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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1986

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UBC Archive; ^ io|
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 37
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, February 13,1986
228-2301
"Excellence" to
Kl
t $110 million
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
British Columbia's provincial
government will sink at least $110
million a year into an "excellence in
education" fund over the next three
years, premier Bill Bennett announced Tuesday.
Most of the money will be used
for "special initiatives" rather than
regular educational costs, according
to a press release issued from the
premier's office.
Specific areas in which special in
itiatives will be encouraged include:
retraining programmes for laid-off
workers, entrepreneurialship training in colleges and university "centres of excellence" to focus on such
areas as Pacific Rim studies, biotechnology, computer systems, and
forestry research, Bennett said.
Although Bennett emphasised
government will talk to students
and educators at all levels to determine local needs, he said all decisions on allocations will be made by
cabinet based on merit.
But the fund is an election gimmick which will further centralise
power in Victoria and it does not
address chronic depletion of
operating budgets, educators and
students charged.
"The main thrust should not be a
special allocation of funds, but
rather, the implementation of a
long-term planning strategy," said
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation
of Students Pacific chair.
Daniel Birch, UBC vice president
academic,  said  he is pleased  the
government wants to recognise excellence but if the university's
operating budget is not enhanced
the additional funds won't mean
much.
"No one will come to a centre of
excellence in a mediocre
university," said Birch.
Bennett's announcement did not
specify how much of the money will
go to operating budgets, nor did he
say how much will be allocated in
the years following 85/86.
The   $110   million   represents
about five per cent of the $2.1
billion total spent on education in
B.C. last year. 1; amounts to about
one third of the cuts to post secondary education made in the past
three years.
"The amount is trivial considering the cuts in the last three years in
operating budgets in the whole
education system have been $330
million, and we're not even considering inflat on," said John
Waters,  president  of the  College
See page 23: "THREATS"
CAIRN PAINTED PINK Tuesday morning. Vandals also added words "WE ARE EVERYWHERE" to base. See
story page 5, "Engineers".
Gays and lesbians hold conference
By SARAH MILLIN
Students are the main focus of
workshops at the third annual B.C.
gay and lesbian conference being
held at UBC this weekend.
"The workshops in the student
track at the conference came out of
a desperate need for students to
learn new skills and relate their experiences in organizing lesbian and
gay groups on campus," said
Damaris Sargent, co-chair of the
provincial gay conference and UBC
student.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC have
jointly organized the last two provincial conferences with the Vancouver Gay and Lesbian Community Centre.  Ken Anderlini, former
president of GLUBC, helped with
the last two conferences.
"In past years there was only one
workshop dealing with youth and
students," Anderlini said.
"But last year after working on
the organizing committee and taking part in the conference I went
away feeling that if you hadn't been
involved in the gay community for
the past ten years, nobody really
wanted to hear what you had to
say."
"This year we made sure that
youth and students would have a
voice. The result: a student track,"
he said.
Six workshops will deal with
building membership,  gay youth,
lesbian/gay issues in student
newspapers, men and women working together, providing services and
building a coalition, said co-chair
Sargent.
"We are really excited about this
track because we think that a
chance for lesbian and gay students
See page 2: "STUDENT"
McGeer graduates,
Fraser enrols
By DEBBIE LO
Wednesday's Social Credit government cabinet shuffle produced a new
and relatively "unknown" universities minister for B.C.
Russel Fraser, a former UBC engineering undergraduate society president representing Vancouver South, replaces Pat McGeer, a UBC professor first appointed to the position in 1976.
"The UBC community probably won't miss McGeer as minister of
universities," said faculty association president Sidney Mindess.
Mindess said McGeer developed a "confrontational' style when dealing
with the universities.
"In his public statements over the years he has attacked tenure ... his
public statements have not been very helpful," he said. He blames McGeer
for a "lack of morale" among faculty.
He said the job of the post-secondary education minister is to give
"overall direction" to the way universities and colleges should develop,
and added the minister should fight for universities in cabinet.
John Waters, president of the college-institute educators' association of
B.C. is not pleased with the new ministry creation.
"Colleges are community based institutions," he said. "Our problems
will be lumped into a large system where universities have a much higher
profile and prestige."
He suggested an education ministry should have been created which
would have been consistent with the premier's earlier statement giving
education more money where education was treated as one department
with three divisions.
Fraser said as the new post-secondary education minister he will work for
the "betterment of students".
George Morfitt, universities council of B.C. chair who attended UBC the
same time Fraser did said he knows Fraser "quite well".
He said Fraser was very active during his university cays and added he is
"conscientious and forthright in doing a job."
Fraser will be responsible for B.C.'s 18 colleges as well as its three universities in a new post-secondary education ministry.
McGeer takes on the International trade portfolio in addition to his
former science and communications responsibilities.
Morfitt said combining the colleges with universities will give colleges a
prominent place.
He said the new system is the first step in creating a "cohesive" B.C.
educational system, where colleges will produce more graduates who will
pass smoothly into universities thus allowing universities to devote more
time and money to research and third and fourth y;ar specialized programs.
Although the two branches of post-secondary education will now be
See page 23: "CHANGE"
Union leaders oppose S.A. boycotts
OTTAWA (CUP) — Union
leaders, a brewery president, and
even some anti-apartheid activists
strongly oppose a boycott of Carling O'Keefe beer and Rothman's
Ryerson creates new course called Gender Diversity
TORONTO — (CUP) — Next
fall, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute will offer Canada's first
social work course on lesbian and
gay lifestyles.
John Hunter, a professor in the
social work faculty, says he decided
to offer the class when he realized
how many students were graduating
unable to deal with gay and lesbian
clients.
"Every social work caseload has
a certain percentage' of clients who
are gay, and many social workers
feel uncomfortable with that," said
Hunter. They end up either ignoring the issue completely or they
overemphasize sexuality and see it
as the source of the problem."
Hunter also wants to introduce
students to the gay community in
Toronto.
"It's a highly organized and
dynamic community that most students know very little about," he
said.
Hunter hopes to teach students
that many of the problems faced by
gays and lesbians are caused by
homophobic attitudes, not by the
lesbians' or gays' own sexuality.
Hunter is not unfamiliar with
homophobia; when the Jan. Toronto Star ran a column about the
classes, he received a batch of hate
mail.
The class, offered through the
social work faculty, will be called
Gender Diversity. An extension
class, also taught by Hunter, will be
called New Perspectives on Gay
and Lesbian reality. Keeping the
reference to gays and lesbians
specifically in at east one course title was an important issue for
Hunter.
cigarettes that is spreading across
Canadian university campuses.
Students on at least seven university campuses have voted to ban the
beer from their pubs and take the
cigarettes out of their vending
machines, in protest of the beer
company's ownership by a South
African conglomerate.
McGill University and University
of Prince Edward Island students
recently joined the boycott, also in
place at Carleton University in Ottawa, MacDonald College in
Quebec and the University of
Saskatchewan, University of
Toronto and University of Victoria.
Thirteen university newspapers
and one college newspaper also
boycott the products' advertisements.
A recent prospectus of
Rothman's International provided
by David Cohen, an investment
analyst for Wood Gundy in Toron
to, shows the Rupert Foundation
holds the controlling 44 per cent of
Rothman's shares. Carling O'Keefe
is listed as a Rothman's subsidiary.
The Rupert Foundation, the prospectus says, is "deemed to be controlled by Dr. Anthony E. Rupert."
The 1985-86 International Who's
Who lists Rupert as a "South
African business executive . . .
founder and chair, Rembrandt
Group of Companies (tobacco)."
Carling O'Keefe president
Donald Twiner played down the
South African connection. "This is
a widely held oublic corporation.
They bought the shares on a free
and open market in a democratic
society," said Twiner.
He protested the boycotts, saying
Carling O'Keefe is a Canadian company providing jobs for Canadians.
"This corporat on is governed by
the laws of Canada and pays over
See page 2: "UNION" :.*>.
Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
Boycott riles brewery
From page 1
$325 million in taxes here," Twiner
said.
"We buy over $1/2 billion in
packaging in Canada," he said.
"We probably employed 1500
students at our seven breweries over
the summer. So it is strange that
these actions would come back and
hurt our corporation."
Gordon Blanderleith, president
of the Canadian Brewery Workers
Union which represents most Carl
ing O'Keefe employees, is furious
about the boycott.
"It doesn't make any sense to cut
off jobs from Canadian workers,"
Blanderleith said. "This (beer) isn't
imported from South Africa.
"These were Canadian jobs before
someone from South Africa bought
into the company."
"Why doesn't someone smarten
up and worry about what's going
on here? " asked Blanderleith,
"Like with the Inuits, native Canadians, the poor and needy . . .?"
Scott Burke, president of the Student's Administrative Council at
the University of Toronto, defended his school's boycotts saying "It's
a statement of our displeasure and
awareness of the situation that exists in South Africa.
"I sympathize with them (the
brewery workers) because most of
the money stays in Canada. But a
lot of the profits go back to South
Africa. The money then goes to the
regime which has huge military expenditures," Burk said.
>
CO
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Q.
u
Student coalition lays tracks
r RE E      -^-studio
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
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From page 1
to meet and organize is long overdue," she said.
Samantha Brennan, Canadian
University Press national features
writer, said the only time gay and
lesbian students meet nationally is
at CUP conferences. Brennan will
be facilitating the workshop on
coverage of gay and lesbian issues in
the student press.
"Student newspapers aren't
blatantly homophobic," she said,
but added they are homophobic by
default because of their lack of lesbian/gay issues coverage.
"Rather than think about it,
they'd rather ignore it," she said.
UBC's gay and lesbian club president will be facilitating a western
regional coalition building
workshop.
"The nexus of it is for the purpose of establishing an informal
coalition of all gay student
organizations in the Canadian west
and American northwest," said
Sean Bickerton, president of
GLUBC.
Conference organizers have planned three other tracks for the conference.
"This year we were faced with a
unique situation in that there are
three major issues affecting lesbians
and gays nationally: AIDS, censorship and porgnography as it relates
to the new customs act and recent
seizures, and section 15 of the
Canadian Charter of Human
Rights," Sargent said.
"The organizing committee felt
that each of the issues were too important to be excluded from the
conference so we decided to include
them all," Sargent said.
"We're hoping that the active involvement of both women and
students in the organization of the
conference this year will draw in
other groups, such as Gay Asians of
Vancouver, who haven't previously
been involved." she said.
Sargent said bisexuality will be
discussed in workshops dealing with
safe sex for gay and bisexual men
and in those dealing with sexuality.
The conference is wheelchair-
accessible and interpreters for the
hearing impaired will be provided
on request, Sargent said.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
"Chuck, I've wanted your
since i first laid eyes or your basket,"
Jon said, his mouth stili at a nipple his
tongue was keeping stiff and hard.
"No more than I wanted to get intoP
you." was my response as my mouth E
covered his again while my fingers I
continued probing his hot relaxing E
his for what t had in mind for m
later. h
We were standing astride a bench in E
the locker room I took my fingers from H
Jon and moved his body to the bench. IE
took my mouth from his and sought fl
one of his tits, quickly making it hard E
and erect. I pushed his legs high in thel
air, his back onto the bench/ and IS
covered him. With a t
penetrated his crack and entered his
He was so eager he almost sucked
my into his gut "All right you tike is
to shot baskets, let me feel you shot P
yours into my willing hole." he said m
as he grabbed my buns and pulled meE
even deeper into himself. "Now. damnE
it. fuck the hell out of me " Soon I wasE
doing my best to carry out his demand . E
Tt*«wa^rt^Wnlr "'-■•"nir^Bn
« I  I-l.TI.T.
:m
By KEN ANDERLINI
esbian Sex a sex manual which Gays and Lesbians of UBC
ordered through a local book store never made it to the shelves
of their library. The book remains in an office of Revenue
Canada and Customs Excise collecting desk, says Tanis Sugden
f Gays and Lesbians of UBC.
Lesbian Sex is just one of three books held for a shipment destined for
ittle Sister's which Canada Customs seized December 12. Lesbian Sex,
en Loving Men by Mitch Walker and Good Vibrations: the complete
uide to vibrators by Joani Blank were deemed "obscene" by Canada
ustoms officials after a review. Bruce Smyth of Little Sister's said the
ooks were seized and deemed obscene under the Customs Tariff Act,"
hich Cana'da Customs has supplemented with its own internal
emorandum.
Most lesbian and gay material sold in Canada
is produced in the United States and currently
lesbians and gays are being silenced by Customs
officials. Recently an issue of The Advocate,
the largest American gay news magazine, was
stopped by customs officials in Vancouver and
the publishers arranged to returr 2,000 copies
rather than remove an advertisement which was
deemed "obscene". The publishers have now
decided to discontinue distributing the
magazine in B.C.
Canada Customs provides a paid service for
publishers who try to predict border decisions
in B.C. magazines distributed by Mainland
Magazine are reviewed by the B.C. Periodical
Review Board prior to distribution.
Blank pages, missing text and invisible
graphics are now common in most gay
magazines published outside of Canada.
Canada Customs has advised publishers to
remove such offensive words as "glorp". In the
January issue of Torso, 34 of its % pages were
ripped out.
Recent editions to Canada Customs list of
Prohibited Importations include The Joy of
Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein and Edmund
White. The ban of this book was initiated in
Interim  Memorandum  D9-1-1   is  a set  of
idelines which prohibits Canadian entry of
portrayals or descriptions of the act of bug-
ry (sodomy), including depictions or descrip-
ons involving implements of all kinds." This
emorandum has been the basis for a series of
izures of gay and lesbian material headed for
tie  Sister's  in   Vancouver  and  Glad   Day
oks in Toronto.
On December 9, Customs seizes 121 books,
representing    16   titles,   destined   for   Little
Sister's. This shipment included the books Urban Aboriginals: A Celebration of Leather Sexuality, an insider's look at leather sex by former
Vancouver   resident  Geoff  Mains,   and  The
reat American Porno Novel a work of serious
y erotica by Mike Shearer,
eva says the appeals against the seizure made
st December and a seizure of an issue of The
esbian Sex magazine in May, have been re-
cted. Not optimistic about the results of the
cond appeals lodged for both cases, Deva
ys "I don't expect anything, except that we'll
turned down again."
The appeal process is both lengthy and
ustrating says Smyth. After Canada Customs
as made a decision on the second appeal, a
nal   appeal   can  be  made  to  the   Deputy
bare        fast and hard My was
thrusting into his gut to its very root
Tne harder and faster I fucked, the
more he cried  "Oh. you
me harder, faster, deeper I have
needed a real man s for weeks!
Harder, deeper me. me. oh
damn. me!"
|    My balls pounding his soon
reached the point of climax and I cried,
•Jon. I cant hold off any longer." t
groaned as my continued .0 bury
itself in his well* "I'm
shooting now!" By the time the words
lava shot out of my and into Jon
After surge of white hot        had been
poured into Jon's I held my
peter in him until it had softened
Withdrawing my half-soft from
Minister of Customs and Excise. "The courts
are the only avenue open after this and we are
willing to go to court if necessary," says Smyth.
Heather Perry of Revenue Canada and
Customs Excise in Vancouver, who actually
reviewed the books seized on December 9 and
12, says she is unable to comment and refers
questions to her manager J.E. Cherwoniak, who
refused to comment as "anything that
transpires with Canada Customs is strictly confidential."
MP Svend Robinson (NDP-Burnaby) says he
has the issue of the memorandum with the
minister in charge and has received a reply back
saying "it doesn't discriminate against gays as
it applies equally to heterosexuals." "There is
such a thing as systemic discrimination," he
says.
"There is very disturbing recent tendency
toward draconian forms of censorship by
Canada Customs," says Robinson. "It's a very
dangerous thing that's happening — suppression of freedom of speech — and it's a very
dangerous thing that's happening — suppression of freedom of speech — and it's directed at
the gay community." Calling the censorship
campaign by Customs "offensive and
ridiculous," he says it is "bureaucracy gone
wild". He is "cautiously optimistic" the
Customs Tariff Act which expires June 30 will
be revised.
Robinson points to a recent issue of the gay
glossie Blueboy in which a safe sex advice column was censored because of references to buggery, as an example of the stupidity of
Customs' interpretation of the act. He says the
gay community is concerned Canada Customs
is interfering with public education of AIDS.
Winnipeg when a customer at a WH Smith
store mistook it for The Joy of Cooking.
General Publishing Inc., the Canadian
distributors of The Joy of Lesbian Sex have
stopped carrying it as well.
Sex is not the only worry of Canada
Customs. In March, the story "Dunk Not in
Armageddon", about a basketball player who
makes a deal with God, was omitted from the
Canadian edition of Tux. There was no sexual
content, but the story was deemed inadmissable
because it was "blasphemous."
"The whole experience with Customs," said
Deva, "has impressed upon me that freedom of
speech is a right we cannot take for granted in
Canada. At one time I supported censorship to
stop depictions and descriptions of violence
against women and children, but now I feel we
must find other ways of dealing with this." He
points to the seizure of Bad Attitude and Lesbian Sex as examples of women's freedom of
speech being taken away by a bureaucracy
"just doing its job."
Little Sister's have joined various community, artistic and civil liberation groups in the
Coalition for the Right to View (CRTV), a
coalition which began as a result of Heat is On:
Women on Art on Sex, a conference held in1
December.
The CRTV is working to oppose the three-
tiered videotape classification scheme proposed
by Attorney-General Brian Smith, which would
establish a board to classify videotapes and
force all video outlets to be licensed, CRTV
also aims to combat other forms of government
censorship including the Periodical Review
Board, anti-obscenity sections of the Criminal
See Page 4: SEX Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
Sex censored in Canadian print
From page 3
Code and the banning of words and images by
Canada Customs.
Sara Diamond, a video artist, historian and
member of the Vancouver Artists League was
instrumental in the organization of the CRTV.
Diamond says "Canada has a history of
government censorship in which politically
critical, gay and lesbian and now feminist
material have been targets of censorship."
"The majority of pornography will continue
to be shown," said Diamond, "but alternative
images may not." Diamond points to the experience of video artists in Toronto with the
Ontario Censor Board as a warning of what
Smith's proposed legislation could lead to.
"The Board has prohibited screenings of the
film Not a Love Story, a feminist critique of
pornography.
Lisa Steele and Kim Tomszak are going to
court in a test case over the banning of their
videotape In the Dark by the Ontario Censor
Board. Diamond said "it is a lyrical type of two
heterosexuals having sex and a lot of people
were moved by it, but because it was totally
concerned with sex the Board banned it."
Diamond said the Board also banned critical
work such as Message from Our Sponsor a
video by Al Razutis, which examines the
destructive power of advertising and its exportation of women. The pressure of censors in
Canada is inhibiting the character of cultural
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expression and film festivals like Canadian Images are not being held regularly for fear of action against them by the board, said Diamond.
One of the most ludicrous examples of censorship Diamond points to is the decision of the
Supreme Court last November that dildos are
obscene materials.
The concern of the CRTV is that the proposed
legisjation by the Attorney-General will only
worsen the trend by governments to censor
anything which offers a political critique or
questions existing sexual mores, while not addressing the real problems of violence and the
economic and social inequality of women.
An editorial in the February issue of Rites, a
lesbian and gay magazine with a feminist bent,
sums up the present censorship campaign: in
relation to lesbians and gays "Once again lesbian and gay material are seen as more -
'obscene' or 'indecent' than hetero materials —
it is our images, sexualities, desires, pleasures
and bodies that are being labelled 'obscene'."
Gary Kinsman and Mary Louise Adams of
the Rites editorial collective will be among the
panel members of a workshop on the problems
of and alternatives to censorship, being held as
part of the Third Annual Gay/Lesbian Conference at UBC, February 15-16. Sarah Diamond will be taking part in the panel discussion
on the implications of pornography hate
literature on personal freedoms. Dart of the
Conference Law and Contemporary Social
Issues at UBC, February 14-15.
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worry.
Choose a Wardair Contiki
holiday and relax. It's a holiday full of fun,
adventure and excitement. You'll have a
wonderful time.
And if your folks start to worry, tell them
not to. Tell them it's a Wardair Contiki tour.
Tell them Contiki has been taking people
your age around Europe for 25 years. They'll
know about Wardair's great reputation, but it
can't hurt to play it up. Make sure they know
that there's an experienced tour manager
on every trip so you don't have to take care
of hassles with customs, currency and
accommodation.
Now with any little worries out of the way,
you can concentrate on the good time you'll
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^WardairHolidays Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
CUPE raps Ritchie efficency tests
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
UBC has hired at least two
employees to maintain a poorly
designed time management system
now being implemented by a
California efficiency company,
Canadian Union of Public
Employees researcher Donald Guts-
tein said Tuesday.
At a press conference, Gutstein
said Los Angeles based Ritchie and
Associates' studies often lead to
sagging  employee   morale,   major
layoffs, and an eventual return to
previous systems to maintain services.
The firm has "taken away the incentive to do a good job" with its
time and motion studies at UBC
over the past year, he said.
Cleanliness has suffered as staff
are required to complete tasks in
impossible time limits, he said.
"The cleaning staff are doing their
best — they care but they can't keep
up."
Gutstein added changes Ritchie
made in the mail room mean important academic journals are delayed.
Senior purchasing department
employees estimated changes there
would cost the university 10 per
cent extra on a $25 million budget,
he said.
He said the efficiency survey can
be seen as another part of the
government attack on post-
secondary education in B.C.
CUPE commissioned Gutstein to
write The Ritchie Report, a 53 page
study analysing the performance of
the company at UBC, University of
Victoria, -and Dalhousie University
in Halifax.
He reports Ritchie's work on
private companies, including Canadian airline Wardair and Acklands
Ltd., an auto parts distributor was
not successful. He tried unsuccessfully to find out where UBC
and UVic got the money to pay for
the survey.
The report also points to problems with the firm's background
knowledge about the university.
"The librarians in particular are
deeply concerned that the Ritchie
consultants on campus have never
studied a library before and yet
claim that after a short review they
will be able to offer good advice to
professionals with many years experience."
Bruce Gellatly, UBC financial
and administration vice-president,
said Wednesday he hadn't studied
the report. "There is, I guess, an
underlying concern for job
security," he said.
The two year break since the last
salary increase probably explains
the morale drop, he said.
Three of the 12 areas surveyed by
Ritchie have their new schedules
fully implemented but Gellatly said
most of them should be completed
by March.
He confirmed the university hired
a physical plant scheduler late last
year and a personnel office coordinator earlier this month to administer the Ritchie program.
No one cares
about divestment
THESE SHEEP RELAX after wild party indulging in unnatural acts like dancing, drinking and smoking. Cows
tried to crash barn burner.
Studenfs don'f di
OTTAWA (CUP) — Eighty-six
per cent of Canada's college and
university students believe
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation should be prohibited.
The Gallup poll results are based
on personal interviews with 1,043
people aged 18 and over in 105 census areas across Canada. Gallup
conducted the poll with financing
from the Gay Community Appeal
of Toronto.
