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The Ubyssey Mar 5, 1963

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Full Text

 Birds,
are your
bills
THE UBYSSEY
in
arrears?
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 5,  1963
No. 60
Bird
s pluc
k
puc
tit
&%
%&
<$>
Mid-term break
on deans agenda
A mid-term break may be
coming.
A committee of deans has
put the subject on the agenda
of its next meeting.
The break was requested in
a letter to the senate by Science president, Don Farish.
Oomph?
Who cares
about oomph?
TORONTO (CUP) —Ryerson
girls are divided on the question
of the merits of Ryerson boys.
. The student paper, The Ryersonian, surveyed Ryerson girls
asking, "Do Ryerson boys' kisses
lack oomph," after Ubyssey reporter Lorraine Shore, claimed
UBC males were shy and their
kisses oomphless.
GOOD tTeME 77;
"I know thsii some are pretty
good at it—and some are really
terrific," said one girl, "I had a
good time with all of them."
Another girl said: "Westerners may lack oomph, but the
Easterners sure have it."
"The one I'm going around
with doesn't lack a thing," said
one sweet young thing. "But on
the whole, Ryerson boys are egotistical. They think they're doing females a service."
REAL HONEYS
"Boys in arts are real honeys
■—hut tech boys are real bores.
They're so wrapped up in their
work that they pay no attention
— and if they do, they only
whistle."
"I think they have to be half
stoned," says another young
thing.
Still another said that she
found Rye males were too young
:to make a job of it.
"But it's not their fault," she
added, "we should have been
here five years ago."
But I wish I washnt
^uiiuw(#.tiwiuii»w.t«iM"<iniii'i'r<'r"''',|'i'ir'1'1 '""»"' '."' ' :"'" "i""""""»h'""""';"""""'""i""""",;iy" '■'""«"«
•^7
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l
Capture first trip
to national final
It took two years of Father David Bauer's coaching and a
handful of imports to bring the UBC Thunderbirds from a
nothing club to the winners  of the Western  Intercollegiate
hockey championships. ®—	
Friday night  before  800 fans
the Birds wrapped up the league
—Lfiyn  Hume photo
He just went- for a spin
championship with a 3-1 victory
over the University of Manitoba
Bisons.
The win pushed the Birds
ahead of the University of Sask-
achewan Huskies and gave them
the right to represent the west
at the national collegiate finals
in Kingston, Ont., March 16 - 17.
JUST A WARMUP
The Friday night game must
have been just a warming up, because Saturday UBC left the Bisons behind 8-1.
i The teams had played sloppy
I hockey until the third period
I when the Birds set up a seige
j around the Manitoba net and
scored six goals.
Bird goals were scored by
Ralph Lortie (2), Pete Kelly,
Cliff Russell, Gary Unsworth,
Mike Smith, Mickey McDowell,
and Bob Parker.
Calmed after a second period
row with referee Gordie Hogue,
Manitoba coach Bill Robinson
had nothing but praise for the
UBC team.
"They are the best defensive
team in collegiate hockey," he
said.
DISPUTE
Midway through the- second
period, Hogue fingered star center Gerry Wilson off the Manitoba bench and over to the penalty box, Robinson protested
bitterly, saying he had the right
to name the player to serve the
j bench penalty.
I Hogue disagreed and expelled
' Wilson from the game. Wilson
| left quietly, while Hogue and
Robinson argued it out.
| . Friday night, McDowell pick-
ied up two goals and Stu Gibbs
the - other.     .
Hey, look ma, I'm a laundronaut!
By GREYDON MOORE
I was a laundronaut for The
Ubyssey.
Clad in football helmet I revolved 25 times1 in an automatic clothes dryer to set an
all-Canadian record.
And I lived to tell the tale.
It's fun to become.a laundronaut, my editor told me before
I became one.
He waved a newspaper clipping in front of me..
"See?" he said. "See? If
two California students can do
it so can you." The California
students had revolved 2,000
times each. ■   ■    -
I had to do it. Canadian pride,
and all that.
Clothes dryers, most of them,
I've been told, have a weight
capacity of 52 pounds of wet
wash. They are expensive
machines and have managers
to watch over them.
I am 160 pounds and the
manager didn't like the idea.
