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The Ubyssey Dec 2, 1986

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Array TJBC Arciavc -•■
THE UBYSSEY
yVol. LXIX, No.3l
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, December 2,1986
sc«|sS^«i:
228-230iy
Questionnaire angers newspaper
By JENNIFER LYALL
The staff of the Capilano College
student newspaper say a questionnaire issued by their student society
is biased against the paper.
The questionnaire, which solicits
comments on the Capilano
Courier's editorial policies and suggestions about the paper's funding,
was prepared in anticipation of a
Dec. 9 Special General meeting
when the society will vote on the
paper's funding.
Courier news co-ordinator Janice
Irving, said the questions were
"biased", and worded to elicit anti-
paper   sentiment.    "Because   we
cover such issues as lesbians and
gays some council members want to
cut the paper's funding," said
Irving. "They can't stand for a
paper that covers issues."
One of the questions reads:
"How do you feel about the
Courier's stance on politics, lesbianism, and homosexuality, or any
other issue?"
Irving objected to the inclusion
of the words lesbianism and
homosexuality in the question.
"Why don't they say, how do you
feel about the coverage of issues,
period?"
"They mention those three issues
because they are the three things we
get letters about," she said.
Irving was also angry about a
question asking if funding should
be increased, decreased or remain
the same. Because no information
was provided on the current financial structure of the papei, she said,
"students can't know" what is the
best alternative.
"This is nothing but a blatant attempt to cut our funding," she said.
"We're going to fight it any way we
can because we feel we've been
cheated in the past and we're not
going to take it any more."
But Paul Edwards, student socie
ty vice-president external, who
developed the questionnaire, said
although the Courier has the right
to set its own editorial policies, it
should conform more to what
Capilano students want.
"We're trying to establish some
sort of accountability to students
without infringing on the autonomy
of the newspaper," he said, pointing out that the paper is funded
through the student society with
student money.
Edwards denied the accusation
that he was putting words in
students'  mouths by singling out
politics and homosexuality in the
question about the paper's coverage
of issues. "The paper spends so
much time on those issues that I
think it's a valid question," he said.
Edwards said the Courier devotes
too much space to issues "students
aren't interested in," such as "gay
rights, politics, and the nuclear
issue."
"The Courier is trying to take an
active role to promote social ideals
that aren't held by Capilano
students," he said. "We're not getting enough coverage of on-campus
issues."
Long-time UBC campus employee retires
By EVELYN JACOB
The modest white-haired man
leans forward, his hand propped
under his chin. He fiddles with a
wrapper and slips a stick of gum
into his mouth. "Write about me?
I'm boring," he says with a grin.
But the man who has been a part
of UBC for more than a quarter
century, who has seen seven of nine
university presidents come and go,
is far from uninteresting.
Jim Banham, UBC's information
officer from 1957-1986, retired on
Spray poses danger
By MARY McALISTER
Resid. of cancer causing
pesticides on California table grapes
may pose a danger to consumers,
United Farm Workers of America
President Cesar Chavez said Sunday.
Chavez is touring North America
launching a boycott to force
growers to ban the use of deadly
pesticides Captan, Parathion,
Phosdrin, Dinoseb, and methyl
bromide.
"Incidence of cancer is high in
the American public and we know
there is residue on the grapes. If you
eat poisons and you eat them consistently, something's going to happen," he said.
Chavez sees Canada as an important factor in the boycott as it
makes up 20 per cent of the California grape market. "We're going to
force the stores to either remove the
grapes or tell consumers they have
pesticides on them," he said.
More and more people are joining the struggle of the farmworkers.
"A great number of farmworkers
are of Mexican descent but now
we're seeing a large white population being affected in neighbouring
communities," said Chavez.
The pesticides are sprayed from
planes, drift on the wind and enter
the water reservoirs.
"Now white middle class people
march with petitions to demand an
end to aerial spraying. People who
five years ago thought we were the
scum of the earth," he said.
In many communities in California's central valley, alarming
numbers of children have developed
cancer in the past few years. "These
people are not pro-union but
they're pro-children. We're both
victims," said Chavez.
The UFW wants the growers to
allow free and fair elections of
union representatives in the
workplace and to bargain in good
faith.
"To keep us from going forward,
the growers have started a vicious
attack on us. We have people who
get harassed and get killed because
they want a union," said Chavez.
"It's a long, long, bloody struggle. No one has worked harder and
longer for unions than the farmworkers," said Chavez.
"We're under tremendous strain
but the one consolation is that they
can't stop the boycott, they can't
extend their power to the
consumer," he said.
Nov. 30 with no regrets.
"After 29 years I'm not bored or
unhappy with the university," he
says. "I've reached that stage in life
when it's time to do something
else."
Born and raised in Vancouver,
Banham came to UBC in 1946
where he completed a "bad"
bachelor of arts degree. "Bad," he
explains, because he spent most of
his undergraduate years putting out
The Ubyssey. He was editor-in-
chief for 1949-50, and worked for
the next three years as a reporter for
Reuters news service and the Daily
Express in London, England.
He recalls being kidnapped along
with another member of the paper
by engineers who took them blindfolded to a motel on Kingsway.
"They held us there for 12 hours
and we were ransomed for two bottles of beer. It was expected to
create a fuss but I decided to pull
rank and didn't say a word (in the
paper) — that upset them more
than anything."
"A week later we turned the
tables on them and kidnapped the
president of the Engineering
Undergraduate Society.'
Banham, 58, says he has seen a
significant swing in siudent attitudes since the late 1950s and early
1960s. "Our generation questioned
everything, and not too politely."
Students today accept unquestion-
ingly, the policies and procedures of
the university, he says.
"It makes for a quietei university
but perhaps not as interesting as it
was in the "60s."
Now pursuing a history' degree in
Medieval Studies, Banhc.m says he
is impressed with the flexibility of
UBC's administration.
"UBC has a willingness to give
people an opportunity to explore
things they're interested in. You
don't always find that at other
universities."
But he says he is worried that a
lack of funding for the university is
not providing opportunities for
everyone in B.C.
"I think that's a bad thing," he
muses. The most rewarding part of
his years at UBC is the many friendships he made. One of his closest
friends at UBC was Larry McKenzie,
who was university president from
1944-62.
"He viewed my years as editor as
part of my education and important
as being in a classroom," Banham
recalls.    "Despite   my   dismal
undergraduate record he hired me
on as information officer. He must
have seen something in me that I
wasn't aware of and I admired him
for it — he didn't like too many
rules and regulations."
Being a bridge between the
university to the outside world is
what Banham has enjoyed doing
most as information officer.