After students, the next highest
support for gays and lesbians came
from Quebec citizens, with 77 per
cent of those polled opposed to
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Quebec is the only
province which includes protection
against discrimination on the basis
of sexual orientation in its human
rights charter.
Most   UBC  students  don't  ap
prove of discrimination against lesbians and gays.
"They're gay but they're people
first," said Laura Mallen, arts 1.
She said homosexuality doesn't
bother her.
"I know a lot of people are prejudiced but I've never discriminated
against gays and I've never been
discriminated against by them,"
Mallen said.
One student said discrimination
against gays and lesbians is like
racial discrimination.
"I don't think anyone should be
discriminated against myself," said
Naryan Kulkarni, agriculture 2.
Others mentioned the difficulties
in ending discrimination.
"The law isn't the answer to getting rid of discrimination," said
Paul Dyson, arts 1.
Joe McCarthy, unclassified arts
said, "It is unfair to try to regulate
what people do in bed together but
it is also unfair to attempt to force
people to approve of something
they believe is morally wrong."
Some students said they would
feel uncomfortable with someone
they knew was gay.
"If I had a choice between two
people to hire and they were equal
in all other aspects I would probably hire the straight person
because I would feel more comfortable working with him," said
Rob Macauley, science 1.
One student said people were
afraid of homosexuality because
they don't understand it.
"I would feel uncomfortable
working with a lesbian," added
Laura Perry, arts 1.
By EVELYN JACOB
UBC's decision not to divest its
financial connections with banks
and companies that do business
with South Africa is a non-issue on
Campus.
Alma Mater Society president
Simon Seshadri said council is not
concerned with the issue because no
one on council feels strongly
enough about divestment to do
anything about it. He said council
did not make a presentation to the
board regarding divestment because
other issues such as tuition fees
were "more important."
Seshadri said the onus of taking
action lies on students' shoulders.
"Students themselves should
have the right to say yes or no," he
said. "If someone takes the initiative, we will act on it."
While student at McGill,
Carleton, Dalhousie and Concordia
have staged large protests against
their institutions' investments in
South Africa, UBC students have
remained indifferent.
Faculty association president
Sidney Mindess said there was no
organized attempt by the faculty
association to influence the board's
decision Friday. Said Mindess:
"We (the faculty association) have
been too busy wth other issues this
year. Apartheid has taken a back-
burner."
Students for a Free Southern
Africa member horacio de la cueva
said "students at UBC don't seem
to care about issues in the rest of the
world that directly affect them."
He charged the AMS makes important decisions for students every
day, but only issues that are "non-
controversial."
But Seshadri said student council
had urged Students for a Free
Southern Africa to gather enough
signatures for a petition to hold a
referendum during the AMS elections. Council did not hear from the
group before the election.
Vice president academic Daniel
Birch was also puzzled the students
involved in the protest had not put
forward a brief to the board before
the meeting. "If people want to
contribute to dialogue, they should
find more effective ways of doing
so," said Birch.
de la cueva said the group lacked
time to prepare a proposal td the
board, but added the group must
make a "formal presentation" to
the board soon.
But president of finance Bruce
Gellatly said Thursday's protest did
not "help or hinder" the board's
decision. He said the reason for low
enthusiasm on campus is because
people are becoming more aware
that the amount of university
money associated with divestment is
"minimal."
In spite of Gellatly's remarks,
Graduate Student Society Council
representative Phil Bennett said the
only reason there was any presentation at all at the board meeting
Thursday was because of the protest outside. He said "There has to
be some leadership somewhere in
this university."
B.A. solid but not sexy stepping-stone
Engineers go anywhere in hot Pink
Engineers didn't mix the red and
white paint on their cairn, but it was
pink on Tuesday morning.
An anonymous group painted the
cairn hot pink and added the words
"WE ARE EVERYWHERE" to
the base. The engineering cairn is
usually white with a big red "E".
Students at the enginneers' headquarters, the Cheez Factory, blamed the gays and lesbians for the
paint job.
"I could take science, aggies and
forestry, but gays and lesbians has
gone too far," said Rich Fitzpatrick, applied science 4.
Various campus groups paint the
cairn to celebrate their weeks. This
week is gay and lesbian week.
Tanis Sugden, vice-president of
Gays and Lesbians of UBC said
that the group has no idea who
painted the cairn.
"It could have been gay
engineers,  or  gay  art   students",
Sugden said. Sugden added that it
was not planned by the gay club.
Jim Wickens, engineering
undergraduate society vice president, said that many groups attack
the cairn.
"It's an easy thing to get at,"
Wickens said. Wickens added that
other groups painting the cairn
didn't bother him.
Arts students were more enthusiastic about the paint job.
"Painting it pink gets students
asking what it means and who did
it," said Damaris Sargent, arts 4.
One student said the cairn was
now three pink triangles. Homosexuals in Nazi concentration camps
were forced to wear pink triangles
on their clothes. The gay liberation
movement now uses the pink
triangle has a symbol of pride.
Sugden said that the cairn was
painted pink last year and four
years ago. "I guess it's a tradition
now," she said.
By BETSY GOLDBERG
It's a crucial stepping-stone. It's the way to go. It's a
solid foundation. It paves the way. It's an asset. But
it's not sexy.
That's how three UBC arts graduates described a
bachelor of arts degree Feb. 6, at Cecil Green Park.
The subject of the evening was Law, Civil Service, and
Public Relations, the second of three After The B.A.
forums.
A B.A. provides "a solid foundation from which to
grow, and you're the one that chooses the direction,"
said Gayle Stewart-Gray, head of public relations for
First City Financial Corporation. She told the audience of 70 her education has had an impact on both
her professional and personal lives.
Stewart-Gray said her arts education taught her she
could achieve a goal. During her undergraduate years,
she also learned to assess her strengths and
weaknesses, and she developed a "fast affinity for
Beer Gardens 101".
A B.A. provides a "general understanding of man's
condition," said B.C. deputy tourism minister Michael
Horsey. He said that the fastest growing number of
jobs in B.C. is in the service sector, and he said that
arts graduates will be well-prepared for these positions.
"There is a route for arts students which makes
some sense," he said. "There's virtually nothing you
can't do."
To keep pace with the current technological boom,
"we must be prepared to change our thinking," said
J.V. Clyne, former judge, MacMillan Bloedel chairman, and UBC chancellor. He said a B.A. trains people to deal with societal changes. "There is no inferiority attached to a B.A."
Horsey said arts graduates should either seek
employment with small businesses or start ones
themselves. "Major corporation, look at me, I'm an
arts student", is not the approach to take, said
Horsey.
Employers look for well-rounded people, and a
B.A. shows that "what you're made of is what you did
before," he said.
Stewart-Gray cited her research skills and her
understanding of Canada's political and legal structures are UBC acquisitions that have proved very
useful in her career.
Once a graduate has focussed in on an area of interest, they shouldn't "be too concerned about where
they start — it's getting in there that's crucial," she
said.
Clyne said "I don't rely on the opinion of
newspaper people,". The media projects a bad image
of the B.A., he said, adding higher education institutions aren't plugging themselves.
The forums are jointly sponsored by the arts
undergraduate society, and faculty of arts, and the
UBC alumni association. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
&
v7--*-- .
Letters
Law school invites students
Students of UBC Law School are
putting on a conference on law and
contemporary social issues that
should be of interest to all UBC
students. The general theme of this
year's conference is government
regulation of the economy and
culture, and its effects on personal
freedom.
The conference begins this Friday, Feb. 14, at 9 a.m., in Rooms
101, 102 and 201 of the Curtis
Building, UBC Faculty of Law.
The first session will feature a panel
Bowl your ^fout
Swim your ^out
Dance your ty out
Bowl your heart out.
Swim your heart out.
Dance your heart out.
And pretty soon you have
yourself a pretty healthy heart.
Eat your heart out, geers' and
other equally nondescript jacketed
people. Swim team, lifeguards,
philosophers, astronomers, nurses,
doctors, lawyers, and other various
interests, please come to the valentine's dance-a-thon that's to be held
at International House.
For more information, please
walk over to the I.R. office
yourself.
AMY W.M. LAM
arts 2
discussion of the possible effects of
government deregulation of the
telecommunications industry.
There will be speakers representing
BC Tel, the telecommunications
workers, and consumer and
business groups.
The second session, beginning at
2 p.m., will focus on the broad
ramifications of government intervention in the economy. The extent and propriety of government
regulation will be discussed by
academics from across Canada. At
the end of each session the audience
will be given an opportunity to
question the panelist.
The following day, February 15,
begins with a panel discussion of
government regulation of Canadian
culture at 9 a.m. Speakers include John Meisel, former Chairman of the CRTC, and Mavor
Moore, well-known playwright and
columnist. The final session, at 2
p.m. Saturday, will deal with the effects of pornography/hate
literature legislation on personal
freedoms. The panelists will include
MX. McCausland, B.C. Director
of Film Classification, Ann Scales,
feminist legal theorist, John Dixon,
President of the B.C. Civil Liberties
Association, Sara Diamond of the
Vancouver Artists League, and J.C.
Smith of the UBC Faculty of Law.
Admission to all sessions is free,
but seating is limited. Students are
advised to come early. This year's
conference is to be the first of a
series of student organized annual
conferences on law and contemporary issues. We invite all UBC
students to attend. We welcome
your participation in what promises
to be a provocative and stimulating
discussion of issues of interest and
concern to us all.
James Baugh
conference organiser
Dean wimps on ride
In response to the recent decision
to prevent the annual Lady Godiva
ride from taking place, and the
large feminist outcry which preceded it, I would like to add a few comments.
I have always felt the greatest attribute of our society is a large
diversity   of   ideas,   actions   and
Expo leaves many homeless
A 70 year old man was thrown
out of his ten by ten foot hotel
room last week by a landlord hoping to rent out the room to Expo
tourists. He has nowhere to sleep at
nights. He has been joined by hundreds of others like him as three
downtown hotels have been torn
down to make parking lots for Expo.
Over 2000 housing units have
been lost in this way for the sake of
the Expo carnival — about one fifth
of all housing in the downtown
eastside.
And that's only the tip of the
iceberg. Street crimes and prostitution are expected to double with the
influx of Expo tourists, rents will
climb and 100,000 extra people will
congest the downtown each day.
Police harassment has already increased; desirous to create a
"wholesome" image for the
tourists, cops have recently picked
up young women and dropped
them out in Surrey without money
and shoes, telling them to walk
back to Vancouver.
All of these injustices are being
perpetrated in the name of the fast
buck, and the Big Carnival by
which the Socreds hope to get reelected. We owe it to ourselves, the
education system and 250,000
British Columbians on welfare to
deny them that pleasure. Boycott
Expo '86.
Kevin Annett
graduate studies
customs which are allowed to exist,
providing of course one group does
not infringe upon the rights or
general welfare of another. The
engineers do not force a female in
riding against her will, nor do they
have her involved in any sadistic activities. We see no harm done to any
particular group, nor do we look
any differently at women because
of this annual event. We see this
merely as an enjoyable break from
an otherwise boring day at the
university. This event has been enjoyed by males and females for
years.
We would also like to add that
the idea of a Gay/Lesbian dance or
a Gay /Lesbian week is revolting to
us, but we respect their rights and
allow their activities to continue
without protest nonetheless since
they don't infringe on anyone else's
freedom. Our comment to the obnoxious feminists who so vocally
protested the event, is to ask if they
are planning to hold a book burning
of any material which seems "offensive or oppressive to females."
Finally, a message to the dean who
gave in to the feminist's wishes.
You wimped out!
Chris Seppelt — arts 2
and Talino Bruno — arts 2
Minister croaks
The minister is dead — long live the ministerl
Bill Bennett called his latest cabinet shuffle a political renewal, but we all
know it was just a shuffling of a crooked deck.
Good news for education is that Pat McGeer was shuffled out of the
universities portfolio.
Kind voices over the years have claimed Pat was the only educated
Socred cabinet minister and he battled fiercely among the ignorant to see
that post-secondary education got its fair share of the budget pie. One
wonders how much more worse it would have become had a lesser mortal
filled his position.
During his tenure, universities received a terrible bruising. Yes, there was
a recession (and we've still got it in B.C.) but Pat was one of those who
agreed that if there was no money to subsidize the giving away of
chopped-up trees and lumps of rock, then there was no money to educate
the unemployed for new jobs — or to educate them to create new jobs
themselves.
Funding was cut, student grants were cut, faculty, programs, libraries,
and courses were all cut — and a UBC president quit in disgust. Student
debts grew, tuition fees grew and class sizes grew.
Pat said government does not tell universities how to spend their money,
but as operating budgets were being slashed, the provincial government
was handing out little goodies to selected faculties it deemed important.
Pat rarely met students and university representatives. Despite this, he
still found plenty of time to show up on campus to do research in
neurology.
Because of recent positive changes in education policy our welcome to
Russ Fraser is a warm one, but our fingers are still singed and we cautiously look forward to a consistent minister who will deal openly with university
and student concerns. We do not need a secretive minister who periodically announces grandiose schemes without public input.
Experiment Now
Students are afraid of homosexuals on campus. Two students
distributed a petition in SUB concourse for the expulsion of homosexuals.
They actually got signatures.
Besides being afraid, students are heterosexist. Heterosexism means the
exclusion of other sexual practices like bisexuality, celibacy, lesbianism and
male homosexuality. Heterosexism is the result of fear of homosexuals. If
students talk about sex, they talk about heterosex.
But a lot of students don't even talk about that or have much information about it. Washroom walls are covered with questions about sex, safe
health practices, and lovers. If students talked about sex with friends, family, and doctors, they wouldn't be so ignorant.
And if students talked about sex more, they wouldn't be afraid of
homosexuality because it wouldn't seem so strange and scary.
And if students had more sex, they'd be too busy to be scared.
wwiwuim  .iijimimum■wily
d    -   ': ' '^ '" -    *■ i    ?sr*
Blue Jeans show pride
You may have noticed the posters
declaring Friday, February 14, Blue
Jeans Day. What is it all about?
Gays and Lesbians of UBC are asking all lesbians, gay men and bisexual people to wear blue jeans on
Friday as a sign of pride in their sexual orientation. We also encourage
heterosexual people to wear blue
jeans to show their support of
everyone's right to love and have
sex with the person of their choice,
regardless of sex.
Sexual minorities are usually invisible minorities. By wearing blue
jeans on Friday you can make your
difference known and more importantly, let people know that you are
proud of who you are. When you
make your presence as a lesbian,
gay or bisexual person visible,
you are helping to breakdown
stereotypes and providing the opportunity for others to get accurate
information about our lives as sexual minorities.
If you are heterosexual and wear
blue jeans on Friday, you might
watch people's reactions to you.
This may give you some idea of the
homophobia which exists on this
campus. If you are taunted with the
epithets "dyke" or "faggot," you
may get a glimpse of what it is like
for those of us who aren't invisible
because we refuse to conform to the
rigid gender role definition of
masculine or feminine. You could
also let the hecklers know that
"faggot" or "dyke" are words gay
men and lesbians are adopting as
their own.
Pull out your 501s, GWGs,
Calvin Kleins, Lees or whatever,
from the bottom of your closet and
wear them on Friday.
Ken Anderlini arts 4
gays and lesbians of UBC
THE UBYSSEY
February 13, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Debbie Lo plays Venus sending Neil "Cupid" Lucente, bare-butted with bow and arrow, on
a mercy mission to the lovelorn. Camilla Dionne, Ronald Stewart, and lan Blair mercifully
deny such a condition, so little Neil wings on. He encounters David Ferman, Stephen Wisenthal, and Karen Gram, but his arrows fail to pierce their tough hides as Sarah Millin and Betsy
Goldberg look gaily on. Neil sighs a little sigh and moves on, ignoring the unhappy Damaris
Sargent and Shari bte. Abdullah and Mary Cameron.
The concerted cupid finds better hunting with Steve Chan and Richard Woloshan; they
point out Peter Prongos end Evelyn Jacob, who promptly fall in love, but not with each
other. Neil checks his crosshairs, and we all know how painful that can be. Ken Anderlini,
Svetozer Kontic, Kerry Sloan, and Jennifer Lyall scramble at the sight of our scantily-clad
Nail, while Steve Neufeld and lan Robertson pluck his arrows from the air and pick Colin
Jerome's teeth with them.
Neil becomes more confused, but still has many Richard Brower-designed arrows in his
quiver. However, Corinne Bjorge and Francoise Preault taunt him, and he loses several arrows in pointless persuit. Dejected, he only tosses the remaining lot at Terry O'Kane and
Doug Schmidt. Returning to Olympus, he gives it one last shot, and succeeds in making Lise
Magee googly-eyed for Enver Hoxha.
Neil presently tells Debbie to do her own match-making. Thursday, Feb. 13,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
f'-^fp^^y-t^'-.
*• '■*-•-' ■ ids?
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tsmrnem
Seminar series promotes Pacific Rim awareness
Exchanging raw materials for
shiny technological toys has long
been the stereotype of Canadian
trade with the Far East. Yet the recent years of economic doldrums
may have served as a catalyst for a
re-evaluation of our existing trade
relations. A new interest in things
"Eastern" seems to have permeated
British Columbia, and new opportunities in East-West cooperation
appear no longer to be tied to our
traditional primary manufacturing.
We need only look at the shaky
future of North East Coal, the
plight of our copper industry, or the
increasing demand for raw Canadian logs — a demand that would
shortcircuit manufacturing
altogether — to see the need for
strong action in expanding our
trade horizons. Expo 86 is only one
of the means by which British Columbia is signalling its readiness to
do business.
Besides soliciting Expo in the Far
East, the provincial government has
taken steps in increasing Pacific
Rim awareness at home. Japanese
and Mandarin were recently added
as language options to the high
school curriculum, and less than
two years mark the birth of the
joint federal-provincial Asia Pacific
Foundation.
Vancouver   based,   the   Asia
Greeks fight cystic fibrosis
As you and the students of UBC
are aware, last week was Mardi
Gras Week on campus, and the
Fraternities and Sororities, with
help from the Phrateres Club, sponsored several events in order to raise
funds to support Cystic Fibrosis.
The events were lots of fun for
those involved, and were very successful in raising funds. On behalf
of the children and young adults
with cystic fibrosis, their families,
and the Vancouver Chapter of the
Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, I would like to thank the Mardi Gras Committee, most especially
Michelle   Askew,   for   their   hard
work, as well as thanking those
students who supported the events.
All across Canada supporters are
striving to reach the goal of finding
a cure or control for cystic fibrosis,
the most common life-threatening
hereditary disease of children and
young adults. Efforts such as the
Mardi Gras Week not only give
funds for care and research, but
also give hope to the many families
affected. The efforts of the students
of UBC are most appreciated.
Thank you for your help in fighting
this disease. (Mrs.) S.J. MacVicar
Secretary,
Vancouver Chapter
Pacific Foundation is designed as a
private organization, its chief function being to foster cultural exchange and trade throughout the
Pacific Rim.
On campus we have not escaped
the lure of the East either. A high
enrolment rate in Japanese
language courses, and the creation
of he new Pacific Rim Club would
signify that student interest in the
East is alive and growing.
Nor has the International Relations Students Association been
idle. Thanks to the determined efforts of active members, notably
Dawayne Wurtz (president) and
Margie Parikh (vice president), an
impressive body of speakers have
been assembled for an upcoming
seminar series on the Pacific Rim.
Beginning Wednesday, February
5, and spanning the following two
Wednesdays, noon-hour lectures on
careers and opportunities in the
Pacific Rim will be held in International House. Speakers involved
will be:
Stewart Hay, special advisor on
China, Ministry of International
Trade and Investment, Province of
B.C.
Jan W. Walls, vice president,
Academic and Cultural Affairs,
Asia Pacific Foundation of
Canada.
Michael   Galbraith,   Lawson,
Lundell, Lawson & Mcintosh, Barristers and Solicitors.
Ed McRae, sales manager of Mitsubishi Canada Ltd.
Robert A. Baskerville, attorney,
Davis, Wright, Todd, Riese and
Jones of Seattle.
Hugh Bernet, manager, Royal
Bank, B.C. International Centre.
David Graham, chief operating
officer, Dawn Development,
Canada Corporation.
Postings of the upcoming events
will soon be visible around campus.
Students, faculty and interested
parties would do well not to miss
this special seminar series, for, after
all, our neighbours are not limited
to south of the border, but extend
across the Pacific as well. For more
information call Dawayne Wurtz
(731-6062), Margie Parikh &
(222-0102), or International House
(228-5021).
Jouni Tanskanen
treasurer,
international relations
students association
Godiva controversy
stimulates thought
Groberman's review of Fiddler smashed
I disagree with your reviewer
Michael Groberman's statement
that MUSSOC's Fiddler on the
Roof was a boring show. On the
contrary, the performance was enjoyable, and the cast's dancing and
singing marvelously expressed the
emotions of the characters.
I am not familiar with hassidic
culture and so cannot respond to
many of Groberman's criticisms,
but then the primary purpose of
Fiddler on the Roof is to entertain,
not  to  give a lecture on Jewish
culture. The laughter and enthusiastic applause of the audience
indicated that MUSSOC put on an
entertaining show. Well done
MUSSOC.
Grant Mitchell
archival studies
My thanks goes out to the EUS
(engineering undergraduate
society), the CASC (Coalition
Against Sexism on Campus), and
all those individuals who took the
time and made the effort to contribute their opinions on the recent
'Godiva' affair. Special mention
goes to the editorial staff at the
Ubyssey for their attempt to provide balanced and full coverage.
I have not witnessed a more
stimulating debate at UBC, involving so many and such a diverse
group of students, faculty and staff
than has been provoked by
'Godiva.' The opportunity this has
afforded individuals at UBC to
reconsider their own values, rename
their experience and generally to
establish a personal position in relation to the question of sexism (in its
varied forms) on campus, has been
invaluable.
Public debate  as  we  have ex
perienced these past few weeks,
without the closure that would have
come from administrative ban or
censure, has allowed reason to provide an outcome that is a compromise between positions. The advantage of this outcome is that it is
a truer reflection of changing attitudes than the artificial results of
behavior change due to coercion.
To the extent that individuals
have changed and growth has occurred, the people on both sides of
this issue are to be complimented.
Education was set up in an open
forum and learning occurred. Now
is the time for sustained effort promoting sexual equality and responsibility of all members of our
university community. The debate
goes on, not with the intent of winning, but rather in the hope of
bringing about growth in oruselves
and others.
R. Kavanagh
adult education graduate studies
M ]/<^      COMMUNITY CONFERENCE ON
s/{ ^T     POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
Who pays, who goes?
The Simon Fraser Student Society invites you to participate in our
Community Conference on Post-Secondary Education.
Issues to be discussed are funding, accessibility, employment, curriculum and community
involvement. Panelists include Margaret Birrell, Bill Day, Stephen Duguid, Jackie Larkin, Stephen
Leary, Donna Morgan and John Waters. Keynote Speaker: Dr. Gordon Shrimpton.
