the attitude of "live
and let live."
Your facts on the Housser
Cup are wrong. To begin with,
it is awarded not only for public service on campus, but also
for academic, and athletic
achievements. You also seem to
over-estimate the importance of
this trophy to the fraternities
on this campus.
I must repeat, Mr. Editor,
as you should well know, that
effort and time consumed by
student government activities
on this campus are certainly
not worth any prestige which
they offer to either the individual or his fraternity.
I realize that the purpose of
editorials is to arouse your
readers' interest. Nevertheless, I am sure you will agree
that criticisms should be of an
honest and constructive nature.
Yours truly,
BARRY G. McDELL.
We still remember fondly that day in 1957
when Premier Bennett came to UBC.
Beaming (the Premier always seems to
beam when he gives his gifts) then as he did
in Victoria the other day, the Premier told a
cheering crowd of UBC students that UBCT
would get $10 million from the provincial government.
Everybody liked the beaming Premier
that day.
All you have to do, the Premier said, is
dig up $10 million of your own.
We did.
And so far the Premier has matched almost $5 million of it. He didn't say when he
would match the $10 million did he?
Well, don't laugh, Victoria College — er,
rather University—the same thing could happen to you.
Maybe your grant will be in redeemable
Nabob coupons collected by Mrs. Bennett.
After all the Premier didn't say how you
would get your money, did he?
Hudson s Bay Oil and Gas
Company Limited
CALGARY
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
For Graduates and Undergraduates
PROCESS AND PRODUCTION  ENGINEERING
CHEMICAL
PIPELINE ENGINEERING
CIVIL,  ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL,  ENGINEERING PHYSICS
GEOLOGY
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING,  HONOURS GEOLOGY
GEOPHYSICS
GEOPHYSICAL  AND  GEOLOGICAL   ENGINEERING,  MATHS  AND   PHYSICS,
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
ACCOUNTING
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Campus Interviews Will Be Held on
JAN. 29,30,31 and FEB. 1
APPOINTMENTS  FOR   INTERVIEWS SHOULD   BE  MADE  THROUGH
THE  PLACEMENT OFFICE
Students wishing advance information  may write the Company  Recruiting
Co-ordinator at 320 7th Ave. S.W., CALGARY, ALBERTA Tuesday,  January  22,   1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Nuclear disarmament
supported by SCM
TORONTO (CUP) — The national council of the Student
Christian Movement has declared its official support for the
Combined Universities Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.
"The establishment of peace
and the prospect of nuclear wai
are the two most critical issues
in the affairs of the world community today," an SCM statement said.
COUNCIL URGES SUPPORT
The Council, meeting at the
University of Toronto, has urged
local branches to support the
CUCND groups on their campuses through active individual
participation.
The council encouraged local
SCMers to speak to university
and church groups.
Earlier at U of T three college
principals and several faculty
members signed a CUCND petition protesting a statement by
Liberal leader Lester B. Pearson
that his party was prepared to
accept nuclear arms for Canada's
armed forces.
PETITION CIRCULATES
The petition will be circulating until Jan. 25 and CUCND
spokesmen said they expect to
collect  about  10,000 signatures
But U of T president Dr.
Claude T. Bissell refused to sign
the petition.
Bissell se.id Canada's presen4
commitments to NATO make
nuclear arms necessary for pur
NATO forces.
He said he could see no valid
reason for having nuclear weapons on Canadian soil however.
"We could add little or no
power to the overwhelming
American    deterrent,    and     by
joining the nuclear club we
would heighten the danger of
similar developments among
allies of the USSR," Dr. BisselJ
said.
»Sour grapes
next theory?
^ By ANN BURGE
Adam's apple was too sour Cor
seduction, says a UBC horticulturist.
Dr. C. A. Hornby, assistant
j; professor of horticulture, was
rommenting on a British bota
rust's theory that the Eden apple
was really an apricot. (The
story appeared in Thursday's
Ubyssey).