"The frustrating part," he says,
is that a great deal of outstanding
activity goes by unrecognized."
Banham says he plans to spend
his time studying, listening to
music, and "ploughing through his
shelf of books at home." He says
he is not sad to leave his job. "I'm
not really leaving UBC." And his
greatest moment at the university?
Banham says, laughing, "yes, but
I'm not going to tell you about it."
Vander Zalm lobbyed
By ROSS McLAREN
NDP's women MLA's said they intend to pressure premier Bill
Vander Zalm into raising B.C.'s minimum wage.
Speaking at a press conference on Friday, the MLA's promised to
keep women's issues in the spotlight when the legislature resumes sittings.
Claiming B.C.'s low minimum wage affects more women than
men, Darlene Marzari, MLA Point Grey, vowed to continue lobbying the government to fulfill their election promise to raise the
minimum wage.
At $3.65 B.C.'s minimum wage is the lowest in Canada.
Marzari, who has the NDP shadow portfolios of Post-Secondary
Education and Social Services, also said the minimum wage an important issue in the NDP caucus and that the NDP was pushing for a
$1 increase in the minimum wage.
Carol Pedlar, AMS External Affairs Officer, said the AMS did not
have an official position on the minimum wage that she knows of,
but that she thought an increase was "a good idea that was long
overdue." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 2, 1986
Liberal feminism loses support
OTTAWA (CUP) — While
critics within the ranks of the national Liberal party grumble the
organization is "Turnering right",
young Liberal women appear to be
turning their backs on such left-
leaning notions as feminism and the
National Women's Liberal Commission.
Though more than a third of the
delegates — 1,300 of 3,000 — to the'
National Liberal Convention in
November were women, the great
majority of the yonger women
delegates did not attend the commission's national meeting.
"The younger women don't feel
there's a need for the women's commission," said Lynda Sorenson, a
candidate for the commission's
presidency.
"University trained women
especially are turning away from the
feminism because most of them
have always been fairly independent
economically," said Sorenson.
"They have never faced discrimination like the older women. They
have more stature and mote ability
to move in different circles."
Sorenson said the scheduling of
the national meeting of the Young
Liberals on the same day as the
commission's meeting was "a
frustrating conflict" for some
young women. Most, however,
chose to attend the Young Liberal
meeting.
Kaz Flynn, youth liason for party
leader John Turner, said many
young women "want to be in the
main flow" of the party. "Until the
younger women get out into the
workplace, they think they can do
without a separate women's
group," said Flynn.
Flynn said there is still a need for
the women's commission. "I hope
there won't be a need for it," said
Flynn.
Some Liberals, however, see the
commission as an anachronism.
"That's for the blue-hairs," said
Bob Richardson, aide to Colleges
and Universities Minister Bob
Richardson. "The women in this
party are high profile. They just
don't need their own group
anymore."
Richardson said the Youth and
Women's groups have turned into
"power bases", used by party
members to climb the ranks.
Mary Clancy, a professor at
Mount Saint Vincent and Dalhousie
Universities in Halifax, said for her
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women students "realization of the
need for affirmative action and
feminism comes later in life.
"I find they are so into working
towards their degrees and they just
don't have as much time for these
issues," she said.
Sorenson said Liberal women are
generally supportive of Turner,
despite his poor reputation with
women voters.
"The thing about Mr. Turner is,
he's learned," said Sorenson. "And
there is nothing better than a
reformed chauvinist. He is no
longer condescending."
Turner, who lost severe political
points during the 1984 federal election because of an infamous "bum-
patting" incident, won applause by
saying "this reformed bum-patter
has come a long way in two years."
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CHRISTMAS
FAIR
November 24 -
December 19, 1986
SUB Main Concourse
) Display Area
CAREERS IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
one of the fastest-growing health
professions in Canada
ACCELERATED DEGREE PROGRAM
BScOT in 23 months
(based on two years' previous university)
Application deadline: 1 March 1987
for details write or phone
Department of Occupational Therapy
University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2G4
(403) 432-2499/5949
The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
Tuesday, December 9, 1986
From 12:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Every student must attach to the examination booklet EITHER a "fee waived" sticker (to
be used by those taking the exam for the first time) OR a "fee paid" sticker ($10), which
must be purchased from the Department of Finance, 3rd floor Administration Building.
New transfer students who chose not to sit the September 25, 1986 ECT must purchase a
sticker. Fee waived stickers labelled "For September Sitting Only" are no longer valid.
Students currently enrolled in English 100 will receive "fee waived" stickers from their
instructors.
University regulations state, "Each person taking the exam should be prepared to produce, upon request, his or her Library/AMS Card."
Students are permitted the use of a dictionary.
ROOM ALLOCATION BY SURNAME
AAA-AZZ
CHEMISTRY 200
BAA-CZZ
ARMOURIES
DAA-DZZ
GEOGRAPHY 100
EAA-FZZ
SCARFE 100
GAA-HAP
ANGUS 104
HAQ-IZZ
ANGUS 110
JAA-KEZ
WOODWARD (IRC) 1
KFA-KZZ
BUCHANAN A100
LAA-LEP
COMPUTER SCIENCE 200
LEQ-LZZ
COMPUTER SCIENCE 201
MAA-MDZ
HENNING 200
MEA-MZZ
CHEMISTRY 250
NAA-OZZ
McLEOD 228
PAA-PON
BUCHANAN A104
POO-RHZ
WOODWARD (IRC) 4
RIA-RZZ
LASSERRE 102
SAA-SHO
MATHEMATICS 100
SHR-STA
HENNING 202
STB-SZZ
LASSERRE 104
TAA-TRO
HENNING 201
TRP-VZZ
MATHEMATICS 202
WAA-WZZ
BUCHANAN A106
XAA-ZZZ
WESBROOK 201
All clashes must be reported immediately to the Registrar's Office, 2nd Floor,
General Services and Administration Buildine. Tuesday, December 2, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
OVER ENTHUSIASTIC FIREFIGHTERS, having long since fled the scene, study matrix algebra as forlorn prof pokes soggy remnants of Sedgewick for third printing of I'm O.K. Your O.K.
Collins attempts to harpoon Watson
By RICK HIEBERT
Doug Collins tried and failed to
harpoon Paul Watson during a
heated debate in the SUB
auditorium Friday.
Collins, a right-wing columnist of
the North Shore News attacked environmental activist Paul Watson as
a "self-righteous vigilante — a
common criminal" during the
debate before a large and lively audience. The debate concerned
whether Watson and his associates
in the Sea Shepherd society were
justified in scuttling two Icelandic
whaling vessels and bombing a
whale meat facility.