Date: Saturday February 22nd 1986
Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Social to follow
Place: SFU Downtown Education Centre,
549 Howe Street Vancouver
Registration: Free, Lunch and Coffee provided
If you are interested in attending send us this
registration form as soon as possible. Space is
limited.
Registration Form
Simon Fraser Student Society
Community Conference on Education
Name:   '	
Address:	
Telephone:	
Special needs:	
Send to Simon Fraser Student Society Community
Conference on Education
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby V5A 1S6
For more information call 291-4494 between 9:00 and 4:30, Mon. to Fri.
Sponsored by the Simon Fraser Student Society and government of Canada, Secretary of State Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
UBC sends $2,000 gift to
Rick Hansen down under
By STEVE CHAN
Students raised more than $2,000
for former UBC student Rick
Hansen's goal of circling the globe
for spinal cord research last week.
Hansen's sister Chris was
presented with a $2,300 cheque Friday. The student-raised funds will
become a part of the $700,000 sum
Hansen has raised to date.
Hansen hopes to raise a total of
$10,000,000.
Funds for Hansen's Man in Motion tour were raised at an
audio/visual show Wednesday, a
beer garden Thursday, and an intramural boulevard road race Friday.
"It all went fairly well," said
AMS program director Bruce
Paisley. "There is still some money
to come in."
"The road race alone raised more
than $400," he said. "There were
over 150 people, including three
wheelchair athletes."
"The people at the AMS box of
fice raised about $200 just from the
sales of buttons," said Paisley.
Hansen, meanwhile has reached
the halfway point of his 40,072 km
trek at Melbourne, Australia.
After a three-day break for
Australian television interviews,
Hansen will embark for Canberra,
Australia's capital.
On his journey he faces daytime
temperatures that reach up to 40
degrees Celsius, but he doesn't
mind.
"He likes the heat," said Muriel
Honey, spokesperson for the tour.
"It doesn't bother him. It's the
head wind that bothers him. He'd
rather have heat than cold."
"But he loves tail wind," she added.
"He would like to thank
everyone at UBC for their participation in the Rick Hansen Days
last week," Honey said. "He'd like
to come back to UBC when he
finishes his tour."
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OJ2 Thursday, February 13, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Watch for dykes
Coming soon to
fine theatres near you
Lesbians have not fared well
when viewed through the lens of
film-makers.
The bulk of Hollywood screen
lesbians have conformed with existing stereotypes of lesbians, and
of strong women in general. These
screen stereotypes have served to
make all lesbians invisible. It's easy
to dismiss lesbians when you can't
see them. When they are visible,
screen lesbians are often evil
characters, quickly disposed of and
punished for their sins.
By FAITH JONES
of the Peak
Canadian
University Press
Picture by
KEN ANDERLINI
Directors have lesbian characters
commit suicide, murder other
characters or die violent deaths in
accidents. Some are pushed out by
more developed characters, and
thus relegated to minor roles with
minimal status. In many American
films, lesbian eroticism is
gratuitously denied as is the case
with The Colour Purple, the latest
Hollywood film with lesbian
characters.
In The Colour Purple, Hollywood has given us, for the first
time, a film about a black lesbian.
It is based on the book by Alice
Walker, and the film succeeds most
in the scenes pulled word for word
from it. Of course this makes sense:
something written by a black lesbian speaks more realistically to
that experience than do Steven
Spielberg's disneyland-meets-
social-realism techniques. (The
music virtually screams at you:
("Emote!'*)
Celis is a black woman living at
the turn of the century in the deep
south. She is oppressed by her colour, her class and her sex. It is not
just white people who opposes her:
it is the self-hatred that has been absorbed into the black experience.
Her husband abuses her, partly on
the basis of her dark skin. When she
voices her plans for independence,
he yells, "You poor. You black.
You a woman. You ain't nothin'."
Juxtaposed against this is Celie's
relationship with Shug, a blues
singer.
Early in the film, Celie's sister
urges her not to simply accept her
situation. Celie responds that she
doesn't know how to fight back,
only how to survive.
Through Shug's example, Celie
learns how to fight back. For the
first time, Celie enjoys sex. She
begins to value herself. In one
scene, Shug sings a song to Celie in
a crowded bar: "Sister, you been on
my mind . . ."
It is through this relationship that
Celie gains the strength to leave her
husband and start life again.
The movie sometimes pulls back
from its subject matter, as if
Spielberg is afraid of too much
female independence. The lesbianism is downplayed. Shug is
given a longing to be accepted by
her father: this places her happiness
in the hands of a man. In the book,
Shug was entirely independent,
even from Celie.
Nonetheless, the movie presents
lesbianism as a potentially strength-
giving force.
Another stereotype is that of the
predatory lesbian, found in extreme
form in such b-grade horror flicks
as Vampyres and Dracula's
Daughter. In these, the lesbians are
literally blood-sucking monsters.
More recently, Windows gave us
a lesbian who hires a man to rape
her best friend in order to push her
(the friend) into the lesbian's arms.
The device fails, but the lesbian has
a tape recording of the assault,
which she plays repeatedly to
become sexually aroused. The film
thus brings into question the
Hollywood notion of female friendship.
Although Julia attempted to explore a female friendship with obvious lesbian overtones, the
obligatory anti-gay scene is so self-
righteous as to be offensive. In it,
an unpleasant young man accuses
Lillian (Hellman, played by Jane
Fonda) of having an affair with her
friend Julia. Lillian punches the
man and storms out in disgust.
Lillian does not question his
equation of lesbianism with unnatural and sinful sexuality. She accepts the equation, as we are are expected to. Her actions deny lesbianism without acknowledging the
homoeroticism we have witnessed
and which Hellman openly discussed in the memoirs on which the
movie is based.
In Girlfriends, a lesbian character
exists solely for the purpose of
allowing the main character to turn
her down. The movie discusses
Susan's relationship with her
former roommate, and the filmmakers obviously felt it necessary to
deny any sexual involvement between those two women, by having
Susan tell the lesbian, "That
woman I use to live with . . . she
was my roommate, not my lover."
This lesbian represents a new
stereotype — the confused,
childlike lesbian. She is utterly
dismissable, certainly not to be
taken seriously.
Another technique for dismissing
lesbianism is to introduce it in a
trivial form intended to be funny.
For example, in Klute the only intimation of lesbianism is in the form
of a neurotic hooker, who says of
an ex-lover, "That little bitch stole
my fur coat." This character is
placed in the milieu of pimps, drug
dealers, sado-masochists and other
'deviants'. The film is entirely
dismissive of independence, friendship between women, and any non-
nuclear-family lifestyle.
The news is not all this bad. It is
possible to find some more realistic
presentations of lesbians.
The independent film Born in
Flames shows a group of women
fighting an oppressive regime. The
■ lesbianism of many of these
women are black. Their political
and emotional commitments to
women, and is an integral part of
their political motivation. It is no
coincidence that most of these
women are Black. Their political
awareness is more acute, because so
is their oppression.
A German film, made in 1931,
shows lesbianism as the complete
opposite of patriarchy. Madchen in
Uniform deals with a girls'
boarding school in which one young
woman falls in love with her
teacher. The teacher obviously
returns the sentiment, but her sexuality is also repressed by the
system. The teacher uses semisexual
gestures in her relationship with
Manuela. In one scene, Manuela
demands a bedtime kiss on the lips;
another one involves the teacher
giving Manuela a slip, since the
young woman has none.
The patriarchy is represented by
the headmistress who defines
women by their relationships to
men. "You are all soldiers
daughters and, God willing, you
will all be soldiers' mothers," she
says. Eventually the headmistress
'finds out' about the growing love
between Manuela and her teacher,
and banished the teacher from the
school. ("Ein Scandale!" she
shouts.)
The film was shot with two possible endings. In one, Manuela jumps
from the roof of the school killing
herself. In the other, the students
(who also adored the teacher) save
Manuela. Other than during its initial release in Germany, the film
has always been shown with the
happier ending.
Perhaps the fact that Madchen in
Uniform was written by a lesbian
feminist and anti-fascist, Christa
Winsloe, and directed by a socialist
feminist, Leon tine Sagan, goes a
long way in explaining the film's
positive aspects. It was produced
within one of the most tolerant
twentieth-century societies: the
Weimar Republic.
This example of a positive,
socially-rooted (ie. anti-militarist)
view of lesbianism explains the
whole problem of lesbian representation: the representation is being
done by a dominant ideology which
holds lesbiansim to be deviant sexuality and fears any power women
might gain from lesbianism. The
sadistic, neurotic, butch, predatory,
confused, naive or reformable lesbian characters are misrepresentations based in our culture's standards. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
T DATE BRING AIMTLME OF LOVE
THE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND OF THE PERFECT MATE PROJECT
Biorhythms were first discovered in the 1890's by Swiss physiologists. Since then, they have
been linked to the "biological clocks" that regulate our moods, energy levels, sexual desires
and periods of clear and "fuzzy" thinking. In the middle decades of our century, it was discovered that biorhythms regulated attractions and repulsions between people on three main
levels: social, sexual, emotional. People with the same "bio" patterns were actually attracted;
those with drastically different patterns were repulsed, felt " cool" to each other, or experienced personal conflicts.
Biorhythms, which are "set" in a person by the day of birth (much as a clock is "set") have
been confirmed by over 36 separate scientific studies, and are now used extensively by large
corporations in the U.S.A., Japan and Europe, and by the Soviet government, mostly in industrial applications (accident prevention, employee hiring, etcetera).
However, although studies have confirmed that the "bio" patterns strongly and distinctly
affect compatibility and attraction between people, the vast complexity of patterns prevented
them from finding the key to a "perfect match" between two people. Although these perfect
bio matches existed, no one knew — or bothered to discover — how to find them.
Then, in 1981, our researcher discovered the method for finding a nearly perfect duplication
of all three patterns (sexual, emotional and social). This method remains a trade secret of the
Perfect Mate Project. Utilizing this method, the Project can take any person and locate the
exact day of birth of their perfect match — in essence, their "true love!"
This discovery was studied for 5 years in over 600 couples. The findings supported the
theory of attraction. People who shared an almost exact duplication were found to be extremely attracted to each other, in a durable, long-lasting way. (We say "almost exact" to refer
to a 90 to 98 per cent duplication. An exact — 100 per cent — duplication does occur, but only
every 60 years. We don't want to match people born 60 years apart, however!) NOTE: You will
not just be given the birthdate of your "perfect match." You will be introduced to a person of
the opposite sex born on that exact day!
NOW THE PERFECT MATE PROJECT IS PROUD TO OFFER, IN A NEVER-BEFORE UTILIZED PROCESS, TO BRING YOU FACE-TO-FACE WITH A MEMBER OF THE OPPOSITE
SEX WHO IS DEEPLY AND ENDURINGLY COMPATIBLE AND ATTRACTIVE TO YOU.
MUTUAL ATTRACTION IS GUARANTEED.
THE COST IS SMALL - $15 TO $30, depending on the type of "perfect match" you want.
THIS IS A ONE-TIME FEE, FULLY REFUNDABLE IF YOU ARE NOT ABSOLUTELY CONVINCED THAT WE HAVE INTRODUCED YOU TO ONE OF THE GREAT RELATIONSHIPS
OF YOUR LIFE.
HOW DO WE GUARANTEE THIS?
WHEN YOU REGISTER (SEE FORM BELOW) SEND US YOUR CHEQUE FOR THE TYPE
OF "MATCH" YOU WISH. BUT POST-DATE THIS CHEQUE FOR A FULL 120 DAYS
(FOUR MONTHS). YOU WILL BE MATCHED, AND INTRODUCED TO YOUR "PERFECT
MATE." THEN, IF YOU CAN HONESTLY SAY THAT YOU ARE NOT BEGINNING TO FALL
IN LOVE, SIMPLY TELL YOUR BANK TO STOP PAYMENT ON YOUR CHEQUE. WE WILL
NOT ASK ANY QUESTIONS. (Please note: it can take from 1 week to 2 months to locate your
match, due to the precision involved. This will still leave you 2 months to test your relationship before your cheque cashes.)
KEEP THIS ADVERTISEMENT. IT IS YOUR PROOF THAT THIS SMALL, ONETIME FEE IS FULLY REFUNDABLE.
It is low because we need you. We need approximately 3,000 singles to register before the laws of probability will give us a reasonable shot at matching every registrant "perfectly" with another registrant.
Any more questions? The Project has written a full booklet on the
phenomena of "instinct matching," as a result of its studies. A copy
will be sent to you as soon as you are matched. Read Tim Stephens'
columns in the Vancouver Courier for week-to-week updates on the
Project! For furthur questions, call 321-9268.
Please note: The Project is not an escort service. Only one matchup will be made per applicant at one time. Only members of the opposite sex will be matched.
A special note to the gay community: We have received complaints that our services are not offered to homosexuals. Due to the
advent of AIDS, and the fact that the Project's results can be a partial "immunization" against it (by matching people who will be loyal
for life) we are willing to initiate a separate program — a "Perfect
Friends Project" — if demand warrants it. In fact, we will let your
community run the program if you wish, although we will have to
perform the computer processing, as we want to protect our methods. Please contact the address below.
TYPES OF MATCHES AVAILABLE, AND FEES:
1. SEXUAL/EMOTIONAL - Fee, $15. Strong sexual attraction towards each other, accompanied by deep emotional affection and
understanding. Similar lifestyle preferences or social outlooks not
guaranteed; therefore, this "match" is good for a love affair, but is
not necessarily good for marriage.
2. EMOTIONAL/SOCIAL - Fee, $15. Deep emotional closeness
and empathy will develop, accompanied by a similar sense of humor
and outlook on friends, lifestyle, etcetera. You will share a close
mental understanding. Sexual attraction may occur, but is not guaranteed. This combination is good for marriage, due to its great stability.
3. "ULTRA" - Fee, $30. This is a special, total match. Combines
both of the above options. Brings enduring emotional bonding, an
unusually high mutual sexual attraction, and a similar outlook and
understanding in areas of career, marriage, children, intellectual interests, hobbies, etcetera. Good for marriage. For serious, stable
seekers only, due to the intensity of attraction which may develop.
Approaches or attains true love.
HOW DO WE FEND YOUR PERFECT MATCH?
The Perfect Mate system compares the instinct pattern "imprints" occurring on your day of
birth with those occurring on all other days (via a computor data bank "search" file) until a
pattern is found that matches yours. (Therefore your exact birthdate is all-important, so
please be sure it is correct when you fill out the registration form below.)
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN YOUR "MATCHING" AND A REGULAR
RELATIONSHIP WITH A MEMBER OF THE OPPOSITE SEX?
Nothing, really. We just choose, for you, a member of the opposite sex whom you'll find
highly attractive sexually, will feel a deep emotional empathy with, and with whom you'll
share very similar social and lifestyle preferences. We just take the chance out of such meetings. Your "perfect match" represents 1 in approximately 1,500 members of the opposite sex.
We find this person "immediately" for you, and introduce you. We save you 1,499 unnecessary dates!
BUT WHAT D? THE PERSON YOU MATCH ME WITH IS NOT ATTRACTED TO ME?
This simply won't happen. Similar bio patterns attract, period. Your "perfect match" will be
attracted to you in exactly the same ways, and to the same degree, as you'll be attracted to
him or her. The attraction is always mutual. We cannot of course, guarantee that circumstances won't interfere - such things as car accidents, job transfers, even a fear of intense
emotions can affect your relationship.
WILL THIS BE AN DISTANT, OVERWHELMING ATTRACTION?
In some cases, yes. But in most cases, you will find that the attraction starts small, ia
subtle, but then grows quickly — by the second or third date, both of you will start to recognize an obvious, strong urge to be together. Your "perfect mate" will start to become more
"good-looking" every time you meet. These patterns affect you on a very deep level, so they
can take time to become evident. But this is why we give you so much time to test your relationship. (The post-dated cheque, remember?) On the other hand, the effect of these patterns grows between  you over the years. This is no six-month "flash in the pan."
HOW WILL WE BE INTRODUCED?
As soon as someone registers who matches you "perfectly" (90 per cent or above) we will
contact each of you, and give you each other's name and telephone number Then, you will be
left to develop your relationship between you. For those who prefer a more social surrounding,
the Perfect Mate Project will be holding Sunday brunches at various Vancouver restaurants,
with from 20 to 40 "matched" couples attending. If you wish to join these, please check the
"Brunch" slot on the form below.
CAN I GET THIS SERVICE ANYWHERE ELSE?
No. The matching system is the exclusive property of its developers, Tim Stephens and the
Perfect Mate Project.
O.UITE FRANKLY, IF YOU CAN DO WHAT YOU SAY YOU CAN, YOUR SERVICES
SHOULD SELL FOR A THOUSAND DOLLARS. WHY IS THE FEE SO LOW?
IF YOUR FRIENDS WOULD LIKE TO REGISTER ALSO, JUST
HAVE THEM PHOTOCOPY THIS REGISTRATION FORM, FILL IT
OUT, AND MAIL IT IN. REMEMBER, THE MORE PEOPLE WHO
REGISTER, THE SOONER EVERYONE'S "PERFECT MATCH-
WILL BE FOUND - BY ENLISTING YOUR FRIENDS, YOU COULD
BE RESPONSIBLE FOR BRINGING A LASTING LOVE INTO
THEIR LIVES!
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR FREE OFFER!
ALTHOUGH HUNDREDS HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED, WE
HAVE MORE WOMEN REGISTRANTS THAN MEN. IF YOU CAN
ENLIST 3 SINGLE MALE FRIENDS TO SEND IN THEIR REGISTRATIONS, WITH A POST-DATED CHEQUE, YOU WILL BE MATCHED AND INTRODUCED TO YOUR OWN "PERFECT MATE" ABSOLUTELY FREE! TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OFFER,
SIMPLY PHOTOCOPY THE REGISTRATION FORM BELOW, AND
SEND ALL FILLED OUT COPIES IN THE SAME ENVELOPE.
MARK "FREE" ON YOUR COPY.
I 1
1      YES. PLEASE MATCH ME ACCORDING TO THE OPTION I'VE CHECKED      •
BELOW. MY CHEQUE, PAYABLE TO THE PERFECT MATE PROJECT, IS
ENCLOSED, AND POST-DATED FOR 120 DAYS. I UNDERSTAND ALL INFORMATION WILL BE KEPT STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL, AND USED
FOR NO OTHER PURPOSE THAN THE PERFECT MATE PROJECT
  FEMALE MALE	
NAME	
ADDRESS:	
TELEPHONE BIRTHDATE: Day: Month Year	
TYPE OF MATCH: Sexual/emotional.... ($15) Emotional/social ($15)
"ULTRA" .... (»30).   Cheque enclosed:	
I would like to be introduced over Sunday "brunch." Yes .... No ... .
I declare that the above information is correct. I am single or unattached
(separated/divorced), and have no communicable diseases. I release the Perfect Mate Project from all liability, beyond a refund of my fee, for any
events which may occur as a result of my "matching."
SIGNED:          Date of signing:	
U
MAIL TO:
L,
PERFECT MATE PROJECT
411 EAST 44 AVENUE
VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA
V5W 1W2
J
NOTE: In the event of a postal disruption
you can register by phone 321-9268 Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
The Iceman picketh
By DAVID FERMAN
Albert Collins should have been
arrested.
Starting at approximately 10:00
on the nights of February 7th arid
8th Collins ruthlessly and with great
volume did knowingly assault and
render berserk hysterical crowds at
the Town Pump.
Collins, who also goes by the
names of: The Icepicker, The
Iceman, The Houston Twister, The
Master of the Telecaster and The
Razor Blade, perpetrated said
assaults with one of the greatest
electric blues shows Vancouver has
ever heard.
Collins' "crime" began innocently enough. His accomplices, the
Icebreakers, unlike those of other
blues gurus, are no mere rhythm
riders but all-star solo performers in
their own right. The Icebreakers are
true blues men, you know, the type
that can make foot-wide collars and
ill-fitting polyester vests look good.
Standouts included sax players
Hugh 'Chuck' Williams, who
blasted on two altos at once, the big
man Ab Locke on tenor, and
Gabriel Fleming whose trumpet
screamed with a military force.
Leon Blue was a visual and
musical delight. Sitting on a stool
and Fleming's trumpet case, Blue, a
small balding man in a three piece
suit, played keyboards with the
relaxed air of an old man playing
checkers.
After a couple of 'bring the house
downers' the ringleader hit the
stage; lights flashed red, Collins
hugged his tan telecaster and let go
Prazak Quartet
attacks with gusto
By RICHARD WOLOSHEN
Despite a shaky start the Prazak Quartet from Czechoslovakia still
managed to dazzle and invigorate chamber music enthusiasts at the
Queen Elizabeth theatre on Tuesday.
The ensemble performed works by Mozart, Martinu and Janacek
in a program of intensely optimistic music.
On Tuesday at the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse, chamber music enthusiasts were treated to a concert by the Prazak String Quartet from
Czechoslovakia. The ensemble performed works by Mozart, Martinu and Janacek in a program of intensely optimistic music.
Mozart's string quartet No. 21, K.575 opened the concert. Unfortunately, the Czech group did not seem to feel at ease with the piece,
despite the prevailing serenity of Mozart's inspiration. The performance was technically sound, but the artists failed in the admittedly
difficult task of communicating to themselves and to the audience
the delicate balance of restraint and joyful exuberance which
characterizes so much of Mozart's chamber music. Only in the finale
did one sense that the musicians were blending without effort.
The Martinu quartet No. 7 which followed encouraged a different
spirit of commitment from the young players. Absolute assurance in
the music being played made the performance of this lively quartet
exciting.
The Prazak Quartet attacked the music with gusto. The passionate
outbursts of the first movement, the lyrical intensity of the second
and the playful finale were sensitively interpreted by a group intimately familiar with the Czech composer's works.
The highlight of the evening was a reading of the quartet No. 2
("Intimate Pages") by Leos Janacek, another Czech composer. The
personal nature of this work — inspired by Janacek's love for a
woman — contributes to its stature as one of the great quartets of the
20th-century. The Prazak Quartet did the score full justice.
Each of the four movements was brilliantly played by all four
musicians, but the hushed accompaniment of Josef Kluson on the
viola in the first two movements was particularly beautiful. The
mood swings of this quartet — from delirious ecstasy to quiet
gratitude — reflect a youthful zest which was captured magically by
the ensemble.
Any music played with such depth of feeling cannot help but exhilarate an audience. If this marvelous group ever repays Vancouver
with a visit, you owe yourself the pleasure of hearing them play!
a mercurial squeal of pure electricity.
Those first notes of aural lightning had a strange effect on the audience. No one danced. No one
moved. On reflection this is
understandable. The audience had
never heard anything resembling
Albert Collins.
That is because Collins sounds
like no one else on earth. Like his
late friend Guitar Slim he uses a
capo to chord. Using just his thumb
and index finger he practices martial arts on his beloved telecaster.
At one Albert Collins against six
strings it is no contest.