Dr. Hornby said that contrary
to the story, he had thought it
was possible for apples to grow
in Mesopotamia, the supposed
location of the Garden of Eden.
"But I have heard they were
very small and sour. I don't see
how anyone could, tempt anyone
with them," he said
Hornby said similar studies
are always being made concerning where plants originated.
"They're mostly just speculation," he said. "But botanists
just love doing it."
"I don't see how they could
get so excited about a legend
like the story of the Garden of
*   Eden."
Managers needed
for sports arena
Applications will be received until noon Monday for
positions on the board of management of the new winter
sports arena. Students should
address their applications to
Peter Shepard, second vice-
presidenf, AMS, Brock Hall.
Announcer
lambastes
censorship
A local radio commentator
says it's too easy for the government to control and censor
broadcasting.
CKWX announcer Barrie
Clark told the university Kiwanis club Friday the Board of
Broadcast Governors -has too
much control over Canadian radio and television broadcasts.
"Ninety percent of the board
is composed of politicians," he
said, "It would be too easy for
the government to fill it with
pro-government people.
"The government could thus
censor any anti-government
comments on this highly influential medium."
Clark also said the government-owned CBC has a tremendous advantage over private
broadcasters.
"The possibility of favoritism
always exists as long as the BBG
and CBC are government-controlled," he said.
He pointed out that CBC - TV
alone turns $18 million of $20
million profit back into the corporation.
"No private system could afford this," Clark said.
Clark said survey ratings can
show any radio station to be
number one, so the stations use
the survey showing them to be
best.
"It's interesting," he added,
"That 'rock' stations are first in
almost every city in North America, but they' have never done
well in Vancouver.
Vancouver has the third largest competitive radio system in
North America (New York is
first; San Francisco second), he
pointed out.
Clark said Vancouver radio
stations have to sponsor giveaway programs to hold audiences.
"The money for this comes
from commercials," he said, "So
we're super-saturated with commercials    and    the    quality    is
lower than it should be."
I	
Science defeated
by law in debate
Sciencemen were laid low by
the lawyers in the first of a
| series of inter-faculty debates
Friday.
Lawyers upheld the resolution
that the science of law has made
i greater contribution to civilization than the natural sciences.
They seld that without law
the present social order could
not exist.
Sciencemen argued unsuccessfully that it was the natural sciences that caused the develop-
ment of today's society.
The judge, Dr. Malcolm McGregor, scuttled both sides, however, when he said neither science nor law could exist without
the humanities.
McGregor is a classics professor
'tween dasses
Big Fanny tells
the naked truth
CHRIS THOMPSON
. . . debaters win
UBC debaters
enter finals
UBC debaters have advanced
into final rounds of McGoun cup
debating championships.
The UBC team, Bonnie Erickson, Dennis Forkin, Judith Anderson and Chris Thomson, beat
Victoria College in debates held
Friday.
This Friday, the team meets
University of Manitoba and University of Alberta teams on the
topic: 'Canadian self-determination is a myth."
Miss Anderson and Thompson debate at 8 p.m. in Bu. 106
against the U of A team.
Miss Erickson and Forkin
go to Winnipeg to meet the U of
M team.
Winner of the cup, emblematic
o Western Canada debating supremacy, is determined by adding
point totals of teams debating in
the different cities
Special events presents Big
Fanny Storgoff and other Sons of
Freedom Doukhobor leaders today at noon in the armory. No
admission charge.
'   *   *   *
UBC LIBERALS
Important meeting, noon today, student council chambers.
All members attend.
*■*■■*■
SCM
N. van Gelder speaks on "The
Chakras," noon today, Hut L-3.
•k    -k    ic
NDC
Dr. Tyman: "The Hard Way To
Peace," 12.30 Wednesday, Bu.
204.
*   *  *
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Rev. Alan Schmidt: "World
Religions," 12.30 Wednesday,
Bu. 2202.
