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The Ubyssey Sep 9, 1987

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Array ■H
s?l
*§- v, ::.^
^> BETWEEN
CLASSES
WEDNESDAY
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Organizational meeting for Clubs
Days, 12:30 p.m., SUB 249F.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, 12:30 p.m, Chem
140.
STUDENTS    FOR   A    FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
Organizational meeting, 5:00 p.m.
Grad Student Centre.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, all welcome. 10:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m. Meet in Main libra4y,
entrance hall. Tours last 45 minutes.
THURSDAY
LAW   STUDENTS   ASSOCIATION
Guest Lecture by Catherine MacKinnon and Katherilne Sagey, 1230
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Hebb theatre
(across East Mall from SUBaO.
SHIYO-RYU KARATE
First Practice of the year, 12:00p.m.
to 2:30 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, all welcome.    10:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m. Meet in Main library entrance hall. Tours last 45 minutes.
UBC STAMP CLUB
First heneral meeting.    The club
welcomes all, old and new, 12:30
p.m.,     International     HOuse,
boardroom.
CITR-UBC RADIO
Beer Garden and cider oasis. Come
and enjoy the lush surroundings.
Well even sign up and mislead new
n=members 3 to 6 p.m., SUB rooms
207 and 209.
FRIDAY
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of a Main and Sedgewick libraries, all welcome. 10:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m. Meet in Main library, entrance hall.  Tours last 45 minutes.
HOT
FLASHES
Fun with No Fun
Experience the return of a great
thing. Last year the hippest folk-
rock duo Surrey ever produced
wowed 100 cheering fans in the
Ubyssey office. Thisyerar.NoFunis
returning, palm trees in hand, to
presenttheRichFolkFestival. come
to the Ubyssey office, SUB 241K in
the Northeast corner (second floor),
and see No Fun, Friday September
18, 3:30 - 7:30 p.m. david M., Paul
Leahy and the gang will not
disa point.
Theology Library
changes hours
The Vancouver School of LTheology
Library is changing ita hours, starting Sept. 14th. New hours are Monday to Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 8:00
p.m, Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
COPE Women's
Conference
The committee of Progressive Electors Wo men's Committee is holding
a conferrnce on women's issues,
Sun. Sept. 27th at Trot Lake Community Centre, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. For registration info, call Michele at 251 -4209 or Tami at 251 -1491.
Lunch and childcare provided.
Ubyssey Staff
Meeting Today
first regular staff meeting of the
Ubyssey. All staff and those interested in becoming staff should attend. SUB 241k, 3:30 p.m.
Ubyssey needs
features editor
Applications for the position of
Ubyssey features editor will be accepted until September 15th. For
more information Phone 228-2307
or drop in to SUB 241k.
CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders — 3
lines, $3.00. additional lines. 60c.
Commercial — 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines, 75c. (10% DISCOUNT ON 25 ISSUES OR
MORE.)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:00 a.m. on the day before publication.
Publications Room 266,   S.U.B.,   UBC,   Van.,   B.C.
V6T2A7.
5 - COMING EVENTS
RUMMAGE SALE. Sat., Sept. 12, 9:00 a.m.
At the soon-to-be-relocated Agora Food
Co-op, 3420 W. Broadway at Waterloo.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
4 SALE. 1982 RD350 LC Fairing. Black. Very
fast. Must sell to pay tuition. Phone JP
738-4689. $900 obo. A destitute student.
APPLE IIC COMPUTER. Image writer monitor, joystick & lots of software. $1300. Call
734-2853 eve.
3-SEATER COLONIAL maple couch, $45;
matching maple sofa table, $30; cane bent-
wood rocker, $25; dark wood arborite kitchen set (30x48 & 4 chairs), $50; 10-speed
bike, $45 obo.
1970 MAZDA 4-DOORSedan. Automatic,
original owner. $795 obo. 263-8292 or
683-3111, Local 263.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS T155 III {same as
T156). Abso. new, c/w case & 171 page
manual, $40. 943-6532.
15 - FOUND
FOUND ON THURSDAY, August 20th on
UBC campus. One black and white cat. Call
980-1917.
20 - HOUSING
WANTED N/S FEM. student with sense of
humour to share lux. apt., incl. ind. pool &
fitness ctr., with male student. Leave
message, Peter, 682-3444, Mon.-Fri., 9-6
p.m., Sat., 10-2 p.m.
LG. ROOM WITH kitchenette & private
bath. Dunbar area. In exchange for occasional after school care of 2 children.
736-5082.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS BY Judy Alexander.
Grad of Julliard School of Music & member
of B.C. Reg. Music Teachers Assoc.
321-4809 Oakridge.
30 - JOBS
PANAGOPOLOUS 2 FOR 1 Pizza, 2517
Alma St. req. p.t. delivery drivers & prep,
helpers. Must have own car. Ideal for
students. Pick you own days of work, eves.
& wknds. $5/hr. & tips. Apply in person
after 4 p.m. or phone Mrs. Nickel,
222-0001.
LOVING N/S NANNIE for 2 boys. W. Pt.
Grey, 4 days/wk. Exc. for night
student/student's spouse. 228-9118 eves.
N/S CHILD MINDER for 3Vi-yr.-old.
Thurs., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. & possibly 3-5:30
Mon., Tues. & Wed. afternoons in Kits.
736-7967 or 324-5404.
AFTER SCHOOL CARE for 2 children 9 & 6
yrs. Approx. 3 days/wk, 3-6 p.m. Drivers
licence & cooking req. Live in or out.
736-5082.
MONITORING    STATION    OPERATOR.
Work any shift or combo, of Mon.-Fri. 6-9
a.m. or 10 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sat. & Sun. 7
a.m.-3 p.m. or 3 p.m.-11 p.m. Exc. English
Ef phone manner. Call Donna, 777-77??.
EARL'S. 4837 W. 10th (at Trimble). Needs
energetic floor staff day/eve. Waiters,
waitresses, bus persons, host, hostesses Et
bartenders. Pis. reply in person Sept. 14
btw. 3-5 p.m.
70 - SERVICES
PROFIT FROM NON-PROFIT groceries at
Agora Food Co-op. A pi otitic and prophetic
experience at Dunbar Et 17th.
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in Indian Act
and Canadian Granting Agencies, etc. can
obtain commissioned freelance assoc. with
a native group. Call McCoy, 580-3484.
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING   -   MINIMUM   NOTICE.
Service essays Et resumes, scripts, proof
reading, writing/research help. 227-0425.
ACCURATE REPORTS. Broadway Et Granville, 732-4426. Student rates available.
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 i in i11 m trti fli m \ \\\ \\\ \ .
{   _________-____________________^
,t-~*   ~t'
Welcome back to another year at The Factory.
Most of the lineups are finished, classes have begun, the teachers are lecturing, and students are
doing anything but studying.
What better time to flip through this introductory
issue of The Ubyssey dedicated to nothing but sex,
rock & roll, and that grand ol' dame, UBC.
Inside you'll learn everything your mother forgot
to tell you about birth control, where to party in Vancouver, and the ins and outs of living and surviving
at university.
But remember that tht re is more to school than
clothes, restaurants and nightclubs. Your time at
UBC is an opportunity to question and question
again nature, politics, history, the meaning of life, or
whatever you choose to debate.
Plus, UBC offers an opportunity to meet people of
different backgrounds, people from other parts of the
world or from other parts of Canada. It is a unique
chance to grow as a person but to grow you must get
involved.
So again, welcome, enjoy, and let the year begin.
you
there,
TO
UBC
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 How to avoid "Uzi toting" secretaries
and other hints to survive campus
By KATHERINE MONK
Now that you've finally made it
through registration, here are a
few things which might help you
wend your way through the
academic jungle as it unfolds
before your virgin eyes.
COURSE CHANGES AND
WITHDRAWALS
Getting cold feet about physics
500? or maybe you and your prof
have "personality conflicts'? It's
time to consider withdrawing or
transferring. Course changes
and withdrawals are nothing to
be afraid of. In its ultimate
wisdom the university has made
provisions for wishy-washy twits
like yourself.
The first thing you have to do
is pick up an "add-drop" form
which is available from your
Faculty Head offices. If you
haven't changed your mind
again yet, go to see the professor
who teaches the course you
want. If you satisfy the
requirements, and any other
instinctive or monetary need of
the prof, they will provide you
with a signature on your "add-
drop" form.
The next step is to have your
change approved by your faculty
advisor. In Arts, the faculty
advisor's office is located in
Buchanan A207. In Science, the
dean's office is located in the
north wing of the biological
sciences building, room 1507.
Now that wasn't too bad, was it?
But wait, before you rush out
and get that set of Ginsu Knives,
remember that this must all be
done by September 18 for one-
term fall courses, and
September 25 for full-year
courses (beginning in September
and ending in April). For one-
term courses in the winter
session you have until January
15 to do the whole thing one
more time.
APPEALS
If that hasn't satisfied your red
tape wanderlust, try appealing a
grade. Appeals are for people
who just don't take the word of
SUCCESS
MONEY
SEX...
What more could I need?
MICHAEL GREEN
MA (Oxford), MA. BD
(Cambridge); Formerly
Principal ol St John's
College. England; Past
| Rector of St. Aldate's
Church. Oxford, England;
recently appointed
professor of Theology at
Regent College
speaks about who
Jesus Christ is and
His relevance to
issues that confront
us today.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 13,10 am at UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
5375 University Blvd. (5 minute walk from UBC campus) FREE CORN ROAST WILL FOLLOW THE SERVICE
si
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(Soft contact lenses in about one hour for most
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• Student Rates:
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3665 West 10th Avenue • Phone 736-5669
RICHMOND COQUITLAM/ VANCOUVER/
4940 - No. 3 Rd NEW WEST BURNABY
(At Alderbridge) 403 North Rd. 3328 Kingsway
273-0371 (Next to PJ.'s All Star Cafe) (Kingsway Joyce)
936-1422 438-6122
VANCOUVER
815 W.Hastings
(Howe &. Hastings)
681-9488
COQUITLAM/
PT. COQUITLAM
3025 Loughocd Hwy.
(Nest to Safeway Superstore)
942-1642
NORTH/WEST
VANCOUVER
1242 Marine Dr.
(Next to Save On Foods)
984-3434
VANCOUVER
(2576 Granville St.
Granville Broadway)
738-1511
the prof as the word of God. For
you foolish blasphemors, you
may contest your grade by
discussing it with your professor.
If you feel your claim to
brilliance is falling on deaf ears,
see the department head, and
then the dean of your faculty.
Appeals are worthwhile if you
really feel you have beer
misjudged, or if you feel there
has been a mistake (they do
happen) in the calculations.
Otherwise it will cost you 25
dollars and a lot of time. Appeals
must also be made within two
weeks of the report of the final
FEES
Unless you want the secretarial
pool on your front lawn toting
Uzis it would be a good idea to
pay your fees on time. Fees for
the first term are due on
September 25, fees paid later are
subject to a forty dollar late fee.
PARKING
If you've still got enough cash
left to run a car, you may be
wondering about where to park
it. For that you're going to need,
what else, more money. Parking
at UBC is good training for
those of you who are planning to
live in New York at some time in
your life.
Parking here develops all those
survival skills you thought were
long gone the minute we became
bipedal. If you are an old hand
at the game, and are a grad or a
fourth year student, you can get
a preferred students sticker to
park in A Lot, but you have to
be quick because it's already too
late to get a spot for this year.
Stickers are available once
again come August 1st, 1988.
Plan ahead.
If you are anything less than a
faculty or staff member, and you
do not live on campus, welcome
to the wonderful world of B Lot.
B Lot is a world of wonder all by
itself. B Lot costs a quarter each
time you leave the facility -
assuming that you might
actually be able to get in the
facility.
If you don't mind paying more,
there are visitor parking lots
opposite SUB, next to the
hospital, and near the Asian
Centre. But the best of all
alternatives is to board a BC
Transit aluminum sided
limousine to SUB loop; after all,
we're paying for it.
Or, if the bus doesn't make it to
your white picket fence, try
finding a car pool on the ride
board which is located by Duke's
in SUB.
Any way you make it onto
campus, make sure that you get
here. Attendence may be more
important than you think.
Check with your prof about how
much of the grade, if any, is
based on attendence. Even if
you're only auditing a course
make sure the prof gets to know
your beautiful face, it could
make the difference between the
beginning of a beautiful
friendship and an ugly
transcript.
DUTHIE BOOKS
Back to the books? Make the
transition a bit less painful with
Duthie's new student discount.
Look for a special bookmark
in this year's U.B.C. Handbook. With the bookmark and
a valid student card, U.B.C.
students are entitled to a 10%
discount on any book purchase
during the 1987-88 school year
at Duthie's West Tenth Avenue
store.
Like logging or fishing,
bookselling is a seasonal occupation and fall is our most exciting season. The early fall
titles are already in the store.
The Illustrated History of
Canada is the first good, accessible general reference on Canadian history and looks like a
must on every bookshelf.
We are now taking orders
for The Historical Atlas of
Canada, edited by R. Cole Harris, and it should be arriving
this month. Along with the
new edition of Canadian Encyclopedia, which isn't due out
until next year, but is already
generating a lot of advance
orders, these books will become the essential Canadian
home reference collection.
Rick Hansen: Man in Motion, by Rick and local sports
writer Jim Taylor is in and
selling briskly.
If you are among those who
see western culture as being on
a slow downward spiral and
standards, especially educational standards, eroding fast,
then two new books of cultural
criticism will be right up your
alarmist alley. The Closing of
the American Mind by Allan
Bloom and Cultural Literacy by
E.D. Hirsch Jr. are both stinging
attacks on the educational system of America and the disappearance of the literate and cultured man.
New Fiction. Presumed Innocent, by Chicago lawyer Scot
Turow, is a well-crafted courtroom drama, loaded with dirty
urban politics and moving family politics, and it's a good sus-
pence story as well. Highly recommended.
In the Skin of a Lion is Michael Ondaatje's new novel, set
in Toronto in the 20's and 30's
and blending history and fantasy into the kind of intriguing
web for which Ondaatje is so famous.
Two new books on travel
worth considering are Brazilian
Journal, by award-winning
poet and painter P.K. Page and
South Light, the story of a journey to Antarctica that evokes
the eerie beauty and vital spirit
of life in that last place.
If you've been around the
Tenth Ave. store lately you'll
have seen our new computerized inventory control and special order system in operation.
The new system has a data
base of over 50,000 titles and allows us to carry a wider range
of titles and to keep on top of
the enormous output of English-language publishing.
Our plans for the fall include
expanding our reference sections and broadening our history, science and social sciences
sections. And watch out for
some mysterious developments
a bit later in the season!
919 Robson Street
684-4496
OPEN 9-9 MON.-FRI.
Arbutus Village Square
738-1833
4444 W. 10th Ave.
224-7012
MANHATTAN BOOKS & MAGAZINES 1089 ROBSON
Page   4
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 THE UNIVERSITY
SONG AND DANCE
BY CORINNE BJORGE
There's THEM, and then there's US. Them
is the administration, the bureaucracy, the
people you curse while you're standing in
line. Us is the ones in line.
THEM
In principle the ministry of advanced
education and job training determines
broad funding allocations for BC's colleges
and universities. But the government also
controls funding to a large extent within
UBC through appointments to controlling
bodies.
The board of governors, for example, is
dominated by eight provincially appointed
members from the business community.