The sound sears through
everything. Solos were long but
never boring. Just when you think
he'll play another icy triplet Collins will up the volume and hold a
note in the 'canine-hearing-only-
zone.' Then when you expect
another stellar scream he'll pull
everything way down and sing, accompanying the guitar note for
rapid note a la George Benson, or
suddenly end the tune by kicking
one  leg  head  high,   spinning  180
degrees and hiding his face behind
his guitar, making w;iat had just
been a sword a shield.
After a couple of numbers the
punchy horns of Dynamite Man
snapped the crowd oul of its trance
and on to the dance floor, but all
eyes were kept on Collins. The
Twister is a constant surprise.
Collins prowls the stage in a
Chuck Berry stoop, and sings songs
with all the traditional blues
themes.
But he also displays non-
traditional sense of humour in hits
like Master Charge, a hilarious tale
of Albert shopping with his woman.
The song is at least ten minutes and
Albert performed both roles con-
sumately; Albert delivered the
mother-in-law jokes, the Fender
supplied the expletives.
Yes Albert's relationship with his
guitar is a close and often strained
one. Collins makes his guitar
friend, lover and at times almost
part of his own body.
During wild solos lovers become
enemies and it becomes hard to tell
if Collins is playing the guitar or the
other way around. His instrument
becomes a machine gun or a jack
hammer in the hands of a ninety-
eight pound weakling.
They are best when they both go
mad together. Collins leaves the
stage and takes an extended - 200
feet of extension cord - solo,
wanders into the audience as
dancers squeeze close and go insane. Wait what's this? Where is
Albert heading? Is he . . . why yes
COLLINS COURTS CONVICTION
he is heading for the bar. Gradually
Collins makes his way to the bar (no
he doesn't drink) or up to the dining room (yes he does eat), and he
has been known to go out the
building and down the street,
volume knob firmly stuck on 11.
Intermission. Backstage with
Albert and something resembling
quiet. Just above a whisper, smoking the world's longest cigarrette,
he talks of the old days. Leaning
forward with his Clint Eastwood
squint Collins explains why he
drives his own tour bus (he likes it)
and he seems nothing like the killer
one sees on stage.
Suddenly he looks up throws on
his guitar and says "I gotta go"
-shari bte abdullab
with his criminal coolness
when he realizes the Icebreakers have
been on stage alone for too long.
Just as suddenly he spins, runs back
to the end of the room and checks
out the man in the mirror — slim as
an icicle, blackshirt, shiny black
pants, white cowboy boots, narrow
goatee, he looks cool.
The second set is just as titanic.
Collins serves up most of his icey
hits including Guitar Slim's sad
trademark The Things I Used To
Do.
At two a.m. the Town Pump audience chants "Albert! Albert!"
pleading for a second encore.
Yes, Albert Collins should be arrested, because if he doesn't come
back soon it'll be a crime.
Debate of the decade a dud as Yippie and Yuppie get yappy
By PETER PRONGOS
The so-called "Debate of the
Decade" between former Yippies
Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin
that took place at the Orpheum last
Saturday was a real "dud". There
would be little point rehashing the
details of the evening.
What is significant, however, was
the issue that was supposed to be
the focus of the debate — approaches to social and political
change in the eighties. Of course,
making progressive changes is not
on the agenda of most people in
North America these days.
It wasn't even a major concern in
the far-off, legendary sixties. The
struggle for women's rights, peace,
social justice, a healthy environment, and all the other issues which
were re-born in the 1960's was waged by a small minority of the
population.
The size of that concerned
minority seems to have decreased as
selfishness and a deformed individualism   have   proliferated.
Greed is rationalized in a thousand
ways, while we are told by the Bennetts, Mulroneys, Reagans, and the
business "community" that we cannot afford to address social and
humanitarian needs. The answer,
according to federal finance
minister Michael Wilson, is for the
Canadian government to create
"more millionaires".
Jerry Rubin agrees with Wilson -
the pursuit of money and power will
ultimately benefit everybody.
Adam Smith's "invisible hand" has
been reborn and it is only a matter
of time before all of these goodies
"trickle down" to the majority of
citizens.
But Rubin goes one giant
(American) step beyond Wilson and
the old-line conservatives. He contends that the "baby-boom"
generation ("Yuppies") will soon
take power and will then be able to
implement the ideals that the hippies, Yippies, and other radicals
fought for in the sixties. These
young, upwardly mobile, profes
sional, idealistic, and affluent tren-
doids are the real new wave, the
hope of the future.
This fantasy seems to be nothing
more than an attempt to justify
Rubin's own decision to grab a
large slice of the American pie. His
story is not that unusual. It's whaV
people mean when they tell the
young: "Just wait until you're my
age. You'll change." And for people like Rubin, that's exactly what
happens. It's predictable and boring.
Hoffman is a different story
altogether. He's older than he was
in the heyday of "Woodstock Nation", probably a bit wiser, and he
hasn't given up. In fact, despite
what the media would have u:
believe, most sixties activist
haven't sold out either. As Hoffman put it: "I want to counteract
the myth of idealism turned cynical
. . . that '60's idealists got disillusioned in the '70s and greedy in the
'80s. It didn't happen to me and it
See page 22.AGING Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, f
Lesbian nun mystifies church
By DAMARIS SARGENT
Lesbians are captivating the
academic community.
Judith Brown's Immodest Acts:
The Life of a Lesbian Nun in
Renaissance Italy, is the product of
a major historical discovery. Brown
tells a fascinating story of a female
mystic in a village in 17th-century
Italy. Using documents from a
series of ecclesiastical investigations
between the years 1619-1623,
Brown has pulled together an enthralling history of a woman, her
religion and her sexuality.
Immodest Acts: The Life of a
Lesbian Nun in Renaissance Italy
by Judith Brown
Oxford Press
The ecclesiastical investigation
into the life of Benedetta Carlini,
abbess and professed mystic of the
Convent of the Mother of God in
Pescia, Italy, is important as one of
the few instances where the practice'
and detail of Western attitudes
towards lesbian sexuality is known.
A scary and vivid picture is painted,
with the Church doubting Benedet-
ta's holiness as well as determining
the extent of Benedetta's sin.
When Benedetta Carlini was interrogated by church officials to
determine whether or not her visions and ecstasies were of divine or
diabolical inspiration, the story of
Benedetta's affair with another nun
was uncovered. The amazing conclusion, however, was that few men
within the Church had any idea who
a lesbian was, or of what a lesbian
sex act included.
Brown details the long history
behind the Church's ignorance,
beginning with St. Augustine, who
laid the foundation for Western
thought (and ignorance) on sexuality. He defined any act as unnatural
if it was not vaginal intercourse. No
specific mention of lesbian sex acts
was included, but his proclamation
that "unnatural and sinful those
sexual acts in which intercourse did
not take place in a vessel fit for procreation," was sufficiently broad
enough to include lesbian sex acts.
In the 17th century, theologian
Theodore of Tarsus considered the
penance for lesbian practices to be
the same as for masturbation,
whereas male homosexual acts were
considered cf a much more serious
nature. However, while the specific
male homosexual act of sodomy
was prohibited in the Catholic
Church, authorities were baffled
over what acts they were prohibiting for lesbians.
Brown points out that these
authorities did not have any concept of what a lesbian was, and
therefore, if lesbian sexuality did
not exist in their minds, then neither
did lesbians. Ignorance
predominated male views of
women's sexuality in general
throughout this Pre-Modern age.
Thus,   when   fellow   nun   Bar-
tolomea confessed her involvement
with Benedetta in engaging in the
"most immodest acts" the officials
amusingly lacked both the intellectual and imaginative capacity to
understand the behaviour she
described. Brown portrays their
slow but eventual understanding of
mutual masturbation, kissing and
carressing between two women.
They could not, however, fully
comprehend Benedetta's interest in
women exclusively.
Brown captures the vivid sexual
life of Benedetta Carlini, explaining
it within Benedetta's own extraordinary life as a visionary and
religious ecstatic. Her book is a rare
insight into a woman's ambition,
relationship to authority, her
economic and sexual options.
Benedetta Carlini's life is an exciting and moving story, interesting
because it is the first such account
to be detailed. Brown has crafted a
superb narration, both historically
accurate and entertaining.
Mack truck of a play needs better gears
By ROBERT GARFAT
Hornv. violent, mmiL and
pathetic, Fool tor I ovc, Sam
Shepard's homage to lamilidl lust,
is one Mack truck ol a pla\
Fddie is a loser, an aimless rodeo
nder He is a borderline
psvehopath, whose *onl is
tormented bv lust for his half-sister,,,
Mdv He left her some time ago for"
"the 0 ountess", and now be wants
her back
tool For Love
Arts Club Seymour
fey Sum Shepard
dtjf^bjL^Wrtgtt
May is the epitome of battered
love. She is, by turn, sexy,
dangerous and vulnerable. She is
obsessed, equally, with getting free
of Eddie and hanging on to him.
Daring the first third of the play,
the two spar relentless!) with each
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love andthefl lashing out and tan*
ting afresh. They are awaiting the'
arrival of Muitin, May's new b«.au.
Bv the tune he arrives the battle
line* are clearly drawn, and Martin
becomes the hapless pawn in a
potentially deadly game.
The fourth and pivotal character
in Fool for Love is the "old nym!'.^
May aod^cUie's father. Thttttgh
oat jh* jgjtof he sits in a rocking
chafr «J$#ttjf-0ff-stage, sipping Jack
Daniels, fie interacts with the
others periodically, whenever cir-
, <nrnstajK^whl$d<^R ^^cdhol
dictate.
He » & semi-mystical character,
who a4£4$a$y exists only in May and
Eddie's n&uny,,«
' 'Hh Pi»& stt^fo'imrstrau-
the source of the ©lay's problem.
the legacy of guflrwhich haunts his
children.
Fool for Love is primal stuff. It
requires a sfease of occasion, a sense
that something vital is happening
Shepard strips the play of all or-
essene
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elevates what could have been a
seedy country-and-western soap
opera into the realm of ritual
theatre.
This is "two-by-four" theatre at
its best. In the hands of a strong
director, the audience should never
knwjvhat hit 'em. Unfortunately,
in tbe,*€ijnvnt production at the
ArtsVCsBtb Sevmour, hit-and-run
becomes hit-and-miss.
The setting for Fool for Love is a
broken dj@wii motel unit in the New
Mexico "desert. The wonderfully
perverted ' perspective of Ted
Roberts' set pulls our focus down to
'he single bedandJtacky aluminum
and arborBe kitchen table and
chairs which are the.rooms only fur-
mshingsTThe clean lines and sparse
dressuig/of; Roberts* set tend it a
shrinc-13s4feeliflg, which is just as it
should be.
Andrew Rhodes and Norma
Mathesoa were outstanding in their
leading roles. Mr. Rhodes endowed
Eddie with the ruthlessness of a
hunter, and Ms. Matheson's May
had the sharp edge ol a lover scorned, tempered with a frailty full of
hope, and open to hurt once more.
Both played their roles with a
-relentless grace.
Douglas Newell, as the hang-dog
Martin, possessed a graceless charm
which endeai'ed him to the opening
night audience, and provided a
welcome source of levity in an
otherwise intense evening.
As portrayed by Dwight McFee,
the old man lacked spirit and definition, which would have lent
credibility to this man, who proudly
proclaims to have loved both May
and Eddie's mothers with "a love
that was equal in every way!" A
character capable of such love, one
who is capable of spawning two
such driven and compelling offspring must be instilled with a lust
for life which continues to possess
and consume his children.
Mr. McFee's old man simply did
not fill the ticket. Because of this,
the production lacked a core
around which the play could pivot.
The fault here must not be laid
upon Mr. McFee's performance.
This is a strong script, and requires
a director capable of transcending
the printed page. Janet Wright's
direction, while occasionally novel,
is largely uninspired. Her interpretation is, with rare exception,
pedestrian. Moments which cry out
for a broad comic stroke are
sacrificed for naturalism, and other
moments which should shock merely surprise. Subtlety in pacing is
sacrificed for speed.
Shepard stated that the play
should be performed "relentlessly
without intermission", but
relentlessness is not necessarily
always speed, and while Fool for
Love is a Mack truck of a play, this
production lacks a driver who
knows when to gear down.
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Loopy lesbian love story laughs
By SAMANTHA BRENNAN
National Features Writer
Canadian University Press
I, Vampire is not your typical lesbian love story.
Strange things begin to happen to
Sterling O'Blivion, a dance instructor who's really a 700-year-old vampire from Transylvania, when she
falls in love with Virginia Woolf,
who's really a Rysemian sea-pig
from outer space on a mission to
save humanity from our own
madness.
I, Vampire
by Jody Scott
Ace Science Fiction Books
The Rysemians have assumed the -
likeness of dead fictional characters
from North American culture, including Mary Worth, General Pat-
ton, and of course Virginia Woolf,
to rescue the planet. If they fail,
Earth will have to be terminated
before our psychosis spreads.
Author Jody Scott uses this
rather unusual plot to make a stinging and hilarious critique of modern
North American society. Through
the voice of Benaroya (Virginia
Woolf's name on Rysemus), Scott
diagnoses our sickness and gives
clues to a cure.
"A prime test for madness and
paranoia is called 'insurance'. If a
species has 'insurance' it is patently
doomed. Only a toy-like,
salvinating pent-up bunch of
gruntlings could conceive of such a
sociopathic type of gambling," says
Benaroya. "Another test is 'forms
to fill our'. Any person or organism
that asks you to fill out any kind of
'form' whatsoever is an entrapment
specialist of the sneakiest kind and
should be avoided or if possible
shot."
Another flaw of the Today People, as O'Blivion refers to 20th century humans, is their need to see
themselves as living above nature,
not in it, and superior to all other
species on the planet. The Ryse
mians chose to enlist O'Blivion in
their struggles because as a vampire
she is only too aware of her part in
the cycle of life, needing six ounces
of blood every so often to survive
and as someone who has outlived 52
lovers and seven centuries, she's
wiser than most.
O'Blivion and Benaroya set out
to reach the women of America
(who are easier to save than the
men, being just a little less messed
up) by selling Famous Men's Sperm
kits. Door-to-door the flog the
sperm of earth's most well-known
men, from the Shah of Iran and Billy Graham to Elvis Presley, to
bored housewives who want super-
children. It's all a guise to talk to
women about their lives, sex and
the reasons for their boredom.
For the Rysemians that's at least
half of what's wrong with evil —
it's dull. Benaroya and her comrades are also fighting the Sajorans,
who are as boring as they are bad
and who are stealing humans for
the intergalactic slave trade. Thursday, February 13, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
;«»H€»H«tf*m"?€»;'4fft&«»r^*^^
Dear Eddy—Baby:
Wanta go home and get naked?
Love your "Pay" SteaBn Mama
C.
My hope, my inspiration rise,
when I think of old OPUS staring
into your eyes. My sweaters are
surely in heaven, its true. But I
must be happier because I love
you.
 XO, P.
Honey Bunny (& Saucerus),
You're the cutest! All my love
to you for sharing bad and good
times,
 Hunnybear
For a Valentine message I send
this sincerely. I love you my
darling, my sweetly, my dearly.
To my bunny—Faced Beauty,
I love you...Billions!
 Your dear sweet PT
M.P.,
Roses are red
Violets are blue
There may be others named
Ted
But this one loves only you.
 KL
FLV
Don't give up!
 Love Goof
To G.H.
You need not observe the stars
to search for a love that's true.
The one who really loves you
might be standing next to you.
Happy Valentine's Birthday
 Love BoBo
Happy Lovers' Day baby pooder
bear!
Snuggles Awaiting
Love Forever
Windjammer, Toddler,
 Pumpkin, Pie!
Spider-bum, Vive la France.
 Love Emma-Cee
ToB
Thanks for the times
that we have
and that we touch
furtively, artfully,
incredibly.
¥
— Lefs 'associate' always—
 Love J.
Sometimes a relationship can
spoil a friendship. But for me it
hasn't spoiled a thing. Nothing is
ever to slow. There is just that
much more time to understand.
 oxxxo Harvard
Pondsllmes; boerlick, batlick,
cowlick, furlick, murlick,
joelick, cjedebbinz yokoan-
drewtamangelaxzgerriberniann
heinsmarthanishatoddter-
ridetegene Thanx 4 a great 'AC
B-day.
 Love DBH
A.D. PI California Girl
You know something,
your pretty cute.
How bout maybe being my
 Valentine
Happy Valentine to the Toddler
 Love the Kid xoxo
A (Toadie) T,
Our friendship began in
summer '85
At times t'was the only thing
That kept us alive
The times we held to get thru
our sorrow
I   always   hoped  4  a   better
tomorrow
I pray that God holds U well
I know at times ifs hard to tell
An extended hand and a
delicate touch
It's our friendship to me that
means so much.
 Love DBH
Tu es qu'H me faut. A memory of
OASA and Mon. PM gets better
all   the   time.   Besides- they're
more fun than Marx.
 x & o'a Toujour*
For lena, my favourite little
Italian, on this special occasion:
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY!!!
Hope  you  save  some  of that
lovin' you've been giving Opus
for me...	
To my H.B.
I like you a little bit but I love
you lots.
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY!!!
Love forever. Your Pookums!
BEANIE WEENIE, Roses are
Red, Violets are blue, Your
Body's so Perfect, I Love slipping it to you. Love BOO
NEB, COUPON
Good for: a lifetime supply of
Love, Wet Kisses, & Grizzly
Bear Hugs. (No substitutions).
Happy Valentines Day
Princnebess.
Moby Dick: You've made my
year. Why do I like you so
much? The reasons could *
anywhere from 1 2 69. Like I
said B4 we'ed make a great
comedy team cuz I'm ORAL and
you're HARDY! Be mine
tonight! MQ? LOVE & KISSES,
B&C
To Michelle and Kelly, our Surrogate   Mothers,   we're   still
waiting    for    our   Bi-Racial
Babies!! Lots of Love.
The BOBBSEY TWINS
Dear Andy,
Here's to Red lights & Vanier
Beer Nites! Nothing, Nothing,
Sweet, Sweet Nothing! Love,
Joanne
To "TIPPY TOES" the Miner,
By far the prettiest of the Geers!
Wishing you a HAPPY VALENTINES   DAY!   From  your  old
Whitespot Flunky.
T; Shoot for the STARS Babe, T
Hey Baby, Happy Valentine's
Day, From all of us, Love
James, Opus, SG
My Dearest Steel: What can I
say? What can I Do? Where can
we go to Show my love for You?
Happy Valentines Day! XOX,
Sparkling Champagne.
THUMPER
I deerly wish u a wunderful
valentines day. We'll have fun
running through sunny forests.
LuvS.
Champagne (Nancy)
a day is not complete
without a sip of you
Elegant Bubbling and sweet
But best of all
you tickle my nose (toes) c.b.
Love and kisses for Ivone from
BAA BAA BLACK SHEEP
To A Civil:
Your name is what you do
How about an audition with a
different Tenor? Animal
Happy Valentines Al and Kim!!
Live on the Wild Side!!!
Love Majority Repressed
  Action (WK)
Dear Snuggle-Bunny,
Looking into your eyes,
I know our love will last forever.
Love always, Sweet-Buns
A Phi Bear
Two whole years have come and
gone   and   out   love   is   going
strong.
So with a song and pretty rhyme
Will you be my Valentine
 Kaptain
Hi   Jag,   Nanny,   Nena,   Nicky,
Sylvia!!!
Surprise! I like you all especially
seeing Jag in a skirt.
Hugs and Kisses from Jug
 The KM1
Dear Valentine,
ERES MI, AMIGO MEJOR Y MI
AMANTE. TE AMARE SIEMPRE.
 LOVES.
Tlhis is a message for
Mr. G. Vine:
Itsezinthjonzthtyursmplydvine
ifthtizthcasthnhelyurplaseor-
mine?
To my dear Trish,
I do so wish,
that you will be
forever mine.
This and every Valentine's. FMP
Princess,
Quickly it passes, time
each day I love you more.
Will you be my Valentine?
You who I adore.
Love Ber-Ber
Happy Valentine's Day
Kenny! Here's to Mickey Mouse
.   .   .  With  endless  hogs  and
quiches — Jenny
C.S. Thanks for a great year
"Lefs stay together" V.G.
To my little mugwump
So, ifs been over 2 years
So what - big deal Love DC
Mama S. Yee, get serious
I love you! Please don't leave
me! Think of all the children we
have!
Broken hearted Papa D. Dang
Dearest Chinou
Happy Valentine's to you and
our little one. Forever yours.
Pinky
DEAREST STEVE:
Though distance may separate
us, my love for you grows
stronger each day. I'm crazy for
you sweetie!!!! LOVE FOREVER
AND A DAY - FANNY.
P.S. Always remember the line
from the card with the bears!
LOVE YOU!
Cookie, how bout some more
negative calories sometime? I
sure enjoyed the last batch!
Cookie Jar
Wee Gee,
Wit-B, Su-she, Bir-dee, U-me
Go 2gether bu-t-flee, Happy VD
DD2B
Kevin; forget the pink shirt. Actions speak louder than words. I
love you. Forever whamo
whamo ^^
Kathleen ^D
Dear Pooh-Pooh,
This past year has been great
but this summer is going to be
better. Everytime I see you I
love you even more. Happy
Valentine's Day!
All my love the lazy one
The Brothers of ZETA BETA
TAU would like to wish their
LITTLE SISTERS, the GIRLS OF
PANHELLENIC and the
PHRATERES all the best in the
months ahead.
WE LOVE YOU GIRLS!
To the "GQ IO's" of the Study
Tour. After bedcheck, your
rooms or ours? Don't forget the
"appetizers and T.P." Sye-sye ni
for the memories! Lots of love
and "sweat",
CYC Gals of the Loveboat
To my Andy, Happiness is sitting by your feet and sharing a
sunset.
Love Letty
Keener-O
Hey Superman, you've put me in
twinkik heaven. Can I be your
Lois Lane? Your all American
looks don't fool me. Watch out
for empty bathrooms (no comments). Hey babe, thanks for
the best year ever. Here's to
many more.
Love, Sperry-Lips
A tome for mother:
Pat Maheini, Miami Mice, rampant patronage, tomato soup,
dancing beagles, love — they-ve
all been there. Eddie
»Ht »H€»H«»HffrHt +>n+y**d*+M+y****V^+yAVd}
%it Page 14
w*mmm4
H
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Februi
K«««s«*x««^«tNcw«»a^
Men(?)    of   AIESEC-UBC:
Grandpa, Mr. Walrus, Mickey
Moose, Crayolas, the man with
red spots, the Fruitbasket
Emperors, Bogart, Charlie
Chaplin, the Halloween
hellraiser, the old male execs
who did it for the experience -
will the new?. All fellow
AIESECERS and ... of course
the Aussie Invaders. Happy
V-Day. We love you all. The
AIESEC women!!!
Maura Ma Chroi: Mo Gra Who?
You, dummy: My peak experience always.
Molly loves fer
Carol in Education:
Where arrrre you??