Collins led off with "It is possible
that Paul Watson is not a lunatic,
but I doubt it." Collins likened
Watson's methods to those of
Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini and
said   "Watson   hears   voices   and
prays daily too see his name in the
paper."
"Put a guy like that (Watson)
away for a couple of years and his
looniness will be put to more useful
purposes, like knitting," Collins
said.
Watson shot back with "It was
amusing to listen to North Vancouver's rent-a-reactionary," and
proceeded to defend the Sea
Shepherd's actions. Watson said
the Icelandic government was continuing to hunt whales under the false
pretense of scientific research.
"The object (of the research whale
hunt) was to find out why the whale
population has declined," Watson
said to friendly applause.
Watson added that the only
reason Iceland hunts whales is to
provide meat for Japanese markets.
He said the Sea Shepherd's activity
received "not one' negative
editorial in European newspapers.
"Icelandic whaling is closed," he
concluded.
Collins retorted that "I myself
am against hunting whales, but I
obey the law," and said "if we are
going to have a free for all then why
doesn't some idealist sink the Sea
Shepherd?"
After an exchange of insults, Collins said "Paul Watson apparently
believes that violence on behalf of
whales in no crime."  He added,
"When you try and change a nation's policy by violence, it is terrorism."
Watson replied, "If I broke the
law, then why haven't I been arrested? There is no warrant in
Iceland for my arrest."
Collins said he thought whales
were more important then boats,
but that he felt Watson's method of
saving the whales left much to be
desired and Greenpeace, which had
"turfed" Watson, agreed with him.
Watson replied that his action ac
tually   made   the   work   of   such
groups easier.
Collins replied by saying "The
Watson type of action is fundamentally undemocratic as Watson
decides for society what is right and
wrong. Democracy and violence do
not go together,' he added.
When asked how far he would go
to stop whaling, Watson said,
"We'll (the Sea Shepherd Society)
go as far as we have to without
causing injury. At that we draw the
line."
Harassment paper debated
University bill tabled
OTTAWA (CUP) — A member
of the Liberal party's task force on
post-secondary education is calling
for a national council to address
"an immense crisis" in the
country's universities.
Newfoundland MP Bill Rompkey
has introduced a private member's
bill to the House of Commons to
establish a Canadian Post-
Secondary Education Council. The
bill has received the first of three
readings required before the
passage.
"A national strategy for education is absolutely essential," said
Rompkey. He said following his
cross-country tour with the Liberal
task force, "I have no doubt in
mind that there is a crisis in post-
secondary education in Canada."
Rompkey's proposal would call
for a national advisory body, with
representation from the federal and
provincial governments, administrators, faculty and students.
Not surprisingly, Rompkey has
received no support from provincial
ministers responsible for post-
secondary education, who say the
Council of Ministers of Education
already deals with the same issues,
Rompkey disagrees.
"I don't think anybody thinks
their council is truly a national
body," he said. "There is no participation from the federal government, or the university community
itself."
Rompkey's bill is similar to one
proposed by the Canadian Association of University Teachers, who
called for a stronger and more influential body. CAUT president
Allan Sharp said Rompkey's bill
may, however, pass because it is
more "realistic".
"All one can really hope for
right now is an agency that can at
least carry on informed debate,"
said Sharp, who said the council
should also have some capacity for
research.
The federal government is planning to save almost $2 billion over
the next five years through limited
growth in transfer payments to the
provinces. Sharp said the federal-
record on education and research
warrants a council.
"There is no mechanism for placing education on the federal agenda, and yet this is an area where the
government spends billions of
dollars," said Sharp.
The Canadian Federation of
Students is initially supportive of
the council. "In principle, we support the creation of such a council.
It is a very wise idea," said CFS
researcher Jean Wright.
Rompkey hopes the bill's second
reading will come before spring.
By PATTI FLATHER
The presidential sexual harassment committee appears receptive
to revising the working draft it
refused to make publ c, students
making submissions sa>.
"They (the committee) do not
have their minds set on anything.
The working paper is just that,"
said Christina Davidson, law 3, who
appeared before the committee of
four faculty members last week.
Davidson and other s:udents said
they are concerned with certain
aspects of the committee's working
paper. The committee, appointed
last summer by UBC president
David Strangway, has been criticized for its lack of student and staff
representation and its refusal to
make public a Nov. 5 working
paper on proposed sexual harassment procedures at UBC.
Committee members deny they
are stifling campus-wide discussion,
and Strangway has said procedures
will probably be made public before
they become policy.
The committee, which is still taking submissions, hopes to report to
Strangway soon after Christmas,
committee member Lynn Smith
said Monday.
Some students making submissions are concerned with the
following aspects of the working
draft:
• there is no mention of an advocate or support person to help the
complainant, usually but not
always a woman in a less powerful
position than the alleged offender.
• there are too many "hurdles"
for the compainant to overcome in
following a complaint through.
• that faculty representation on a
possible hearing committee dealing
with a complaint by a student
against a faculty member is taken
for granted, but a mention of student representation is followed by a
question mark.
Megan Ellis, law 3, who appeared
before the committee and has six
years experience in rape and crisis
centres, said she is concerned with
American students protest CIA
BOULDER, CO. (CUP/CPS) —
Protests against Central Intelligence
Agency recruiters have sprung up
on several American campuses.
More than 100 University of Colorado students in November
chanted and waved signs while protesting the presence of CIA
recruiters on campus.
CIA representatives have recently
drawn protestors at the universities
of Texas, Minnesota, Oregon State,
Massachusetts-Amherst, Iowa and
Rhode Island, among other places.
"It seems like everywhere they
go, they get protested," said Tom
Swan, president ofthe U.S. Student
Association. "And it seems to be
increasing. It could be tied into (the
case of arms runner Eugene) Hasen-
fus or Congress's approval of the
Contras in Nicaragua."
CIA spokesperson Sharon Foster
said the agency visits "several hundred" campuses a year, but doesn't
keep  tabs  on  how  many protests
greet their arrival.
"We go where we are invited to
talk with students who have already
expressed an interest," she said.
Student protestors at the University of Massachusetts forced the
CIA to cancel a recruiter's planned
visit to the campus by blocking the
door to the university's career centre.
"We don't think brutal
murderers should be on campus
recruiting," said protestor Barry
Lefsky.
However, conservative students
on campus staged counter-protests
to support CIA recruiting. "I don't
see how people can come out and
protest an organization that's out
for their best interests," said Brian
Darling, presideni of the
university's Republican Club.