Other members on the board include two
faculty members, the Uaniversity Chancellor, UBC president, one staff representative
and two students elected by the student
body. The board makes funding allocations
within the university based on recommendations from the administration and the
senate. The biggest responsibility and
power of the board is to set the university's
budget which includes an annual review of
tuition fees. They were also responsible for
approving the recent increase in athletic
fees. Student representatives are not allowed to be an effective force.
Students enjoy greater power in the senate. Although the student senate caucus is
not particularly large, with 17 representatives out of 87 (19 per cent), it has the
potential to influence decisions which affect
academic standards of the university, decisions regarding course content, the state of
libraries, and etc.
Students also have representation at the
faculty and departmental level through
student representatives who attend meetings and voice their concerns. These positions are not highly publicized and are
usually appointed through undergraduate
societies.
US
The most visible student organization on
campus is your students' council — the
Alma Mater Society. Council is made up of
students elected at-large and students
elected by their constituencies. There are
five at-large positions: president, vice president, director of finance, director of administration, and external affairs. These, the
council executives, have offices on the upper
floor of the Student Union Building and,
generally, more influence than other council members. Although decision making
power is loosely held by all council members, in practice decisions are usually directed through the executive and the bureaucrats, the AMS business office.
All students enrolled in credit courses at
UBC are members of the AMS and, as
members, enjoy certain rights and privileges. Facilities such as the ice rinks, gymnasiums, rooms in SUB, and the aquatic
centre are available at reduced rates, or
sometimes without charge.
AMS PRESIDENT, REBECCA
NEVREAUMONT:
As president, Rebecca publicly represents
UBC students and attends various official
functions. She chairs all student council
meetings and is responsible for overseeing
everyday AMS business.
Rebecca will be representing UBC at the
national forum on post secondary education
this fall. She claims to operate on the
premise that student politicians can speak
their minds without fear of retribution.
JODY WOODLAND, AMS VICE PRESIDENT:
Jody's main job as vice president is to act
as a liason between the AMS and the undergraduate societies.
"One thing I would really like to do is try
to get council a little more active again.
Basically it's a lethargic body. Things are
left to the executive to get done," he said.
During the first week of classes Jody will
be responsible for running the annual general meeting, which will take place at the
Friday's AMS barbecue between sets of cow-
punk music by K. D. Lang. The code and
bylaw changes that Jody hopes to pass at
the meeting are general housekeeping
motions to 'clean up' the AMS constitution.
"People tend to forget that this (the AMS) is
a legal entity and that (if it's not reviewed)
things can can go wrong," said Jody. "With
a more accessible document people can be
more aware of what the society can do, and
what it is allowed to do," he said.
During the summer Jody gave high school
orientations. He enjoyed getting the positive feedback, but criticized the university's
lack of participation in the orientations. "I
think the university should be paying for
(the orientations). The university has been
resting on its laurels for too long. Their
record of academic recruitment is poor," he
said.
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE, DON ISAAK
Don merits two accolades. Once is for
attaining fame as the only director of finance to ever be made an honorary Ubyssey
staffer. The second is for his crocodile boots.
"My number one project over the summer
was to establish a typesetting shop for the
AMS," said Don. The shop currently serves
The Ubyssey newspaper and various constituency newspapers on campus, but Isaak
hopes to expand it into a competitive publishing business during the year. "I'd like to
market the typesetting shop so it's used to
its potential," he said.
As director of finance Don would like to
see all AMS-owned businesses run efficiently, "I want to see that there's not a
speck of wasted space in this building (SUB)
where people aren't trying to make money,"
he said.
AMS DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION, TIM BIRD:
"I thought I would have more time to
work with people and to work on long
term projects," says Tim of his position as
director of administration so far, "but in a
position like this you end up solving everybody elses day to day problems. So I'm
treading water more than I'd like to be."
Tim is responsible for communications
between clubs, the Student Administrative
Commission (of which he is chair), and
council.
He hopes to pilot an expansion project for
SUB this year. "We've got three clubs in
some offices and it's just too crowded - it's
not fair to them".
Tim said a review of executive honoraria
at UBC was needed to bring them more in
line with other campuses across Canada.
The UBC student body made a big mistake
in assuming they're going to attract competent people in these positions if there is
really no monetary compensation," he said.
"Most universities across Canada provide a
comfortable salary for the positions like our
executive. Other student council executives
are paid a full time wage and they do a full
time job so they have time to spend on long-
term goals."
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
COORDINATOR, CAROLINE RIGG
"We would like to see increases in the
student aid program," Caroline says. She
hopes to gain public support for student
aid by working to improve the local profile
of UBC.
You have to learn the steps
before they'll tet you polka
Caroline said one way to improve the
UBC's profile would be "to invite as many
MLA's from both parties to campus" this
fall. "You get so many students from different areas," she said. "Student aid is the one
thing you can hope to better."
Increasing communication and structuring the office of external affiars will also be
a priority this year, she said.
From top to bottom:
Rebecca Nevraumont
Tim Bird
Caroline Rigg
Jody Woodland
Don Isaak
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 DARLENE MARZARI,
M.L.A. VANCOUVER. PT. GREY
is available to help you with
- student aid appeals
- landlord & tenant problems
- up to date information on
government programs
at her community office
3606 West Broadway (at Dunbar)
Tel: 732-8683
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.- 1p.m.
Serving All Point Grey Residents
FIASCO
ITALIAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT BAR
- wood-fired pizzas
- pastas        - salads
- grills - appetizers
.V Monday Nite Football
t> $2.50 Tuesdays
ft Wednesdays - 990 Nite
& Thursdays - $6.49 Jug Nite
Broadway & Bayswater
734-1325
Fun courses to take
Now that you've actually been to
class and met your profs you may
be regretting some hasty decisions
you made this summer. If you
think you're in over your head,
don't despair: if you act now you
can lighten the load without losing
any credits. UBC provides plenty
of opportunities for people to get
credits without doing any work,
and the Ubyssey has sought out
the best of these for you.
Turn to page four to learn how
to change courses. And now, the
easiest courses on campus, in alphabetical order.
FINE ARTS 100: "Introduction to
Art History" involves the memorization of paintings, art concepts
and historical trends in art. According to one students, you'll do
fine if you can remember Picasso
was the guy whe drew like you did
in kindergarten.
FRENCH 400: "A Survey of
French Literature in Translation"
in the calendar, this course is better known as "Football French"
and is one of the most infamous
easy courses on campus. According to one student all that is required is to "sit back and watch the
prof rant about sex for two hours."
Fills up fast.
All UBC students welcomed to
enjoy all the games in our sports
lounge throughout the year.
Dare to Compare!
Microprocessor
Wait states
Generation
Processing power (Norton SI 3.1)
Hard drive
- Data transfer rate
- Access time
- Auto park/ Head lift
Manufacture and design
Expansion slots
Standard RAM
Matti co-processor socket for
VLSI Technology
Floppy drive and controller
Battery backed up dock/calendar
Parallel port
Games port
Mouse port'
Mono and Color graphics adapter
Light pen interface
CSA approved power supply
Heavy duty slide chassis
AT style keyboard
12" Amber mono monitor with
tilt & swivel base
Complete system cost"
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1 MB
640K
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8087
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YES
7
YES
7
YES
7
YES
7
YES
7
YES
7
YES
7
YES
?
$1999 00
7
' Now! Free Mouse Included
"10 Times More for your Money
cci
2724 S.E. Marine Dr.
Vancouver, B.C.
432-9687
GEOLOGY 100: "Introduction to
Physical Geology" is the original
"Rocks for Jocks" and deserves the
name. Worth three credits, this is
the easiest way to fulfill your science requirement.
GEOPHYSICS 310: "Exploring
the Universe." A three credit
whirl around space for those with
an aversion to advanced mathematics. "No background in science
or mathematics" is necessary, and
it's apparently interesting as well
as easy.
MUSIC 326: "Music Appreciation" is a course in which students
listen to a variety of classically
oriented music and discuss musical concepts and history. It is
known in the department as "Clap
for Credit."
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 206
through 229 inclusive: This is
the last year you can take the
absolutely easiest courses on campus; they will be phased out next
year. You will learn the intricacies
of all the sports you have played
since you were a kid. ("This is a
football...") Try PE 222 to get
credit for going skiing.
THEATRE 350: "Theatrical Production" is colloquially known as
"Stagehand 350" or "Introductory
Roadie 350." You make sets and
stuff for the Freddy Wood plays,
get lots of exercise, and yep, three
credits.
U.D.C. Thunderbird
Winrer Sports Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
228-6121
228-6125
Squash - Racquetball Contracts
- We will be offering four month contracts for September 14th '87
through to December 18th '87.
- These will be a one court a week contract with no reduced
fee's.
- Courts will be issued strictly on a first come first serve basis with
payment required in full.
- Special rates available only on presentation of valid student AMS
card or faculty /staff card.
Contracts Can Be Booked On September 11th,
Starting At 7:30 am, In The Lounge At...
The Winter Sports Centre
6066 Thunderbird Blvd.
Office: 228-6121
228-6125
^rjjj^j^Mryyy,^
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 DRINKERS' GUIDE TO CAMPUS
A guide for
the
uninitiated
and the
uninebriated
By JENNIFER LYALL and ROSS
McLAREN
-inspired by Joe McCarthy
Feeling stressed? Needadrink? Thatisbad
because alcohol increases stress. But never
mind. You know what you want and we
know where you can get it, and in this guide
we want to share our knowledge with you.
THE PIT PUB
Aptly named, the Pit can be lots of fun,
especially if you want to be very loud, get
very drunk, dance a lot, and pick up a
stranger. It is certainly in the running for
the worst decorated pub in the city, although the back issues of The Ubyssey all
over the walls provide interesting reading
when conversation wanes. The Pit boasts
the largest selection of draft beer in B.C. at
real cheap prices, along with a singularly
unimaginative menu of greasy burgers and
thick cut fries. The Pit is frequented mostly
by fashion victims, UBC residents and fraternity members, especially on Wednesdays, when trendy people of all affiliations
come to see and be seen and maybe get
lucky. There is no cover charge for AMS
cardholders, but you will be required to
present ID at the door. Cover is $1 for non-
students.
THE GALLERY LOUNGE
No lounge lizards here! The Gallery offers
a refuge from the barbarian hordes located
in the Pit below. It is a comfortable, tranquil
place to relax with friends or with that
special person in your life. Daily drink
specials, both hot and cold, make it even
more affordable to seduce the aforementioned special person. In keeping with its
name, The Gallery walls display a different
artist every month. Live entertainment,
usually mediocre but occasionally excellent, is featured several nights a week.
99 CHAIRS
99 Chairs is the only bar on campus with no
atmosphere. It would make a real nice
luncheon cafe. It is the only bar with a piano
that is never played. How boring is this bar?
UBC Lawn Bowlers refuse to drink here.
But it is real convenient if you happen to li ve
in Fairview or Acadia residence.
THE GRAD LOUNGE
This has to be the most boring bar on campus. How boring is this bar? It is even more
boring than 99 Chairs. It used to be pretty
good but has gone downhill since management was taken out of the hands of the grad
students two years ago. Even people who
aren't grad students are allowed to drink
here, especially at one of the many politically correct parties.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International House is an interesting place
to meet wild and wonderful people from
around the world, although the most interesting of these people are probably out
somewhere else meeting Canadians. The
decor isn't much and the booze selection
isn't worth writing home about but is rumored to be the cheapest on campus. Great
beer gardens 'cause they got the best dance
floor on campus.
THE CHEEZ FACTORY
Rumors that there is a puking trough
around the engineers' pub are completely
unfounded, although it certainly attracts
dedicated drinkers. The Cheez has the
atmosphere of a backyard picnic area, complete with checkered tablecloths, surrounded by geer memorabilia. Since the
engineering faculty is mostly male, this is
probably a better place to pick up men than
women. The Cheez is located off the Main
Mall between the civil/mechanical and electrical engineering buildings.
Fearless geer clowns beer
George Anderson photo
Stuff your face
Although most of the time students can
subsist wholly on starch, chemicals, and
lotsa Kokanee, there will be times when
you need real food. Contrary to popular
university mythology, real food can be
found on campus; just follow this handy
guide.
SUBWAY CAFETERIA
For variety and a large selection, this is
the place. UBC's largest cafeteria, taking
up most of the main floor of SUB, offers
deli style food, a salad bar, Chinese and
Asian cuisine, burgers n' fries, fruit ka-
bobs, omelettes, and more. Be sure to
experience the original UBC cinnamon
bun, famous nation-wide but available
only in this cafeteria. The most recent
special addition is the "Lickity Split" ice
cream bar, featuring 26 different decadent flavours... indulge! Open M-F, 7:30
am to 7 pm, Saturdays 10 am to 2 pm.
Closed Sundays.
DUKE'S COOKIES
Finding themselves on the main concourse of SUB, gourmet cookie junkies
will easily follow the pervasive aroma to
discover true hot n' chewy cookie ambrosia. Duke's also features an excellent
capuccino and espresso bar, and other hot
and cold beverages. Open M-F 7 am to 10
pm, and probably weekends too.
TORTELLINI'S
Mama Leone, eat your heart out! Affectionately known to some as "Plastic
Pasta", Tortellini's is UBC's version of
little Italy and is located on the lower
concourse of SUB, with indoor and outdoor seating. They offer a wide selection
of pasta dishes (unfortunately not always
al dente) with a choice of 5 scrummy homemade "sauca's." You can enjoy filling meals
at fairly reasonable prices. Indulge in stro-
ganoff or the spicy chili, or try the full salad
bar and baked goods. Early birds can sit
down to a breakfast special offered daily, or
go for the hearty T- Bir d breakfast sandwich
at $1.99. Open M-F 7 am to 10 pm, Saturday
and Sunday 11 am to 10 pm.
THE PIT PUB
Also located on the lower SUB concourse,
the Pit is open from 11 am to 1 am daily and
till midnight Sunday. Here you will find
unbeatable burger bargains and a variety of
burger fixin's to tempt the fickle. Daily
specials make great ploughman's lunches
at dirt cheap prices. With enough draught
beer to sink the Canadian navy, the Pit
boasts the largest selection of draught on
tap, import ciders and the infamous Pit
shooters. You can nibble excellent finger
foods to nibble while catching up on your
soaps on the larger than life satellite TV, on
ByHEDYRUBEN
which various featured films are shown
every Sunday. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday nights it's time to kick back and do
some dancing!
SNACK ATTACK
Again on the lower concourse, the Snack
Attack provides the quick solution for the
most wicked case of the munchies. Variety
of gourmet "dogs" in three different sizes,
humungous muffins and heavenly chocolate malts. Open M-F 7 am to 8 pm, S-S 10
am to 8 pm.
THE DELLY
The Delly specialises in wonderful custom
made take-out sandwiches at affordable
prices. For a change of pace try the samo-
sas, cornish pasties or tasty spanakopita, or
indulge in sinfully delicious nanaimo bars
or cookies. Healthy light snacks also available for the conscious nibbler. You will find
the Delly near the Bank of Montreal in the
SUB lower concourse.
IHE. Oi—«*o%   crt,c^K#q(
THE BUS STOP
Centrally located on Main Mall, the Bus
Stop provides a cozy, unhurried, although often crowded atmosphere. This
is the place to make contact! Good hot
and cold short order items, excellent
fresh pasta salads, and a truly irresistable ponderosa cake that goes down best
when accompanied by one of the various
specialty coffees. Renowned for the
friendly staff, always ready with a smile,
a listening ear, and helpful advice on any
problem!!
BUCHANAN SNACK BAR
Conveniently located in Buchanan block
A, you'll find baked goodies for a quick
snack and for that much needed night
class caffeine fix, the coffee is, well, definitely an eye-opener!
