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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1983

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Vol. LXVI, No. 6
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 30,1983
■"S»l5^48
228-2301
UBC chemistry shutout
sparks student reaction
- c. fidelman photo
K. GEORGE PEDERSEN officially became UBC's eighth administration
president Monday night during ceremony at Vancouver's Queen Elizabeth
theatre. It has been confirmed by Ubyssey sources present that Pedersen's
first name is Knud, dispelling rumors he was named after green talking
frog.
By ROBERT BEYNON
Forty students registered in an
important chemistry course were
forced to drop it Tuesday because
funding for promised laboratory
space failed to come through.
The students in chemistry 103 who
no longer have a scheduled lab will
have to wait until next year to take
the course, according to chemistry
department head Lawrence Weiler.
But Michelle O'Rourke, arts 1,
said she needs to take the course —
a prerequisite to rehab medicine,
dental hygiene and a home
economics specialization in education.
"I'll be wasting a year of university if I can't take chemistry to enter
rehab next year," she said.
Weiler said he told the students to
drop the course because he had not
received expected funds from the
administration to open an evening
lab. "I still haven't received a reply
to my request," he said.
But Weiler failed to tell students
the lab was cancelled until the
deadline for course changes had
almost passed. He told some of the
students at a 1:30 lecture Friday,
the last day for course changes, and
told the rest Tuesday.
"After Weiler told students the
news, a stream of them left the
room to see if they could still find
space at a different time," said
John Welsh, arts 2.
Students to become 'victims'
By FRANCIS LEW
Students renting off campus are
vulnerable to eviction without
cause, unprecedented rent increases
and unscrupulous landlords as the
provincial government attempts to
impose its new Residential Tenancy
Act.
"With higher education costs,
less money in loans, and rents going up, students will be hit hard,"
said Wayne MacEachern, B.C.
tenants' rights coalition coordinator.
Although Bill 5 has not yet passed, rent controls have been abolished and tenants' remaining rights are
being eroded, he said.
"Rents are being increased over
100 per cent in some cases," he
said, adding appeals can still be
taken to the Rent Review Commission until June 30, 1984.
But he said many appeals will not
be heard because of the recent influx of complaints and anticipated
abolition of the Rentalsman office
Sept. 30.
The government claims Vancouver has adequate housing and
that rent controls are unnecessary,
but Paul Cruickshank, another
member of the Tenant's Rights
Coalition, said this is a myth.
"The vacancy rate for affordable
housing in B.C. — that is, where
rents are under $359 — is a tenth of
Pakistani student held
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton's
Amnesty International chapter has
printed 6,000 protest postcards in
its stepped up campaign to free a
Carleton student being held
political prisoner in Pakistan.
Students are asked to sign the
cards requesting Pakistan
authorities to release Tariq Ahsan,
a doctoral political science student.
Ahsan returned to his native
Pakistan in 1979 for health reasons,
and was arrested in 1981 for
possessing seditious material including a pamphlet calling for a
return to democracy in Pakistan.
Ahsan still awaits the verdict, which
could mean execution.
The cards will be distributed on
"Tariq Ahsan Day," Oct. 11,
which may include a Pakistani meal
and dance to raise funds for
Ahsan's return ticket to Canada,
should he be released.
Scott Reid, a Carleton Amnesty
International co-ordinator, said the
cards and special day were organized "to make sure Pakistani
authorities know people haven't
lost interest in Tariq Ahsan and that
we want him to return."
The cards feature Ahsan's picture
on the front. The inside reads "It is
with concern that I have learned
that Tariq Ahsan...has been held in
jail since Nov. 1981...Mr. Ahsan remains a valued member of the community at Carleton University and I
therefore urge you to allow him to
return to Canada to continue his
studies."
Fifteen hundred copies each will
be sent to Pakistan president Zia, to
the country's minister of law, to the
district law administrator where
Ahsan is imprisoned and to the administrator of the jail.
one per cent. The government tries
to twist things around by saying
there's a high vacancy rate," he
said.
Bill 5 will adversely affect
students as well as senior citizens,
women, minorities and working
people, said Cruickshank.
"These groups have limited incomes and can't afford the luxurious housing with the high vacancy rates," he said.
Tenants can also be evicted
without cause on three month's
notice, and if a landlord gives a
reason for eviction, he said, only
ten days' notice is required.