"I'm furious, 'said David
Arams, who wanted to speak with a
CIA recruiter. "These people don't
know  me. They don't  know why
I'm interested in the CIA, and yet
they're prohibiting the way I can express myself. They're deciding for
me whom I can apply to."
Demonstrators say the want to
inform students as much as protest
the CIA's "very successful" in its
signups "because of the kind of
recruiting" the agency uses.
"People still see the CIA as protecting the American way of life.
We have to go further to change
that mindset," said Jain.
"The people they are recruiting
have never talked to a liberal in
their entire lives. These are the kind
of people we have trouble
reaching."
A demonstration at the University of Texas at Austin followed a
speech by former CIA agent John
Stockwell, who accused the CIA of
manipulating the press, overthrowing democracies, installing military
dictators and preparing an
American invasion of Nicaragua.
the lack of an advocacy role in the
draft.
Ellis said the burden on the complainant will be greater than in the
current post-rape procedure with
the courts and police if nc advocate
is provided.
"None of us, no matter how
tough, would be thrilled to take on
one of our professors."
"It's (the lack of an advocate)
worse than nothing," she said.
But committee member Dr.
Nadine Wilson said she supports
some kind of advocate. And Smith
said "there are some pretty good
arguments for having somebody
assisting the complainant."
However, Paddi Arthur of the
law school women's committee said
she is opposed to an advocacy role
for any sexual harassment officer.
"The counsellor should be seen
by all members of the community as
being in a neutral rather than an
adversarial role," said Arthur,
whose group presented a 22-page
brief.
Davidson, who presented a
dissenting oral brief last week as
another member of the law school
women's committee, said she is still
concerned that in the draft there are
too many places where the complainant can be dropped, and too many
hurdles to overcome.
Lynn Smith said the committee
has discussed the need for procedures that do not create "unnecessary hurdles."
UBC is one of only a few universities in Canada without formal
procedures to handle sexual harassment complaints.
Helga Jacobsen, associate anthropology professor who chairs
the women's studies committee,
said in the last few years about six
women have come to her with sexual harassment complaints ranging
from the fairly mild to the serious.
She said she recommends they go
to the women student's office and
tells them there are no formal procedures.
"The best thing I can tell them is
'I'm sorry'," she said. "People get
angry. There is a real need to have a
place to go." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 2, 1986
How to
Your friends at The Ubyssey, though deeply embroiled in the
larger issues that concern this planet, are also aware that exams are
approaching faster than Bill Vander Zalm can deny that Fantasy
Gardens is a conflict of interest.
Some thoughts we share, because we care:
• If you have two hours to cram before the exam, and are trying
to decide which is more important, learning the entire term's work,
or sleep, sleep. It's already too late. Proper bullshit demands a
good night's sleep.
• Every historic period saw "the emergence of the middle
class." Sprinkle all history essays liberally with this fact.
• Assume an air of total knowledge in your opening sentence.
Use "moreover".
• If you're in arts, refer to a scientific theory; if in science, refer
to some philosopher.  Your profs have been out of the other
discipline for at least twenty years. They'll be deeply impressed.
• If you get that philosophy exam that has only one question,
"Why?" answer "Why not", then tell all your friends so they can
say, "I knew this person who had a philosophy exam ..."
• Always single-space your essays so you won't have room to
go back and change anything, and your prof will have no room for
rude comments.
• Never choose D. Never.
• On any science exam, draw the following:
H week is the chance to destroy stereotypes
O.K., this is getting out of hand.
I'm sick of receiving slanderous
remarks from both sides of this
debate that aren't helping the situation.
I do not support the mockery of
gays and lesbians. I support the
right to freedom of speech for all
people when expressed fairly. I do
not support heterosexual separatist
activities or heterosexual domination (i.e. — homosexual oppression). I do not feel ecstatic
about some of the activities happening this week, but I support the
healthy exchange of sexual information on this campus.
Despite the fact that a lot of people will either use this week to hassle
homosexuals or use it to try and
stereotype the actions of fraternities, I still believe that extending
ourselves both ways to focus on
frustrations and ignorance of sexual
freedom will be to everyone's
benefit.
I am not 'ignorant' of what some
participants in heterosexual week
are thinking. There are those who
are using it to promote 'old fashion
ed values' and manifest feelings of
machismo and false superiority,
and even suppress homosexual feelings.
These people are not who I am
appealing to. They are filled with
myth and fear. They are afraid of
me because they think I will 'touch'
them (don't worry, I won't), 'come-
on' to them (don't worry, I
wouldn't want to), or try to 'have
sex' with them (don't worry, if you
perpetuate these myths I would probably find you very unattractive,
and extremely unintelligent).  The
Students blatantly misrepresented
The lack of student and staff
representation on the University's
sexual harassment committee indicates whose rights and privileges
the University respects and is trying
to protect: the faculty's. The
University seems to think that it can
best protect the usual victims of sexual harassment — staff and
students — by referring the issue to
our intellectual "superiors".
This paternalistic attitude may
have some justification when it
comes to academic considerations,
but not ones which are designed to
protect students and staff against
the abuses of power and privilege.
Faculty can make certain that
their own rights are protected, but
they cannot claim to represent
students as well.
We are told that students were
not added to the committee because
"it would set us back two months"
(The Ubyssey,  Friday,  November
21, 1986). After all these years, why
is there a sudden rush? Why wasn't
student representation included in
the first place? How could the
failure to implement the latter be
used to justify the former?
There is a conflict of interest
here. Faculty want to ensure that
they have adequate protection
against accusations of sexual
harassment, as, of course, they
should. As members of that constituency, however,' faculty cannot
adequately represent the interests of
students over whom they exercise
considerable academic authority.
Such blatant misrepresentation
on a committee which is primarily
supposed to protect those who lack
power and privilege is not only unjust — it is a farce.
Until students and staff receive
the opportunity to fully participate
in   a   genuine   public   forum   to
establish a fair and equitable policy
on sexual harassment, these proceedings will continue to suffer
from tunnel vision.
Let's avoid the necessity to repeat
these proceedings in the future. Put
students and staff on this committee now!
Phil Bennett
presient GSS
joint letter proved that two
representatives of two sexual
groups could come up with a fair
line regarding sexual freedom,
'without me even laying a hand on
Patrick Kirkwood' as Mr. Lymer
would say.
To all these people — don't
bother saying that this week is
working to your advantage, because
it is not. Don't talk about morality
and the false arguments of continuing the population until your
morals treat all people equally and
the hunger and poverty of children
around the world has been
eradicated. Don't tell me I'm going
to burn in hell, because I'll see you
in heaven, with all the others who
have been persecuted wrongly in the
name of 'decency'.