Michael in Electrical
Rick
Thinking of you now and always
Happy Valentine's Day
Love you very much
Your best friend
Ma Petite Chou,
Je ne peux pas attendre jusque.
Je pourrai echer ton corps
Apres lavoir envelopper de la
yaourt Pamplemousse. Tout
mon Amour mousse.
To my sportsmachine, there
you sit, glasses in place, hockey
stats in front of your face, here I
sit, night after night, watching
you, in perfect delight, despite
our misgivings, our past
mistakes, I love you so much,
I'll never forsake, life without
money, just you and me honey . .
.... the love of your life.
S.L.K., PB's Mend;
Why don't you put on your
fuschia shoes and come dance
with me. Nudge, nudge, wink,
wink, G. Pumpkin S.
Dear Snugglebuns
The world's best hugger. Dinner
Saturday? Yes its from me.
Love you
Roddly
Beware!!
The  nookie  monster  wants  to
eat your nookie
To my darling RSY
My love for you is endless
Please be mine. Your Goofball
Happy Valentine's Day Pookie
Love Love Love
Sweet Pea
To   the    Breakfast   Club    —
Thanks for making my mornings
so wonderfully interesting! Happy Valentine's Day! Love ya all,
Janice
To my love Kyty
You know I want you
You and me baby
In an orgy for 2. Afshin
Snuggles,
Your smile brightens each day,
and your eyes melt my heart! Be
my Valentine! I love you!
Snoozer
Dear Susie (the S.M.),
Parking's your favorite, Jiffy is
me, forget any others because
I'm all you need. No more
looney trips & no more fights
too. Love Charlie
To the sisters of Alpha Phi —
have a happy, happy Valentine's
Day! Love ya, Janice
Margwai . . .
A friend indeed when I was
need
To Cutie Pie
Even though we're apart
You're still in my heart
Happy Valentine's Day
Love Hugmuffln
BODY (BAWDY) COUNT:
Favourable conditions have
definitely raised the rates of
interest! Be my Valentine!
XOXO
To my Skipper
Have a Happy Valentine's Day
From    your   loving    Captain
K.P.
Hey Casper!
I bet this could be worth one
hug! What do you say?
"The Nurse"
You Martin!
Happy Valentine's Day!
P.S. How do you like your eggs?
My Dearest Tex
Thanx for everything!
Your buddy Tonto!
-C
N.
Dear Brenda, my love for you
will forever grow. I am looking
forward to sparkly day, the Big
M, and the three B's and
avoiding the big D.
Love always, Doug.
Alaska man.
How could I concentrate on the
northern lights with you behind
me, so strong and bold. Please
be mine!! Hugs and kisses,
Matchbook Lady
D.M. For all the times we've had
together whether good or bad,
just know I loved then, I love
you now and I'll love you
forever! Be my Valentine! Love
Always, me.
Shro,    love    and   laughter,
cookies and D.C., lazy mornings and sunny afternoons.
By my Valentine!  Love Waffle*
Joy! We can hit it off if we try! I
want to be your special guy.
Love U.B.C. Squash Club guy.
Dear Nibbles: If you'll be my
Valentine I'll show you my
culinary skills. First Fll bring
you to a slow boil ... I love you,
you delicious thing! Hugs &
Kisses, Truffles
"Shirley you jest!"
Your friends will protest
when they hear
what has not yet been told:
You've made my life sweet,
since the day we did meet;
Love from Grant (so now they
all know!)
TedE.
Happy Valentine's Day Sweet E.
I love you, Fll always love you.
Shell E. XOX
P.S. Big bearhugs when you get
home.
Andrea,
You worked at Ricki's in P.C. I
would like to meet you. How
about 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 18 by
the copiers in the SUB? See you
then! Shy Guy.
Chers    Hommes    du    Club:
N'oubliez jamais le pouvoir de
1'amour .... Affectueusement,
Franchement Adorable,
Ravissement Belle, Si Dynami-
que & Mysterieusement
Liberee. P.S. Grant, tu rest
encore notre "zookeeper"
prefere.
 j	
Dear Mitch, Modest, intelligent, talented, charming &
handsome. Can you be real?
A Secret Admirer
To all the cute organisms in
Micro. Happy Valentine's Day!
Lots    of   love,    Roderick   &
Pumkin
To the girls of Ballet /Jazz
club: I have really missed you
since I moved. Come take a
walk past my way sometime. I
really miss the deep knee-
bends. Love Bruce
Lambchops: Tm hopelessly in
love with you and ifs all your
fault. Now that you got me
started, you'd better finish it -
BE MY VAL 4EVER!
Snuggles and Cuddles,
BOBEAR
Scab, If you ever need any more
plumbing   just   call   me.    My
fingers were made for fishing!
Love Dickhead
To my beautiful shmiel: may we
cont so share many skwishes,
occasional bonks and frequently unspoken whats.
To Clark Kent, here's some random thoughts for you: No
glasses, White Spot, wine, wild
type fruit flies. Out of Africa,
visual distortion, Out of Out of
Africa, Whitespot, no
Whitespot, Rose and Thorn,
Toby Dark, Biltmore; my place,
6:00 a.m. Also . . . trust me I
know what I'm doing.
Love, the Starship Enterprise
Steven, Eric, Arthur
My thanks to I.M. UBC
for giving us the chance to be
and so I'd like to take this
time
to say to you I'm glad you're
mine.
Have fun in Montreal — I'll be
missin' ya!
With love, your silly nurse.
"GENA", Lefs you and me, blow
this scene and live in fantasy!
Your favorite Alpha Doha Phi
Guy!
"C" If looks could kill, you
would start world war III all by
yourself. Be my thing-me-Bob.
"B"
To the S.U.D.S. Be my VALENTINES. What a bunch of
sweethearts! Lots of Love and
Kisses. B.
To my hard-working Execs and
others who should have known
better! Thanks!!! Happy V.D.!
LoveW
To the gorgeous girls who serves
me my chocolate-chip cookies.
Td love to take you out but unfortunately Fve got ties back
east.
Ice-cream fanatic and
chocoggoholic. Thanks for
humoring me. L. a radical.
Maraschino cherries are redder
than sweatshirts which won't fit
the smile on your face when I
win. Hee-hee
Have a sparkling Valentines Day
Love M
Webster, Sherman and Herbie
IlShlrley Yee!!
Happy "B" and "V" Day!
Best Wishes.
-MC?
Dear C.
Even   if  you   are   a   little   late
sometimes, I still love you.      R
SILLY GOOSE (A.K.A. H.B.)
This Valentine's for you
From James and Opus too!
Come D.S. and pmor with me
because I heart you!!
ALWAYS EDNA
My snugglepup, I love you so
much and I hope our F & S
times go on forever and ever!
Love, your Sascha
Hey Goof! Happy Valentine's
Day. Td say something nice but
Td rather be mean.        Tap-Tap
Happy Valentine's  Day to  a
great mixed dbls partner! Good
luck with the brain.
To the UBC Engineer*. Words
cannot express our appreciation
for all your assistance, support
and kind gestures this year.
You've been great! Thank you
and Happy Valentine's Day.
The UBC Nurses
To James Canova — We've
been admiring you from afar and
now is our chance to show our
love for you so we can share a
coke. From LiR.
Happy Valentine's to
doublefault, ace lovegame,
topspin and lob. From the
hunks of the Tennis Club.
Sainte NHouche (Neige Blanche),   me   souviens-tu?
Bonjournee MJ86.
Farley ... I think you oughta be
in pictures. How about doing
some reeling with me!
To my Mother and Father
These words I script,
the thoughts that say
my feelings for you,
in my own special way.
This poem exists
so you shall know
that a proud son am I,
with much love for you both.
Anonymous
*
dWd:**d«*d*x<<Vd*m>}*&^
To claim the above prize for th
the authors of the above winnin
receipt to room 266 in SUB. iry 13, 1986
ItftMtft* «^«»MC»H
W
THE    UBYSSEY
H«tHttN« Vd'«+:-d:*K:'**>* *-■!'
Page 15
L
^
'/
■v
d are the memories
hold
r.
leased are the feelings
e share
sar.
ough the act is over,
ay,
not end.
igh the sun does set,
iurely rise again.
Love Warren
Dear Shenil,
I've waited a long time for this.
Will you be my Valentine?
With lots of love, Rustum.
To My Bear,
Happy Valentines Day!
Love your Liddo Bunny.
Happy Valentine's Day Arnie!
Ti Amo Princess
Remoh Nacho
Dear Tracy: Tom knows, Tina
knows, Ralph knows, Beatrix
knows, but don't tell Shandy
that I love you. Klaus
A day without Otter
is like a day without orange
juice.
To the Dang family: Happy
Valentines Day everyone —
especially you, Shirley, on your
birthday. From the past Miss
HKB 1985.
6 December, 1962
What a wonderful person, she
if but for something divine
so this mongrel might share
a smile and give liberty.
Warm kisses for
stunning, wonderful, sensational, gorgeous, sexy and
beautiful. LovS.C.
To my Teddy Bear,
You will always be inside of me
forever in my heart, I love you
Klssee Kissee . .Cherish
To Carlsa, the most beautiful
girl I met, have a Happy Valentine's Day Y. Oh Nuts!! H.
Michael Partrick
You're big & strong you he-man
you, but underneath you're gentle, just one look and I can tell
ifs love. (But then I'm mental).
Farrell's
coast
if is the
to my
soften
JVTJL
* 1
^H     The most beautiful thing about
^H     time is spending it with you.
^M     Happy VD Cheeps.
^H                            All my love Snap.
^H     Cumquat,
^H     Be my Valentine. I want to hug
^H     every inch of you!!! with equal
^H     parts of lust and lust       Dinzey.
^^M      To my Tasmanian Devil on the
^H     court
jjffjH                Happy Valentines!!
■                         Love Wally
Helen Barboaa: My huge crush
on you has not fizzled one teeny
bit since Langara Jan. '83. You
and your eyes make me melt,
you sweetie-pie, you!
JiAi
The eloquence of your kiss
is the elixir of my life.
To my favourite
wrestling mate.
This bare-hug's for you!
Love, "Wonk"
To: The cutest track team
manager. Are you crazy enough
to be mine?
From: The hurdle-basher
(Baldy) xoxo
Mi
Marvelous (Donna) More,
please. Love your twit (up high).
Dear Marvin Monchichi (C.H.)
Don't ever stop being the
special person that you are.
Love, Aly
P.S. You're the inspiration
Lisa Go, thinking of you on this
and every day. Just: thought I
would put this in print... I love
you . . . Love David.
Mickey,
Elephant shoes for always.
Love Louine
Bear Bear,
Did you think I would forget?
Love Princess
2Phephee: You are SO
SPECIAL TO ME that I can not
stay away from you. Will you be
my valentine? Hugs & KISSES
FOREVER xox Coach xox
O'tay Buckwheat, I'll store
your acorns anytime! Love
Akin
T.G. I dig your mother's taste in
clothes. Fish
"Jan-July". I hope you're always
part of my lounge act — Love
ya!!
"Dan August"
HAPPY V DAY TO KEN & THE
SWIMMERS. Remember: 20
days to Ciau's — and everyone's
going to be there!
To David and Ann
May the love of Valentine's Day
mend your broken limbs.
LoveCJ
Cat — Happy Valentine's Day to
someone sweeter than
chocolate, more addictive than
PB. LoveCJ
To my Princess Honeybun,
As swift as each year has flown
by, my love for you has grown
proportionately. Happy 7th
V-Day, Boo Bear
ODE to MEL:
Even though we're miles apart
You'll always be in my heart
I know it may sound corny
Snowflakes still make me . . .
The seasons come and go
Winter turns into spring
But whenever I see eyelashes
I can still taste those
snowflakes
What was can never be (again)
Of that, you'll surely agree
But if someday you cannot see
I'll gladly clear off the
snowflakes.
(Slurp!)
Happy Valentine's Day, Mel.
It was great while it lasted.
Huey, Dewey & Lewey
To the Brothers of
Beta Theta Pi,
Thank you for all your support at
our functions this year. No, I
haven't forgotten Randall!
The Head Nurse.
Happy Valentine's Day to my
favourite "CIVIL"ized mink and
Mercedes provider. To bridge
the gap in my heart meet me Fri.
at 9 p.m. Popcorn supplied.
Luv, your Mugwump
My Dearest M:
Once upon a time ... I love you
more and more each day. They
lived happily forever after . . .
Easily yours forever.Y.S.B.xox
To the love of my life:
I never thought I could love
a man
more than I love my dog. Boo;
But you came along & stole
my heart when you looked
at me with your eyes of blue;
Twas a crisp day in March
in anatomy class;
when we met & studied
so we both would pass;
a first class we managed
to make
& that seemed to seal our fate;
You said "There isn't anything
we can't do";
& so I fell in love with you.
Your love for me is oh, so rare
& with you I want my life
to share
& from you Bear,
I will not depart,
for I love you E,
with all my heart.
Sapphire, Remember Whistler
and New Year's Eve? The good
times always bring back smiles.
I hope there are many more. I
love you, ifs the truth.
All my love, Pom Pom
Sportsfan
Thanks to you VD can be a lot of
fun
Much Love OP
BUI
Burgesnarf! (DEF: NDH, pg 472)
BUII
Rhonda (Zest)
I think you are a big pooh.
Andrew
Happy Valentine's Day
Scooter! I love you! Thanks for
making my life so wonderful!
Yours always, Buffy
Burger*: You are my dream
come true. I love you and will
never leave you. Together we
can "sail" above the clouds.
Forever, Lise
C.J.: The pool is fast.
Your legs are hairy. Make C.I.'s
and we'll all be merry!
Linguinl — here's to more
Spaghetti dinners in the future -
and more. Love C.S.
Randy Gurten:
Dog^gone it • I love you, too!
pant, pant, pant. Charlotte
Dear Moo, Alia* "M" • Baby:
How about flourentine ice-c,
Parislen food, Russian ballet &
a Venetion hotel room in the big
T.O.? Miss you & love ya a
whole bunch! Forever Meow
For my very own Bad luck
Shlebrock: Ifs the best, I must
admit, its on your Love I thrive.
And as the year draws to an end
I hope our marks survive. Love
Mr. Impossible.
Dear Keith,
Warning: Only 77 days of
freedom left. Make the most of
it! Love Sue XO.
Rusty
Je TAime
Be my valentine
Smells Good
Hey little girl (me again mantel). Thought Td say I love you.
Happy Valentine's Day. Love,
your mere.
•• 'Sigma Chls in love"*
Wendy Cho, Time for the secret
initiation into love. From your
frat cat . . .Patrick***
To my long distance Valentine: Can't give you a hug or a
kiss. But I can tell you just what
I miss.
Dearest Sid,
Here is a FORMAL apology for
KIRSEN at you for BUSTing
LOOSE. yours, O-CHERRY
To Mickey: HURRAY! You do
want to go see 101 spots with
me! You are my chocolate
mountain of joy Mickey. I love
you forever, Minnie xoxoxoxo
modi d . . . love your hugs &
kisses,    love    our    special
moments, love your . . . little
tush!
"wo ai ni" . . . xox IT1 mojo
My Cuddly Orient Rat
Rick,Wishing you were here . . .
with me! Sweet dreams,
Tiger Alice
To my dearest Ray, Ever since
you have appeared in my life,
life's meaning is love's magic.
Luv, Nancy
To my sexy Valentine, a kiss
away. A tough away. Wherever
you are, I'll always LUV you!
With bumpats and kisses,
Sniffles.
Sunny Bunny — To a
bodacious        woman, a
tropological Valentine from an
efemeral admirer. Pretty
numinous! • sweaty palms
Victoria Kathleen, My ownest,
be my Valentine, my lady-love,
my squaw, Thank god for
crossword puzzles — god bless
G. Bernard Shaw. Love Ort
Dear Penguin Lover, when
you've graduated and you're
gone will I still be number one?
I surely hope so yes I do 'cause
all my love is meant for you.
BEBE: You're so .. . exlstensial!
Like no more nausea. Wanna
jump into the void avec moi?
Je f aime, D.
To Bert, Hugs and Kisses from
across the puddle.
Love Yunoho
i "Proofers Choice Awards"
l entry should bring his or her
*v:;»ivx« *,-&•>>•
%
;.-:;«■:;«»>;:,■:« »HC»Nt»H
•W
S» Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
J**
*;^«.k-:;«i^»^
To Darling Bel
Happy Valentine's
ShafHq
CB:
Will you be mine
Oh, sweet Valentine
and let us dine, on cookies
& wine
A soon to be architect
To Boo Boo
In case you missed the other
one . . . Happy Valentine's
SFUC
Sarah Aquarius:
Pay attention to who loves you,
especially those with dark, curly
hair. Financial matters improve
when a romantic gent takes you
to dinner. Put your car out of its
misery and shoot it in the head.
Your smile turns men into
helpless mush. Let a young man
with an Irish name cuddle you
until emotional and physical
nirvana arrive fm:
Blarney Stn.
Boubla
Did I ever tell you I love you?
Fm going to fybo
PS: The schnoog Is watching us!
Your French Maid
Norm Oberson
(The Hot Commodity)
Don't give up so easily!
Love from the woman in hot
pursuit.
My dear Jennifer
You keep me hopping
with lust and affection
will you be the topping
on my dream confection?
An Admirer
To chubby cheeks: A super big
GWAGWA and a dozen red
roses, from some romantic guy.
Dream Girl
Through Glory Days and Injured
eye, have three or thirty years
gone by?
A white heron on snow is hard to
distinguish; but the ravens, how
they stand out.
Happy VD Michael. Ag.
To Peter F. (Yes I mean U
AstroBoy) Happy Valentines
Dayl How original. Be good on
your side of the campus. Write
me a letter?
Love Eileen
I formally protest K.T. being
called a homo. He has shown
great determination in proliferating the Japanese people.
Keep it up Buckaroo, you're the
best! J.G.
Little Snapper. A year ago you
ran because you enjoyed it. But
now you are a machine, an
aerobic machine, and your enjoyment for the sport has
transformed. This change has
brought about yet another
beautiful attraction that attracts
me closer to you. I LOVE YOU
FIONA. Keep up the fantastic
work. HVD Brian
Fellow Langley Lover: Hope
this makes you feel sheepish so
we can have a real baaad time. I
like to watchl Love your
significant other.
To Simon Seshadri (Da Prex).
Congratulations! Fm very proud
to know you, a man of such
talent and personality. Happy
V.D.
Your California love Bunny
Beautiful Belgian, Bathroom
sex is the best — smile at me in
the morning and Fll jump you
again — much love.
Fuzzy and Firm
Dearest LlnL
Always be my woo-woo.
I love you, Winston
TO OUR BROTHERS OF
SIGMA CHI: Roses are red,
Violets are blue. The sexiest
guys on campus are the
sweetest too! Happy V-Day!
Love the Sister Slgs
211819 8565 35 3143115 90
05750858 94 0585405 2525
312
To Jeph, If you carry the thermos, ril keep my toenails to
myself, xox the mother of your
bastard son.
RumbaH man — I miss Robson
walks; evening talks. Heartache
mends, wish we were friends.
Your ex princes*
To the big H — You always
brighten my day, so glad you
would go out with Mil — Hugs
and kisses. phone Pal
Elizabeth Milobar. The best
things in life are free - like the
dinner Til buy you If you meet
me at Jonathan's at seven p.m.
on Tuesday. You'll recognize me
- just look for the shy fellow with
the security blanket.
Chris, s'agapo. Love Kiki
JIM and GEORG. Don't let
Napoleon bite. See you for
teatime. HAPPY V-DAY!
Love B.
When I met you my little 'Geer, I
had no one to blame, I fell for
your old A.R. routine. My heart's
never been the same. XOXOBY
To a very special person named, "Chlycmi". I dedicate this
spot to my one and only Valentine. Happy Valentine's Day!
Love Richard
Minki
Happy Valentine's Day
Love Your Minky
MGL
Watch the Rose grow;
Feel it bloom
Skip 8c Muffy: I know Fve been
delinquent in my job, but for you
two, I wouldn't change a thing!
Congrats 8.8mths.
Your Chaperons
Ducky, May we always shake
our feathers together.
Your Quack
Thought     for    the     day:
Aesthetics can be more fun than
green salads. Trust me.
Love Chris
My Darling Dobby, You teach
me 'comfortably' and Til teach
you 'madly', OK? Either way, ril
love you — forever.
Happy Valentine's
EM. Love
I
Sabrina — You're my friend, advisor, confidente. Tm so lucky
to have you. You have my heart,
now a valentine, too. — Ina
Maria F. — You don't know me,
but a friend of mine thinks
you're really special. Be my
Valentine. — Tomaao
Carolyn
Happy Valentine's Day Sweetie
Love Jeff
Clam aauce
I even love you cold
Happy Valentine's Day,
Lingulne
Cynthia — no matter where you
go, there you are. Til be there
too. Love, Ross
Hey Vie! l-a-love-a-you! You
gonna be my Valentine, or
what? Sel molta bella!
TI amo, Ian
•Ht Vd'MVdXVd'M*
¥
Thanks, for your swimming tips
your help in every way;
but gosh those big lips
are always in the way
Guess Who?
To all the Anatevkans, crew,
orchestra, and friends! Many
thanks, lots of love, Happy
Valentine's Day!    L'Chaim, Wa
To my favourite Wusss
I love you lots
Joey
I met Duffyho at a parade,
Ever since my heart has been
weighed
With a love so deep
That I act like a creep
Whenever he is far away
Dear Jake,
Please by my teddy bear
(at night)
Love Fuzzy
CHEROKEE:
You will be my VALENTINE
forever on October 25, 1986
Love you, MUFFIN
Dear Killer:
Have a "Super" Day
Can't wait for tonight
Love, Warm Fuzzy
Wah,
all your demands but my "come
here" is the best! I Love You!
Better treat me good or else!
Win
Hamms and B. Brian Bumble
I'll be your boy, I'll be your man,
I'll be the one who understands
G. Michaels
Poor baby.
Scrap your thesis! The answer to
international politics is a Little
Joie de Juan & candlelight bubbles! Love your moronic baby
pumpkin.
To my favorite E.E. (great
legs!!). To many more late quiet
nights. Love from your
favorite P.T.
To my Sara in Waterloo:
Tve got so much affection for
you
. . . hurts to be without you.
Hugs, kisses, and tears
The Brat
James Dean: Td show you how
much I love you but . . . my
arms are too short! Happy
Valentines Day. Love Kate XO.
Dearest Lu
No I didn't forget about the girl
that means the most to me.
Happy Valentine's day.   Mickey
Dear L.C. V-Day isn't just for
the boring! I like it too. I know
you say you miss him but I think
you're just Thorney. Sending you
a big wet one, Your bud-D.
Dear little groundhog
If you didn't see your shadow
would you like to come out and
play? There's lots of new snow
just waiting for us! Hugs *n' bum
pats, your ski buddy.
K.S. H.L. C.E. N.S.
Happy Valentine's Day Girls
Single girls have more fun.