"Canadian pride is at stake,"
I told him and he agreed,. finally and dubiously, to look
the other way.
•    •    •
Bravely I donned the helmet,
.Photographer Ipon. Hume,
grabbed a few pictures of me
waving as I climbed into- the
dryer, a few pictures of me inside the dryer and a few pictures of me climbing out .of the -
.dryer, No . point in leaving
these things to chance.
Then we tested for safety
gear.
The California dryers had a
button you could push to stop
the thing. Ours didn't.
There was no danger of suffocating because the dryer
spun just as fast when the
door was opened. We turned
off the heat.
Then all was ready.
I squeezed . in, . found t h e
center of gravity and with my
legs crossed, braced myself
against the drum.
Hume put a dime in the slot
and laughed as he pushed the
starter.
- It started slowly but they
have a pretty powerful engine
in those things. Soon I was
whizzing around at a stomach-
turning pace.
After 25 turns I'd had it.
Enough, I hollered. Hume,
a chubby sort, threw his full
weight against the drum and
it wheezed to a stop.
It needed Hume and reporter
Gerry Hivon to pull me out.
And Hume ana Hivon had to
help me out to the car. I was
groggy. ■ ' ,.. ^ ^i 7
-   •  • ..•: ,-_■.:
I was groggy in the car,
groggy when I got out of the
car at The Ubyssey office and
I'm still groggy as I write the
story.
- My conclusion is this: If
Canadian pride depends on
revolving in a clothes dryer,
we should become the 51st
state.
TREASURER Malcolm Scott
says that council will not
pursue a lawsuit against a
Vancouver novelty firm for
using AMS name on discount
cards.
Two girls
seek AWS
presidency
Students vote Wednesday in
third slate elections.
There is only one contest —
for president of Associated Women Students.
Candidates are Brenda Buller
and Carole Fielder.
Two other third slate positions
— presidents of Men's and
Women's Athletic Association —
went   by   acclamation.
No nominations have been received for the fourth position —
president of the University
Clubs committee.
In faculty elections, Gus Shur-
vell was elected Grad student
president.
Stew Millward was elected
vice president and Judy Blake-
ston and Sam Sydneysmith secretary and treasurer respectively.
Thirty-seven per cent of grad
students turned out to vote.
The nurses' executive elected
at the annual general meeting of
Nursing Undergrad Society  is:
Nancy. Symnes, president;
Jane Muskett, first vice-president; Susan Haywood-Farmer,
.secretary; and Judy Griffiths,
treasurer.
AMS AND
RED TAPE
See- Page 2 Page  2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 196
EDITORIALS
There's still hope for the AMS...
There may be hope for student government
yet.
If changes proposed by president-elect
Malcolm Scott can be implemented, the Alma
Mater Society may prove to be something
more than a bureaucracy.
Last week, The Ubyssey noted in this space
that councillors spend most of their time performing janitorial or  service  functions.
We also pointed out that the councillors
spend much time in mutual admiration.
The rest of the time, we said, is spent in
performing tasks that could be more efficiently done by paid staff.
The student council spends most of its
time (90 per cent, says Scott) dealing with
absolute trivia.
It argues about spending $10 for blinds for
a room in the Brock, for instance, and at the
same meeting passes expenditures of hundreds
of thousands of dollars with little question.
Between meetings, the members of the
executive spend most of their time doing administrative work.
The undergraduate society presidents forget all about student council, by and large,
and work on the programs of their own societies.
This is obviously far from ideal.
The Alma Mater Society Constitution includes these under functions of the society:
• To advance the cause of higher learning in British Columbia;
• To promote harmony and unity among
the students.
The first clause means that officials should
be backing the Macdonald Report to the hilt.
It means they should be working with the administration to press for implementation of the
report.
This area has not been entirely neglected,
as we shall see, but much more could be done.
It is the seond proposition that has been
almost completely overlooked.
What it means is that the student government should be attempting to represent the
students as a labor union would a group of
workers.
It should be organizing the students to
fight for improvments in their lot.
The council should be fighting to have
smaller classes and better qualified instructors in first 'year.
It should guard against fee increases and
attempt to get a better registration procedure.