What we need to do now is break
down stereotypes, on this campus
and everywhere, and stop putting
people into groups and labelling
them unjustly. I'm sick and tired of
stereotypes placed on anyone.
I don't believe we need a
'heterosexual club' on campus, just
as we don't need a 'white people's
club' on campus. As stated by Ron
Stewart, heterosexuals enjoy all
rights and privileges. They can ask
someone out in class that they like,
don't need to worry about holding
hands with their partner or expressing their sexuality at school without
fear of departmental scrutiny.
Anyone who has a problem with me
doing this can confront me personally, and not hide behind a banner or a 'week'.
I want people this week to realize
what we need to do in order to stop
people from thinking they can
persecute homosexuals like William
Schiffers — raped, hands tied
behind his back, body set on fire, or
Kenneth Zeller — beaten to death
with clubs in a community park.
This fear and hatred has to stop, in
all forms.
This week should explore sexual
identity, and address problems such
as this. Let's fight this together, as a
people. Please.
Scott Beveridge
vice-president, Gays and
Lesbians of UBC
Ego plagues the irresponsible
THE UBYSSEY
December 2, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Fifty plus one enough," they claimed, but the staff knew no collective could carry on with less than
three-quarters support. Senators Mary McAlister and Patti Flather had written very dirty books in
which they accused the four of "journalistic integrity." Polls indicated they were in trouble. Collective
supporters Ross McLaren, Chew Wong, and Louise Panzier tried to ignore the books, but when collective members called the books "typical lies," the mud slinging started. Would-be giant killers Jennifer
Lyall and Malcolm Pearson refused comment, but were often discovered signing other peoples' names
to damning letters. Gordon Clark approved of the libel as practiced by the collective. Susan Bertoia and
Rick Hiebert came out in support of the opposition forces. The final vote indicated massive support only for Michael. David, Evelyn and Svetozar have been sentenced to North Bay for one week of eastern
winter.
At first I hesitated to respond to
Blair's contradictory contribution,
in which the frequency of the word
"bullshit" is already an indication
of the quality of the argument.
However, maybe this is an opportunity for clarification.
I have been president of the
Acadia Tenants Association while
Blair used to call himself president
of the Acadia Highrise Tenants
Association which had
amalgamated with the ATA a year
before. You may ask how many
presidents one organization can
bear? Well it is not surprising
because some people do indeed
need titles to represent their ego in a
more favourable way. As Blair said,
"I don't pretend to be responsible
or represent anybody but me."
Let's not argue about the many
wrong "facts" which he uses.
Games with wrong percentages do
not help. The core of his argument
is the "colonial" attitude and the
lack of democracy paired with the
disservice by the "pretend to be
responsible representatives". The
term colonial covers the real problems and is quite inappropriate.
The comparison with the "real"
democracy at the federal and provincial level is so ridiculously naive
that I almost misinterpreted it as a
joke. Do you really think that Brian
Mulroney or Bill Vander Zalm will
listen to your concerns?
There are jerks in the University
administration. There are people on
power trips and people who do not
keep their promises. That is part of
politics. There is really not much
difference to the political games
which are played outside of the
gates of academia.
There are two things which aggravate the situation at the university however. Several people in the
administration pretend to know
how it is to live a student life or being a student family. A resulting attitude of ignorance towards the real
problems which are raised by
students or tenants can be very
disturbing.
The second problem relates to the
transient character of the population. Students come here to study
and then they take off. Their
primary interests are outside of the
university. This may be only one
reason for their lack of involvement. I agree that this attitude is
quite shortsighted and somewhat
egocentric. The administration,
however, makes its best efforts to
reflect this attitude as well in its lack
of sound longterm planning. This is
a nice collusion.
However, Blair's attitude is not
helpful. The Rhino bursaries are
simply a form of tax deduction.
They have nothing to do with
political clout. I agree that students
should be more responsible and
more active in their matters. This
also involves risks and confrontation. Ego trips — under any
pretense — are very counterproductive, or else welcome to the world of
dictatorship.
Bjorn Katjen
inlerdisplinary studies 4
If there is something you think
people should know, write us a letter. In order to minimize backlogs,
please keep your ramblings as short
as possible; very long letters may be
edited for brevity. Please keep in
mind that racism, sexism and
homophobia are not acceptable in
The Ubyssey. Letters should be
typed, tripled-spaced, on a seventy
character line, and presented in person, with II), at The Ubyssey office, SUB 241k. Tuesday, December 2, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
B.C. Liberals, your supporters vote Socred
John Pennant's letter, in which
he supplies us with a long parade of
quotes from that esteemed Liberal
guru, Allan Fotheringham, begs a
response. Rather than target poor
Mr. Fotheringham, who is busy
making profound observations on
social life in Washington, I will concentrate on the substantially smaller
part of Mr. Pennant's letter; that is,
his own thoughts expressed in his
own words.
Mr. Pennant, first of all, notes
that Garde Gardom and Pat
McGeer were "kicked out of the
Liberal Party" before joining the
Socreds. One has to question the
wisdom of such a move by the
Liberals, if indeed this ever occurred; judging by the subsequent
political success of these two
political sojourners and the Social
Credit Party, and considering the
somewhat less successful record of
Mr. Pennant's provincial Liberals,
Booted out
In my letter to the Ubyssey
"Tories in Cahoots with Socreds",
I made an error when I stated that
Pat McGeer and Garde Gardom
were kicked out of the Liberal Party
"before" they subsequently joined
the Socreds. In fact, McGeer and
Gardom were expelled from the
Liberal Party "after" they joined
the Socreds. I apologize for the
mistake and hope the error did not
cause any great distress and the
issue of ex-Liberals being Socreds
may forever rest in peace.
John Pennant
arts 3
Gathering
for all Ubyssey staffers —
that means everyone who
has ever done anything for
the paper.
Saturday, Dec. 6
7:30 p.m.
at Jennifer's
more details in SUB 241k
The Dental
Clinic at UBC
is accepting applications
for patients needing
EXTRACTIONS
including  wisdom  teeth
and minor oral surgery
Please contact
228-4157
or
228-4216
for an appointment
Hair Styling
4384 W. 10th Ave.
"Designs by Debbie"
Shampoo, cut & finish
$14.00-$16.00
For Men & Ladies
224-6434
it appears that this wasn't a
politically astute decision. Nice
motives, maybe, but then nice
motives didn't make Pierre
Trudeau prime minister.