Love JFP
Edward Bear and I send loving
greetings to Fiona from across
the salt water
To BU 1 from BU 2:
Hooray for drastic croutons!
Happy Valentine's Day:
Burglesnorf
My love and wooby, this year
has been the bestest. You and
me and your lingerie should get
together and celebrate!
Elephant Shoes!
To Spike, For the TEACHER in
you, In Anatomy, youfre complete! For the MECHANIC in
you, You can work on my body
anytime! for the STOCKBROKER in you, Lefs combine
our assets and...! Happy V-Day,
Love Sunshine xxo.
t»
W
GDB:
Tulips are red
Irises are blue
When my heart goes thumpa-
thumpa
You know I love you. XO the
monster.
Dear She, roses, chocolates,
fine wine, hot tub, candles,
clean sheets and a black lab . . .
someday. L. DonJuan.
I still haven't forgotten about
the movie yet, Chrisltne.
Gimme a call.
xo Randy
Gumby,
Be my Valentine!
Love Pokey
John McD:
Roses are red
Violets are simple
Td really like
to play with your dimple
Signed a lawyer in love.
«jttHt»Nt THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Brazil basks in the bizarre
If Monty Python and George
Orwell wrote a screenplay together
the result would probably look a lot
like Terry Gilliam's Brazil.
Gilliam imports Python-esque
humour, couples it with an
Orwellian vision of the future and
throws in a potent dose of absurdity, horror, and something that
looks frighteningly like truth. Every
joke has a sharp point which pricks
the serious side of the brain. The effect is disturbing, but never dull.
Brazil
directed by Terry Gilliam
at the Park Theatre
The action takes place
"somewhere in the 20th-century".
Actually Brazil is a future that star-
tingly resembles the present and is
vaguely reminiscent of the past.
The plot involves a simple
bureaucratic mistake that sets off a
chain of events which affect complacent,   unambitious   bureaucrat,
By RONALD STEWART
Sam Lowry (Jonalhan Pryce). The
events that follow are hardly simple
as the film chronicles Lowry's dizzying tour of this bizarre world.
While trying to correct an error
that has been ascribed to his department Lowry briefly encounters the
woman of his dreams. He soon
realizes that by taking a promotion
to the Department of Information
Retrieval he'll have the opportunity
to pursue her. His dream comes
true but not before he interacts with
socialites obsessed with plastic
surgery, heating engineers driven
crazy and vindictive by paper
work,and children whose favourite
game is blowing up cars.
All the action is interspersed with
Lowry's dreams of glory—titanic
Samurai battles and flights of fancy
in a gilded bird suit.
Cinematographer Roger Pratt
ties the look of the film to its
humour and meaning. All the colours of the film are either the garish
reds and purples of absurdity or the
dull greys of bureaucracy.
Many shots, especially faces, are
slightly distorted. The sets are also
distorted, filled and twisted by
machines, pipes, ducts, and metal;
indeed, most of the plot's complications occur because of the
machinery which clearly rules this
future world.
It    seems   as   if   the    film    is
bizarre
bizarre
perpetually about to end; every
scene feels like it must be the final
one. However, this sensation is appropriate as the plot twists and
turns like the ducts in the scenery,
and the film evolves into a dreamlike state. Overall, the
cinematography instills a sense of
harsh, claustrophobic confinement.
The actors give performances
perfectly suited to the film.
Katherine (Soap) Helmond is appropriately grotesque as Lowry's
mother, and Python-alumnus
Michael Palin is well-cast and
marvelously restrained as Lowry's
friend Jack Lint. Instead of Python
silliness, Palin — as a bureaucrat
whose job is torture — exudes a
disturbing complacency that
typifies the prevalent attitude of his
character's society.
Robert DeNiro, in a small role,
steals every scene he appears in,
playing a subversive, swashbuckling engineer. Newcomer Kim
Greist, as the truckdriving, tough-
but-tender love interest, manages to
keep her role from drowning in
clichedom.
However, the star of the film is
clearly former stage actor Jonathan
Pryce, who outdoes himself as
Gilliam's everyman, Sam Lowry.
The role owes much to Walter Mit-
ty: Lowry, too, is a milquetoast
dreamer, but Lowry actually tries to
fulfill his dreams. He wants to be a
hero in a world where that's no
longer possible. Pryce not only has
impeccable comic timing, he also
brings feeling to the role, making it
touching and endearing.
Our identification with the hero
gives the film that much more impact. Gilliam guides his audience up
dizzying trails to a precarious
precipice, and just as they begin to
enjoy the view, he shoves them off.
The truth residing in the film' absurdity makes Gilliam's vision seem
possible. In such an empty, confining reality, a permanent state of
dreaming — a psychotic escape — is
more rewarding. That is the urgent
tragedy behind the film's absurd
comedy.
Terry Gilliam has crafted a moving, rich film that is destined for
cult, if not classic, status.
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at life, lust and insurance forms
What do they do, asks O'Blivion.
"Sue each other," giggles
Benaroya. "Live like bees or ants in
statewide metal cities all crawling
with security guards. Make their
surroundings as ugly and oppressive
as possible, and blame each other
for it, as if they couldn't have
anything in the galaxy they wanted.
Lots of them cling to one body and
gloat over its illness. Others get into
power positions on planets like
Earth and grind down the dominant
race saying they are 'helping' or
'doing good' by suppressing people.
They're the ultimate groupies, loving strange entertainments and concerts in which 'aliens' are
dismembered to music; all that kind
of stuff. Evil is boring. Same thing
over and over again."
I, Vampire is in this way a warning. A call for its readers to wake
up, a cry for sanity before it's too
late. Scott wants her readers to
abandon the bureaucratic state and
the Twinkle culture of modern
Earth before we end up like the Sa-
jorans. By using humour and sci/fi
fantasy as her form, Scott allows I,
Vampire's audience to laugh at the
hang-ups of the Today People.
Freedom and laughter are ours
already; we just have to stop obeying and start living.
The Rysemians' answer to the
problems of the planet is to do away
with all of society's laws, rules and
regulations. Benaroya says the first
ten commandments didn't work, so
humans passed a billion more which
work even less. Scott shows how
our rules surrounding morality have
oppressed the beautiful O'Blivion
first as a vampire and later as a lesbian.
When O'Blivion is fired from her
job as manager of a Max Arkoff
dance studio because of her
disgusting habits, she assumes
they've discovered that she is a
vampire. Losing jobs and moving
to countries with a new identity is
nothing new to a vampire, whose
practices have been hated for hun
dreds of years. (Except of course in
medieval Europe where she was
respected, feared and loved.) O'Blivion is shocked when Bubbles, a
new dance starlet, informs her she
was dismissed for being a dyke.
The novel also turns traditional
stereotypes of lesbian sexuality on
their head. Scott moves them from
the category of annoying to the absurd. While lesbians; in the past
have been portrayed as unnatural
and strange, Scott delights in making her lesbian characters the deviant's deviants. O'Blivion is a
blood-sucking vampire and
Benaroya a bloated sea creature
from outer space. They lust after
each other madly.
I, Vampire is more than a lesbian
love story, though it's definitely
that, too. It's a wonderful piece of
science fiction, fantasy, social commentary and political criticism not
written for Today People. And it'll
make you think twice about taking
out insurance. Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
Video shows British attitudes
By KEN ANDERLINI
You are in your late teens or early
twenties. You've left your parents
home and are subsisting below the
poverty line. You are lesbian or
gay. Given the resources, what kind
of video would you make?
Framed Youth: Revenge of the
Teenage Perverts, or Pleasing
Ourselves produced by the London
Lesbian and Gay Youth Video Project and made by young lesbians
and gays is such a video. It is the
story of what life is like as a queer in
Maggie Thatcher's UK.
The video begins in the editing
room, the equipment is shown and
the production crew introduced,
f he decision has been made to show
everything; it aspires to telling the
absolute truth. The truth unfolds
through a montage of stills, news
footage, film clips, street interviews
and interviews with the video
makers.
The narrative begins with the
basics. What is a lesbian? Some,
people interviewed on the street
suggest they are "sex maniacs," into "wheeling and dealing.'" One
young man responds that he would
kill his sister if she was a lesbian.
For Sarah, one of the editors, lesbianism is synonymous with love,,
and sex is taking that love one step
further.
There are no psychiatrists explaining the theories of homosexuality in this video, the story is that
of the experiences of being lesbian
or gay. One gay man, Royce, recalls
the first time he felt himself attracted to anyone sexually. Not
unusually it was in the changing
rooms at school, that he first found
himself attracted to men. Amanda
remembers definitely wanting a
relationship with another woman
and deciding that if that is what
makes someone a lesbian, then she
was one.
The interviews show the diversity
of forms and meanings which sex,
love and relationships take on.
Some of the people are looking for
a life-long commitment, others are
happy with the first days of butterflies one gets after falling in love
and a relationship of two to three
weeks.
As society is homophobic and unwilling to accept this sexual nonconformity, violence is a common
response young lesbians and gay
men face. A young gay man recounts being attacked on his way
home, held down while two men
played knots and crosses on him
with a razor blade, before spitting
and pissing on him for being a
"queer bastard." Kaz recalls being
kicked unconscious when she went
to get help for a friend who was being bashed, and Trill recalls a
Greenham Common benefit which
was crashed by a group of men who
proceeded to beat up everyone
there. Why the beatings?
"Sometimes just because we're
women, sometimes because we're '
lesbian."
This anger and frustration at being subject to violence for who you
are is the thrust behind a version of
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the song "Screaming," by Jimi
Sommerville in a performance prior
to his recent Bronski Beat fame.
The refrain "would you like to
express your sex without stress,"
backs a discussion of sex. A man on
the street is floored when one of the
women interviewing him rejects his
assertion that men can give
"ladies" more pleasure than
women. According to Carol it's the
knowledge of your partner's body
and what pleases them that can
make sex between two people of the
same sex great. His first blow job in
a bus shelter was an "amazing
thing" according to Mark.
Sex is not the only topic the video
takes on honestly and without care
for the respectability which
hampers so much of the work done
on and by lesbian and gay youth.
Sex isn't everything, there is also
dancing and politics. Footage of a
dance interspersed with news
footage of Maggie Thatcher, Ronnie Reagan, mushroom clouds and
tanks parading down the street, gets
the message across that not
everyone is dancing in the streets as
the score suggests.
Coming out also means a,
political awakening. Questioning of
the morals and ideas that society ex-
tolls, rejection of the suburban
dream complete with house, car and
dog, leads to questions about society as a whole.
One gay man says that after coming out he discovered that the country is not geared for most people,
but only for a few people who are
making money. Naive about the
boys in blue, another gay man says
he has realized the police are not
friendly bobbies on the beat, but
are both dangerous and frightening.
They have "convinced me I have
done something wrong when I
know I haven't."
What about liberation and the
future? Ultimately a world free of
the artificial divisions between gay
and straight, male and female. A
world free of harassment, "no matter what kind of clothes you wear."
This video is part of the realization
of such a world. It presents
positive images of lesbian and gay
youth: images that you won't find
on television or in the theatres, and
which have meaning for those of us
who are excluded by our sexuality,
colour and aspirations in
mainstream film and video.
Framed Youth makes no
apologies. No one backs down
against the hostility of the people
interviewed on the street or muffles
their own views on love, sex and
politics. It's a video from an insider's view and as such tells it like it
is, "something close to the truth,"
which won't be too far from the experience of lesbian and gay youth in
North American cities today.
Framed Youth plays today in
SUB 212 and will be shown as part
of the student and youth track of
the third annual provincial gay/lesbian conference on Saturday. Proceeds from the exhibition of the
video are given by the producers to
the Lesbian Line and Gay Switchboard in London.
STUDENTS V2 PRICE
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SAM SHEPARD'S
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HERTZ ft UBC
HAVE BECOME A TEAM
Simply present your UBC identification at Hertz on
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UBC/HERTZ discount sticker. This sticker is valid at
all Hertz locations worldwide.
VANS
CARS
TRUCKS
For more information call:
HERTZ ON BROADWAY
731-9296
1322 W. Broadway
Open 7 days a week 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
The #1 way to rent a car or truck
Hertz rents Ford & other vehicles
WORLD  WIDE   RESERVATIONS  CALL  1-800-268-1311
MAMA ALDA'S it proud to present our Valentine's Special. Your
sweetheart will appreciate our gourmet pizza baked in your own oven and
served piping hot at its moment of perfection. Valid through to March 14th
at any of our four Vancouver locations.
Pick Your Pizza!
Any two toppings
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Imagine yourself in a slab room] |^ BR0AD™™EC?RD?+TAPES
By MARY CAMERON
One of the biggest evils of this life
is work. You have to do it some
time. Whether it's in a chattering,
bell-ringing office downtown, a
greasy restaurant, a factory, a gas
station, the PNE — at some time
you'll be in a job you'll want to get
out of.
Now imagine yourself in the slab
room of a carpet factory, where
paint is mixed for designers. It's
small, cluttered, paint-spattered;
the pay is low and the boss is always
Slab Boys
Presented by Studio 58
Directed by John Cooper
until Feb. 23
trying to discipline you with his war
stories.
Depressing? Not for the two guys
in Slab Boys. Spanky Farrell and
Phil McCann sneer at the boss,
smoke incessantly, trade biting one-
liners, and attempt to rehabilitate
HARD AT WORK
good time.
smoking, sneering and just generally having a
their misfit co-worker Hector. The
company bombshell Lucille struts
in and out, as does their grotesquely
pimple-faced superior, Jack Hogg.
This is another great production
from Studio 58, and most of the
cast are loose and relaxed. Ted
Cole, playing Phil, is perfect with
his trendy purple suit and yellow
hair, brows popping up and down,
and easy, tragi-comic style.
The entire action of the play
takes place on a Friday in 1957.
James Dean glows from the wall,
and both boys' hair gleam with
Brilliantine. Jokes fly thick with
slangy Scottish accents (kept up
amazingly well by actors Cole and
Mike Stack) and the energy level is
high: lots of jumping around,
paint-spattered jackets flying.
But both boys want to get out of
the slab room, one by way of art
school, the other by promotion to
design. They are contrasted by a
new slab boy who comes straight
out of school, outfitted in near
sweater and blazer, with manners to
match. Alan is the privileged one
that Phil finally lashes out at after
his crazy mother is again sent off to
a convalescent home.
In fact, each character in the play
is physically deficient in some way,
almost absurdly so, in the manner
of real life. The main matter is not
how these deficiencies are dealt
with, but how the larger demand
placed on them — work — isn't
able to squash their humor.
So paint a watch on your wrist,
curl your lip, and turn up your collar this summer (or now, if you're
already imprisoned) but for now,
check out Slab Boys to keep the
rebellion boiling.
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
• 5        GIFT CERTIFICA TES A VAILABLE
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut $20 Color $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St., Vancouver, 738-0519
Our Art  Director is also interviewing hair models with potential for
photographic and demonstration work.
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR
GRAD CLASS
GIFTS
Applications must:
- be as specific as possible.
- include the following information:
- name of group requesting funds
- number of people working on project
- name of a contact person (include telephone #)
- who will benefit from the project
- description of the project in detail
- a  summarizing  paragraph   including  the  most
salient points
- the amount of money requested
- a budget for the project
- sources of other funds if applicable.
NOTE: There is a limit of one application per particular group of
graduating students.
Each group must be prepared to give a short
presentation of their idea to the members of the
graduating class at the general meeting held at the
end of February.
The deadline for applications is Tuesday, February 25,
1986 and is final. No application will be accepted after
this date.
Please submit applications to SUB room 238
Bring inquiries to the Grad Class Council, care of
SUB 238. Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
Bisexuals bash stereotypes
By DAMARIS SARGENT
Ubyssey readership is perhaps
not generally aware of the lesbian/gay community on campus.
There is indeed such a community.
As in any other identifiable group,
there are heated divisions within it.
In the lesbian/gay community, one
such division concerns bisexuality.
Lesbian feminists introduced the
notion of power within relationships to the lesbian community in
the early 1970's. This introduction
of feminist analysis brought a dual
view of power: patriarchal power
and personal power. Within this
analysis, women are traditionally
seen as barred access to the power
granted within a patriarchal system.
Women, however, can become personally empowered through the
growth of sisterhood, the collective
power of women.
For many lesbian feminists,
bisexual women are betrayers of the
feminist movement. Bisexual
women are seen as conforming to
societal expectations by sleeping
with men. It is believed that in doing so, a woman gains the limited
power a woman is permitted within
a partriarchal society. Presumably,
lesbians having challenged the
society, gain no power within it.
There are two faults in this argument. First, this position implies
that bisexuality is a choice women
make, rather than an orientation.
Bisexuality is not a choice. It is a
sexual orientation, just as homosexuality and heterosexuality are. Lesbians have been angered by
straights using a similar argument
against them for many years. It is
painful to have to point out to lesbians, that bisexuals, like lesbians
do not choose their sexual orientation.
Secondly, lesbian feminists who
object to women calling themselves
bisexual as if to gain some form of
acceptance, misunderstand the
nature   of   our   society.
A second criticism some lesbians
believe is that bisexual women are
merely lesbians not yet ready to admit their true identity. While there
are some women who do indeed
find it useful to see themselves as
bisexual, presumably as a transition
phase between being straight and
lesbian, this is certainly not true of
all bisexual women. The question
"how can you know if you are
bisexual" comes from the straight
and lesbian community alike, echoing the more familiar straight
phrase, "how can you know if you
are a lesbian". Bisexuality is an
orientation, just as heterosexuality
and homosexuality are, and like
them, one simply knows who one is
attracted to without going through
any complicated procedures.
These remarks, while displaying
perspectives
both ignorance and intolerance
within the lesbian community, are
not as damaging to feminist bisexual women as the next point. Bisexual women are seen as forsaking
their sisters because they put time
and energy into their relationships
with men. While lesbians have
learned that they can support one
another and empower themselves
through organizing together,
socializing together, and loving one
another, they forget that bisexual
women, just as straight women,
have also learned this.
Bisexual women, like their
straight sisters, can work with other
women, and grow stronger for their
relationships with other women,
without having to dedicate all of
their time and energy to women.
Just as there is a need for women
who dedicate everything they have
to other women, there is a need for
women who are willing and able to
devote their energy towards both
women and men.
It is time for lesbian feminists to
accept their bisexual sisters.
Tolerance and understanding are
needed so that bisexual women may
finally be recognized as sisters
working towards equality for all.
Damaris Sargent is in arts 4 and co-
chair of the third annual B.C. lesbian and gay conference at UBC.
AMS CONCERTS LINE-UP
CITR presents the following
Friday, Feb. 14 —    Valentine's Day
BOLERO LAVA
Rhythm Mission
Crimpolines
No Minors Please
Saturday, Feb. 22
CHEAP THRILLS
featuring 39 STEPS
from Montreal
and Cast of Thousands
$3 at the door only
Friday, Mar. 7
GRAPES OF WRATH
and MOEV
with guests 4th Floor
Friday, Mar. 21
DOA
£r guests
All shows SUB Ballroom. Doors open 8 p.m.; Music 8:30 p.m.
All ages welcome except Feb. 14. Advance Tix: AMS Box Office
ams
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NOTICE OF
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GENERAL MEETING
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14
12:30 pm
Council Chambers
(SUB 206)
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Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1G5 Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
UBC life causes STRESS
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The University environment needs to
be modified to reduce the stress which
gets in the way of proper learning, say
UBC Students for a Democratic University in a recent report on stress.
UBC must reduce course loads and
allow more discussion time for students
to learn effectively at university they say
in their document, Learning Under
Stress — Are There Alternatives? researched last summer.
"The seriousness of the situation can
be appreciated best in the emotional
breakdowns many of our fellow students
suffer each year," they say. "Some of
them recover and continue. Many of
them — who cannot or will not enter the
race but who may have wanted to learn
— must drop out and think of
themselves as failures for the rest of
their lives."
The solution is "analytical, critical"
learning, which would inspire students
to enjoy learning for its own sake, SDU
says.
campaigns by workers and the
unemployed, to dispel prejudice against
academics. They add the resulting more
healthier relationship between professors, students, workers and
unemployed people will make it possible
to win higher education as a right for all.
Everyone in the university —
students, faculty and staff — should
decide on cuts, not just the 15 people on
the board of governors, says SDU, adding university finances shouldn't be
secret. They want public forums open to
the whole university to discuss not only
how to cut but also what actions should
fight those cuts.
They also say an important goal is to
change the way students at university are
taught.
xc .e«f>^
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end of the year. They are mostly bright,
and used to getting high grades —
Hewko says no one makes it to university without an IQ of 110 or 120.
Hewko says these distressed students
get into a vicious circle of failure and
loss of self esteem, adding fear of failure
is common to all of them. He says most
of them require a chance to do some free
reading and relax and many of them do
well once their final exams are postponed to the summer.
Many students don't make it to the
UBC Psychiatric Unit. Too self critical,
many of them just drop out, Hewko
says.
SDU says in addition to academic requirements, the lecture-exam model at
UBC seems to be directed only at the
speed learner.
"Slower learners (who are not
necessarily less capable than speed
learners) and people with other cognitive
styles are handicapped in their capacity
to achieve high marks," says Barsallo.
Analytical, critical learning, the alternative to speed learning, is much better,
she says.
Also, to reduce stress and allow learning to students' full potential, students
and instructors must communicate much
more closely, she says, adding tutorials
and seminars are important, as is the
aquisition of more teaching assistants.
The atmosphere of competition on
campus is very detrimental to healthy
education, SDU says.
SDU members Barsallo, Bill Coller
and Alan Patola, who co-wrote the
report, hope it will inspire discussion
about education at UBC and would like
to see "new and better written contributions to ensue."
They invite students, faculty and staff
to look critically at the academic policies
on campus which control students' lives
and fight for change.
The report also contains interviews
with student health services, the student
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For example, they continue,
workshops should be run to enhance
students' capacity for critical analysis,
and to encourage a will to argue, a spirit
of research and independent thinking.
"The university administration must
understand that classes shouldn't be
larger than 60 students and they should
have associated tutorials and seminars,"
says SDU. "These aren't frills that
should be the first to go when government funding declines: they are the basic
requirements for learning which should
be maintained at all costs."
They say government funding must
also be increased to ensure proper
education is provided. Protests stronger
than the 1985 faculty/AMS march — attended by 2000 people — must be
organized to show the institution's
resolve to preserve itself.
Our protest should consist of a well-
organized, continuing campaign to
educate the public about the benefits of
higher education, says SDU. "University education must begin to be thought of
as everyone's right, just as is high school
education."
They recommend the university community  be socially  active,  supporting
Evidence in the report shows a large
number of UBC students suffer from
anxiety and different kinds of depression, mostly mild or moderate —
although a few hundred are classified as
having serious emotional disorders.
SDU member Alicia Barsallo, a UBC
graduate student originally from Peru,
helped write the report.
"One of the most important conclusions drawn from campus professionals
interviewed about stress at UBC was the
importance of academic workload," she
says. "Excessive academic requirements
and an overly fast academic pace either
cause or trigger emotional breakdowns
by students on campus."