•k    ic    ic
IH, EAST ASIA SOC, NISEI
Japan Week: G. Fujisawa
talks on 'Problems of Nisei,"
12.30 Wednesday, IH.
NISEI VARSITY
Films on Japan, noon today,
Bu. 104.
NOTICE
Take notice that the Discipline Committee is investigating the alleged illegal .posting
of notices by the following:
UBC Radio Society
Associated Women's Students
Judo Club.
Persons desiring to give evidence in these matters are
directed to the hearing to be
held at 12.30 p.m. Friday, Feb.
25, 1963, in the Brock- board
room.
S. S. MERRIFIELD,
AMS Discipline  Committee
Minister gives
thought talk
A veteran Christian Scientist
will lecture Wednesday on how
Christian Scientists use God's
healing power to solve problems
of everyday living.
Paul Stark Seeley, a member
of the Christian Science Board
of Lectureship, speaks in Bu.
104 on "The Origin and Power
of Thought."
The free public lecture is sponsored by the Christian Science
Organization at UBC.
Seeley, of Portland, Ore., is a
former lawyer and associate editor of Christian Science religious
publications. He has served as
president of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ Scientist, in Boston, Mass., and now
gives his full time to lecturing.
He has lectured on Christian
Science to audiences throughout
the world.
Marz & Wozny
548 Howe St.        MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
Applications for
symposium end
All applications for Academic   Symposium    (Feb.    15-17),
must be in by the end of this
week.
Application forms, from the
AMS office, graduate student
centre and International
House, must be returned to
Box 1, AMS office, by Saturday noon.
About 80 students, 40 professors and 10 Alumni are expected to attend the weekend
retreat at Parksville.
CAMERA  CLUB
Valuable criticism for Ben
Hill Tout — first black and
white competition of term, 12.30
Wednesday, Bu. 203.
FOR RENT
To Students and Members of
the Faculty:
2-bedroom unfurnished suites
at Acadia.
Apply  Housing  Office
TAKE 20 AT TEN P.M.
VESPERS
EVERY NIGHT
at the
Lutheran Student Centre
4608 W.  10th (1 blk. E.  of
Gates)
Students in charge Jan. 20-26
M
The California Standard Company
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offering careers in
Petroleum Exploration & Production
will conduct campus interviews on
January 23 25 & 26
for
Post Graduates Graduates
— Undergraduates -
in
Honors Geology
— Permanent and summer employment
Physics and Geology
— Permanent and summer employment
Geological Engineering
— Permanent and summer employment
Mining  Engineering
Permanent positions only
Chemical Engineering
Permanent positions only
Students interested in both permanent and summer employment in mineral exploration with a sister company,
CREST EXPLORATION LIMITED, will also be interviewed for work in connection with the development
of iron ore deposits in the Yukon—
Geological   Engineering
Honors Geology
Arrangements for Personal Interviews may be made
through The University's Placement Office, West Mall Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  22,   1963
'tween sports
Bisons buffaloed
The UBC Thunderbirds' basketball team scraped by the
University of Manitoba twice over the weekend, but they still
have not regained first place in the WCIAA.    	
Friday night Birds edged Man
itoba  49-44,  and Saturday they
won 54-51.
Birds had to come from behind
Jayvees, who were somewhat
upset by the American style of
refereeing, lost the game on the
Western crew
Bob Barazzuol was high
scorer for the Jayvees with 13
points.
a nine-point half-time deficit to backboards. They were contin-
take the win in Saturday night's ually out-rebounded by the tall
match.
"We played pretty well Saturday night," Bird Coach Peter
Mullins said. "Our shots just
wouldn't go in."
"Manitoba has a good team,"
he went on. "I wouldn't be
surprised if they beat Calgary
again next time they meet."
CALGARY WINS
Calgary, meanwhile, was protecting their hold on first place
by taking two games from the
University of Saskatchewan.
Although Calgary has two
more points than the Birds, they
have also played two more
games.