THE BARN
Located on the south side Main Mall, The
Barn offers a quaint and cozy atmosphere
with daily luncheon specials, a sandwich
bar, hamburgers and other hot items.
Open M-F 7:45 am to 3:35 pm.
PONDEROSA CAFETERIA
Located by the Ponderosa Pine on the corner of West Mall and University Boulevard, take out or eat in. This cafeteria is
most famous for its baked goods (try the
ponderosa cake) but also features daily
specials and a create-your-own sandwich
bar. Licenced. Open M-F 8 am to 2 pm.
I.R.C. SNACK BAR
Located in the Instructional Resources
Centre lounge in the Woodward library
building, take out service for a quick
snack or a light meal. Open M-F 8 am to
3:45 pm.
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Hang out, look
good, be cool
Tiffany, misguidedly questing for
romance at the Luvafair, is rudely
introduced to the concept of slam-
dancing.
By DEANNE FISHER et al
If you're brave enough to venture beyond the realms of the
familiar this year, past the gates of
conversational idiocy ("Like,
what's your major, dude?") then
you're ready to enter the real
world full of real people who hold
real jobs and have real goals and
go out and have real fun. Get a
taste of adventure through
Vancouver's night clubs where
students are almost a novelty and
average people make asses of
themselves and live to tell about it,
over and over again. You too can
be cool just by studying this simple
guide.
■ AMMNESIA (99 Powell, Gastown) Plastic people dance to plastic music in a plastic nightclub.
Top 40 with cosmic lighting and
lots of college students. Might as
well go to the Pit, it's cheaper and
they can spell.
■ ARTS CLUB LOUNGE (1181
Seymour) Interesting bands play
late at night after Arts Club productions. Sit back and watch the
beautiful theatre people roll by.
■ BUDDY'S (1018 Burnaby) A
gay bar with little tolerance for
heteros. A favorite of the young
crowd, plays mostly new dance
music.
■ CELEBRITIES (1022 Davie)
The newest gay club in town, has a
very large dance floor and attracts
a diverse crowd. Nice decor.
■ CHANNEL 1KLUB (860 Denman) Can you say "big hair?" — I
knew you could. Either be authentically cool or wear enough black to
cover up the fact that you don't
belong here. Live bands sometimes, reggae night Thursday,
everything but the bass mixed out
of the music.
■ CLUB SODA (1055 Homer)
Live top 40/rock. Don't wear anything special. Nobody cares.
Pretty ordinary.
■ THE EDGE (1225 Homer) After
hours/underage bar. Look like
death and you'll fit in.
■ EIGHTY SIX STREET (Expo
site) Big enough for big name
bands, but has the atmosphere of
the PNE food fair. Billy Bragg said
it was the only time he'd played in
a shopping mall.
■ THE GANDYDANCER. (1222
Hamilton) Straightest gay bar in
town. Men dance with men, men
with women, women with women
and dancing alone is perfectly
acceptable. Bathrooms are almost
co-ed. Men only Friday and Saturday.
■ GRACELAND (1250 Richards,
in the alley) Music to wear black to
but beware of stray slam dancers.
Sometimes they show pornos on
the video screen. Good local bands
occasionally.
■ HOLIDAYS (135 W 1st., North
Van.) Highlight of the evening is
Madonna's "Holiday". Need I say
more?
■ LUVAFAIR (1275 Seymour)
Like Graceland but even more
black. Don't expect to feel comfortable unless you are a pseudo
punker pinhead. Wear lots of
black, blend into the walls and
laugh at the pseudo punker pin
heads. Never a lot of fun, hostile
atmosphere, you'll go home alone.
■ MARDI GRAS. (century plaza
hotel, 1015 Burrard) Mid-life crisis centre (pick up an older man)
with an ethnic flavour.
■ The METRO (1136 W. Georgia)
Spandex mandatory. Heavy
metal heaven. Michael J. Fox is
seen here.
■ NUMBERS (1042 Davie) An
older gay bar featuring pool tables,
dance floor and skin flicks.
■ THE RAILWAY CLUB (579
Dunsmuir) Original alternative
local bands play to a mellow crowd.
Lots of reggae, blues, and rock n'
roll. Spirit of the West sings a song
called Our Station about how
great this bar is. It doesn't cost
much to become a member.
■ RICHARDS ON RICHARDS
(1036 Richards St.) Alias dicks on
dicks but not a gay bar. Women
come here to meet lawyers, doctors
andentrepeneurs. Men come here
because women will believe
they're a lawyer, doctor or entre-
peneur. Safe sex atmosphere.
Bring a condom.
■ THE SAVOY (6 Powell) Same
management and atmosphere as
The Railway Club. Good dark
draft.
■ SYSTEMS (350 Richards) Revives disco tunes like "Born to Be
Alive" and "Knock on Wood" which
are initially nostalgic but eventually nauseating. Men should wear
a Corona t-shirt. Women should
wear enourmous bows in their
blonde hair. 99 cent highball extravaganza on Wednesdays. Has
been accused of racism.
■ TOMMY AFRICA'S (1010
Beach) Full of underage UBC students. Plays Sid Vicious' I Did it
My Way every night. The only club
desperate enough to offer drink
specials even on weekends. Get
lucky on Mondays.
■ THE TOWN PUMP (66 Water)
The only place in town where the
band plays to a wall. Good blues
and rock from all over. The band
never comes on before 11:30, and
there are no good seats anyway, so
come late.
■ UNICORN (expo site) Go there
with lots of friends and act stupid.
Relax, there are no intimidating
cool people here.
■ The WAREHOUSE (871
Beatty) Only slightly intimidating for white folks. Good funk
music.
■ XENON (1108 Hamilton) All
those sickeningly trendy people
who can't get enough of that generic music come here.
■ THE VENUE (932 Granville)
The Town Pump in a seedier district. Blues/rock/country.
■ THE YALE (1336 Granville)
Great blues bands, relaxed mood.
Mixture of yuppies and rubbies.
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
AISO
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
FORERUNNERS
Specialty Footwear
f ,RST ANNIVERSARy
^■THDAY BASH S/^,
^SBHOOMS
CHARIOT
$59.
99
reg. $79.
Many Other Specials On Footwear and
SportsClothes -ToonumeroustoMention.
10% Discount to UBC Students
3504 W. 4th Ave.
732-4535
ORIENTATION WEEK 1987
SEPTEMBER
WEDNESDAY
From Toronto
THE.^
12:30
SUB Plaza
THURSDAY
MOLSON
CANADIAN
Sports Trivia
Contest
1st Prize $250
2nd Prize $100
3rd Prize $50
plus other prizes.
12:30
SUB Plaza
FRIDAY
£«*,
MS.
11
<4G^
and
    OLD
SAN FRANCISCO
SELTZER
present
The 4th Annual
A.M.S. Barbecue
Noon - 7:30
with
^-y
**=£&   V
.    -"J . **
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 * Oxford
Filler Paper 200's
Metric Ruled
99(p
* Limit 2 per customer.
FREE Clipboard or Mug
With minimum $15. purchase.
While quantities last.
Hibitane
Antiseptic Cleanser
450 ml
$£29
5
Oxford
Vinyl Binder
One Inch
99<p
* Limit 2 per customer.
FREE Clipboard or Mug!
With minimum $15. purchase.
While quantities last.
Uiih
SKIN
cleanser
Revlon
Nail Polish
& Lipstick
10°/c
O   OFF
Equal
Low-Calorie
Sweetener
100 Packets or
Spoon for Spoon
100 g
$Q99
3
BAUSCH &
LOMB
Sensitive Eyes
Saline Solution
335 ml
$Q99
2
BAUSCH
LOMB
Sensitive
Eyes
Saline
Solution
(ft
__l
Otrivin
Conditioner/
Shampoo or
Hair Spray
Gel
$229
$-|99
— ^
fLBOPEAN
FORMULA
|Or-iCHTI_KsjEP
zVITALISAIMT
A FOHtV_JLE
JROPEENrsJE
Stayffee
max/pads
(30'S & 26'S)
save
$f
Coupon valid only at University Pharmacy
Coupon expires Sept. 13/87
Limit one coupon per purchase.
-_
r*-
ru
m
_-
o
RSITY^
VISA
MasterCard
5754 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VAN. B.C. 224-3202
((in the Village one block east of S.U.B.)
Prescription Service: Mon. - Sat. — 9 am to 10 pm / Sun. 12 noon to 8 pm
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 BRAND NAME SOFT CONTACT LENSES
from $79.95
from $128.00
Offer expires Sept. 30/87
All Prices Include Starter Kit, Follow-up Visits
CAMBIE OPTICAL
3302 Cambie (at 17th)   879-9494
WE WILL
BE OPEN TO
DO MORE FOR YOU
September 8-11
& September 14-18
Our University Branch Will Be
Open 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
To Process Student Loan Requests
FIND OUT MORE TODAY
CALL 665-3768
*
Bank of Montreal
DOING MORE FOR YOU
SSILT,
20% DISCOUNT CARDS
being issued to
STUDENTS - FACULTY - STAFF
VALID EVERY DAY UNTIL DECEMBER 31/87.
COME PICK UP YOUR CARD TODAY!
AVAILABLE AT BOTH LOCATIONS
UNIVERSITY MARTINIZING
DRY CLEANERS
2146 WESTERN PARKWAY
UBC VILLAGE
228-9414
BUSINESS HOURS:
MON.-FRI. 8 a.m. -6 p.m.
SATURDAY 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
FALSE CREEK
DRY CLEANERS
657 Moberley Road,
False Creek,
876-6066
BUSINESS HOURS:
MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
SATURDAY 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Don't be a fashion victim
Or, How to look good for cheap now that your mom
no longer dresses you
BY DEANNE FISHER
The University of British Columbia is an enormous speckled mass
of levis and deck shoes and unless
you sport a fuchsia mohawk or are
blessed with a grotesquely disfigured body, you will likely remain,
for the extent of your glorious
years on campus, one measly conforming dot in the matrix.
So you ache to cure your wan
wardrobe crisis with a shopping
extravaganza but feel morally obligated to limit your clothing allowance to the grossly unrealistic
$50 per month you foolishly stated
on your student loan application.
Don't fret, you superficial GQ
disciples. You can save enough
money by scrimping on necessities
to eventually afford that dull blue
Aritzia sweatshirt you yearn for
and which will likely be out of style
by mid-October anyways.
Used clothing stores are ideal
should you need to dress up for
some depthless wing-ding. Shops
like Paradise Alley on Davie, The
Web on Granville, Sequels on
Broadway and Deluxe Junk and
The Clothesline on W. 4th are
teeming with classic vintage
gowns and suits. Their jewelry
makes for great conversation
pieces. Try on excruciatingly
pointed shoes and charmingly
tacky winter coats. Don't be surprised if you have to spend hours
weeding through the true junk
until you find that piece of exquisite trash that transcends the
boundaries of mere fashion.
If you simply cannot wait
until Christmas, purchase your
socks and underwear at
Woolworth's or Army and Navy
downtown on Hastings. Buy the
cheapest most hideous panties you
can find and hope to start a
lingerie trend. Socks are purely
functional. Never labour over
colour co-ordinating the triangles
in your argyles with your favourite
sweater because no one will notice
"I'm no measly conforming dot!"
or appreciate your efforts. With an
abundant supply of socks and
undies, you can do laundry semiannually and save even more
money.
Wear plenty of black. Not
only is it in style, versatile and
flab-concealing but you can wear
the same black t-shirt repetitively
before washing it as the dirt you
accummulate blends in conveniently. If it smells, spray a lot of
cologne on it. Don't, however, buy
your own cologne (wait until
Christmas for that too) but use the
testers on the fragrance counter of
any department or drug store you
happen to pass. Go for the costly
stuff.
While you're in the vicinty,
women might mosey over to the
cosmetics counter and help themselves to the display testers to do a
respectable job of plasticizing
their faces and actually co-ordinating shades with their attire.
Try those brush-on hair colours at
the same time. Warning—do not
return frequently to the same cosmetics counter as the dippy beautician may miraculously catch on
to your deception. Inquire about
different shades of foundation or
buy a 73 cent eye shadow brush to
deter her suspicions.
To avoid having those burgundy streaks in your hair dribble
down your face from the constant
Vancouver drizzle, you'll need an
umbrella. You will break or lose
about sixteen of these this year so
don't bother spending alot of
money on a cute red one with yellow duckies on it. Apply for a Bay
card during their free umbrella
promotion. Apply sixteen times.
The umbrellas are dull brown but,
like socks, are purely functional.
Expect sixteen rejection letters.
If the Bay wimps out on their
dandy umbrella deal thisyear, you
still needn't splurge. Buy a sharp
hat at a second hand store. Hats
not only attract attention and distinguish you from the 29,452
clones at UBC, but they save your
face from streaking and your hair
from sticking to your forehead
during the perpetual rainy season.
Never buy jewelry in a mall.
Never buy anything in a mall for
that matter but especially not
jewelry. Granville and Robson
streets are rampant with jewelry
vendors. All of their merchandise
is inexpensive and of decent quality and varying styles. And these
people need the money more than
Timothy Eaton does.
If you insist on binding yourself, buy 99 cent nylons at 7-11.
It is essential that everyone
spend money on footwear. Shoes
can make or break your wardrobe,
are indicative of your lifestyle and
keep your feet dry.
If your closet still seems
bland, remember that after those
intial weeks of mutual respect, you
can borrow your roommate's
clothes and double your wardrobe.
m    NOTICE OF    w
AMS SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11
5pm
Maclnnes Field
(During the Barbeque)
To Vote on accepting the Constitution
and Bylaw Amendments proposed by
Student Council
For more, information
call Jody Woodland 228-3092
BRING YOUR AMS CARD
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 CONTRACEPTION
Birth control. Nobody likes to think about it.
But birth control is a major concern for
many students—married, coupled or
playing the field.
Numerous methods are available. At
worst, the UBC Health Science Hospital's
emergency ward has morning-after pills
available to anyone 24 hours a day. But they
have serious side affects.
And SUB washrooms, men's and
women's, have long, ugly condom
dispensers. Inside, for 75 cents, are small
cardboard packages labelled "Climax
"4"...EXOTIC COLORS...STIMULATING
TEXTURE" and a small, scrunched up,
protex condom. That's not a great option
either.
The best solution for students of either
sex is to talk to the friendly staff at Student
Health Services about birth control
concerns. They've heard it all before and
they're not at all shy. Consider methods and
decide for yourself before it's too late.
These methods include:
CONDOMS, which have increased in
popularity with the burgeoning AIDS scare
because they help prevent the spread of the
virus. They are also effective in checking
other sexually transmitted diseases. They
are rubber tubes placed over an erect penis
to stop sperm from entering the vagina. The
quality of brands varies so check it out. Use
them properly (read the directions) with a
spermicidal foam.
place for up to three days with no ill effects,
allowing greater freedom and spontaneity.
They too require consultation and fitting
with a health professional.
THE PILL is a combination of the
hormones estrogen and progesterone. The
ratios of one hormone to the other vary;
women are affected differently by the
different combinations, so if you react to one
it might be a good idea to try another. The
pill is taken orally daily and has an
impressive effectiveness level of
approximately 99 per cent. It can have
various side effects including weight gain,
lethargy, depression, and, ironically, loss of
sexual drive; it can also have more serious
effects, especially if you are over 35 and a
smoker. Talk to your doctor to determine if
you are in a high risk group. The pill
requires a prescription from your doctor.