It should, but it isn'.t
..... if Scott can get his way
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy, 1961 and 1962.
Winner of the Bracken Trophy, 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star Trophy, 1962
Authorized as second class mail by the Pest Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Uhyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3242,
Locals:   Editor—25;   News—23;   Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief:  Keith Bradbury
Managing Editor  Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor Mike Hunter
City Editor _-_. M. G. Valpy
Picture Editor    Don Hume
Layout Editor   Bob  McDonald
Sports Editor  Ron Kydd
CUP Editor  _ Maureen Covell
Editorial Assistant .._ Joyce Holding
Critics Editor William Littler
Layout: Dave Ablett
Can't think of anyone else, Valyp.
REPORTERS and DESK: Lorraine Shore, Ann Burge, Graeme
Matheson, Greydon Moore, Heather Virtue, Ron Riter.
Can't think of anyone else. Valyp.
SPORTS: Donna Morris, Glenn Schultz, Danny Stoffman.
Can't think of anyone else. Valyp.
TECHNICAL: Clint Pulley. Still can't think of anyone else,
Valyp. f\
Scott,, however, is quick to point out that
the student . government is performing some
of its duties adequately.
He says students are working with the
Nationals Employment -Service and the Ped-
sonnel Office to get a better summer job deal
for  students.
He points out that the student brief to the
provincial government was successful last
year in getting the sales tax removed from
text books.
This year, students presented a blunt brief
asserting, with figures, that UBC is getting far
less money than it should be.
The treasurer-cum-president asserts that
the winter sports arena would not have been
built if students hadn't taken the initiative.
He points to Academic Symposium, Frosh
Symposium, High School Conference, Frosh
Orientation and other similar committees as
examples of worthwhile student government
activity.
Scott admits, however, that only a small
percentage of students working in student
government are really involved in worthwhile activities.
And he admits that there is much that
should be done that is now ignored.
The president-elect does, however, have
plans.
He wants to set up an "ombudsman" or
grievance official, with a budget and staff, to
investigate and attempt to rectify injustices
by students at the hands of student or university officials.
He wants to extend the work of the student housing committee which this year started to look into student housing problems.
He wants to encourage the council to deal
with the important problems of the student
body and he wants to set up a secretariat to
investigate problems for the council to aid
them in making sound decisions.
He wants to stress the co-ordinating function of the council and to cut down upon futile committee work.
Scott's desire is to have each committee
evaluate its work in terms of importance and
to either justify it or disband.
It is always difficult to prune the bureaucratic tree. If it can be done, however, students
may find that they have more than a service
organization sitting in Brock Hall.
There may be hope for student government yet.
On fetters
Whereas letters to the
Editor-in-chief of The Ubyssey should be typewritten
and contain no more than
200 words;
Let It Be Known That:
Full and just consideration
must be given this "On Letters" by all those who in
future see fit to air their indignations via The Ubyssey,
student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia.
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.
MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We   specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
Letters to the editor
Encouragement
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In a Ubyssey news story it
was reported that Miss Roberta
Watt constructed a collage as a
means of criticizing the works
of Bobbie Creeley which were,
at that time, on exhibit at the
Fine Arts Gallery. (By the
way, "Bobbie" Creeley is a
woman. "Robert" Creeley, the
poet, is someone else.)
I want to thank Miss Watt for
any act of creativity, regardless of its motivation. Although
Miss Watt's intention was to
hurt, to ridicule out of existence, yet she succeeded unconsciously in revealing a certain sensitivity to form, color
and composition.
And what a pity it would be
if she continued to squander
her potential talent on such
adolescent and futile gestures.
Certainly, her collage was
amateurish, and indicated a
total lack of artistic experience.
But I want to urge her to continue her work in this direction; for there may well be the
kernel of an artist here.
We, in the arts, should consider it our responsibility to
throw  a mantle   of protection
over the creative spark, where-
and whenever it appears; and
we should not attempt, as so
many people would, to ruthlessly crush any threat of originality.
Miss Watt, you may count on
my support.