The Rentalsman will not handle
grievances over eviction, unit
maintenance or damage deposits
after Oct. 30, 1983. These will have
to be taken to the courts, which will
be costly for both parties, said
Cruickshank.
"If a landlord doesn't like someone who's Indian, or French
Canadian, or gay, he can just throw
them out. With the demise of the
human rights commission, where
will these people turn?"
MacEachern said the coalition
will conduct an educational campaign in October, focusing on how
Bill 5 will affect each low income
group.
The coalition will be staging a
"tent-in" Saturday, Oct. 1 at 1
p.m. in Vanier Park. A rock band
called The Evictims will perform
popular songs with lyrics altered to
address tenants' issues. The tent-in
will focus on the theme: "If Bill 5
becomes law, you may find yourself
living in a tent."
"We'd like to educate people and
have concerned people step forward, but right now too many people are scared," said MacEachern.
Welsh said he would not be so
upset if the department had not
promised the students that a lab
would eventually be scheduled or
had notified them earlier.
Another student enrolled in the
course, Jill Larson, arts 1, echoed
Welsh's anger. "We kept asking
them about the lab and they kept
telling us it would come but they
didn't know when."
But Weiler said the department
never promised the students a lab.
"The department alway said the
evening lab might not go ahead."
Vice provost of student affairs
Neil Riseborough said he hoped
money might be made available for
another lab and advises students,
who are mostly in first year, to stay
in the course.
"The university has got a contract. I feel it has to provide space
for students once they've accepted
their money and their registration,"
he said.
It is hoped a compromise can be
reached with the department, allowing students who need the prerequisite to be given credit although
they only attend lectures, he said.
Buy Weiler said this solution was
unlikely.
Student board of governors
representative Margaret Copping
said she also hoped a solution could
be found. Copping said she attended a lecture and advised students
not to drop the course yet.
The students have a right to take
the course because they have
registered, she said. Students
should write the vice president of
academic affairs, Robert Smith,
and demand action, said Copping.
Freeze covers
tip of iceberg
A UBC hiring freeze imposed
Sept. 9 will not help the university
deal with a projected $4 million
shortfall, said vice-provost for student affairs Neil Riseborough.
"The hiring freeze is not productive, it's just a blanket," he said.
But administration president
George Pedersen said the freeze will
save the university money and may
continue past Oct. 5 if money cannot be retrieved from university
faculties and contingency funds.
He could not estimate the
amount of money an extended hiring freeze would save.
Engineering dean Martin
Wedepohl said his faculty is "badly
affected" by the hiring freeze
already.
"Its going to destroy us if we
have any budget cut at all,"
Wedepohl said referring to
Pedersen's statement about taking
uncommitted funds from faculties.
Expected funds for the expanded
engineering program will probably
not materialize, said Wedepohol.
Student board representative
Margaret Copping said UBC may
be faced with an even larger shortfall than expected.
The term retrenchment used for
several years has been replaced by
"downsizing," she said.
Jim Kennedy, vice-president of
university services, said vacant positions and a lack of equipment are
affecting the quality of university
services. This includes the physical
plant, the computing centre, and
the traffic office, he said.
Processing delays can be expected
because of a lack of staff, Kennedy
said.
Vice-president academic Robert
Smith said a plan for the 1983-84
operating budget must be ready by
October. Pedersen has met with
deans to discuss uncommitted funds
and will initiate an examination of
ways to reduce ongoing commitments and a future budget,
Smith said.
UBC's future in mind
Next week's National Universities Week activities should cost
UBC between $15,000 and $20,000 university officials said Monday.
UBC has already spent $13,500 on NUW, said Neil Riseborough,
UBC's NUW committee chairperson.
The stated goal of NUW is to bring university and community
together. "We want to eliminate the isolationist problem between the
university and community," said Riseborough.
The week's events at UBC include a lecture series, plays, concerts
and exhibits. The Museum of Anthropology and the Aquatic Centre
will be open free to the public nightly.
A substantial amount of the $13,500 was spent on advertising in
The Sun and on the national CTV and CBC networks. The remainder of the costs will be for the extra staff needed for the university to operate in evening hours.
The community public relations blitz by the B.C. universities has
been done on a "shoestring budget," said Jane Byrne, universities
ministry policy coordinator.