About half of first year students in a
given year fail at least one course, according to evidence in a 1984 report by
counsellor Jim Jamieson. SDU says this
shows the difficulty many students have
carrying a full UBC course load.
In an interview in the report, Dr.
Hewko at UBC's Psychiatric Unit says
he sees the most emotionally distressed
students around Christmas and at the
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"It would produce not only professionals capable of performing tasks in
their technical field, but wholly
developed individuals capable of making
a full-fledged contribution to society,"
says Barsallo.
But she stresses time is required for
critical learning — it cannot take place
under conditions where the instructor
must race through the year to cover an
excessive amount of material.
counselling and resource centre, the office for women students and the university chaplains, as well as summaries of
reports on pass/fail rates at UBC and
the employment fate of graduates.
Copies of the full report are available
for 25 cents each from the Alma Mater
Society business office, SUB 266.
DUFFY CUTLER
"This is not meant to be the consummate opinion on the topic of
suicide, but rather a brief discussion
that perhaps will raise some new
questions in the minds of those who
read it.
The motivation for writing this
comes from watching a young man
throw himself willingly through a
window, five floors above the
ground. This happened during
Christmas exams and although I
didn't witness the event, the broken
glass and the blood on the concrete
brought to mind an all too vivid image of a man consumed by emotion.
Even as absolute strangers, those
of us who saw the result feel a loss
— and we can't even begin to comprehend what the family and
friends feel.
The common belief about a
suicide victim is that prior to the
event, he has suffered from a profound depression. The victim may
not have slept for several days or
perspectives
weeks leading up to the event, and
is often rendered incapable of rationally making even very simple
decisions.
A victim is so consumed by his
emotions that he cannot function
normally. Apparently small problems become severely overblown,
contributing to the victim's overall
feeling of hopelessness. One need
only listen to the stories of a few
survivors of suicide attempts to be
convinced of this. But for the vic
tims, the problems are real. Suicide
is rarely the result of a snap decision. It is usually premeditated and
deliberately planned out.
For the families of the victims,
the process of mourning usually involves a more severe and prolonged
period of depression than for accidental death. Signs of clinical
depression may still appear up to 14
months after the incident, compared with 3-4 months normally.
There are periods of grief, denial,
guilt, anger, and finally acceptance.
It seems the anguish suffered by the
victim is no more severe and certainly less prolonged than that
which the family and friends must
deal with.
Can the act of taking your own
life be construed as anything but
melodramatic and selfish? Yet there
still seems to be something about
suicide that our society reveres —
perhaps this relates to the belief by
some oriental cultures that suicide is
noble. There is nothing noble about
copping out of life.
The tragedy of suicide occurs far
too often on our campus and what
is worse, the statistics are silenced.
There have been at least three
suicides at UBC in this academic
year, but you won't find actual
statistics. Nobody seems to know
anything about these incidents. The
R.C.M.P., Student Health or Student Counselling won't even release
numbers. Certainly even the
families of victims would like to see
better awareness of the subject if it
might help to prevent suicides.
Programs like Suicide Attempt
Follow-up and Research (SAFER),
and the Vancouver Crisis Center
have been set up not only to help
those in immediate need but also to
make people more aware of these
issues, the idea being prevention.
This idea is well worth promoting,
especially with young people.
Here are some 1984 statistics:
suicide accounts for 20 per cent of
all deaths of Canadians between the
ages 20 and 24, second only to
motor vehicle accidents (38 per
cent). This is also the most popular
age to kill yourself: 13 per cent of
all suicides are 20 to 24-year-olds.
The most trendy way to do it —
firearms. Hangings and drug overdoses are a close second.
Another alarming fact is that in
1984, of the 385 verified suicides in
B.C., 299 of those were males.
Nationwide, there are nearly 3.5
times more male suicides than
female.
The problems young people face
today are no more disconcerting
than they ever were. So the next
time you feel life is giving you the
shaft, just think for a minute about
this. I can't help but think that if
every person who ever considered
doing such a stupid and selfish act
knew that 3,439 other people died
this way in Canada every year, then
maybe he or she might see more
clearly the foolishness of becoming
a statistic.
Perhaps we should paint a large
target on the concrete next to the
clock tower as a reminder to those
who feel that their problems are
worse than everyone else's. We
could allow access to the tower to
qualified candidates and paste
numbers on their backs to keep a
tally — like lemmings.
Although we might not admit it,
most of us have probably considered the idea of suicide at some
time or other, and some more
seriously than others, but I don't
think we can pretend to identify
with the feelings that suicidal people have unless we have actually experienced them. So far at least, we
survivors have been able to maintain a grip with reality and are able
to deal with life's bitterness.
To take a life is something
nobody has the right to do. In any
case, an increased awareness of the
subject certainly can't hurt. Information is available from The Canadian Mental Health Association
(873-1633) or from SAFER
(879-1211).	
Duffy Cutler is a fourth year
engineering physics student who
thinks life is worth living, no matter
how hopeless it may seem. Page 22
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 13, 1986
Aging idealist scoffs at disillusionment
From page 11
didn't happen to most of the '60s
activists I know."
But Hoffman is not out to resurrect a bygone era. His current efforts are just as intense as before,
albeit more subdued. The man who
once caused a riot by throwing
money on the floor of the New
York Stock Exchange is now involved in efforts to protect the environment.
His other main concern these
days is with the U.S. war in Central
America, where Hoffman sees intervention   there   as   paralleling
More Godiva
I don't think the "exuberant
engineer" did much for his cause on
Friday, February 7th.
Many aspects of his letter were
offensive, purposely so, I am sure.
However, I will concentrate on just
a few of the rather facile and very
irritating arguments.
Mr. Exuberance may well be
right when he says that preventing
the engineers seeing their nude
Godiva on horseback will do little
to deter the world's wifebeaters,
rapists and murderers. Does he feel
then that such a ride would help the
victims of such exploitation? In
fact, doesn't the fact that he
classifies himself and his fellow
Godivites alongside these exploiters
make the whole concept of the ride
even more appalling?
Our "friend" implies that the
event is all right because it is paid
for. Does this mean therefore, that
anything is O.K. provided that you
pay for it, so then, prostitution is
acceptable?
Finally, the Minibus For Women,
which, according to Mr. Sankey is a
"more blatant sexist event," than
the ride. The minibus is intended to
protect women, whereas the rationale of the Godiva ride exploits
them.
Surely even an engineer can see
the difference?
J. Goddard
education graduate studies
THE
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Washington's   escalating   violence
against Vietnam.
Hoffman has no use for the
Rubins of the world, those who try
to rationalize their desire to make a
lot of money. "I'm not interested in
being a millionaire". He believes
that it is important to draw a line
between your own needs for a com
fortable life and your responsibility
to your community, your society,
and the world at large.
In a culture where we are constantly pressured to consume, to be
selfish, to sell our souls, it is
refreshing to see someone who
hasn't surrendered his integrity or
his ideals.
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Scholarships for
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University of Alberta is a large university and research center offering a full range of academic programs to over 28 000 students
Approximately 3,500 students are pursuing graduate studies through
the 75 departments which belong to the Faculty of Graduate Studies
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University of Alberta offers a large array of scholarships to superior
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2    Approximately 60 Province of Alberta Graduate Scholarships and
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3,    Approximately 20 Dissertation Fellowships of $11 500 for completing Ph D  students
4 20 Andrew Stewart Prizes of S2 500 to senior Ph D   students in
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5 Over 140 Alberta Heritage Medical Research Foundation Studentships of S12.000 (plus S2.500 research grant) to graduate
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6, Approximately 20 Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Scholarships of
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7. Many   more   major   and   minor   awards   listed   in   the   Graduate
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In  addition,   we  have  a  fully  competitive  program  of  graduate
assistantships for teaching and research, and a program of research
travel support available to students
For further information write to:
Graduate Registrar
Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J9 Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
Autonomy threatened by cabinet
From page 1
and Institute Educators Association.
William Saywell, president of
Simon Fraser University, said he
was unwilling to make a judgment
on Bennett's announcement until
he heard more.
"Everything hinges on the extent
our regular costs are covered," said
Saywell.
"If they're looking at three years
of additional funding, perhaps then
we'll also be getting three years of
basic funding," he said.
CFS head urges
direction change
From page 1
merged, Morfitt said, he does not
expect funding for both to go
through the UCBC.
"It is a question of how fast
things are brought along," he said.
Fraser said he is not "contemplating" placing college funding
under the UCBC.
Canadian Federation of Students
pacific region chair Terry Hunt
said, "The impetus is now on the
minister to change the direction of
post-secondary education."
The minister and the premier has
agreed to meet with CFS.
UBC president David Strangway
was in Ontario and could not be
reached in time for comment.
Other cabinet minister changes
include installing new ministers
James Hewitt in education, James
Nielsen in human resources and
Stephen Rogers in health.
University autonomy is also
threatened with cabinet allotting the
money, he said.
"I would be concerned about the
ability of the university to maintain
a proper level of traditional
autonomy," said Saywell.
The control aspect of the announcement was very important,
added Hunt.
"The Federation is concerned
that the allocations of the fund will
be   based   on   political   concerns,
not educational ones," he said.
Waters also said there is a real
potential for abuse because cabinet
will allocate the money.
"The government is using scarce
education funds to fund political
and economic projects which
should be funded by cither portfolios," said Waters.
Hunt said he doubted Bennett's
claim the three year fund will allow
universities to plan on a more long-
term basis.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
Blast those tough leg injuries
IBM-XT COMPATIBLE
There will be no rest for the
Thunderbird women's gymnastics
team this week after a successful
meet in Chico, California last
weekend. This weekend they and
the Thunderbird men travel to Winnipeg to compete in the Canada
West championship.
The  Thunderbird   women   have
Field hockey dazzles
Both the UBC first and second
field hockey teams continued their
impressive start to the second half
of the season by each recording
their second consecutive victories in
Vancouver League play.
The first team scored an upset 2-1
win over the second place Vancouver Rowing Club Jokers with
goals by Ryan French and Chris
Gifford. The second team scored a
convincing 4-1 win over Fraser
Valley. Goals were scored by Mark
Seymour (2), Brian Olsen and Tom
King. This game saw a great defensive performance by Doug Yeung
and dazzling goalkeeping by Brian
Barnett.
Next weekend the first team
travels to Berkeley, California to
compete in the North American Intercollegiate Tournament.
9.
10.
11.
SUPER LEAGUE SCORING LEADERS
(Fort Camp Ice
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Gs      As
D. Kozier, Beta
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D. McGuire, Arts 1
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P. Mottishace, Com.
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B. Masse, Forestry
2          1
M. Soy, Beta
2          1
B. J. Heathcote, Arts 1
2          1
B. Naka. Arts 1
2          1
D. Kaila. Beta
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D. Philip, Beta
2          1
G. Harris, Arts 1
3          0
D. Smetheran, Com.
1          2
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suffered a rash of leg injuries (stress
fractures, shin splints) that have affected their performances lately. In
fact, it has been fairly difficult to
field a full complement of gymnasts
for each meet.
Nevertheless, Jennifer Dong, in
her second season with UBC after a
brilliant rookie year, finished first
at the Chico State Invitational Meet
in California. UBC finished second
in the team event behind Chico
State. Other UBC standouts were
Bev Beres (5th) and Janet Rosenfeld
(6th).
Looking ahead to the Canada
West championships, the Thunderbird women could finish (depending
on injuries) anywhere from first to
last. The men likely will finish third
behind Calgary and Saskatchewan.
Thunderbird top gymnast Mark
Byrne competes for the meet title
against some national team competition in the form of Saskatchewan's James Rozen.
Sat. & Sun.,
Mar. 1-2
AT A GLANCE
NOON RUNS
Valentine's Sweetheart Run
SUB Plaza Race Center
12:30 p.m. 3.0 km. 5.5 km
SPECIAL EVENTS
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RACQUET SPORTS
Alpine Squash Grand Prix
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Thurs., Feb. 27 Broomball Tournament
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SPECIAL EVENTS Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 25
'Birds win big games for Klassen
By COLIN JEROME
UBC hoopsters may have given their star
senior forward Ken Klassen the best going
away present he could ask for by beating the
University of Alberta Golden Bears 76-68 on
Friday and the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies 76-69 on Saturday in the season's
last homestand.
The two wins leave the Birds alone in the
fourth and final playoff spot in the Canada
West Division with a 3-6 record.
The "winning streak" began with a Friday
night rumble in which UBC collected 17 team
fouls in the first half and eight in the second.
The Golden Bears threw their fair share of
elbows and finished the match with 23 team
fouls.
This is not to say that fans viewed a lack of
finesse that evening. Canada West's number
two scorer, 6'2" guard, Paul Johannson paved the way for the Birds with 32 smooth
points. Old reliable, 6'4" Klassen, bumped
and grinded inside for 20 points. Klassen also
grabbed 12 rebounds. "I shot well, but the
win was just as important for me," said Paul
Johannson.
Friday's game dispelled any myths that
basketball is a non-contact sport. Good outside shooting gave the Birds an early seven
point lead, but their fouls eventually forced
them to play tentative defense. At the half
the score was 35-34 for the Birds.
With a new lease on life the Birds played
tenacious defense and gradually increased
their lead. Alberta "beared" down and
bodies started flying. Their high jumping
guard, Mike Kornak, pulled down an
unbelievable 21 rebounds. At one point
Klassen actually crawled out of the key to
avoid a three second violation. UBC maintained their lead until the clock ran out.
Saturday's game may have been appropriately named, "The Battle for the
Boards." UBC easily won, collecting 41 rebounds to the Huskie's 28. Head coach Bruce
Enns called it, "Unbelievable." Klassen had
15 rebounds of his own and 24 points. Referring to Klassen's gutsy performance in his
last home game as a T-Bird, Enns said, "His
rebounding is amazing for a guy who is only
6'4" and can't jump."
Kevin Hansqn's 8-12 wizardry from the 15'
range earned the 6' Bird guard 20 points.
UBC's little guy, 5'9" Doug Eberhardt
scored 8 points, most of them lofted from
downtown Vancouver. Kirk Jones netted 17
points for the Huskies with his aggressive
play inside.
Before the game, Klassen's team-mates
presented him with a plaque and a signed ball
for his valuable years as a Thunderbird.
Klassen will graduate this year with a M.B.A.
and probably the nation's scoring title. He
said, "The best present was the win. Now
we're fired up to play UVic."
The Birds travel to Victoria to play the
Vikes next Saturday.
Klassen leaves in high style
^**«(&^bj»^
(SPORTS
By RICHARD BROWER
It was nice for the UBC men's basketball team to
win this weekend but more important was the tribute
to star forward Ken Klassen playing his last home
game.
Since coming from Trinity Western College three
seasons ago Klassen has shone brightly despite playing
for a team that has continuously struggled. "The most
frustrating thing about my career is the team's performance. The bottom line is really whether the team wins
or not," said Klassen.
Only six foot four inches tall, Klassen plays like
someone a whole foot taller. He dominates the
backboards and leads the league in scoring with a 28
point per game average. "Outside university ball my
most satisfying experience has been playing the last
three summers with the B.C. junior select team," said
Klassen.
It has also been a comeback season for Klassen. Two
seasons ago he finished second in league scoring, then
missed an entire season with bone chips in his ankle.
"He is simply the best university player in the
country," said teammate Paul Johansson.
Klassen is a smart, aggressive inside player who
knows where to be at the right time. He plays with a lot
of heart," said UBC coach Bruce Enns."
"I have to anticipate the play before the shot or pass
is made," said Klassen. He is a hard working player
who earns his merits through the bump and grind
school of play.
Kid from Trail smokes'em away
— kent kallberg photo
FLYING WATERMELON ELUDES the outstretched hands of thirsty road
warriors withering in murderous city heat. UBC rugby team lost this
weekend but have had a successful season.
Big overtime win goes
for naught in prairies
By STEVE NEUFELD
After a spirited comeback and a
63-59 overtime win on Friday over
the University of Alberta, the
Ladybird hoopsters saw their
playoff hopes fade when the lost
Saturday to University of Saskatchewan Huskiettes.
night's Birds with a 17 point outburst in a thrilling match of nerves
and pressure. UBC was down 15-3
early in the match but rallied to
even their #4 nationally ranked
Alberta opponents at 51 by the
fulltime buzzer.
Although the Birds were minus
the services of ace guard Lynn
Clark, they managed to perform as
a class unit on both offence and
defence. Colette Pilloud was
especially busy on the boards hauling in eight rebounds.
But then Saturday came. It seemed as though a different blue and
gold team stepped onto the War
Memorial courts. UBC was
outscored 49-46 by the cellar dwelling Saskatchewan Huskiettes.
Trailing at the half, UBC continued the downhill slide with
numerous missed layouts and a
poor 29% shooting percentage
from the field. Andrea Belczyk
tallied 12 points and Nadine
Fedorak added the same with a four
for 18 shooting performance.
"After such  an emotional win
(Friday), keeping the momentum
going wasn't easy," said Thunderbird coach Jack Pomfret after
Saturday's game.
The long faces in his team's
dressing room acknowledged the all
too obvious fact the Birds playoff
hopes are quickly fading. UBC's
season record is now 4-5 with their
last league game against the #1
ranked Victoria squad in Victoria.
To obtain the final playoff spot,
UBC needs to finish with a better
record than their Calgary rivals'
3-5, who have two games left in
their schedule, including an easy
matchup with Saskatchewan. The
road to the Canada West playoffs is
getting decidely steeper for the
1985-86 edition of the Thunderbirds.
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The tall, slinky forward picks up
a pass in centre ice, beats his opponent then cleverly uses the
defenseman as a screen — blasting
the puck in the low corner.
No, it's not number 99 but a
young man named Tim Lenardon
playing university hockey with the
Brandon Bobcats. But in many
ways he is just as special as Wayne
Gretzky, if not more so.
For the second year in a row he
will be the Canada West University
Athletic Association's scoring champion. With 55 points in 22 games,
Lenardon's statistics resemble Gret-
.zky's. When asked about his success, Lenardon's only reply is, "It
makes life easier when you play
with two great linemates."
Those linemates are Jim Mollard,
the second leading scorer in the
league and Bruce Thompson, a
tough grinder with solid backcheck-
ing. Mollard is also the league
leader in penalty minutes.
"Our defensive play has really
picked up," said Lenardon. "I
think we only have one goal a game
scored against our line on average.
It makes life a lot easier on the
defence."
Lenardon is a shy, lanky 23-year-
old from one of Canada's great
hockey towns, Trail, B.C. His
father, Norman Lenardon, was part
of the great 1961 Trail Smokeaters
hockey team that won Canada's last
world hockey championship.
Lenardon is modest and easy going in his manner. The Bobcat's
latest loss does not seem to bother
him — nor does the aura that is
building around him. Lenardon is a
genuinely nice guy.
In each game he plays, Lenardon
knows he will have someone checking  him,  someone  giving  him a
cheap shot. "Nothing bothers me, I
don't care what they do — I just go
out and play my game," he says.
That is an understatement
because he plays the game better
than anyone else in the league. He is
one of a slow-growing breed of
great Canadian college hockey
players.
Brandon is an offensive team in a
defensive league. It is a fast-skating
team with a high-powered offense
and innovative style.
"We haven't really got it together
this year," said Lenardon. "We are
an offensive powerhouse — we like
to let it ride, but the checking
started to get to us."
"I like to carry the puck in over
the blueline, none of this chasing it
in business — that's not my game."
Watching Lenardon out on the ice
one immediately senses that he is a
cut above the rest. Every time he
touches the puck something happens. It is something all the great
players have, an on-ice presence.
Though he does not spew out
flashy one-liners, Lenardon's office presence is equally impressive.
He talks about a future NHL career
in an earnest, candid tone without
big-headed arrogance.
Lenardon recently attended the
New Jersey Devils' training camp as
a free agent. He did well and was
offered a minor league contract but
turned it down in favor of another
season in Brandon.
"It is a couple of steps faster in
the big leagues and the play is a lot
more positional," Lenardon said.
"The guys play it tough but they
treat you well. It was a lot of fun, a
very positive experience."
Lenardon feels that Brandon, not
Trail, is where he has developed as a
nockey player. "There are a lot of
nice people here — that's what
counts and why I came here. The
league is getting better all the time
— it is quicker than junior
hockey."
Trail is a long way from the
bright lights of New York state but
for Tim Lenardon a small bridge to
cross.
UBC swimmers ready to
ripple flat prairie water
By IAN ROBERTSON
The UBC Swimming and Diving
team travels to Edmonton this Friday for the Canada West Championships. There they will compete
against the Universities of Victoria,
Edmonton, Calgary and Manitoba
for top spot in the West.
"This meet is extremely important for us because it is the last
chance for many to qualify for the
CIAU championships. To date we
have qualified 12 women and 6
men, but hopefully we'll be able to
Old boys receive premium whitewashing
A 23-0 whitewash of the UBC Old Boys rugby club
last Saturday afternoon at Jericho Park sets the stage
for the Thunderbirds' assault on first place in the Vancouver First Division standings.
Led by Gary Vine's 11 points from a try, two converts and a drop goal, the Thunderbirds took control
of the match in the second half after playing to a 0-0 tie
to halftime.
The difference in the game was "that we capitalized
on their errors. We had an overall great team effort
and our defensive pressure led to many mistakes by the
Old Boys," said UBC coach Barry Legh.
Other tries were by Mark Olesen, Pierre Duey and
Lee King and left the team tied with Ex-Brits in second
place behind the first place Trojans. But the way the
Trojans have been flagging of late it appears that UBC
will battle it out with Ex-Brits for the first division title.
In other news, the UBC Rugby Union is having one
of its best years ever as it is close to wrapping up the
VRU club championship with its four teams entered in
a variety of leagues. Varsity is also ahead in the try
scoring championship.
add another 3 women and at least
another 7 men to that," said head
coach Ken Radford.
The latest CIAU rankings have
the women 1st in the nation and the
men 4th.
The men will be led into competition by Geoff Donnelly, men's team
captain Geoff Grover and 7 time
national team member Bruce
Berger. Strong swims are also expected from Kevin Stapleton, Greg
Lohin, Clint Hirst, Mark Feeney,
Pat Smith, Dan Blondal and
Graham McMillan.
"We've been putting money in
the bank all year, and now it's time
to make a withdrawal," said swimmer Ian McMillan.
The women's team will be led by
veteran Kim Austin, Fiona Waddell
and Barb McBain. Expected to
qualify this weekend are Taimi
Olson, Pauline Martin, Stephanie
Brown and Carlyle Jansen.
"We get so few chances to dive
intercollegiately during the school
year that it is imperative all six of
our divers are in top condition for
this meet," said coach Liebermann. Page 26
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
Wtf&fi
TODAY
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Bring along your scruples for some great discussion, noon, St. Mark's college music room.
NETWORK
'The media in Israel — a journalist's point of
view," with Shlome Raz, noon, Buch B214.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International house.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Committee meeting, all members welcome,
noon, SUB 119.