Yours truly,
ALVIN L. BALKIND
Assistant Curator
Focus  on  Jesus  The  Christ
attend
Every Night:  10-10:20
LENTEN
VESPERS
LUTHERAN   STUDENT
CENTRE
4608 W. 10th Avenue
(1  blk. E. of gates)
Going to EUROPE
kcOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER
Save $200 — travel on a
[Leave May 7—Return Sept. 7|
GROUP FLIGHT
^Meeting of all interested]
[Wed., ???? ? Noon in Buzzoj
lor phone Barry Patmorej
LAM 1-5770.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Reply
Editor
The  Ubyssey,
Dear   Sir:
Leigh Hirst's letter to The
Ubyssey failed dismally to
establish the true reasons for
Jim Ward's electoral success.
Basically, the reason for
Ward's success was that he
conducted an effective campaign whereas Coleman sat
quietly, secure in the dream
that Brocksters would elect
him. Coleman did not campaign before classroom audiences, to residence dining-
halls, or in C-lot one afternoon,
as Ward did.
Jim Ward's campaigning
was responsible for the record
vote, which in turn was responsible  for his victory.
Yours  truly,
GEOFFREY FOSTER
Arts II.
\\
to  see  Vancouver Opera  Association's
FAUST
n
Opening Night - This Thursday, March 7th and
Saturday, March 9, Tuesday, March 12,
Thursday, March  14 and Saturday, March  16.
THE QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
ONLY IF THERE ARE UNSOLD SEATS
on  each   performance   night  after   7:45   available tickets
will be sold at The Queen  Elizabeth  Box Office
at $1.00 each
regardless of  location
TO BONA FiDE UBC STUDENTS
On presentation of official student card for identification
FIRST COME- FIRST SERVED - NO CHOICE OF SEATS
ONLY ONE TICKET PER STUDENT
Alltickets issued at the discreteion of fhe V.O.A.
and  not before 7:45  p.m. on any  night
REGULAR TICKET SALE - DAILY - EATONS BOX OFFICE - TEL   684-4464
IF YOU WANT TO BE SURE OF A TICKET Tuesday, March 5, 1963
garner
crown
An uninspired UBC Thunderbirds team travelled to Saskatoon over the weekend and came home with the Western
Intercollegiate basketball title.
Birds have won 12 out of 16
league games, edging out Calgary Dinosaurs whose twelfth
victory was forfeited to Edmonton.
Huskies greeted UBC with a
49-47 upset victory Friday night.
It was the first time the Saskatchewan team had beaten
Birds. "Everything was off,"
stormed coach Peter Mullins.
"We went into the game complacent and they taught us a
lesson."
HUSKIES HANG ON
Saskatchewan jumped to a
22-5 lead in the first half. Birds
woke up in the second half,
shooting for a 50 percent average, but Huskies survived a brilliant finish.
Center-forward John Cook
with 15 points and Keith Hartley
with 10, led UBC scorers.
Birds came back with a 50-37
victory Saturday. "Our shooting
was off again." said Mullins,
"but our defensive game made
up for it." Cook and Hartley
again led the point-getters with
15 apiece.
WESTERN REPS
This is the fourth straight
reason Birds have won the West-
arn title. UBC will represent the
conference in the first national
:ollegiate meet to take place
March 15-16 at Windsor.
The team won't know their
aastern opponents until sometime next week.
This weekend Mullin's squad
goes to Alaska for a three-game
exhibition series at Fairbanks.
Birds will meet St. Martin's College, University of Alaska, and
a military all-star team.
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
KEITH   HARTLEY
.  .  .  high  scorer
SPORTS
SHORTS
IN SAILING: The combined
men's and women's Thunderbird sailing team shut out the
University of Washington to win
the Northwest Intercollegiate
championships over the weekend. Final score was 152 to 148.
The victory makes UBC eligible for entry into the North
American championships to be
held during the summer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.
* *     *
IN    GRASS   HOCKEY:     The
UBC squad downed Vancouver
3-1 Saturday. The win, which is
UBC's sixth straight, put them
into the league semi-finals.
Goals were' scored by Joost
Wolsak, Nelson Forward and
Tom Groeneveld.
* *     *
IN SQUASH: The UBC Var-
. sity team defeated Victoria College 3-2.
Signatures will be taken Wed
nesday until 1 p.m. in BE 155
for entrants in the UBC Squash
championships.