THE MORNING AFTER PELL is a very
heavy dose of hormones which can be taken
to stop pregnancy up to three days after
unprotected sex, but it commonly has
serious side effects including vaginal
bleeding, abdominal pain, dizziness,
nausea and vomiting. It can be useful in
emergencies but should be avoided if
possible. It's estimated to be 98 per cent
effective. The emergency ward at UBC
Health Sciences Hospital has them on
demand, 24 hours a day.
THE IUD, or intra-uterine device is a
small, plastic piece which is inserted into
They look sort of like huge contact lenses,
with a diameter approximately the same as
that of a tennis ball
DIAPHRAGMS are inserted into the
vagina to block passage to the cervix and
stop sperm from entering the uterus. They
look sort of like huge contact lenses, with a
diameter approximately the same as that of
a tennis ball. Used properly with a
spermicidal jelly or cream, diaphragms are
judged to be 92-95 per cent effective. They
must be fitted by a health professional.
CERVICAL CAPS are similar to
diaphragms but much smaller, about the
size of a golf ball, and don't require the use
of jelly or foam. They prevent the passage of
sperm by adhering to the cervix, where they
are held by suction. Insertion can be
awkward for women with very deep vaginas
or short fingers. Cervical caps can be left in
the uterus for up to five years. Insertion is
performed by a medical professional.
Perforation of the uterus occurs sometimes
and there are other side affects.
STERILISATION is always an option for
those who know they don't want children.
The operation is simple for men and a little
more involved for women; talk to your
doctor.
The key to all these methods is knowledge
and correct usage. Check with a health
professional and know what you're doing.
It's much easier than dealing with a
pregnancy or anxieties related to sloppy
birth control methods.
SNIP SNIP SNIP SNIP
By KURT PREINSPERG
For those of you men who've done your
share of reproducing or who want no part
in exploding the population, getting a
centimetre of your sperm ducts removed
will save you any birth control worries
from now till doomsday. For the fickle of
mind, the success rate in reversing vasectomies through microsurgery now hovers
around 70 per cent.
If you're ready for that little cut in
your scrotum, Student Health will refer
you to an expert with twenty thousand
vasectomies to his credit. The fifteen
minutes you spend under the knife of this
expert pass so fast that it's almost fun.
Almost! Your balls will feel sore as hell
for a day or two, but a few weeks later
you're back in circulation. And a month
or two later - when the last straggling
sperm are gone - you can fire away without messy forms of birth control or fear of
paternity suits.
A vasectomy won't, of course, protect
you from a nasty virus. Once you're
monogamously ensconced with the right
partner, however, and unencumbered by
worries about birth control, sex may well
blossom into the intimate, tasty, reckless, incredible fireworks it can be. And
best of all, you, the male, proudly assume
contraceptive responsibility instead of
expecting the woman to dump chemicals
or insert funny contraptions into her
body.
?
MYMcfflgt rou met
A&srtA/£A/£E WAS
the EE^rmrn
bONT/tOL BUT THEY
DON'T SEEM TO&ELL
AiVV l/VTf/E WA*>rif\C0M.
S^&U*
What if that friendly Friday
night partner wasn't so
friendly after all?
AIDS is a fact of life. Sounds corny but it's
the truth. Smaller than a pin-prick, this
virus is deadlier than John Wayne in his
prime.
The campus community, however, has
responded well to the AIDS crisis. Student
Health Services has an outreach program
run by a nurse to educate people about
AIDS and individual doctors are available
to answer questions and test people for the
AIDS antibody.
The UBC AIDS Coalition is also dealing
with the AIDS crisis in a constructive fashion. The coalition's membership includes
students, doctors, nurses, and staff from
UBC It serves as a resource center for
campus groups and agencies concerned
about AIDS and answers hypothetical
questions such as should students with
AIDS be allowed in residence (the answer
was yes).
The coalition helps students with AIDS
cope with their disease. One member, Dr.
Rick Mathias, said that although it is not
mandatory, some students have told the
committee they have AIDS and the
committee in turn has been able to better
help those students.
The AMS student council also came up
with ideas designed to prevent the spread
of AIDS. One of the more exotic of these
was a plan to throw condoms from a Trojan
Horse. Unfortunately that idea died but
the council did decide to distribute an
AIDS pamphlet at the annual AMS
barbeque in September.
Then there are chlamydia, gonorrhoea,
and syphilis. These are some of the
diseases you might receive from that
friendly Friday night partner who wasn't
so friendly after all.
Chlamydia is the worst offender on the
UBC campus, according to Dr. Charles
Brumwell of UBC Student Health
Services. This nasty little virus strikes
about five per cent of those who receive
checkups. Only half of those people show
chlamydia symptoms, which include
infection and internal inflamation.
Gonorrhoea and syphilis are less
common. Last year there were no cases at
Health Services, but since students have
doctors off campus it might be around.
The safest sex is no sex but if you find
that idea unpalatable and you haven't run
the appropriate tests on your partner, it's a
good idea to wear a condom.
gil fg__g__y>V-ff_Vg yvywvy_i^>v^l f-ww^wuuw^
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September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 Hair Styling
4384 W. 10th Ave.
"Designs by Debbie'
Shampoo, cut & finish
$14.00-$16.00
For Men & Ladies
224-6434
busy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20% DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
card and receive 20%
off your dry cleaning.
(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
4480-2 West 10th Ave.
(at Sasamat)
PH.: 224-4212
YEAR THIRTEEN
1
9
7
5
1
9
8
7
ART SALE
Prints For Every Taste And Budget
Hundreds of Reproductions $3.00 - $7.00
Over 400 Exhibition Posters ■ Most Farpelow List Price
Moderately Priced Limited Edition Prints
Date: SEPT. 8, 9,10, 14: 9-8 PM
SEPT. 11,15: 9-5 PM
Place: S.U.B. 1st FLOOR
PIZZA FACTORY LTD.
2630 SASAMAT STREET
224-3333,2625,2417
"JUST OFF UBC GATES"
WE WELCOME ALL STUDENTS
BACK FOR ANOTHER YEAR.
FOR YOUR IN-CAMPUS DINING
NEEDS, WE OFFER THE FINEST
QUALITY PIZZA & PASTA DISHES AT
VERY COMPETITIVE PRICES WITH
FREE. FAST AND EFFICIENT DELIVERY SERVICE.
WE ARE PLEASED TO BE OF SERVICE
TO ALL UBC AND SURROUNDING
AREAS. NOW IN OUR 4TH YEAR!
"WATCH FOR OUR MONEY
SAVING MONTHLY
SPECIALS"
More pages for your $
By RICK HIEBERT
When I get a little money, I buy books;
and if any is lnft, I buy food and
clothes.
—Desiderius Erasmus
No, Erasmus was not a UBC student, but after
buying texts for UBC courses, we can all
empathize; it's easy to be cleaned out by the price of
books. However, there are places, both on and off
campus, where you can find books at a reasonable
price.
When buying textbooks it is important to resist
the temptation to go to the UBC Bookstore first.
That would be a big mistake, for two reasons. First
of all, there are a few bookstores around town that
sell the texts you need and secondly, everybody and
all their dogs will be inside the UBC bookstore
getting their books this week. Unless you are sure
the book will sell out fast, it is better to wait a day
or two, and see where else you can get the texts.
The first place to try is the AMS' Used Book
Store, SUB room 125, which is open throughout
September. Operated by students, it has most of
the more common textbooks. The pricing system
eliminates most of the overhead, which results in
significant savings for text buyers and extra cash
for students using the bookstore to flog their old
books. The used bookstore receives textbooks until
September 20 and sells them until Oct. 2. Returns
are accepted until Oct. 9.
There are, of course, other Vancouver bookstores
you should look into. Some deal in textbooks, some
don't, but most are worth a visit, if only to dig up
more bedside reading.
Just outside the gates on 10th Avenue (4443 W.
10th) is Better Buy Books. A good bookstore, open
seven days a week, it stocks a lot of Coles, Monarch
and Barron Notes, if you use them. It stocks tons of
really cheap paperbacks for bookworms, and it
buys and sells used textbooks. Check it out.
Across the street is the university branch of
Duthie's Books. A typical new bookstore, it caters
to those with literary tastes and deep pockets. But
it is a good place to look for recently published
books, even fairly obscure ones. The downtown
branch on Robson Street is bigger and better, with
a huge paperback cellar.
books and bestsellers for a little cheaper than most
downtown bookstores. They also provide chairs to
ease your aching feet and is a little less
claustrophobic, more open, than many bookstores. A
nice little place.
Continuing down Broadway, we find, at 2887
Broadway, Kitsilano Books. Lots of books, but a bit
musty. Generally prices its books a little high, but
here you find books you won't find elsewhere. The
cats are friendly.
Just down the street, at 2685 Broadway, is
Banyen Books, an alternative bookstore that
concentrates on natural-based lifestyles. With lots
of books on religion and spirituality, the
environment, wholesome cookery, feminism,
socialism and such, this is a very mellow place to
hang out, with lots of space to sit down and a really
friendly staff.
Down at 632 West Broadway, out by London
Drugs, is one of my personal rave faves, the Book
Warehouse, where you will find lots of hard cover
bestsellers and paperbacks, with lots of obscure
books. Few of these relate directly to UBC courses,
but they give out free coffee and have a damaged
and clearance books table that is worth looking at.
A-Aaabaca Book City, at 1247 Granville, is an
excellent warehouse style store. Although, like most
non-University bookstores, it is very hard to find
exactly the text you want, it is a good place to pick
up good, inexpensive books that explain other facets
of the subjects you're taking. An incredibly large
store, great for browsing.
If you want books by, for and about women, go see
the women at Ariel Books (2766 West 4th) and the
Vancouver Women's Bookstore (315 Cambie,
downtown), where feminist magazines and books,
and other material relating to women is available.
If you want leftward leaning reading material, go
to Octopus Books (1146 Commercial) where you'll
find all sorts of books, magazines, flyers and
pamphlets approaching politics, economics, social
issues and history from a collective perspective. Lots
of really neat posters and buttons. A laid back place
where you can meet nice, pleasant people.
And then there's the People's Co-op Bookstore
just down the street (1391 Commercial Drive). Lots
of Soviet material, and an entire wall of Marx and
Lenin. Pacific Tribune readers will love this store.
For UBC's Christians, or those interested in
religious   reading   material,   videos,   records   and
Ashley's Used Books (3712 W. 10th), is an
antiquarian bookstore, which means they deal with
very fine (and expensive) used books. However,
they also have a great selection of inexpensive
paperbacks of all kinds. As well, they sell paintings
and play classical music. A very cultured place,
Ashley's has a lot of hardcover books, biographies
and a lot of fiction.
Around the corner, at 2553 Alma, is the Book
Mantel. The Book Mantel has crammed enough
books for two stores into one, piling them onto lofty
bookshelves that stretch up towards the ceiling.
Quite a few books that tie into UBC courses,
notably strong literature, politics and history
sections. They also have a lot of used records (alas,
mostly 70's and Disco) and the staff is friendly. A
nice place to browse while waiting for the bus to
UBC.
Around the courner, on Broadway, is West Coast
Books (3209 Broadway).    It has good hardcover
magazines, Faith Christian Books (10036 King
George VI Highway, Surrey, across from Surrey
Place) is the biggest and best. Those unwilling to go
so far will find that The Music Cupboard (521 W.
57th) and Pilgrim Book and Bible (2756 Kingsway)
are also quite good.
And last, but not least, the UBC Bookstore. Here,
you will find all the textbooks you couldn't find
anywhere else, assuming they have come into the
store. A big bookstore, it has an incredible number
of books that people would actually want to read in
their spare time. The usually friendly and helpful
staff will help you find all those textbooks whose
purchase will give you a checking account overdraft
almost as big as the American national debt. Also,
you can outfit yourself almost entirely in clothes
that will give free advertising to the University.
The books that you need are out there. The fun
part is looking for them. Pleasant reading.
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 After the isolation wears off, mature
students enjoy the benefits of experience
0)
JZ
I—
By JENNIFER LYALL
ore UBC students have grey
hair these days,
but for many
mature students
the return to
campus means adapting to an
alien lifestyle and overcoming
feelings of inferiority and isolation.
"I felt like I had turned my
back on everything I knew and
was comfortable with...(Being a
student) was a very unfamiliar
situation; it's very different from
the workforce," said Helena
Petkau, 44, who returned to
school after 12 years in the
workforce.
That uneasiness is heightened by a lack of confidence felt
by many mature students. Even
people who have done well in
school in the past can lose faith
in their ability to study after
many years away from school.
"Self-confidence - that's what
I lacked going in," said Petkau.
'You're afraid that your thinking
capacity isn't so good any
more...I was worried that I
couldn't maintain (a high) standard."
Those worries dissolved when
she got her first essay back: "I
got the only A in the class, (and
I thought) it's okay, I can do it."
As a single mother, Petkau
has more responsibilities than
most students, and has been
forced to reasses her priorities
and make some sacrifices in
pus.
June Lythgoe, director of the
office, said mature students typically start out with an eroded
sense of self-confidence.
"After you've had a fair bit of
experience, with all that entails,
you're not as sure of yourself,"
said Lythgoe. "It's ironic but
what experience does very often
is to chip away (at self-confidence)."
And it isn't difficult to understand why people feel alienated,
she said.
"If you walk around this campus as a mature student with
grey hair in this sea of excited
and seemingly self-
confident...fresh faced younger
students, you feel absolutely isolated."
'You feel this enormous sense
of loss of identity., .and you think
you're all alone," she said. "It's
like being in a foreign country
without knowing the language."
But "once the initial
strangeness wears off," mature
students enjoy many advantages
over those coming straight from
high school, said Lythgoe.
For example, mature students
know what they want to achieve
and bring more direction to their
studies.
"What you learn as a mature
student is embedded in experience," said Lythgoe. "When I
went back to school as a mature
student I really wanted to integrate my studies...to feel that I
was learning."
HELENA PETKAU...no longer out of
order to pursue her education.
"I have a bit of a problem reconciling the fact that (my daughters) have to make do with less
because I'm following my
dream," she said. "Traditionally
motherhood has always been the
most important thing for a
female; I can't say I don't have
any guilty feelings but it's a
guilt I can handle."
Petkau also had to address
feelings of isolation and displacement during her first
weeks on campus.
"I felt a bit out of place (during the first weeks on campus)
because so many of the students
are younger," she said.
Her experiences are so common that the Office for Women
Students annually offers a one-
day program to help mature
women students adjust to cam-
place.
Petkau agrees that her life
experience nas been an asset.
"We can see the value of what
we're doing because we've been
in the workforce," she said. "The
returning (mature) student is
doing it because they want to do
it."
Far from being alienated from
her fellow students, Petkau said
she assumed "a little bit of a parenting role." Her willingness to
speak out in class gained her the
respect of the other students, she
said.
Her age has actually made it
easier for her to establish a rapport with her classmates. "They
don't need to compete with me
because I'm older and I don't
need to compete with them
because they're younger, so it's a
very supportive relationship."
Women's Office offers support
By WANDA CHOW and
FLORENCE LOUIE
"As long as we live in a culture that is in most part shaped
by men, there is a place for a
special support for women," said
the director of The Office for
Women Students.
"We approach counselling
from a woman's perspective,"
June Lythgoe said, and added
that the office is there to offer
support according to woman's
needs.
Lythgoe said the office faces
every kind of problem under the
sun, from homesickness to
school anxieties, and that the
office staff is availabe for discussion and advice on particular
problems.
First established in 1921, The
Office for Women Students(for-
merly the Dean of Women's
Office) was one of the first student services on campus.