FOURTH YEAR DIETETIC STUDENTS
"Cupids cuisine," 4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB
cafeteria.
PREDENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture: Dr. P. Barer othodontics; last day for
payments; $13.11 and »21.14, noon, IRC 5.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes;
your choice of any or all classes for only $45,
noon, SUB 208.
THUNDERBIRD SKIING
UBC men's end women's teams compete for
berths in the national championships which will
be held in Killington Vermont. Meet is at Whistler
with slalom and giant slalom races, 10 a.m.,
orange chair.
SUBFILMS
Film: Pale rider/Silverado, Pale rider 7 p.m.,
Silverado noon, 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time meeting: special event tba, noon,
Brock 302.
UBYSSEY CREATIVE
OVEREXPOSURE SHUTTERBUGS
Expounding of system of beliefs (ie. darkroom instruction) be there or be filmless, noon, SUB
241K.
UBYSSEY
Staff meeting to discuss next year, noon, SUB
241K.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30 p.m., Asian centre
604.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Discussion of future Liberal policies with Jim de
Wilde, of chapter 88, a Liberal think tank, noon
SUB 215.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediates'   Mandarin   conversation   class,
noon, Buch B317.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership drive, noon, SUB 58.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Video by London lesbian and gay youth project,
framed youth, noon, SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Heather   Bishop  and   Tracy   Riley   in   concert,
tickets VTC and SUB 237B, doors open 8 p.m.,
SUB ballroom.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Elections! all members please show, noon   SUB
212.
FRIDAY
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Greet valentines day kiss off, noon, Mclnnes
field.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible and government class, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Lecture: "Canadian-Soviet relations," by Derek
Fraser, Dept. of external affairs, noon, Buch
A205.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Lavender history, a talk on lesbian/gay history,
with Indiana Matters and Gary Kinsman 7:30
p.m.,  Vancouver gay and  lesbian  community
centre, 1170 Bute St.
AUDIOPHILE CLUB
Weekly meeting for those with discerning ears
and an appreciation of fine audio equipment,
noon, SUB 224.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Film: "The times of Harvey Milk," admission $1,
noon, SUB auditorium.
A special exhibit and sale of
several thousand books in french
for children, young people and
adults will take place February
15-22 at the Alliance Francais, 6161
Cambie. The exhibit will include the
latest in fiction and non-fiction,
paperbacks, french language learning and teaching material and
reference books for libraries. The
exhibit will be open every day from
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Discussion: "Career opportunities in the department of external affaire," Derek Fraser, Dept. of
external affairs, 2:30 p.m., Buch A 204.
THUNDERBIRD SKIING
UBC men and women compete in the 1986
regional championship meet at Whistler. Slalom
and giant slalom races, 10:00 a.m., at the beginning of orange chair, come out and support your
fellow UBC students.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International house.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes;
your choice of any or all classes for only $45,
noon, SUB 208.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Blue jeans day: wear blue jeans with pride today
if you are lesbian or gay, all day, all over campus.
ECONOMICS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bzzr and margariti night, 4-8 p.m., Buch lounge.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Valentines day ice-skating, 8 p.m., Kitsilano ice
rink.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Fred H. Knelman; "Reagan, God and the
bomb," noon, SUB 206.
SUBFILMS
Film: Pale rider/Silverado, Pale rider 7 p.m.,
Silverado 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
"Valentines ball," — the prom you always
wanted, 8 p.m., Grad centre ballroom.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Annual semi-formal dinner-dance, 7 p.m., Black
Angus, Richmond.
SUBFILMS
Film: Pate rider/Silverado, Pale rider 7 p.m.,
Silverado 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
CANAOIAN UNIVERSITY NURSING
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
And Oxfam third world health project, Conference: primary health care in action, 8:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m., UBC school of nursing, third
floor acute care hospital, $10 unemployed, $17
employed.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
"From pride to power," third provincial gay/lesbian conference, opens 9 a.m., SUB parly room
for opening.
THUNDERBIRD SKIING
UBC men and women compete in the last day of
the regional championships at Whistler. Racing
starts at 10:00 a.m., top of Orange Chair. Winner
of the meet goes to the nationals at Killington,
Vermont.
THUNDERBIRD WRESTLING
UBC hosts the Canada west university championships. Preliminary round robin action 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Finals 7 p.m., Osborne centre, free
admission.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., 2845 Acadia Rd. (UBC
day care gym).
SUBFILMS
Film:   Pale  rider/Silverado,   Pale rider 7  p.m.,
Silverado 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
"From pride to power," continues, starts at 9:30
a.m., SUB.
MONDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Marilyn Monroe in "The Misfits," 7:30 and
9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
Meeting on divestment, noon, T. A. union office,
upstairs in the armouries.
WORLD   UNIVERSITY  SERVICE   OF  CANADA
IWUSCI
Film: "Grenada: the future coming towards us,"
noon, Buch B212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dence classes:
your choice of any or all classes for $45, noon,
SUB 208.
TUESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, noon. Brock 302.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 211.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Letter writing group, noon, SUB 119.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes;
your choice of any or all classes for only $45,
noon, SUB 208.
JSA/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon. Hillel house.
WEDNESDAY
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Pacific rim seminar series and wyne and cheese,
reception, noon-2:30 p.m., International house.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Steering committee meeting, noon, SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes;
your choice of any or all classes for $46, noon,
SUB 208.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
THE UBYSSEY
Chris Wong, Sun reporter and ex Ubyssey hack
is giving a feature layout seminar, 3 p.m., SUB
241K.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: "Artistry in living," guest speaker, Bill
Porter, noon, Buch B221.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Prof. Michael Smith
Biochemistry, UBC
GENETIC
ENGINEERING
1986
Saturday, Feb. 15
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, 8:15 p.m. FREE
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1979 FIAT X-19 convertible. Exc. cond.
Metallic black £t gold. 5-speed, stereo,
fogs, cibies. 734-0263 or 921-7388.
INVENTORY BLOW OUT!! used standard
cassette transcribers. Only $99. Call
684-2222
'78 DATSUN B210 GX. Hatch, 5-speed, air
cond., radials, one owner. Immaculate
cond. $3100 OBO 662-3254.
1972 TOYOTA COROLLA 2-door. Standard.
Mechanically sound. New radials. $600.
734-5801.
MARKETING
EXPERIENCE
Are you an achiever
looking for . . .
1 autonomy
1 people management
1 practical business
experience?
College Pro ®
Then contact your
Campus Employment Centre
30 - JOBS
'73 VOLKSWAGEN 412, 4 new brakes, new
tires, good engine, fair body $1300 OBO.
Ph: 324-9701 Andrew. Call after 6:00 pm.
20 - HOUSING
TEMPORARY HOUSE SWAP starting Fall
'86. We have large 3-bdrm deluxe waterfront home with dock on Quadra Island,
B.C. To exchange in Vancouver area.
285-3239.
ACCOMODATIONS ON CAMPUS - 5765
Agronomy Road. Live without rush hour &
within minutes of SUB! Rooms are NOW
AVAILABLE FOR RENT. INCLUDES - 3
meals per day — 8 washrooms kept tidy by
our weekly cleaning service — free parking
— cable TV & TSN, movies, music — use
of stereo system.
Our prices per school term are $1350.00 for
a shared double room & $1600 for an exclusive single or approx. $338 & 400/mo.
This opportunity is open to all UBC men.
Please phone either Terry Marleau or Erik
Madsen at 222-1135 or 222-2619 for details.
ROOM & BOARD: Clean, comfortable,
close. $250/month - everything included.
Phone Dave at 922-2700.
2 BR BSMT SUITE. $525 incl. util. 10th
and Alma. March 1. Children welcome
734-2415.
BACHELOR  APARTMENT, 8th and Yew
available  March   15,   $322  a   month,   call
733-4086 between 9 and 11 p.m..
25 - INSTRUCTION
"GREAT EXERCISE", great fun! English
riding lessons at new facility with indoor
riding ring. Located in Delta 2 min. thru tunnel. Phone stable a.m. 946-2590 or evgs.
856-8735.
30 - JOBS
PAINTERS - College Pro's North Van
interior outlet is currently interviewing interested students in securing a position.
Wages from $6 to $7.50/hr. Apply at Brock
Hall or mail application to 5959 Student
Union Mall box 321 Van. B.C.
RESEARCH    ASSISTANTSHI PS   for
graduate students with extensive experience in RF & electronics in UCLA
Auroral research facility, Fairbanks, Alaska.
Call 12131 825-9531.
CARETAKER NEEDED for remote island
lodge up coast. A chance to write or
meditate. Couples preferred. Stipendt
bonus. Call Woldy 926-1237 bet. 7-10 p.m.
AMS FOOD AND BEV. DEPT. now hiring
for Tortellini's Restaurant. Must be avail,
for 11:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. shift Mondays
(plus on-call shifts). Apply to SUB 266 with
resume.
40 - MESSAGES
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free tests —confidential help.
PREGNANT  &  DISTRESSED?  We  are  a
childless couple desiring to adopt. Perhaps
we can assist each other. Please respond in
confidence with your name Et address to
Pauline, P.O. Box 48552, Bentall Centre,
Vane, B.C. V7X 1A3.
THE MISSING DANCE PARTNER contest
at the Pit Pub! Two more Saturdays to win
trip for two to Big White ski resort,
courtesy of Summit Leisure. Airfare
courtesy Air B.C.. Win gift certificates for
sportswear from Intramurals. Just ask someone to dance. Arranged by CITR Mobile
Sound.
HAPPY    VALENTINES    DAY,    SHTICKY
Thanks for the memories! Home Mr. PP
forever, love your little mole (I'm sure you
know which one!) P.S. I kinda like your cat-
so!
VIXEN, I'll love you 'til the gums give way
and beyond, even 'til the cows come home.
Happy birthday and happy valentine you
'sexy thing you' — Tiger.
60 - RIDES
KELOWNA RETURN transportation $30.
Bus leaving McMillan Lounge Wed. Feb.
19th 4:00 p.m. return Sun. Feb. 23rd 7:00
p.m. Phone Nate 872-2220, Jim 224-1159.
70 - SERVICES
University Hill United
and Presbyterjan
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings at
10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology.
6060 Chancellor Boulevard
FREE FACIALS!!! Introduction offer by a
major skin care company. No obligation!
Call Jean at 224-4706.
SPEAKEASY has pamphlets and posters on
bus routes, health, movies, campus events.
Drop by SUB concourse.
YOUR PARTIES GOT NO HUM to their
drums? Pick up the beat by calling
228-3017. CITR mobile sound delivers the
best dance music & rock 'n roll cheap.
VALENTINE FLOWERS 15% student
discount. Visa & Mastercard accepted.
April Flowers, 2693 W. Broadway 734-2767.
ALL MUSLIM STUDENTS are invited to
come to Friday Prayer at 12:30 in International Hse. We also have meetings on Mondays — twice a mth. Please come & pray to
God.
75 - WANTED
ASTHMATICS: Well paid volunteers are
needed for a study at St. Paul's Hospital.
Contact 682-2344, ext. 2259.
80 - TUTORING
MATH HELP SERVICE. Highly qualified,
eperienced tutor. Flexible hrs. Call for appt.
Days, eves, wkends. 931-6014.
80 - TUTORING
TUTOR    AVAILABLE    FOR    FRENCH    &
German.  Reasonable rates.  Call 732-5759
(afternoons)
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Main Concourse
Phone 228-3777
NEED A TUTOR?
Achieve goals you thought
were never possible.
Call 736-3399
GEiC Associates
1110-1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V6H 1E5
ARE YOU A TUTOR?
Want to Earn Extra Income?
For Contacts Unlimited
Send Resume to:
G. & C. Associates
#110, 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 1E5
Ph. 736-3399
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST. ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mepts., essays, tech., equal., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
MASTER TYPIST. Expert wordprocessing.
Very fast. $1.50 per double-spaced page
228-3881 or 224-0866. RACHEL.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING. Student
discount. High quality work. 10th &
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
SPEAKEASY TYPIST REGISTRY. Find a
typist or register as a typist. No charge.
SUB concourse.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statistical. 271-6755 Richmond.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reasonable rates. 261-2337.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wkends.
731-1252.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       (hrs   9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.    939-2703 Thursday, February 13, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 27
ExUkik
Michael Morris Early Works 1966-1972.
53 paintings at Vancouver Art Gallery, until
March 23.
Paintings by Richard Tetrault, paintings
concerned with landscapes and abstracts,
Surrey Art Gallery (13750-88th Ave.
596-7461), until March 4.
Ceramic Erotica, from the delicate
porcelain of Jeannie Mah to the precision of
architect Peter Baker to the bold sculpture of
Ron Sawatsky, all pieces will be devoted to
EROTICA, please use discretion when visiting
this show with children, until March 2.
A Measure of Consensus — Canadian
Architecture in Transition, UBC Fine Arts
Gallery, until March 1, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Lithographs by Steve Nelson and Ken
Pattern. Granville Island Graphics (1650
Johnston St. (687-8914), until Feb. 22.
The Basketry Link, international travelling
exhibit of more than 100 baskets, Cartwright
Gallery (1411 Cartwright St. 687-8266), until
Feb. 16.
Betty Jean Drumond — Prints,
Gateway Gallery (6500 Gilbert Rd.), Feb. 13
- March 3.
"Art About Issues" and "Political
Posters by Klaus Staeck" are two
politically charged shows that . . . are
now over . . . why the hell did I just type
all that?!
The Joy of Form, an exhibition of 15 paintings by B.C. artists including collected by
curator Roge Boulet "I think paintings should
be objects for contemplation", Burnaby Art
Gallery (6344 Gilpin St. 291-9441), until
March 2.
25 Young Artists (I have no idea) present
their works, Or Gallery (1729 Franklin St.
261-6415) and the Convertible Showroom
(40 East Cordova 688-7405), there will be a
performance by Judy Radul FeL/. 24, 9 p.m. at
the Western Front. (303 East 8th Avenue,
Vancouver 876-9343). Whew, not one of the
25 is from Edmonton. The show runs from
Feb. 17-March 1.
The Wendy Dobereiner Paintings and
Collages at Surrey Art Gallery (13750 - 88th
Ave. 596-74611, Feb. 19 - March 16.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chi/yese Cuismt-
228-9114
10'- DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
M:,n  Fn    11  30 M 00 i.  m
"".LOSED SATURDAYS      ,
" 2142 Western
l UBC Vh
Vfcfa
Cmtse tt» Kraft* wt* B.C. Hrif*. Outo» ComriwroW for «»«««r>«i. Simulate«n»r!t
«lttgwin»*lng^Can>Bi^
The Mask (kinda intriguing eh?l, Cartwright Gallery (1411 Cartwright St. Granville
Island 687-8266), February 20 - March 23.
Transferred Impressions, an exhibition of
silkscreens, etchings and lithographs by
Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, Vancouver Art Gallery until March 23.
Berlin Notes, introduces five contemporary Berlin artists, includes paintings, collages and video, Vancouver Art Gallery (750
Hornby 682-5621), until March 23.
Lorna Mulligan, and The Central
Character by Patricia Gruben, a film about
women, Contemporary Art Gallery (555
Hamilton St.), until March 1.
Bob Evermon: A Retrospective Burnaby Art Gallery (6344 Gilpin St. 291-9441),
until March 2.
New Visions: Seriographs by Susan A.
Point, Coast Salish artist, an exhibition of
silkscreen prints by Point, Coast Salish print-
maker and jeweller from the Musqueam
Reserve in Vancouver, witl be on display,
Museum of Anthropology (6393 N.W.
Marine Drive 228-5087), until March 30.
'dancing, at the Arts Club Granville Island
Theatre (687-1644). Held over to February 23.
Only in Vancouver, a lively musical comedy that pokes fun at our city, at the Arts
Club Revue Stage (687-I5315), Monday to
Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 and
9:30 p.m.
Fool for Love, another Sam Shepard play,
at the Arts Club Seymour Street,
(687-5315, Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m.,
Saturdays at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m., special price
matinees on Thursdays at ':>:30 p.m.
Eyeglass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
The SlabBoys, a comedy by John
Byrne, at Studio 58 (Langara Campus,
324-5227) until February 23, Tuesday to Sunday at 8 p.m. with Sunday matinees at 2:30
p.m.
Noises Off, a comedy at the Vancouver
Playhouse. Thursday February 13, only
$2.50.
The Prisoner of Second Avenue, by Neil
Simon, presented by Cue to Cue Players.
February 13-15, 19-22 at the Surrey Arts
Centre Theatre 1594-4785) 8 p.m.
Lulu Re-Vamps Steveston or Saving of
the Samson, Richmond's own melodrama.
February 18 - March 2, 8:00 p.m., at the Richmond Gateway Theatre (6500 Gilbert Road,
Richmond, 280-4444).
The Haunting Of Hill House, the heart-
stopping ghost play written by Shirley
Jackson, February 19 - March 8, 8 p.m.
Presented by the Vagabond Players.
(525-1829).
On Tap, a fast-paced musical tribute to tap
FlowMotion,    an    exploration    of    fluid
dynamics,    at   the   Arts,    Sciences    & j
Technology   Centre   (R.S.V.P    687-8414),
opens February 27, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Recruiting Board Members, a workshop,
at the Vancouver Volunteer Centre, (3102
Main Street, 875-9144), February 19, 7:00 to
9:30 p.m., cost $10.00.
The Training Needs Survey, a workshop,
at the Vancouver Volunteer Centre, (3102
Main Street, 875-9144), February 27, 7:00 to
9:00 p.m., cost $5.00.
Mysterious Objects, a multi media performance installation and exhibition, by Andre
Patterson, at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, (254-9578), February 27, 8:30 p.m.,
one night only.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs in this tiny island
kingdom were confused by reports
of the strange pagan Valentinian
traditions of the west. Bacchanalian, orgiastic rites are common among locals, but no one, ob-
solutely no one, has thought of
capitalist exploitation. We know it's
really their gods who are crazy.
Western lovers are always sane
about mammon matters. "Ugga
booga wooga," they said, "We
worship three gods."
mm sarah's mm
™GOURMETV
COFFEE   &   TEA
P.S. DEAR VALENTINE, Please remember to bring home
a pound from Sarah's!
— AT YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1929 —
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(Across from Duthie's)
224-0331
2297 W. 41st Ave.
261-2939
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
738-2024
PLUM
wishes you
HAPPY
VALENTINES
DAY!
A GIFT TO OUR VALENTINES
AT UBC!
anything in the
store
(minimum purchase $35.00)
Offer expires Feb. 28/86
... a new kind of discount clothing store!
West Fourth (at Alma) and 128 Lonsdale, North Van.
! Single Vision Glasses.
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I Friday 9 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
■ Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
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You won't get to graduation
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Rent it.
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WE DELIVER
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Fogg n' Suds is having a Mexican Fiesta until
February 28th with lots of food specials and a
mule-train full of golden cerveza. Canadian
dollars, the "Peso of the North", will be
gratefully accepted.
SPa^gonSJcutZtA.     Qv^tm-thiSilcuj
3293 \V. 4th
Kitsilano
ph. 73-BEERS
1215 Bui well
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ph. 664-9297 Page 28
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Feb. 13, 1985
Lesbians and gays
fluster campus
with activities
By IAIN BLAIR
When several people first decided to found a gay organization at UBC
in the early 1970s, they had to go to International House in an attempt to
find a room to meet in. When the woman there in charge of reception and
booking understood why they were, she was shocked and flustered, but
their request was answered.
** #»
Ken Anderlini photo
" VjP gm..
Today, gays and lesbians at UBC
have a room of their own, and a
homosexual presence on campus is
no longer a shocking thing. As well
as being one of the oldest gay
organizations in the province, Gays
and Lesbians of UBC is also one of
the newest service organizations of
the AMS, and within the past two
years its voice and activities in SUB
237B have grown greatly.
Like all SUB offices, the GLUBC
office is small, boxy, and poorly
designed. This office, however, is
almost always in use, and the atmosphere is made positive and open
by the men and women inside. Recent donations of plants and a
ghetto blaster have helped.
''Atmosphere is very
important," said Tanis Sugden,
Service Coordinator and Vice-
President.
As well as being simply a comfortable place to sit and talk, the
GLUBC office functions as a peer
counselling and referral centre and
library. The people inside are able
and willing to talk to anyone about
the purposes of the group.
According to President Joe Kennedy, Gays and Lesbians of UBC
have many aims. "We see ourselves
as trying to educate and provide
support," he said.
"And, of course, we create opportunities for gays and lesbians to
socialize in a friendly and comfortable environment, like at beer
gardens, hikes, skating parties and
dances," he added.
The group also holds events
throughout the year, and this Gay
Week a Heather Bishop concert and
two films will be featured.
GLUBC events and services are
open to everyone on campus. The
recently expanded library, is accessible to all and it has books on
such topics as gay and lesbian sexuality, bisexuality, health issues and
coming out as well as literature of
gay/lesbian interest.
Service Coordinator Tanis
Sugden feels that the organization
has a definite role to play in the
university community.
"I think we have three
objectives," she said. "The first objective is to be of service to any individual on campus who is in the
process of coming out, the second
one is to serve as a referral service to
any gay person who just isn't coping, the third, and I think this is
very important, is to educate the
campus to see that stereotypes
aren't valid."
Sugden   added,   "1   think   that
when you come to university, the
education has to be more than just
book learning; you have to come
away with a positive understanding
of all the types of people out
there."
Posters and pamphlets have been
distributed by the organization to
raise its profile on campus this year.
The level of prejudice or condemnation of gay people on campus is
about the same as or better than the
level of homophobia elsewhere in
society. Outright violence is rare,
but hostility and name-calling are a
part of existence for many gays and
lesbians. Sugden said the GLUBC
office has infrequently received
obscene phone calls and had the
pamphlets on their door stolen and
written on.
"It's usually just a case of trivial
insults that we've all gotten use to
by now, but it's still indicative of a
day-to-day prejudice on campus,"
she said.
She added "nuisance people"
have appeared at some of their
functions.
The campus organization plays
an active role in the Gay/Lesbian
Liberation movement. Contact is
maintained with other groups
across the city, province, and nation, and events such as the upcoming Regional Gay/Lesbian Conference on campus provide an opportunity for gay activist groups to
discuss issues of interest and plan
strategies for change. Gays and Lesbians of UBC has been lobbying for
changes in federal legislation.
"We've been running a postcard
campaign to change the age of
sexual consent laws which are different depending upon sexual orientation and discriminate against
gays," said GLUBC Advocacy
chair Ken Anderlini.
Yet there is still a long way to go
to attain legal and social parity with
the "straight" population for all
sexual minorities.
"We have to keep working at it,"
he said.
Like all groups with special interests that run against public conception of the norm, Gays and Lesbians of UBC is bound to run into
opposition at some point in its activities.
Homophobia cannot be escaped
on campus, but GLUBC will continue trying to inform people of different social realities through information tables, posters, and film,
and encourgage students to speak
with them about any topic which is
of mutual interest.

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