There will also be a demonstration, Thursday noon, by the
"A"  players.
* *     *
IN WEIGHTLIFTING: There
will be an important meeting
Wednesday at noon in Room 214
of War Memorial Gym for all
those competing in the B.C.
championships   March  9.
WAA sponsors
basketball tourney
Twelve girls' teams from seven zones across B.C. are entered in the B.C. High School Basketball Tournament March 7, 8
and 9.
The tournament, sponsored by
UBC's Women's Athletic Association, includes teams from Vancouver, West Kootenay, East
Kootenay, Okanagan, North Central B.C., the Fraser Valley, and
Vancouver   Island.
Top contender from Vancouver is John Oliver.
Qualicum Beach, Stanley
Humphries, Salmon Arm, Selkirk and Prince George high
schools are the other winners
of their zones.
PADDY SLOAN
.   .   .   scores  penalty
Rugby Birds
blank Western
The UBC Thunderbirds won
6-0 over a determined Western
Washington XV in Bellingham
last weekend.
UBC took a 3-0 half time lead
on Dave Howie's try. In the second half Birds padded their lead
when Paddy Sloan scored on a
penalty kick.
Coach Albert Laithwaite's
boys held a wide edge in play.
Western never got in the UBC
end of the field in the second
half.
Birds are tentatively scheduled to play Trojans this weekend at UBC stadium.
Birds trhd Wsfsdn
soccer victory
Bv DANNY STOFFMAN
For most UBC Thunderbirds, Saturday's 3-1 soccer victory
over Royal Oaks was just another game but for Keith Watson
it was an historic occasion.      , ■■
MAA positions
ofcenfbr applicants
\vaison, me team captain,
scored his first goal in three
years with the UBC club. The
rugged team play of left halfback Watson has been a major
source of inspiration to the
Birds during their undefeated
season. As coach Joe Johnson
put- it: "He deserved this goal."
High-scoring John Haar added Birds' other two goals. Haar
now has 13 for the season.
STIFF COMPETITION
The game, at Killarney Park,
was no easy victory for the UBC
squad. Royal Oaks, with strong
defensive play, provided stiff
competition.
As well, two players, inside
forwards Ron Cross and Bob
Johnson, were injured. Cross' |
injury did not prove serious.
Johnson, however, will be out
two weeks with a pulled leg
muscle.
CUP COMPETITION
Birds, who have clinched the
Mainland League first division
title, next week begin the Province Cup, a knockout series involving all Lower Mainland
leagues. The team meets Williams in the first round Sunday
at Hillcrest Park.
Applications for three executive positions on Men's
Athletic Association are now
being received.
One position will be recommended to sit on the Men's
Athletic Committee.
Duties will involve athletic
policy, promotion, and admin,
istrative work.
All male members are eligible and should apply to Mr.
Bus Phillips, Athletic Director.
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Station
CA 4-7644
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
UBC drops
three titles
Three WCIAA titles were on
the line last weekend and the
defending-champion Birds lost
all three of them.
The curling team lost five
straight games to take sixth and
last position. Saskatchewan won
the championship.
The fencers slipped to third
spot behind Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The badminton team also
came in third. Saskatchewan
won the championship with
Alberta taking second spot.
Last year the Birds took most
of the events  easily.
EYEGLASSES
includi
UP
Complefel
es Frame of Tour Ch
and Single Vision, Prescription
_,        lenses.
Bifocals  Additional.
*M   EYE   DOCTORS?
™"~ — " oevxanl
OPTOMETRISTS
I EYEGLASS
PRESCRIPTIONS
FILLED
GRANVILLE
OPTICAL   ITD.
MU  3-8921
861 Granville, Vancouver
"'Repairs While You Wait"
EYE EXAMINATIONS
du MAURIER
A      Product      of      Peter      Jackson      Tobacco      Company      Limited Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1963
'tween classes
Festival winner
in noon show
PROFESSOR S. A. Jennings,
one of four co-authors of the
Macdonald Report, will be a
panelist at higher education
conference in Kelowna Saturday.
Professor
faces deep
problem
UBC has nearly a ton of seaweed.
It is unique.
It is probably the largest collection in the world of Indian
Ocean seaweed.