Apart from a variety of professional counselling services,
this office offers skill workshops,
informative programs and special discussions.
There is also a Resource
Library for student research and
the Mildred Brock Lounge for
women. Located in Brock Hall
(Room 223), the lounge is comfortable and available to all
women students for socializing,
meetings, or simply rest and
relaxation.
Basically, Lythgoe said, "If
you have a question you're too
embarrassed to ask anywhere
else, this is the place to go." Just
drop by at Brock Hall, Room 203
or call for an appointment at
228-2415. The office is open
Monday to Friday from 8:30am
to 4:30pm.
Don't wait for the midterms
and finals to throw you on their
doorsteps.
CAN YOU ENROL FOR A McGILL C.A.?
You can, if you have an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
You can start in May, September, or January on a full-time or
part-time basis.
COME TO OUR INFORMATION SESSION
TUESDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER 1987
2:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BROCK HALL - ROOM 110
or please write to or telephone: (514) 398 - 6154
McGill University
Chartered Accountancy Department
Centre for Continuing Education
3461 McTavish Street
Montreal, Quebec
H3A1Y1
A/fCf^_11Centrefor
IV A    Vjlll Continuing Education
What better place to
better yourself.
PRESENTS
THE 4TH ANNUAL
AMS BBQ
FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 11
NOON-7:30
TV**
featuring
k.d. lang
and the reclines w
Wailin' Demons and
Mercury Festival
in a FREE concert
Maclnnes Field (next to S.U.B)
Please bring I.D.
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 13 The Ubyssey Open Frisbee-Golf Tour of UBC Campus
Welcome to the scenic UBC campus.
THE OFFICIAL RULES
1) All rules (except #53b) are
amendable by players as they
wish.
2) PAR stated is for PE students
and Canadian Olympians only.
All others double quoted par.
3) Three points deducted from
your score for every pint of beer
drunk while playing.
4) Every hole starts from the target of the previous hole.
NINETEENTH HOLE NO PAR
VALUE
Head to The PIT and see how low
you can get your score at three
points off per pint.
FIRST HOLE PAR 3:
Start the course in the main foyer
of SUB across from the candy
counter. Buy yourself a snickers
bar to fortify yourself while playing. Now, head north to the plaza
outside the north doorofSUB. The
target is the totem pole in the
middle of the traffic circle opposite
you. You can't see it because ifs
obscured by trees. Beneath the
north entrance is the Bank of
Montreal which no longer approves student loans on campus so
students have to go downtown to
apply for their money.
EIGHTEENTH HOLE PAR 2
Now we turn to that big ugly concrete bunker ahead of you. Hit the
south door of the Student Union
Building and congratulate yourself on a job well done.
SEVENTEENTH HOLE PAR 8
Another long hole for the grimly
determined—just remember how
close the Nineteenth hole is. Head
further north through some more
medical buildings to the Aquatic
centre. Hit the door (careful not to
break the glass) of the big bath.
This is another of the many buildings built with student money.
Students are occasionally allowed
to use the facility (three times a
day).
SIXTEENTH HOLE PAR 5
Now head North to the Terry Fox
cancer research clinic. As you hit
the door of the pale pink concrete
building, wonder aloud at the
state of contemporary architecture now that pastels have left
Better Homes and Gardens bathrooms and erded up on public
buildings.
O-SCCWERY BASW
THE
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
THIRD HOLE PAR 5:
This dogleg takes you along the
avenue of trees running west from
the cairn and then south towards
the clock tower which is your target. Theclocktowerwasbuiltwith
money donated in the will of a
certain man named Ladner. Anyone looking at it will surely agree
that the nickname "Ladner. Last
Erection" is most applicable.
SECOND HOLE PAR 5:
From the totem pole, head northwest to the Tuum Est Cairn
"erected to commemorate generous actions of student bodies, in
providing for their Alma Mater."
The Ubyssey is always in favour of
generous actions by student bodies. Across the road from the cairn
is Brock Hall which contains,
among a number of services for
students, the job centre and the
counselling centre. Bear in mind
that this conselling, like this
game, is free. Free advice and free
games are often worth the price.
FOURTH HOLE PAR 6
Continuing, the course heads
west around the green area in
front of Sedgewick Library. Hit
the north door of the Old Administration Building. Go in and have
a chat with UBC president David
Strangway about university politics or something. All of the
president's men have their offices
here and the Board of Governors
meets upstairs. The Board features such academic luminaries as
Peter "the Rabbit" Brown and Joy
"Tennis With McGeer" McCusker,
as well as president Strangway
and nine others.
FIFTEENTH HOLE PAR 6
Next stop is the Health Sciences
Hospital further to the east. It it
the big concrete building with the
dark blue top. It was built beacuse
a certain Universities Minister (a
UBC medical researcher, as
chance would have it) thought the
only thing worth funding at UBC
was medicine. He thought people
in other subjects such as the the
iioeiai arts should wither away or
go to Stanford because UBC was so
inferior in Arts. You should hit the
door to the Student Health centre
at the end of the covered walkway
at the South end of the building.
The student health clinic is a good
place to go if you have physics- o_
mental ailments. Don't hesitate to
head on over if you have suicidal
exam stress in December (or
April).
FOURTEENTH HOLE PAR 5
This hole was thrown to test your
navigational skill. Head east to a
pair of "do not enter" signs at the
exit from a multi-storey visitors'
carpark. Hitone of the signs. Parking is a contentious issue on campus. You either pay a lot of money
or get a lot of exercise.
Mapt bus routes serving the UBC campus are
//'/ No. ID from downtown Vancouver via Granville 5t .
' /> Wast Broadway {9!h Ave.) West 10th Ave. and
//  University Boulevard King Edward. No. 25 bus
/ travels crDSStOwn via King£___(_ (25tfi Ave.) and
.- 22nd Ave trom Brentwood Wah m Burnaby; No 41
'• bus reaches the campus via <1si Ave and
'  Soutiivi-es? Marine Drive. No 49 (49lh Ave.) travels
trom rneiroiown Station. Burnaby. along 49th Ave
/  Major arteries to Ihe campus for cars are Northwest
and Southwest Marine Drive. West 4IM Ave . West
10th Ave em3 West 16th Ave There are numerous
parking Jois on the centra' campus for vstore, including !*-_ mu Hi-storey parkadss Large scale
campus maps are located al map' campus
entrances and parking lots.
FIFTH HOLE PAR 4
To the north, along the boulevard
in the middle of Main Mall is the
large flagpole with a beautiful
backdrop of the mountains. Hit
the pole and learn that 90 per cent
of the campus population will be
on those mountains skiing during
the term. Be careful not to overthrow and hit a pair of young lovers planning safe sex in the rose
garden below the flag pole.
SEVENTH HOLE PAR 4
To the south southeast is the
Frederic Wood Theatre which only
produces boring classical plays
that have no social relevance or
relevant plays that are simply
boring. Good sets though. Hit the
ticket booth, but avoid breaking
the glass.
EIGHTH HOLE PAR 4
From the ticket booth, skirt the
theatre lobby and head south to hit
the large white stone sculptured
head at the end of the long gallery.
This is one of many sculptures on
campus which can be appreciated
in contemplative moments.
NINTH HOLE PAR 3
Now, head south along the covered gallery and hit the large rusty
metal sculpture at the end. To The
Ubyssey, this sculpture symbolizes the dialectical struggle between to intertwined rusty forces,
the United States and Russia, for
example, or maybe the Tories and
the liberals, or maybe you and
your transcript.
SIXTH HOLE PAR 4
From the flagpole, head west to
the Graduate Students Centre.
On your way, look at the privileged
profs swigging dry martinis
(shaken, not stirred) in the Faculty Club on your right. Hit the
door of the Grad Centre and then
head in and have a cheap pint of
Rickard's Red in the lounge upstairs. Remember that you get
three points off your score for every pint you drink.
TENTH HOLE PAR 6
This is a long hole because Jack
Nicklaus couldn't think of any
other way to get people through
this part of campus. Head south to
the Computer Science building
past Yum Yum's cafeteria and
between the Geography and Math
buildings. Hit the door of the
building and feel sorry for the poor
sucks stuck inside computing
away all night long.
TWELFTH HOLE PAR 10
This is a long hole which Nicklaus
was reluctant to include because of
the high par. We had no such
qualms. Head directly south along
Main Mall to the famous, the infamous, the infectious, Engineers'
Cairn. It is heavy, thick and immovable, just like 90 per cent of
geers. Hit the cairn with your frisbee. Maybe this will be the year
the Science Undergraduate Society finds a way to blow the fucking
thing to bits.
ELEVENTH HOLE PAR 4
Head east then south to hit the
Great Trek Cairn between the Bus
Stop Coffee Shop and the Chemistry building. The cairn commemorates a walk by most of the students in 1922 to agitate for completion of the campus. The Chemistry building has at least three
labs which could synthesize good
acid — talk to a Chemistry grad
student to find out about availability. The coffee shop has the best
food, cheapest prices, and greatest
service on campus. But, beware,
the building could be torn down for
a new science/management library on the site.
THIRTEENTH HOLE PAR 4
Head East from the cairn between
two engineering buildings to the
building where Applied Science
students argue about Nietszche.
Yes, your next target is the roof of
the Cheez Factory. Head in and
have a cheap brew (remember, you
get three points off your score for
every pint quaffed). Then you can
discuss philosophers like a true
geer.
Ubyssey Frisbee Golf Score Card
Hole
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
• 14
15
16
17
18
Total
Par
3
5
5
6
4
4
4
4
3
6
4
10
4
5
6
5
8
2
87
Playerl
Player2
Ptayert
Player-.
Page 14
September 9,1987
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 15 AMS
Student
Bargain Days
September 8-11
SUB Main Concourse
228-3456
•   •
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined
major, honours, graduate, and diploma students in each of the Departments and
Schools of the Faculty of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and
Second year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings of
the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices,
the Dean of Arts' Office, The Faculty Adviser's Office, and the Arts
Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar of
the University not later than 4:00 p.m. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1987.
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations have been
received by the deadline, there will be no representation.
APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
for one (1) student position on the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Management Comniittee and one (1)
student position on the Aquatic
Center Management Committee.
Positions run Oct. 1,'87 to Sept. 30, '88.
Applications Deadline
4pm Friday
Sept. 25,1987
Forms Available
SUB 238
CALL FOR
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being accepted to
one (1) vacant student SENATE-AT-LARGE
seat. The term of office will commence
October 1,1987 to March 30th, 1988.
As per the Universities Act and the A.M.S.
code of procedures and by-laws, the
successful candidate will be an A.M.S.
member. Applications may be picked up from
SUB 238 and returned by 4pm, Friday,
September 25th, 1987.
For more information, please contact A.M.S.
president Rebecca Nevraumont, SUB 256,
228-3972
Don't let it get to you.
ByCELIAHENSLOWE
At the beginning of September
the pressure of essays, labs, and
exams is still a nebulous threat.
But by the end of October, with
four assignments and six midterms in just one week, the pressure can become intense.
Academic anxieties, moreover,
aggravate stress in other areas of
your life. Combined with emotional, personal, or financial worries, school can be traumatic.
Stress is an integral part of the
university experience. And not all
stressisbad; everyone needs some
pressure to stimulate them, especially when studying. But it is
important that you control your
stress and use it to your advantage
rather than let it control you. Soif
the upcoming term is already giving you headaches and sleepless
nights, you might want to consider
some techniques in stress management.
The best way to reduce stress,
according to Student Health Services' stress specialist Dr. Dorothy
Goresky, is to maintain good
health. Regular aerobic exercise.
Awell-balanced diethighin whole
grain goods, fruits, and vegetables, andlowin refined flour and
sugar. And enough sleep.
While going for a coffee or besr is
relaxing, remember that caffeine,
alcohol, and nicotine tend to increase levels of stress.
Take time out every day to relax.
Meditate. Practice yoga. Walk
through the Endowment Lands or
watch the sunset from the beach.
Vent your frustrations on your
squash partner.    You can even
justify watching t.v.
Organize your time so that you
have time both to study and to
have fun. Counselling offers free
workshops in time-management
and study skills.
When you do start feeling
stressed out, acccept the fact.
Stress is natural, and in university it is inevitable.
Evaluate your stress. Are you
putting unneccessary pressure on
yourself by having unrealistically
high expectations?
Use the power of positive thinking. If, for instance, writing exams
paralyzes you, Goresky suggest
that you visualize the situation as
a series of steps which you successfully complete. Picture yourself
calmly sitting down to study, reviewing your notes, understanding them, serenely slumbering,
then going to the exam and breezing through it.
Imagine the worst possible outcome. So you fail a course or decide
not to finish the year. It is not
going to ruin your life and it is
certainly not worth ruining your
health over.
Talk to a friend. Sharing a problem makes it less distressing.
Your friend can give you the emotional support you need, and
probably some useful advice. Your
friend may
also be experiencing similar
anxieties, in which case you can
commiserate together.
Should you feel unable to cope
alone, however, there is
plenty of help available on campus. After all, many other students are feeling similarly
stressed out.
Student Health Services can
deal with your medical problems.
Doctors often diagnose physical
complaints as
symptons of stress. And while
they can alleviate the headaches,
stomach aches, and insomnia,
they can also suggest where to go
for counselling to get to the underlying problem.
A variety of pamphlets on
stress, including an article by
Goresky and director of counselling services Ken Kush, is available in the SHS waiting room.
SHS and Student Housing are
holding a workshop from December 1-4 on "Recognizing and Coping with Stress." Goresky offers
sessions teaching stress managing skills, but you need to see her
before enrolling.
Speakeasy offers personal and
anonymous counselling from your
peers. Drop by the SUB or call
228-3700 crisis line, 228-3777 info
line.
The Women's Resource Centre
also offers personal counselling for
women, and specializes in
women's concerns.
Drop by the Office in Brock Hall
or call 228-2415 for an
appointment with a counsellor.
The Centreispresentingathree
part workshop November 12, 19,
and 26 on "Creative Techniques
for the Reduction of
Stress and Anxiety."
Counselling Services offers
counselling for personal, academic, social, career, and emotional concerns. To make
an appointment with a counsellor, drop by Brock Hall or
phone 228-3811. Counselling
also offers workshops on a variety
of subjects.
It is important to control your
stress, and use it to your advantage, rather than let stress control
you. So
relax, take a deep breath, and
take the time to enjoy your life as
a student.
Frats...Check Them Out
by Ross McLaren
Fraternities and sororities can be the best of
times or the worst of times, it depends on who you ask.
"We do everything together, all the time. Sororities have more to offer than any other UBC club or
organization," says Corey Evans of Delta Gamma.
Brent Lymer, past president of the Inter-Fraternity Council says that, "I gained many different skills
in my fraternity. My resume is packed. You get more
out of a fraternity than you ever
put in, but you have to put in."
Fraternities, sororities, and
phrateres, however, are not for
everyone. The greek community is
criticized for the cliques that surround fraternity life, the childish
pranks forced upon pledges, and
the male bonding experiments
that ensure the majority's voice at
the expense of the individual's.
Fraternities 19th century attitude towards homosexuals is an
example of the latter tendency. Individual frat members may accept
homosexuality but the majority
don't, hence gay fraternity men
remain in the closet.
"I know gay people in frats.
It's fine by me but gay people I
know don't let it out," says Lymer.
If gay men can cope with hiding their sexual preference, then
what better place to meet men
than in a fraternity. Perhaps in
time the "greek" way of life really
will resemble the historical greek
way of life. ■	
In other areas, fraternities have worked hard in
the last few years to improve their image. Alcohol will
not be served at the first Rush function this year. And
for the other Rush functions, those who drink too
much will be driven home.