Secondly, in noting that John
Turner leads (as of press time) a
party with no provincial seats in
B.C., Mr. Pennant raises the fact
that provincial Liberals like himself
must  grapple  with:   most   federal
Liberal supporters in B.C. vote for
parties other than the provincial
Liberals, generally the Socreds.
This tends to confirm Ken
Dickerson's argument which Mr.
Pennant took pious exception to:
most Liberals, rather than sticking
to their so-called "principles" will
invariably exercise the politically expedient option and snuggle up in
bed with  the Socreds.  A case in
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Application deadline: February 1, 1987
Announcement of winners: April 1, 1987
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For details and application forms, contact the Graduate
Awards Officer, S-202, Concordia University, 1455 de
Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec H3G IM8.
Tel: (514) 848-3809.
'Includes the David J. Azrieli Graduate Fellowship, the Stanley G.
French Graduate Fellowship, the John W. O'Brien Graduate
Fellowship, the J.W. McConneil Memorial Fellowships, and
the Alcan Doctoral Fellowship in Commerce and Adminiitration.
All
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point: Mr. Turner's 1984 campaign
in B.C. was largely supported and
co-ordinated by several provincial
Socreds. Maybe Keith Davey
should have enlisted their help in
Quebec.
Mr. Pennant will probably not
see this letter until next week, by
which time he will have participated
in confirming the leadership of that
bastion of Liberal principle, John
Turner. I'm confident that the next
federal election will tell the same
story as the recent provincial election: when the Liberals discard the
maxim of "victory at any cost" for
genuine Liberal policy, the voters
discard them.
Russ Brown
arts 4
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OPEN SUNDAY DECEMBER 7, 14 & 21-12-4
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Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 2, 1986
tween classes
TODAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock Hall.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon,  Lutheran
Campus Centre.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Club closes officially.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM   group  II   meeting,   all  members  pick  up
newsletters and obtain party tickets, noon, Hebb
12.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Critical
WEDNESDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Model Parliament meeting, noon, SUB 249e.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General    meeting    and    slide    show,    noon,
Chemistry 160
UBC MARXIST-LENINISTS
Literature table, 11:30 a.m., entrance Buchanan
A.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music   night,   8:30-11:00   p.m.,   Grad   Centre
Lounge.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox Rd.
AMS ROCKERS
Pickup tickets for Big Ball Bash, noon, 241a.
PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Last chance to pick up newsletter, also Xmas
bash tickets available, SI, SUB 241 h.
CITR
The best in dance music, 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.,
Pit Pub.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THURSDAY
AYN RAND CLUB
Video presentation, Individualism: The Moral
Basis of Freedom, and Sociolism-Fascism, noon,
Henry Angus 215.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Theatre sports, 8:00 p.m., Grad Centre
Ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational meeting, noon, International
House.
UBC HANDGLIDING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 207, 209.
CITR
You'll wish you hadn't, 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.. The
Pit Pub.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT' ASSOCIATION
Meeting regarding Variety Show, noon, Scarfe
208.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Final meeting this term — all welcome, noon,
Chem 250.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC High School Tournament featuring your old
high school: 11:00 a.m., Steveston v. MEI; 12:45
Westyde v. Vancouver College, 2:30 p. m.,
Killarney v. Centennial; Windsor v. Lord Byng,
4:15 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Divestment rally at Board of Governors meeting,
2:30   p.m.,    outside   the   Old   Administration
Building.
FRIDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Christmas dinner, 7:30 p.m., Fogg 'N Sudds
Restaurant.
UNIVERSITY UNITARIANS
Social gathering, 6:30-8:30 p.m., the board room
of the Lutheran Campus Centre.
SPEAKEASY
Information and film about Varsity Outdoors
Club, presented by Varsity Outdoor Club,
12:00-2:00 p.m., main concourse of SUB next to
Speakeasy desk.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational meeting, noon, International
House.
SIGMA CHI SOCIAL CLUB
"Proud to be a Breeder Dance," 8:00 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
Last day of classes bzzr bash, 3:30-6:30 p.m.,
Buchanan Lounge, Buch Building A.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
End of term drop-in, 2:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC men's university tournament, 6:15 p.m.,
UBC v. Laurier, 8:15 p.m., Winnipeg v. Northwest Christian, War Memorial Gym.
staffers —
that means
anyone who
has ever done
anything for
the paper.
Sat., Dec. 6th
— 7:30 p.m.
at Jennifer's
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT—C.A. FIRM
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
If you are a 2nd or 3rd year accounting student with
academic and leadership abilities and are interested in professional employment with a C.A. firm May to August
1987, please submit your resume (UCPA form is suitable)
and a copy of your most recent transcript of marks by
December 17, 1986 to the Canada Employment Centre on
Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. Campus interviews will
be held in mid-January.
Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Office.
LIVE AT
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
al The Sk\liiu>
DAVID SUII
12 times on Carson
DEC. 3, 4, 5
Call 278-5161
for showtimes &
reservations
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
Hma ENGLISH COMPOSITION
TEST SEMIM
^
44
HOW TO PASS"
Guest Speaker:
Ms. Nancy Horsman
WKDNKSIMY, DKC'KMBKR 3
12:30
Please be seated early. No one will be turned away.
SIB BALLROOM
FREE
When you need copies
quickly and hassle-free, see
us at Kinko's. Our self-
service copiers are very easy
to use and give you the great
quality, inexpensive copies
you expect.
kinkcs
GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC
COUNCIL
m.
The Alma Mater Society is now accepting applications for three (3) student positions on the University Athletic Council (U.A.C.)
The U.A.C. is responsible for all areas governing
athletics on campus, including finance and long
range planning.
Applications can be picked up in SUB Room 238 &
returned with brief resume by December 5th, 4:00
p.m.
* ZtJino ^Maute  L^oifrures
VANCOUVER, B. C.
COMPLETE HAIR & SKIN CARE
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Book now. Offer applies only till the end
of Dec. '86.
Gift Certificates
Available
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional I
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi-1
tional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day |
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
JMI
Highly comp. IBM
micro computer
-640K RAM
—Twin 360K Panasonic drives
-Serial/Parallel/Game port/
clock & calendar
400 Sold to SFU
1 Yr. Warranty Parts & Labour
Reg. Price $1995
XMAS SPECIAL $1849
Phone 222-1150
10 — FOR SALE — Commercial
in
Brand Name Quality
Micro Computer
-640K
RAM
— Twin
Floppy Diskette
25%
larger monitor
1 Year Warranty Parts &■ Labour
Reg. Price $2495
XMAS SPECIAL $2350
Phone 222-1150
11
FOR SALE - Private
AIRFARE   Vancouver-Toronto   return   Dec.