'  Researchers here are going to
see if people can eat it.
The seaweed was collected by
oceanography professor Dr. Robert Scagel during a four-month,
500,000 mile trip.
He said researchers will conduct investigation to determine
whether the seaweed is suitable!
food for people in under-developed countries.
Dr. Scagel said many scientists have claimed seaweed is
edible.
But he doubts it.
"Seaweed is low in protein
and many varieties contain carbohydrates which men cannot
digest," he said.
However, he said, it may have
importance as a food source and
breeding ground for other forms
of marine life.
Dr. Scagel said Indian Ocean
seaweed has not been studied
before because countries surrounding the ocean are too poor
to be able to finance expeditions.
The UBC trip was sponsored
by UNESCO and will continue
for a number of years.
Vancouver Film Festival's
Great Ships" will be shown at
Admission   to   the   Industrial j
Management  Society - sponsored
film is 10 cents.
* '*       *
SCM
Dr.  Donald  Soper speaks  on
"God in the Industrial Society,"
noon Wednesday, Bu. 100.
*' -    *       *
PRE MED SOC
Film: "Gastro-intestinal Cancer," noon Wednesday, Wes. 100.
Members only.
* *       *
NEWMAN  CENTER
Annual banquet supper, Thursday, 6 p.m. 75 cents. Everyone
welcome.
* *      *
CHORAL SOC
General elections meeting for
next year's executive, noon
Wednesday, Bu. 212.
* *       *
PRE ARCHITECTURE
Henry Elder, director, speaks
and answers questions on t h e
new program, noon Wednesday,
Lassere 104.
* *       *
UN CLUB
Election of new executive,
policy and program for next
year; all members and those
wishing to join for next year,
noon today, Bu. 100.
* *       *
wus
Applications for scholarships
to Spain, Chile, Japan, due Wednesday, IH.
* *       *
CAMERA CLUB
Color slides from the Ben Hill
Toute Memorial Photographic
Salon will be shown, noon today,
Bu. 203. All interested welcome.
* *  *
BURNABY SOUTH
HOMECOMING
Homecoming, Friday, Mar. 8.
Basketball game 7 p.m. Skits
featuring events of last five
years start at 8 p.m. All Burnaby
South grads welcome.
* *       *
UBC LIBERALS
General elections meeting,
noon today, Bu. 102. All members please attend.
Brain trust ditched
in favor of PR men
Liberal   leader Lester
Don't be chicken
all you eggheads
Wanted: eggheads.
Nigel Chippindale, chairman of the academic symposium committee, wants them
to help plan next year's symposium.
Applicants should have
attendfed symposium in the
past and be returning next
year. Apply by March 15 to
box 1, AMS office.
Paper ducks censure ^
TORONTO (CUP)—A motion
of censure against the Ryerson
student paper, The Ryersonian,
has been defeated at student
council. Charges were levelled-
after the paper published "suggestions" as to who students
should vote'for in Ryerson student elections.
Pearson has dumped his brain
"""< trust.
He's replaced it with public
, relations men, says the national
deputy leader of the New Democratic Party, David Lewis.
"It is significant that Mr.
Pearson has no use for his
"brain trusters" now that the
campaign has actually started,"
Lewis told a UBC audience.
"His campaign entourage now
is made up of only public relations people who tell him what
will sell.' "
He accused Prime Minister
Diefenbaker of turning his campaign over to publicists also.
Lewis said the major crisis
in Canadian government and
politics is a lack of integrity and
leadership.
"And I'm not referring to the
type of lurid headlines on B^C.
politics I-see here now (regarding accusations against the Socred government)," Lewis said.
About 250 students attended
the meeting.
first prize film, "Seaward the
noon Wednesday in Bu. 104.
Cheering section
Cheerleaders are wanted for
next year.
Those interested in trying out
should appear at the Education
Gym today, Wednesday or
Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
UBC gets $250,000 grant
for blood vessel research
UBC will investigate the cause and treatment of diseases
of the blood vessels.
The P. A. Woodward Foundation has given UBC $250,000
for establishment of two professorships for the study.
They will not duplicate work on the heart now proceeding
in other research centers. One professor will concentrate on
the approach at the basic science level, the other at the clinical
level.
U
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