Hazing has also been toned down. Hazing —
mental or physical abuse that endangers lives of
pledges or humiliates pledges — was outlawed after
men in the United States and Canada died while
being hazed.
Don Isaak came to UBC
alone, afraid and unwanted. Then Don joined
the Fiji's. Now Don is Director of Finance, a somebody. Don spends money,
lots of it, and none of it
his.
Lymer, a Kappa Sigma member,  says, "if the   is what you are after.
international finds out (someone was hazed) the
fraternity (UBC chapter) could lose its charter. But
it is hard to define what hazing is; we don't kidnap
people but we do other things that could be considered hazing. The definition often gets sticky."
One area where the greek community excells is
in charity work. Last year the Inter-Fraternity
Council raised money for the Rick Hansen Fund,
Mothers Against Drunk Drivers, and the Kidney
Foundation.
Individual fraternities and sororities also select
individual charities to support.
The sorority, Delta Gamma, for
instance, raises money for the
Canadian National Institute for
the Blind. Car washes, penny
drives, and the "anchor splash"
raised $1,000 last year. That
doesn't seem like much but Delta
Gamma chapters across North
America have raised over $10
million for charity, according to
Corey Evans.
Phrateres also raise money
for charity. Last year it raised
$8,000. Phrateres, unlike a sorority, is an AMS service organization but they have close ties with
the greek community. Phrateres,
with approximately 190-200
members, is larger than a sorority
and is open to any female student.
Rush week is the time for
people interested in joining a fraternity or sorority to drop in and
check out the houses. Everybody
is free to drop in and the individual
houses will explain what their
particular house has to offer.
Then each house invites individuals they like to
join their organization. Once a person chooses a
house they are pledged and then they must prove
themselves to the house. Once the appropriate tests
are passed, pledges are accepted into the house.
Then comes the infamous secret initiation rite so
wonderfully satarized in National Lampoon's Animal House.
For those people interested in joining, try it out,
ask questions and see if fraternity and sorority life
Page 16
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 Nuclear winter
demands smaller
global arsenals
By JAMES YOUNG
A recent graduate of the University of British Columbiahas developed teaching materials on nuclear winter, in order to help Canadian science students think more
critically about nuclear weapons.
"Ultimately the objective is to
provide students with enough information to understand and
evaluate the claims made about
nuclear winter and assess the
uncertainties involved? said Al
Banner, who developed the materials for the B.C. chapter of Science for Peace, after completing a
master's degree in forestry.
In preparing the course material, Banner compiled information
from over 50 highly specialized
articles into a 71 page book.
"Nuclear winter is a good topic
to be covered because the subject
matter has a strong science component to it as opposed to political
science," said Banner, a former
member of UBC's Students for
Peace and Mutual Disarmament.
Although political science
courses in Canada now routinely
use textbooks describing nuclear
war scenarios, these materials are
the first in a series designed to
make nuclear issues more accessible and relevant to science stu
dents.
The series, coordinated by
UBC microbiology professor
George Spiegelman, will include
additional units on topics such as
radiation and verification technologies.
The materials developed by
Banner give background on the
climatic, ecological and agricultural effects of nuclear winter, as
well as looking at special concerns
for Canada.
Banner, who would like to
apply his knowledge of remote
sensing to improving arms control
technologies, said scientific models of nuclear winter have become
increasingly sophisticated since
the theory was first advanced in a
December 1983 issue of Science
magazine.
The original articles argued
that the smoke resulting from cities burning in the aftermath of a
nuclear war would significantly
block the amount of sunlight
reaching the earth's surface, with
temperatures in the northern
hemisphere plummetting to minus 15 or 25 degrees centigrade,
followed by months of subfreezing
weather, and the possibility of
human extinction.
Some later studies, however,
support the concept of a "nuclear
faH'" with less severe temperature
drops.
But even the less severe effects of a nuclear fall could still be
disastrous for Canadians, said
Banner.
"A drop of slightly more than
two degrees centigrade over the
growing season could end up
making wheat production virtually impossible in most of the prairie provinces—a four degree drop
could virtually eliminate barley
production? he said.
The material also examines
the vulnerability of other crops,
noting that without agricultural
production, between 90 and 99 per
cent of the world's population
would die.
"Recent studies have argued
that theimage of a post-nuclear
world is not so much a Hiroshima
or a Nagasaki on a global scale, but
rather something similar to
Ethiopia or Biafra," said Banner.
The resource booklet ends
with an examination of policy implications of nuclear winter theories.
The American scientist Carl
Sagan, for example, asserted the
only logical political consequence
of the theory was the drastic reduction of global nuclear arsenals
to levels which could not precipitate nuclear winter.
But the US think tank, the
RAND corporation, responded by
supporting targetting scenarios
designed to reduce city fires and
smoke, thus arguing in favor of
high altitude airbursts, neutron
bombs and detonating weapons
upwind of cities to rely on the
destructive effects of radiation.
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THE UBYSSEY
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This is about winning.
Winning isn't everything. It's the only thing."
It isnt whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game."
If you don't win, you lose"... and on and on and on.
Ask a dozen people today what it means to win or what it takes to be a
winner, and chances are you'll come up with a dozen or more answers.
At Xerox, we have our own ideas about winning and winners.
To begin with, we believe winning is a team effort. Maybe that's because we've
never met a winner who in some way hasn't been trained, coached, encouraged
or just plain influenced by another human being.
We also believe that winning is fundamentally a by-product
of character. To win at anything of value requires
the overcoming of obstacles. Often, the greatest of these
obstacles is a wavering faith in our own potential. To win,
in our opinion, is to go the distance. It is the ability to
endure and persevere.
Winning, as far as we're concerned, is the ability to stretch oneself and
be better for the effort.
In the final analysis, winning is anything but easy.
It is. however, the ultimate recognition of our struggle.
If you are interested in joining a winning team, Xerox will be interviewing
on-campus this fall. Please contact the university placement office for details.
TeamXerox
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Page 18
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 UBC Women's grass hockey battles UVIC in 1986. Watch for similar action this fall
Thunderbird Athletes
Lace-up for Another Season
By VICTOR CHEW WONG
An iron echo of a tackling dummy yielding to 230 pounds fury, the
crisp crack of a field hockey ball sent on its way, fresh turf spun
airborne by cutting cleats. The UBC sports machine is stoking the
coals and grinding itself up to full speed and it's all yours for free - well,
almost.
The $37.50 student activity fee that is donated by
every full-time student goes toward funding two
major programs: UBC athletics and UBC intramurals. Because students fund these programs, AMS
card holders are admitted to all CIAU events free.
If you weren't a UBC student last year then you
missed some of the most thrilling moments in Thunderbird sports history.
Some highlights include the UBC women's soccer
team capturing their fourth consecutive Canada
West title, back-up quarterback Eric Putoto's fourth
quarter drive that led to a Vanier Cup victory, the
UBC men's soccer team's third consecutive national
title, and the UBC men's basketball team's resurgence from anonymity to qualify for the national
final.
But don't fret if you weren't there — athletics for
1986-87 promises to be just as exciting as last year.
If cross town rivalries are
your bag, then slap an "X" on
September 30th.
Topping this year's list of hits is the Thunderbird
football team. Despite the fact that head coach Frank
Smith lost President's trophy winner, Mark Norman,
the C.F.L. number one draft pick, Leo Groenwegen,
and three starting linebackers, the team was ranked
number one in the first top ten poll of the season. The
high ranking can be attributed primarily to the 'Birds
depth at the running back position - returning are
both Matt Pearce and Mark Petros.
Football fans can also look forward to the revival
of the fall classic "Shrum Bowr. The "Birds will lock
face guards with SFU on September 12th at Swan-
guard Stadium in Burnaby — bring your wallet,
'cause admission is six bucks.
If cross town rivalries are your bag then slap an
"X" on September 30th. The UBC soccer 'Birds will
take a break from their defense of the national crown
to host SFU at Thunderbird Stadium for the Diachem
Bowl.
While the men's soccer team is trading crosses,
corner kicks, and throw-ins, the UBC women's soccer
team will be mounting an assault on the first ever
national title for women's soccer. Look for national
team member, Mitch Ring, to figure heavily in the
statistical columns for the womens side.
The third and final cross town confrontation will
feature the UBC men's basketball team facing SFU
in the Buchanan classic. The traditional three game
series will be reduced to just one meeting this year at
SFU's west gym on November ninth.
The young basket "Birds should fare well this
year, but whether they'll be able to duplicate last
year's national final performance is questionable.
The loss of UBC men's basketball all time leading
scorer and All Canadian, Paul Johansson, and starting point guard Kevin Hanson to graduation leaves
the team without proven leadership.
But head coach Bruce Enns can take solace in the
fact that returning are junior national team members Mike Clarke and J.D. Jackson.
The UBC women's basketball program witnessed
the end of an era last year with the retirement of
head coach Jack Pomfret. New head coach John
Ritchie should provide a new direction for the Thunderbird women.
Hopefully last year's hiring of head coach Terry
O'Malley will mean the end of the men's ice hockey
team's losing era. Thought of by many as a financial
black hole, the varsity hockey team proved they
could win and be marketable as they qualified for,
and played admirably in the Canada West play-offs.
With the return of Mark Trotzuk, Keith Abbot, in
addition to tier one recruits, Grant Delcourt, Mike
Nottingham, and Jerry Johanson, the hockey 'Birds
can only continue on their winning tangent.
And winning is something the men's varsity volleyball team has consistently experienced this decade. This season should be no exception with a low
turnover rate from last year's team. Matches
to watch for at War Memorial Gym include a touring
squad from China, and the mighty Bruins from
UCLA.
If the aforementioned sports have had recent
winning track records, then this year's big loser
without question is the gymnastics program. Funding for both the women's and men's program has
been cut off this year.
While the funding for a national championship for
men's gymnastics has been granted by Sport Canada, the same generosity was not bestowed upon the
women's program. This year there will be a Canada
West championship for both the men's and women's
teams, but beyond that the future is uncertain for
women's gymnastics at UBC.
So remember, your $37.50 activity fee goes toward subsidizing UBC athletics and intramurals.
Take a date to aball game. It's all yours for free. Well,
almost.
Boot Camp? No, it's "Storm The Wall", only one of multitudes of intramural
events students are encouraged to join.
New Challenges for Intramural Jocks
By VICTOR CHEW WONG
If you're a weekend athlete
and feel inspired after watching
UBC's elite corp of athletes, then
all you need do is get your Reebok's
down to Room 66 in the Lower
Concourse of the SUB and sign
yourself up for some of the numerous intramural events.
Participation in UBC's nationally renowned intramurals program is a must for any student
who claims to be active. The ol'
"I'm shitty at sports" excuse
doesn't wash here. There is a wide
enough variety of team and individual events, and skill levels, to
suit anybody.
Aside from the ever popular
leagues (basketball, volleyball,
and soccer) and special events
(Storm the Wall, Arts '20 Relay,
UBC Triathalon) the boys and
girls of room 66 have added some
tasty new items to their menu —
some interesting ones include:
1. Day of the Longboat. Where 12
person teams paddle in Voyageur
canoes from Spanish Banks to
Vanier Park and back.
2. Spanish Banks Downhill
Derby. Soap box cart racing
makes a comeback. For all the
"kids" on campus.
3. Mad Melvin's Mountain Bike
Challenge. An obstacle course for
mountain bikes around the SUB
plaza.
Aside from providing premium
activity for your hard belabored
dollars, the intramurals program
also provides opportunities for you
to make some bucks. Members of
the referees club make between
six and nine dollars per game
hour while the staff of more than
85 is compensated by way of
honoraria.
There are far too many events
and leagues to list so get ye down
to room 66 and investigate.
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 19 Overture, to the tune of The Sound of Music:
The SUB is alive
With the sounds of commerce
With space rented out
For the bargain splash.
The sounds fill my heart
With despair and fury
AMS will rent space
To any geek with cash.
I want to express
All the rage that I feel right now,
About AMS abuse of space
To bitch and compalain
that they've got fucked brains,
(But present a balanced case)
To write for the press that the masses read,
and tell all what I want.
Ill interview some students,
I might even meet R. Nevraumont.
The Ubyssey rag
Is my destination,
111 walk through their filth
And apply witin.
Their pages will be blessed
With the rage of reason.
Eager new staffer (hereinafter referred to as
ENS, looks a lot like Julie Andrews, but with larger
breasts than those displayed in S.O.B.) comes hesitantly into the Ubyssey office (SUB 241k, it's really
easy to find), and walks up to what appears to be the
central desk.
ENS: Excuse me, I'm an eager new staffer, and
you guys need my help. I'd like to write a story.
The editor behind the desk appears about to
answer, looks around the room, receiving only awkward looks from the others in the room.
(big dance number, involves much of the staff—
mainly those skipping class — mainly the entire
staff)
Editors sing (five of them, but who's counting?).
To the tune of Doe, a Deer:
Let's start with our complicated structure
An idiotic place to start
The staff has no hierarchy,
Decisions are all made collectively, collectively
We can't give you an answer unless we agree
Collectively, collectively ...
hmm ... maybe we can make this all a little bit
easier
We know ....
Fuck, the staff, the voting staff
Vote, their tool, their useful tool
Fair, what voting makes us be
Staff, the workers really rule
Left, a thing what we're sometimes called,
Bright? (afraid you're out of luck)
Class, a thing we don't have much
That will bring us back to Fuck.
At this point no one is paying any attention to the
so-called editorial collective except for the ENS.
The Collective goes into a quick conference, and
turns to the new staffer.
The Editors (only four now, one quit because his
contribution was going unrecognized, and all the
other editors were "fucking usless"):
You didn't pass the English Comp did you?
ENS: well ... no ...
Editors (three now, an ugly incesutous love
quadrangle in the group having forced one to
abandon the paper in favour of brooding): You're
on. What do you want to write?
Big grin on ENS. Blackout.
Lights up on office set again, the staff is in a
chorus line, (there are only two editors left, one got
a job on an important daily newspaper, and left
without even saying goodbye).
To the tune of My Favourite Things:
Sports, film, and photos (off-centre and cloudy)
Staged demonstartions with crowds that get
rowdy
Alma Mater execs who spend unapproved cash
These are some things that we love with a pash.
Angry club members demanding a story
Thunderbird teams on the journey to glory
New Mussoc shows all "big, boring and brash"
These are some things that we love with a pash.
When our proud Board of Governors makes
secret decisions
When the Zalm does dumb things that require
derision
When Rebecca approves fee boosts and needs to
get bashed,
These are some things that we love with a pash.
When the readers bitch,
When Council complains
That the writing's weak,
We humbly suggest that they join our great staff
Or shut up and go back to sleep.
Wild applause
Blackout.
-by Michael Groberman, former Ubyssey editor,
currently a publicity hack for the Vancouver Playhouse
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For the Roads
to Higher Education
Attention all post-secondary students! Before
you open a textbook this term, study the benefits
of fast, affordable transit to and from school.
FAST TRAX, the post-secondary student's transit
guide, will be available on campus this fall. Pick
one up for complete information on routes serving
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and money with prepaid fares. Watch for details
on posters and in the September 11 edition of
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Page 20
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 Student paper
ceases operation
Kelowna (CUP) — The student newspaper at Okanagan College is dead.
After a year and a half of wrangling with its student society,
publishing off-campus and without the funds entitled to it, the
Goliard has ceased operations.
The Goliard Publications Society has been struck from the B.C.