18-Jan. 5, $375 obo. M/F. 299-3606 after 6
p.m.
RENAULT   R5   1982   gold,    sunroof,   low
mileage 222-1785. $2900.
15 - FOUND
PAIR   OF   LADIES   GLASSES   on   Mon.,
Dec. 1. Southwest Marine Drive. 266-0320.
20 - HOUSING
GAGE. TOTEM PARK. PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
ROOM AVAILABLE in exchange for childcare services. References necessary.
224-9283.
41st & SELKIRK. Female share 3 bedroom
2 bathroom house. $250. 266-2636 (Tom).
30 - JOBS
BABYSITTER needed. My home, near UBC,
for 2 children. Mondays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. starting Jan. '87. $5/hr. 228-8339.
PART-TIME WORK selling designer earrings
straight from artist. Deborah 224-7144.
35 - LOST
KEY RING includes Toyota, UBC, round
bike, color coded. Lost between Education
and Acadia housing. Phone 228-1761.
Reward.
70 - SERVICES
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free Tests — Confidential Help
75 - WANTED
UNIVERSITY STUDENT in Australia studying for B.A. in Humanities looking for a
"pen pal" in Vancouver to learn about
lifestyle, etc. in Canada. Write Michaela
Dedek, 28, Delicia Rd., Mapleton, 4560,
Queensland, Australia.
80 - TUTORING
FRENCH OR SPANISH courses with PhD.
student. Univ. & Continuing Education
experience. Oscar 738-4102.
SPANISH GRAMMAR & conversation with
PhD. student & TA in Hispanic studies.
Translations. Nora 731-0441.
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(Ph.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after six $10/hr.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM   NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263 0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type   theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS - word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-10 p.m. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
WORD PROCESSING. EDITING, writing:
resumes, theses, papers, letters. Pick-up &
delivery avail. 324-9924.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
THE   GOOD   WORD   PROCESSING   CO.
Spelling,  grammar expertise.  Days, eves,
wknds. Stud, rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
WORDPOWER-Editing. proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies.
Stud, rates. 3737 W. 10th at Alma
222-2661.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Certox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing, 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & VISA accepted.
ON-LINE TYPING SERVICES Fall special.
Fast, professional results @ $1.10/dble-
spaced pg. In-town or Richmond drop-off
or pick up. Glenna 277-0410 (24 hrs.)
NO FANCY TYPESETS-Just a correctly
typed and correctly proofread paper for
$1.10/pg. (tables extra). Experienced. Campus pick-up, drop-off. 736-9031.
TYPING. Fast and accurate. $1.50/pg.
Rachel, 224-0866 or 228-3881. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES - Qual
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SUPPORT THE
UBYSSEY! Tuesday, December 2, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Ontario brewery athletic sponsors queried
TORONTO (CUP) — Brewery
sponsorship of university athletics
may become a thing of the past, if
the Council of Ontario Universities
has its way.
The COU, which represents the
presidents of the province's 15
universities, is concerned about student drinking, and has asked its
members to review their policies on
brewery sponsorship of athletic
events.
As a result, many athletic departments could find themselves losing
lucrative advertising revenue and
scrambling for new sponsors.
COU spokesperson William
Sayers said the recommendation
resulted from the findings of a
special committee on athletics.
"It came to their attention that
the volume of sponsorships and the
dollars involved were
considerable," he said.
Some universities had abandoned
brewery sponsorship long before
the COU recommendation.
In 1982, the athletics department
of McMaster University in
Hamilton established a policy of
refusing sponsorship from companies promoting beer, wine or
tobacco.
"We feel that in our academic
programs we're promoting
knowledge of the effects of tobacco
and alcohol on healthy lifestyles,"
said Mary Keyes, McMaster's director of athletics, "and to be promoting that through advertising is
not very consistent."
She said the total sponsorship
package from breweries was worth
only $15,000, so a large financial
loss was not involved.
University of Toronto director of
athletics Gib Chapman said the
Labatt Brewing Company Ltd. has
been heavily funding U of T sports.
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Banning this sponsorship would
result in a huge loss of advertising
revenue, he said.
Chapman said the McMaster administration made it easier by reimbursing the athletics department
with the money it lost by initiating
the policy.
Toronto's Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute two years ago adopted a
similar policy by restricting advertisements from beer companies.
"We have gone away from that
because we didn't want to have a
reliance on sponsorship from the
beer companies," said Chuck Matthews, Ryerson assistant athletics
director. "If they pulled out we'd
be stuck, so we basically have gone
on our own and tried to stay with
the policy."
Rather than refusing brewery
sponsorship, U of T has tried to ensure that beer company promotions
are "tasteful" and don't involve
lifestyle advertising, said Eric
McKee, U of T assistant vice-
president for student affairs.
The breweries admit they are
quite active on campuses.
"You name a sporting event on
campus and we're involved," said
Bruce Pierce, a sales representative
of Carling O'Keefe. "A good deal
of beer drinking goes on on campus, and naturally the breweries are
going to try to ensure that their
brands are represented."
Pierce said breweries are not trying to recruit non-drinkers, but instead are attracting beer drinkers to
support a specific brand.
He said if universities decided not
to allow brewery sponsorship, Carling would re-evaluate its promotional activities.
Carling offers student awards, including scholarships and bursaries,
at every Ontario university and college.
Community Sports
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 2, 1986
Hoopsters ranked fourth in nation
By CHEW WONG
With two victories and a loss last
weekend at the University of Alber-.
ta basketball tournament in Edmonton, the UBC men's basketball
team upped their record to 10 and
three, good enough for a fourth
place ranking in this week's CIAU
top-ten poll.
The top-ten appearance is the
first for a UBC men's basketball
team since the great teams of
former head coach Peter Mullins in
the mid-1970's.
"Personally, I think we're over-
ranked right now," said head coach
Bruce Enns. "But we'll take it — it
feels good."
On Saturday the 'Birds dug
themselves out of a 10 point hole to
down the University of Manitoba
85-78.
Paul Johansson, who also received a tournament all-star award, led
the UBC scoring assault with 30
points.
Enns said that coming back from
the ten-point deficit took a real
team effort.
On Friday UBC cruised past
Bishop's University 93-81.
Johansson paced the 'Birds with
26   points,   while   highly   touted
THE ZETA BETA Tau boys, resplendent in old sheets, celebrated UBC's Vanier Cup win with a float in Saturday's
Grey Cup parade.