:JMike Potkonjak and Ken Mac-
J3.onald were high scorers for
the Birds each night. Friday,
Potkonjak picked up 12 points,
and MacDonald 10. i Saturday,
Potkonjak scored 14 to MacDon-
ald's 13.
Keith Hartley was a standout
defensively for the Birds both
nights, knocking down shots and
rebounding.
Birds will meet the University
of Alaska Polar Bears this
Thursday evening at 8:30 in War
Memorial gym. Last year Polar
Bears edged Birds 76-74.
•    •    •
The UBC Jayvees basketball
team dropped, a decision to a
powerful Western Washington
team in Bellingham Saturday
night.
UBCs swimming birds
drown Washington Wildcats
By SCHULTZIE
The UBC Thunderbird swim team won their first
meet of the season, and they did it in fine fashion as they
sank the Central Washington Wildcats 74-21 Saturday at
Percy Norman pool.
It was UBC's biggest victory since 1959, when they beat
Western Washington by the same score.
Double winners in the meet were Dave Smith, Brian
Griffiths and Bill Campbell.
Smith broke the team record for the 100 meter freestyle with a time of 1:00.7, and won the 50 meter freestyle.
Griffiths took the 200 meter butterfly and breaststroke. Campbell copped the 200 meter freestyle and backstroke.
UP
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Bifocals   Additional.
ALL    EYE    DOCTORS'
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"Repairs While Vou Wait"
EYE EXAMINATIONS
French  Maids  ont
beaucoup de style
By JANET CURRIE
As Told to BILL WILLSON
The butler didn't do it. This time the French Maids were
the guilty party.
French Maids, Canada's representatives in this spring's Pan
American Games, made an impressive show of their qualifications at the fourth annual Thunderette Invitational basketball tournament.
The polished French Maids'
machine bowled over the pre-
tournament favorites, Kelowna
Teddy Bears, with a lopsided
69-39 victory in the final at the
women's gym Saturday night.
Despite a rigorous schedule of
three games in one day, Portland found its way to the consolation final.
The lead see-sawed until the
last few minutes when Portland
cashed in on foul shots for a
46-43   triumph   over   Richmond.
UBC Thunderettes placed third.
French Maids also copped the
free shot contest as Diane Beach
emerged the eventual winner.
UNCLASSIFIED
SPORTS
MALE    STUDENTS
I.F.C.  INVITES YOU TO
Spring Rush
Registration - Jan. 14 to 31 - AMS Office
SOCCER: UBC Coach Joe Johnson
yesterday announced plans for an
exhibit on same with Vancouver
Firefighters.
(lame will take place Thursday
afternoon, Feb. 14, at I'BC. Fire-
fi^hters hold down second place
in the hi^'h calibre Pacific Coast
League. This will be the most difficult opposition Thunderbirds, who
are undefeated in thirteen games,
have   yet   faced.
Birds romped to a I'.-O victory Saturday over Royal Oak^, in a name
played at Mclnnis Field.
WEIGHTLIPTING: The T'BC team
Won the team trophy at the Washington    A A17   Invitational   Wei&'ht-
lifting-       championships. George
Tsoi-a-sue, Andrew Hinds and Rob
McGavin won in their individual
classes.
WRESTLING: The VRC wrestlers j
dropped a close decision to the Uni- ,
veisitv oi' \\'a:;iiin,^tou bv a score !
of   IH-IS. ' I
WANTFD:
Thu   *-ii n
U.B.C.  DEPARTMENT OF  THEATRE
presents
HENRY IV, PART ONE
by William Shakespeare
DIRECTED BY JOHN BROCKINGTON
JANUARY 23-24-25-26
University  Auditorium   8:30 p.m.
AND TO MEET DEMAND
Added Matinee — Saturday 2:30
Tickets $1.75 -$1.25
Auditorium Box Office
Students 75c
CA 4-1111, Local 339
SRI CLEARANCE
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