Register of Companies, andhadits
assets seized by the Kelowna
Campus Student Association
(KCSA) executive.
The Goliard was dealt its final
blow when the present executive,
elected this April, learned that
staff members failed to renew the
Goliard Publications society's incorporation with the B.C. Registrar.
The KCSA executive were then
able to take possession of the
paper's equipment in the name of
the Goliard Publications Society's
members, the students.
Throughout the entire dispute,
the Goliard maintained that the
KCSA owed the paper a $4 per
student levy. The paper was otherwise autonomous and did not
share the same editorial views.
Ian Case, a former Goliard
board member and staffer, said
the paper suffered through last
years executive's withholding of
paper funds, a lack of cooperation
from news sources within the college community, the trashing of
virtually the entire press run of
two issues, and the physical and
verbal abuse of staffers.
The loss of the Goliard's society
status marked the staffs last solid
ground in its bid for financial autonomy from the association
through collecting its own a seperate student levy.
The executive intends to carry
out its plan of starting a new student paper, said KCSA co-chair,
Thai Poonian. The new paper will
most likely exist as a sub-committee of the executive, pending a
change in the student
association's constitution later
this month, said Poonian.
But Case says the new paper's
relationship to the KCSA executive worries him.
"The executive say they want an
'entirely fresh start,' which
sounded quite familiar to me," said
Case, referring to a similar phrase
used by Premier Bill Vander Zalm
in last fall's provincial election
campaign.
Case said the paper will likely
be run by an editor hired by, and
directly answerable to the executive — a set-up he believes would
seriously hamper the paper's editorial freedom.
Poonian confirmed Case' description of the editor's role, but
says that "there will be more than
adequate autonomy (from the
executive)."
Case said the new paper will be
less likely to cover education and
global issues, something for which
the Goliard was noted.
Poonian said that while considering the new paper's structure
the executive has taken Goliard
staffers' opinions seriously, meeting with them twice over the
summer.
Goliard staffers have also cooperated with the executive, helping
in the transfer of equipment and
records from the paper.
"We've tried to give them everything they'll need to start up a
paper," including a revised form of
the Goliard's constitution, said
Case.
The fate of the new paper lies
with the students at Okanagan
College, as the necessary change
to the KCSA constitution goes to a
general vote at a General Meeting
this month.
The Goliard was started in 1979
as the Catalyst, adopting its most
recent name, meaning a wandering student in Chaucerian England, the next year.
In the following years, the paper
bought typesetting and camera
equipment, and joined Canadian
University Press, a national cooperative of student newspapers.
In 1983, the paper became an
editorially autonomous, registered publishing society.
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Do you remember Rosh Hashana?
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Come in to Daddy-O's and pick up a gourmet
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September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 21 Ate the femes dhafigfrtg? U.B.C. sited t<> __ a placie w_6_e
s.*wterj$$ did not.get myofyed-^jiistlast year forinstence. But
this year, itlie number _fcliibs pri tMa«iajnp&s is increasing*—*
•the number of student clubs right now is more than double the
number of dubs existing last year at this time. Yes, I've done my
home work. The number of members within these clubs is also m
the rise. It seeme to be the thing to do these days. Why is this?
Are they not given enough home work? Shouldn't they be i n the
libraries where they belong? „___l^^-______
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SORORITIES OF UBC
MAKE THE MOST OUT
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- Meet new people
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Come see what we're all about:
Sunday tours: Sept. 20th 10 am
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For more information call:
Carey     -266-2169
Cynthia - 986-2540
Janice   - 732-0471
Students Help Mozambique
In Mozambique, they're
known as the "armed bandits." Their name evokes a
mixed reaction of terror and
hatred marking a seven-year brutal war that has left the country
scarred and struggling for survival.
After gaining their independence from Portugese colonial rule
in 1975, the people of Mozambique
were very successful with national
health, educational and economic
development.
But since 1980 they have been
locked in a bitter war against an
insurgent army of South African-
sponsored 'rebels,' or the Mozambique National Resistance
(MNR).
Now, after a two-month trip to
Southern Africa, two UBC students, and three others at
Dalhousie, McGill and York universities are setting up a national
network to mobilize student support for the people of war-torn
Mozambique.
"Southern Africa is the most
pressing international issue right
now," said UBC student Mary
McAlister, coordinator for Students Support Mozambique .
"And right now as were working, people are being killed," she
said. "It s just incredibly urgent."
McAlister, UBC student Kevin
Halsey, and the three others were
chosen from a group of 30 Canadian students travelling in Zimbabwe this summer, to go on a
special tour of Mozambique. The
tour was co-sponsored by World
University Service of Canada and
the Mozambican government.
"The government sponsored us
so we would go back to Canadian
campuses to educate and mobilize
people for support," said McAlister.
"Hopefully, what they will get
back will be a good investment of
their time and money," she said.
McAlister said that the situation in Mozambique is critical. A
country of about 15 million people,
most of whom are peasants,
Mozambique is ravaged by poverty, malnourishment, and a drastic cut in production due to the war.
As a vital trade link to the neighbouring states of Zimbabwe,
Malawi and Tanzania, Mozambique poses a major strategic tar-
getfor the regional destabilization
aims of the South African regime.
"Bandits are hitting on key targets — ports, railroads, roads — to
try to bring the economy to a halt,
and in doing so force the other
frontline states to use South Africa," said McAlister.
Because the MNR is active in
much of the countryside, said
McAlister, government officials
would not let the group travel
outside the capital city of Maputo.
But McAlister said the group's
powerful impressions did not come
only from contact with government officials, teachers and international volunteers.
"We met with two survivors of
the July 18th Homoine massacre
where 400 people were killed (by
the MNR),  she said.
"We met street kids who come
into the city from rural areas —
their parent's killed-by bandits —
and live and sleep on the streets,
eat out of the garbage, who wear
rags and beg for money."
Canadian students can play a
vital supportrole for Mozambique,
says McAlister. "This is an issue
that Canadians don't know
about."
"I think that students have
enough time and resources to put
into solidarity work," she said.
'"They can really have an impact."
McAlister said Students Support Mozambique has several objectives. The most immediate is a
petition to be presented to Prime
Minister Mulroney at the Commonwealth Conference happening
in Vancouver this October.
The petition demands that the
Canadian government: 1) send bilateral aid to Mozambique; 2)
impose full economic and diplomatic sanctions against South
Africa; and 3) take a leading role in
providing aid and support to
Mozambique.
The group's other objectives
include   speaking/film   tours   on
Canadian campuses, fundraising
for non-governmental organizations (NGO's) working in Mozambique through cultural events;
and networking with other Anti-
Apartheid groups to expand their
focus to include all of Southern
Africa.
The University of British Columbia
Frederick Wood Theatre
Presents
A Doll's House
by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Charles McFarland
September 16-26
Special Previews - Sept. 16 & 17
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8pm
Matinees :    Sat. 19 th & Sat 26th - 2pm
Thurs 24 th - 12:30 pm
Student Season Tickets - 4 Plays for $15
A Doll's House
Ibsen September 16-26
The Collected Works of Billy the Kid
Ondaatje ..November 18-28
Juno and the Paycock
O'Casey January 13-23
A Flea In Her Ear
Feydcau March 9-19
Box Office • Frederick Wood Theatre • Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Page 22
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 Get A Degree For UIC
by Mike Gordon
Canadian University Press
They're engineers, biologists,
teachers and nurses, and they all
have one thing in common — they
are out of work, or working outside
of their chosen field.
The Ministry of Advanced
Education and Job Training, sore-
named under Premier Bill Vander
Zalm's first cabinet, contains more
than a note of irony for B.C. students.
Unemployment in B.C. is more
than three per cent higher than
the national rate, at 11.7 per cent,
according to Statistics Canada
figures for July 1987.
But of the 178,000 people out
of work in B.C., almost 14,000, or
roughly eight per cent, hold post-
secondary degrees or diplomas,
compared to the national rate of 5
per cent.
"And those are the people who
registered (for unemployment
benefits)," said Joan Vincent, director of the Centre for Non-Traditional Unemployment in Vancouver.
"There are many who are
simply not bothering to register
any more."
Vincent said that high unemployment in the province has created a growing number of 'underemployed' people — those taking
low-level, low-paying jobs outside
their qualified field in order to pay
the rent.
"One reason is the incredibly
poor economic performance in
B.C. in the last few years," said
Moran, linking high unemployment in the province to the Social
Credit government's costly business exploits, such as Expo '86 and
other mega-projects.
"We're not convinced that
that kind of economic development is creating employment for
students coming out of universities," she said.
"The government's priorities
are ridiculous," says Amoure
deCosmos, a geography graduate
from Simon Fraser University six
years ago, who now works in automotive restoration supplies. "We
just don't exist," he said.
DeCosmos said he looked for
long-term employment for 18
months after graduating, while
supporting himself with temporary work. Now, tired and frustrated, he is applying for a
master's program at UBC in hopes
of eventually entering his field.
"We have a great number of
highly educated people in this
province," said Moran, "but we're
not necessarily training them."
But Moran said that the CFS
fears the Vander Zalm government will respond to the unemployment situation by putting all
the emphasis on job training, at
the sacrifice of advance education.
"We have concerns that the
comprhensive community college
system will be turned into vocational and applied technology institutions."
"There's no real solution happening," said Neil Trainor, director of the YMCA Employment Initiatives program.
Trainor said that youth unemployment has been a serious
problem since 1982, but now because the same number of people
are still out of work, the program
has shifted its age range from 15-
24 to 17-30.
"It's upping the anty," said
Vincent. "People are at the job
entry level for longer periods now,
whereas four or five years ago
people 30 years old would have
been in their chosen field for a
couple of years."
Trainor said one problem is
that university and college graduates are among the most disadvantaged because they have been out
of the job market for a few years,
and hold unreasonable job, moeny
and status expectations.
"Can you bank pride, eat it?
No," said deCosmos.
"Ultimately, you will find a
position," he said, "But you have to
have realistic goals — don't hold
your breath, you have to take what
you can get," he said.
And if a master's degree
doesn't get his foot in the door,
muses deCosmos, "There's always
a doctorate."
Summer Not Hot For Jobs
by Mike Gordon
Canadian University Press
Students seeking employment this summer in B.C.'s increasingly privatized economy
struck a wall.
According to the B.C. Public
Interest Research Group, 19 per
cent of students looking for summer jobs came up empty.
But the summer job vacuum
only reflects a greater trend ranking youth unemployment in B.C.
amongst the worst in the country.
The NDP recently announced figures of 64,000 unemployed youths
in the province, up 10,000 from
June.
Almost 16 per cent of full-
time, returning students between
the ages of 15 and 24 in B.C. are
unemployed.
That means returning students comprise 11 percentofB.C.s
unemployed population, according to July 1987 Stati sties Canada
figures.
Though the number of unemployed returning students in B.C.
is down from 20 per cent last year,
Ontario, which has roughly four
and a half times the number of
B.C.'s student labour force, shows
a figure of 8.1 per cent, while the
national rate is still lower at 12.5
per cent.
Given the Social Credit's penchant for privitization, millions of
dollars in federal-provincial job
creation schemes, such as the
Challenge '87 summer wage-subsidy program, only leave students
with dead-end, low-paying jobs,
says Canadian Federation of Students-Pacific Region researcher,
Rosanne Moran.
"Challenge '87 wages are pathetically low," said Moran. "Even
with work of 16 weeks in the
summertime, students can't afford to go to school."
Moran said that the money to
programs like Challenge '87 go to
private sector jobs which would
have been created anyway.
"Money is being taken out of
the non-profit sector, and put into
the private sector," she said.
Some universities offer the
alternative to work and study.
Programs such as those at UBC or
Simon Fraser University's work
co-op allow students to work one
semester to afford studying the
next.
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September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 23 Unite and Conquer
One purpose of a university is to push for humanitarian causes. The ability of all citizens to live in peace and
harmony is not a radical dream nor is it impossible to attain. Yet, people in many parts of the world cannot feed
their children or feed themselves, cannot protest without
fear of persecution.
And what do we at the university do about the world's
problems? We study them. We analyze the reasons why
death squads terrorize El Salvador. We search for a cure
for cancer. Inhumanity and injustice continues while for
only moments a week people consider the plight of underprivileged people everywhere. The just society, the ability
for people to live in peace and with food on the table, eludes
mankind.
We, the educated, we the students, are the future
leaders so we should view ourselves as part of the world
community.
We should decide what sort of a world we want for
ourselves and for our children. But it is as students we
have a voice. A voice that says we want change. A voice
that says the status quo fails to satisfy our needs and
desires for a just society. The Ubyssey is a means to
express that voice. It is the student's vocal chords. It is up
to the students to use the paper to express themselves.
The Ubyssey is also a means for students to learn what
happens on campus, what students in other faculties are
doing, and what latest laurels our excellent varsity teams
have won. To cover all campus events adequately is an
impossible task as UBC is too large, with too many
interesting and exciting events. So the Ubyssey attempts
to gather information that will appeal to more than one
segment of the campus into a bi-weekly paper. We at The
Ubyssey think we are good at what we do but we also think
(and are reminded constantly by ex-editors) that the paper
can be improved. We at The Ubyssey have made a
committment to provide the UBC campus with the best
student newspaper ever.
And that is why we are what we are. That is why we
print stories on South Africa, Mozambique, central America, and gay and lesbians. That is why clubs are not
featured on the front page. But the paper is open to
everyone and tries to operate as a democratic organization. Be a part of it: the few, the proud.
Socreds play favorites
in education policies
Welcome to UBC. Welcome to the education factory.
This is where you will be prepared for your future career.
You may or may not learn to think. But that is not
important; thinking is not a marketable skill.
When the ministry of post-secondary education was
renamed the ministry of advanced education and job
training last year, it reflected a trend in B.C. education
policy that had been developing for several years. Funds
for basic academic programs were cut while money poured
into specialized job training programs. Education's emphasis shifted from academic to vocational and technical
programs.
Training programs qualify people to do jobs to make
money, and deserve to be well funded. But job training is
not, and should not be, the primary goal of post-secondary
education.
Academic courses do not train you for a specific career.
They do encourage you to learn to think, to be flexible and
apply your knowledge to any job. They help you develop
problem solving and communication skills that will be invaluable as you enter the jungle of the real world. But the
Socreds apparently consider these qualifications too intangible to be useful.
Allocations from the Fund for Excellence provide a
dramatic illustration of the government's vocational and
technological bias. Former premier Bill Bennett, who
created the fund in 1986, let us know its orientation when
he said it would help institutions "respond to economic
development opportunities." Applications       for
money from the Fund were approved by cabinet.
Today's government continues to fund education
around the needs of the marketplace. They hope to
develop skilled labor for new industries in B.C. But in
these days of rapidly developing technologies we need
education emphasizing adaptation and flexibility if we
want to compete. It is not a good time to focus on technical training for specific jobs that will likely be obsolete in
a few years.
Today's shortsighted education policies seem designed
to develop a province of followers, not leaders — and
certainly not thinkers.
B.C.'s education system has been compared to a fast-
food outlet. You are now part of the factory.
Tuum Est.
STOP FEE
WAIVERS
By KURT PREINSPERG
Is tuition taking a hefty bite
out of your savings? Then it will
probably amuse you that UBC has
just given free tuition to children of
faculty members. This perk, on top
of a five per cent salary increase, is
a nice shot in the arm for professors whose average annual salary
used to be a paltry $50,000.