Women jammed in second place
By LOUISE PANZ1ERA
A win over Lethbridge and a loss
to Calgary last weekend put the
UBC women's volleyball team in second place in Canada West standings, tied with Calgary.
Both teams are sandwiched in
between UVic, which owns top
spot, and the University of
Manitoba in third place.
UBC came up against Calgary
first and lost the match in four
games, 17-19, 15-2, 15-10 and
15-10.
Rhonda Sampson had fifteen
kills in the match for UBC followed
by teammate Heather Olafsson with
twelve. Sheila Jones, Christiane
Martin and Vikki Lalari each had
ten kills, while Trina Hewlett contributed eight.
Heather Olafsson had a strong
defensive performance with fourteen blocks, and Sheila Jones also
contributed with a total of 10
blocks in the match.
Despite the high numbers in
blocks and kills, UBC gave up their
chance of taking sole possession of
second place with the loss.
UBC    had    little    trouble    in
defeating Lethbridge and
dominated each game in the match
to win 15-5, 15-7 and 15-8.
Rhonda Sampson with twelve
digs and nine kills, received her
third player of the game award this
season.
UBC  finished  its  Canada  West
schedule for this year with a record
of three and two, the losses coming
at the hands of Victoria and
Calgary.
The Thunderbirds will continue
their season in the new year with the
UBC Thundervolley Tournament,
January 16 and 17.
Men killed by Dinosaurs
The Thunderbird men's
volleyball team failed badly this
weekend in their attempt to clinch
second place in Canada West competition, losing convincingly to the
University of Calgary on Friday
night.
"We got killed," 'Birds,coach
Dale Ohman said.
Playing in Calgary, the 'Birds lost
in three straight games by scores of
6-15, 2-15, and 7-15.
UBC had been preparing for this
match-up for the last few weeks,
and the team did not perform
anywhere near their potential at any
point in the match.
"It's hard to tell how good they
(Dinos) are," Ohman said. "We
didn't give them any test at all."
On Saturday night, the 'Birds
played the University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns, a traditionally weak
team in Canada West, and took the
match three games to one.
The easy contest enabled the
'Birds to give all players some floor
time.
Power hitter Brian Snelling came
off the bench to blast down 27 kills,
while five-year veteran Walter
Janzen smashed in 24 of his own.
The weekend's action leaves the
'Birds in the number three position
in Canada West with a 3-2 record.
Grand old gymnasium hosts hoop classic
The hardwood floor at old War
Memorial Gym will come alive this
weekend with the squeaking of rubber soles and the thunderous echo
of bouncing balls as UBC plays host
to the Thunderbird Invitational
Basketball Tournament.
This year's tournament is really
two tournaments: an eight team
senior high school boys draw, and a
four team men's varsity match-up.
The eight highly ranked high
school teams: number one ranked
Vancouver College, number five
Lord Byng, number six Menionite
Educational Institute, number
seven Killarney, number 10
Westsyde, and the highly regarded
Steveston and Windsor high schools
will begin tournament play on
Thursday and conclude with the
championship game Saturday
night.
The province's best high si   ool
prep players will be on display at
this annual tourney. Look for
giants Paul Chaffee (6'7", MEI),
Chris Frye (6'4", Lord Byng), and
Cam Aronetz (6'9", Centennial) to
dominate play.
Men's university action will begin
Friday night with the Thunderbirds,
ranked fourth in the nation, playing
Sir Wilfred Laurier University and
Northwest Christian College taking
on third ranked University of Winnipeg. The men's final will also take
place Saturday evening.
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freshman guard J. D. Jackson
started easing himself into the
system, adding 17 points.
UBC's only loss was to the
University of Regina 71-67 in the
Thursday afternoon opener.
Paul Johansson once again led
the 'Birds with 24 points in a losing
effort.
UBC played even with Regina
and shot a respectable 50 per cent
field goal percentage in the first
half, but in the second half the
'Birds shooting plummeted to a
chilly 30 per cent.
Enns said the loss could be attributed to poor second half
shooting and sending Regina to the
free-throw line 39 times.
Despite the opening game loss to
Regina, Enns said he was pleased
with the team's overall performance
and thought it had made some progress.
"A few of the guys who were
struggling earlier in the season
(Gord Matson, John Carlson, J. D.
Jackson) came out at this tournament."
CIAU MEN'S BASKETBALL RANKINGS
1. UVic 6.    Toronto
2. Western Ontario 7.    McMaster
3. Winnipeg 8.    Concordia
4. UBC 9.    Brandon
5. Alberta 10.    Calgary
Jocks chauvinistic
MONTREAL (CUP) — Moves
to give women's varsity sports a
higher profile at Concordia University have been short-circuited by the
university's athletics department,
critics charge.
A university committee passed a
motion last spring establishing a
three-tiered directorship of the
department, including a director of
women's varsity athletics.
However, a five-director structure still exists, and critics say the
intent of last years's restructuring
has been ignored.
"We're concerned," said Susan
Hunt, a student representative on
the committee that restructured the
department.
"The idea was to have three
associate directors, one of which
would be a woman. It's a shot in the
foot now that she is one of five,"
she said.
But athletics director Ed Enos
said the women's program is not
suffering, even though there are
more men made directors and in
spite of a lengthy history of funding
inequity. Concordia athletics have
long been overwhelmingly male-
dominated, with the men's varsity
sports teams claiming 80 per cent of
the total budget.
"We did not just hire a token
woman," said Enos. "We took the
top person in Kathy McDonald.
"I had to take out a man with 17
years experience to put in
McDonald," said Enos. "I had to
put him in the basement."
Enos said because two associate
directors of men's athletics split the
work of a full-time associate director, they count as one and therefore
do not have more power than the
women's director.
"McDonald is really privileged,"
said Enos. "She only has to work in
administration. She doesn't have to
worry about tomorrow's game with
McGill. My men have to coach full-
time as well as work in administration."
But student council co-president
Scott White disagrees.
"It obviously puts the women in
a disadvantageous position," he
said.
In a letter to the university vice-
rector, White said the current situation was a clear step in the wrong
direction.
"You get the overall impression
that whatever was done last year
doesn't amount to much," said
White.
Elizabeth Morey of the Concordia Status of Women committee
said the athletics department could
use more improvements. "There
are still a lot of changes that can be
made in attitude," said Morey.
McDonald, who was hired in
August to oversee the women's varsity program, doesn't feel her appointment will be neutralized by
having two men's associate directors.
"As long as two men don't have
more power than me alone, as long
as that intent remains, I will be happy," she said.
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