I am not worried about the obvious injustice of waiving tuition
for already privileged faculty kids
when kids of welfare recipients
face a tuition increase. Nobody in
their right mind believes injustice
any more. My worry is, however,
that faculty kids may now choose
UBC for the wrong reasons: not
because that's where they really
want to study, but because it's free
- and because they can use dad's or
ma's office and Faculty Club account.
Let me therefore make a
modest proposal. Since free tuition
for faculty offspring is a widespread practice, it only stands to
reason that universities all across
"CHALLENGE"
Tuition waivers for faculty offspring are discrimination on the
basis of family background - a
clear-cut, ugly example of it.
Many   faculty   members   I've
talked to agree. I wish to invite
any concerned faculty member
who thinks otherwise to a public
debate on the question: "Are tuition waivers for faculty offspring
fair?"
-Kurt Preinsperg
North America should agree to let
faculty kids pick the university of
their choice, free of charge. Not
only will this further smooth the
path for kids who, by blood and
noble birth, deserve to inherit
superior positions in society, but it
will also promote social stability
by helping to ensure that the best
jobs continue to go largely to offspring of academics and other
well-to-do members of the upper
dentists and lawyers (and perhaps
government officials), offering the
kids of these people privileged
treatment at university in exchange for services rendered.
About 90 per cent of all faculty
kids attend university. For that
reason alone they deserve to be
treated better than ordinary students. Let us congratulate UBC
faculty on securing a free university education for both their smart
PERSPECTIVES
crust.
And why stop at tuition waivers? Why not give the faculty
other benefits for their kids as
well, like free student housing,
free use of computing facilities,
free graduate tuition, faculty
mentorships and other privileges?
Indeed, the next logical step for
the self-proclaimed owners of our
university is to negotiate with
and not so smart offspring. The
respectable gentlemen who make
up the faculty have shown themselves to be fine parents who look
after their brood. The example of
nepotism they have set again
shows how, in our society, entrenched power and privilege entitles you to grab what you can.
Truly heartwarming and inspiring.
PB_*e>iV
WW,©* _eo*S_,»TX fWfi-V.-*5*46
*$**. fOR-eM**-* ■sn_toe»sc5 •_.
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 24lKof the Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977
Corinne Bjorge, Hedy Rubin, Jennifer Lyall, Ross McLaren, Celia Henslowe, Deanne Fisher, Robert
Beynon, Kurt Preinsperg, Wanda Chow, Florence Louie, Katherine Monk, Tim Bird Chew Wong,
Stephen Hunt, Michael Groberman, Mike Gordon, Carol Ann McKenna, Steve Chan, Stephen Wisenthal, Laura Busheikin, James Young, Deanne Mould and the ever popular Rick Hiebert all helped put
out the first issue of the vilest rag. Sorry Kids, no room to be funny this week.
Page 24
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 CAMPUS CRUISING
One student's story
By STEPHEN HUNT
You have no idea where
anything is, but off in
the distance there's
smoke and umbrellas,
so that's where you go.
You've discovered the Student Union Building (SUB).
You go inside. You discover a
darkened corridor, some
couches, a newstand - nothing
remotely familiar.
You locate a bathroom and
relieve yourself of the bus trip.
You tell yourself again that cars
really aren't necessary, they
were just some industrialist's
bright i dea of how to make a few
billion.
Back in the darkened corridor, you look right, then left,
then straight ahead into a bar.
It's 11:10 AM. A strong dose of
Protestant Guilt smothers your
desire to go and get drunk, despite the fact that you're not
Protestant.   OK, no beers yet.
corridor, hopeful that someone
might offer to show you around.
You haven't got a place to live, no
proof that you have been admitted
to this institution - nothing except
a paperback in your knapsack, a
bank card and your wits. Just as
you are about to inflict your wits
on someone, you notice those
couches again and - SUPRISE -
another kiosk that sells gourmet
coffee and chocolate chip cookies
that taste JUST LIKE MOM'S.
Coffee break.
After Coffee Break
The couches, you have
learned, are really comfortable.
So, a nap.
After a Nap
It's close to two. You get that
sinking feeling that comes with
the understanding that you are
getting dick-all done today. You
have read the Province from front
Perspectives
You decide instead to do Lunch.
In the Subway Cafeteria,
there is an area full of kiosks, at
which there are many different
foods representing different
cultures or at least food groups.
There is even a kiosk that sells
gourmet coffee to those who
cannot stomach University
Horsepiss. Although you have
never been an avid drinker of
Krona or Bolivian Marching
Powder or Bowel-Blower or
whatever, you intuitively recognize that a significant advancement in the Academy has been
made. Things just get better,
you think, as you bypass all
those cultures and food groups
in order to get to the area where
they sell cellophane-wrapped
tuna siandwiches, which you
pick up and squeeze to see if the
bread is stale yet, the way you
always did at the University of
Winnipeg, when you notice the
deli counter person staring at
you as if you were squeezing her
young infant's head, not a tuna
sandwich. You retreat to the
cashier to pay.
After Lunch.
Washed and fed, you are
now ready to conquer the big,
unfamiliar University of British Columbia.
You re-enter the darkened
to back, and discovered what everyone who's lived in Vancouver
for more than a week already
knows: the Province sucks. After
everyone bought a car, you think,
those rich industrialists decided to
start tabloid newspapers.
The Smile of the Day is 31
years old, her name is Leslie, she's
a travel agent whose likes are L.A.
and her boyfriend and dislikes are
'non-spiritual people'. You reflect
that if they printed that in the
Winnipeg newspaper, people
would assume Leslie was a
Moonie.
Inertia overwhelms you. Your
body rejects the couch. (It's that
Protestant Guilt again.) You locate a board that explains all the
buildings on campus and locate
the Buchanan Building, where
you have to go. You are going to get
something done today.
On the way to the Buchanan
Building
Having made an extremely
close inspection of the map, because God knows people take one
look at a map, think they know it
by heart and then proceed to get
completely lost, you set off for the
Buchanan Building only to learn,
through the muddled interpretations of a half-dozen strangers you
meet along the way, that you
have indeed gotten completely
lost.
45 minutes later, sweating
again, you arrive at the
Buchanan Building.
They greet you warmly. Everyone reminds you that you are
a grad student and makes you
feel important. They have documents that say you are a student. They are full of suggestions as to where you might live.
They remind you of a cocktail
party three weeks hence.
You are remembering now
that this is B.C. A professor
comes sprinting into the office
and yells 'everyone to the window!'; the secretary bolts from
her chair and does it, the professor does it and soof course do you.
You are thinking there is a
sniper in the bell tower or else a
fire is gutting all those gourmet
coffee kiosks, it was foolhardy to
think of a winter passed without
drinking University Horsepiss.
The professor is pointing at the
sky. "The clouds," he says,
"they're in the most wonderful
formation. I followed them all
the wayin from the parking lot."
You receive instructions to
the Housing Registry and, feeling renewed, leave the
Buchanan Building in search of
shelter.
On   the   way   to   the
Housing Registry
You started towards the
Housing Registry because that
was the most important thing to
do - find a place to live. You can't
continue to commute from Surrey. You would rather by a reporter for the Province, or car
salesman, or divorced.
But somehow you got lost -
it's a hot, sunny day, August is
almost over, the cloud formations really are beautiful and
there's a breeze blowing away
the heat.
How this happens you're
not quite sure, but the next
thing you know, you're naked
and there's a lovely beach out
there. An Arab with blue eyes
named Nick is handing you a
really cold beer, your third since
you got down here an hour ago.
There's driftwood to lie against
as you read your paperback and
big rocks for people to sun themselves on, like sea lions, or penguins in Antarctica. To your
right lies Jesska, who is a
dancer. So you haven't got a
place to live. No biggie. You try
to remember what you were
worried about in the first place,
but you can't.
v^
Office for Women Students Presents:
How to pass the
English Comp. Test
FREE WORKSHOP
Thursday September 17th
12:30 - 1:30 pm    Buchanan B 212
pANAGOPOULOg
2 for 1
Pizza placE
two for one
YOU CAN ORDER ANY TWO ITEMS FROM
OUR MENU AND PAY ONLY FOR ONE!
(THE HIGHER PRICED ITEM)
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(MINIMUM $6.00 TOTAL)
$1.50 DELIVERY CHARGE ON 2 FOR 1 ORDERS
222-0001
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2517 ALMA STREET, VANCOUVER
HOURS:   Sun. - Thurs. 4:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat. 4:00 p.m: - 2:00 a.m.
PIZZA • PASTA • BBQ RIBS & CHICKEN
*    i
FURNITURE SPECIALS
STEREOS
BEDS
HIDE-A-BEOS
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from $15.00
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from $29.50
from$130.00
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 25 Student aid 1987
Improvements fail to help
ex-grads
By JENNIFER LYALL
BC's new student aid program
represents a dramatic improvement over past years but students
are still finding cracks in it that
need filling.
The new program revives a
grant system, making loan debts
over and above $12,000 non-repayable for students who successfully complete a degree within five
years.
But loans are not remitted to
those who graduated in the years
without a grant program, many of
whom accumulated debts in excess of $20,000.
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont thinks the provincial
government is shirking its responsibility to past graduates.
"If the government is now
recognizing the problem with the
system why can't they accept the
problem of a few years ago?" said
Nevraumont.
There's no recourse for
those people (with high debt
loads). What the hell's supposed to
happen to them?"
The average debt load for
1986 B.C. graduates with loans
was $15,000, up $12,000 since the
elimination of the grant program
in 1984. The 1986 loan default
rate was 20 per cent.
Graduates fared better in
1984 and 85 because they were
able to take advantage of the old
grant system in their first years.
Advanced education minister
Stan Hagen offered sympathy but
said his ministry couldn't afford to
offer past graduates assistance.
"I don't think there are
enough funds in the program (to
cover retroactive remission) and if
we were to do that it woul d have to
have an impact on the people in
school now," said Hagen.
UBC director of awards and
financial aid, Byron Hender, said
the new program represents such
a great improvement over recent
years that it is unreasonable to
complain.
"I think it would have been
nice if the province could have
made it retroactive but things
don't always work out that way,"
he said.
Byron Berry was hired by the
AMS to spend the summer reviewing student aid in BC and Canada.
Berry said the program is overwhelmingly positive, but since his
study he is "a little less enthusiastic about that program than I was
at first."
Berry thinks it is unfortunate
that past graduates receive no
assistance. He wants something
to be done to alleviate the difficulties they often have with repay
ment.
"One of the things I'd like to
see done about (past graduate
debts), given that it's unlikely the
government will forgive any part
of the loan retroactively, is increased flexibility in the payback
program."
Berry said that many loan
defaults could be avoided if the
payback system were more sensitive to individual student situations. "Seeking alternative repayment schedules...may be a
good idea," he said.
The BC payback schedule is
less rigid than the Canada Student Loan program, Berry said,
but he would like to see more flexibility across the board.
Berry also has problems with
the guidelines restricting eligibility for loan remission. In order to
qualify for a grant students must
work, study, or volunteer during
their summer holidays.
"I think that should be loos-
New student aid program
You still can't finance the BMW
Some of the highlights of the
BC government's new and
improved student aid program
are that it:
*Reduces student loan debts to
$12,000 for students who successfully complete a post-secondary program - every cent
you borrow in excess of $12,000
is considered a grant. To be
eligible for loan remission you
must work, study or volunteer
during summer vacation and
complete your degree within
five   years.     The   ceiling  is
$16,000 for a second degree.
*Increases the maximum assessment for student assistance in
keeping with today's cost of living
- you can now borrow more money
per year.
*Provides extra assistance for first
and second year students who
must live away from their families.
*Provides special funds up to
$1,000 for Adult Basic Education
students at colleges and for special
needs students.
*Gives parents tax breaks for
saving towards their children's
education.
"■Provides financially needy
students with summer employment vouchers which are
supposed to encourage employers to take on the students with
the greatest financial need.
*Matches private donations to
scholarship and bursary endowments.
ened to allow for documented job
search," he said.
Nevraumont said she objected to the personal responsibility clause on principle.
"It's the only province in
which to get a loan you have to
prove your worth on a moral basis
as well as on a financial basis," she
said.
Although she thinks volunteer work is a great option for
those who cannot work,
Nevraumont said, Tm not sure
it's a judicial call (the government)
should be making."
But Hagen disagrees. "I don't
think it's a moral question at all,"
he said.
Since taxpayers subsidize
students with loans they should
expect students to try to earn
money towards the cost, said
Hagen.
"Education doesn't only benefit the individual who's getting it,
it benefits the society as a whole,"
said Hagen.
Nevraumont said another big
problem with the new student aid
program is completing a degree
within the five year limit, while
remaining eligible for loan remission.
She said exceptions should be
made for single parents or students who get involved in extracurricular activities like student
service organisations and student
council.
"They've denied you that opportunity to broaden your experience," she said, adding that such
initiatives should be encouraged
as an important and fulfilling part
of an education.
Hagen said his ministry is
"not unsympathetic to individual
cases," but he didn't see the value
of extending a degree to allow
more time for extra-curricular
activities.
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Page 26
THE UBYSSEY
September 9,1987 Theres more to Student Assistance
than just Student Loans
Student loans are the foundation of student financial assistance in British Columbia. A
number of other programs to supplement these loans are also provided by government,
post-secondary institutions and private sources. These programs put money directly in
the hands of students with demonstrated financial need.
The basic student loan
The provincial and federal governments provide
yearly loans to post-secondary students with
demonstrated financial need. No payments or
interest are due until six months after leaving
school. In British Columbia both the federal and the
provincial programs are administered by the B.C.
government. Application forms are available from
all public post-secondary institutions.
Work Study
The provincial government funds part-time
employment for students who need to earn extra
money. Generally these jobs are related to some
type of campus service (such as the library) or to a
student's field of study. This program is
administered by the Financial Assistance Offices at
each participating British Columbia post-secondary
institution.
Adult Basic Education Student
Assistance Program (ABESAP)
Direct financial assistance for students completing
high school level programs at a community college.
Bursaries and Scholarships
A variety of bursaries and scholarships are
administered by post-secondary institutions in
British Columbia. As a rule bursaries are awarded
on the basis of financial need and scholarships on
the basis of achievement. Funds for these awards
come from private donors, foundations,
corporations, service organizations, government,
and from individual universities, colleges, and
institutes.
Find out more!
Contact the Financial Assistance Office at this
institution or write to:
Student Assistance
c/o Parliament Buildings
Victoria, British Columbia
V8V 1X4
New programs to reduce
student loan debt
Last spring three new programs to reduce student
loan debt were unveiled by the British Columbia
Minister of Advanced Education and Job
Training, Stanley B. Hagen. These programs,
which are based on financial need, include:
Loan Remission: reduces student loan debt of
new graduates to a maximum $12,000 —
regardless of the amount borrowed. This limit is
raised to a total of $ 16,000 after a second degree.
Supplemental Funds: provide direct assistance to
Adult Basic Education college students preparing
for post secondary training. This assistance helps
reduce the level of student debt by reducing the
need to borrow.
Equalization: provides direct financial assistance
to students in their first year of post secondary
study. This program is targeted at those students
whose financial needs are the greatest. In August
1988 this will be extended to also include
students entering second year. Like the
Supplemental Fund. Equalization reduces the
level of student debt by reducing the need to
borrow.
These new programs require students to make a
personal contribution during the summer* by
working, studying or volunteering in the
community.
*summer or any pre-term break longer than
thirtv davs
Investment
Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training
"Skills for Life"
HONOURABLE STANLEY B. HAGEN, MINISTER
September 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 27 UBC        B0    07KSTO
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Page 28
THE UBYSSEY

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