But Riseborough said UBC's expense "isn't really that much," adding that he hopes NUW will benefit UBC by increasing community
involvement in the university on a regular basis.
"That makes it an investment in the future," said Riseborough.
"It's important to let the public know they're welcome (at UBC),"
he added.
UBC will be offering off-campus events at Robson Square Media
Centre, and the "Hortline" will give out advice on plants.
Costs have been somewhat defrayed by volunteer work done by
faculty and students, said Riseborough. Page 2
Trolleys link campus
A trolley system soon to be in- may   be   unsafe,   a   transit   union
stalled along University Boulevard member warned Thurdsay.
......................................................................... The existing lanes are too narrow
:X:X:xixi$:X:X&^ for such wide buses, said George
Krantz,    Independent    Canadian
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Hairy Transit Union member,
puce   blorgs   on   this   tiny   island University   Endowment   Lands
kingdom errupted in delirious rap- manager Ron o'Genski said there
ture   when   it   was   revealed   that are no plans t0 widen University
Ubyssey News Service (UNS) island Bouievard t0 accommodate the new
correspondent   Haig   Crooks   was SyStem
leaving  for greener pastures. The
Blorg, enslaved for the last three ICTU president Colin Kelly said
years  by the giant  Amalgamated the trolley buses have less flexibility
Media Services for his only pleasure of movement than diesel buses, but
food, left UNS ranks to devote his he saw no cause for concern,
life to redecorating the interiors of "The only concern we have is of
MacDonalds outlets. a possible dewirement," said Kelly.
The Boorg has worked feverishly "If the buses go too fast, the wires
late into the morning to fill gaps in can   easily   detach,   and   the   bus
the  island  newspaper,  The  Daily drivers would have to stop the bus
Blah, and his loss leaves a very large to fix the problem."
hole in the staff. O'Genski  said  the  new  system
"Burp," replied the blorg at his wjl, increase the speed of transpor-
retirement party, with characteristic ,ing students and save fueL
class and style. "i think it wjll be great," he said.
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
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5\«'° Friday, September 30, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tenure still uncertain for B.C.
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Despite two amendments, the
controversial public sector retraint
act still jeopardizes tenure and
threatens academic freedom, according to UBC's faculty association
president.
Because the cabinet can draw up
the bill's regulations after the act is
passed, dismissed professors may
not be able to dispute their job termination, Dennis Pavlich said
Thursday.
"We continue to be opposed to
Bill 3 on the grounds that it
abridges the right to enter into and
conclude agreements with the
university administration," he said.
An NDP spokesperson said the
cabinet can impose the regulations
without consultation and behind
closed doors.
"While you have this government
in power and you speak out (if you
are a professor), it may be a coincidence if your program isn't funded next year," said the spokesperson who requested anonymity.
Bill 3 is unnecessary because collective agreements already have
provisions for laying off people in
case of funding shortfalls, he said.
The Bill is one of the "dirty
dozen" that the NDP intends to
"fight with the resources that the
law allows," he said.
But a civil servant in charge of
implementing the legislation said
the bill's amendments do give protection from unjust dismissal.
The amendments replace the
original phrasing "without cause"
with four causes: insufficient work
or insufficient funds; changed
organizational structures; discontinued programmes and reduced
level of activity or service of the
employer.
- stuart dee photo
FORESTRY WEEK gets off to big splash in Empire Pool during student's vain attempt to stay on rolling log.
Ritual attempts at staying up on round, wet, slimy object are just part of forestry week activities. Now that
forestry week is over other undergraduate societies can start unleashing their own brand of madness on campus.
Women rally for legal abortions
By MARCIA KREDENTSER
Vancouver will be joining 17
other Canadian cities Oct. 1 in a national day of action for a women's
right to choose pregnancy.
Marva Blackmore, a spokesperson for Concerned Citizens for
Choice on Abortion said the
legalization of free standing abortion clinics, and the removal of
abortion from the criminal code are
the main demands the CCCA is
making.
"If we don't fight for a women's
right to choose, and if we don't
win, we'll move back to the days of
the coat hanger and all it's ramifications," Blackmore said.
Abortions have always occurred.
The question is whether or not they
will be legal or illegal," she said.
With the exception of Quebec
abortions are legal in Canada only
if they are obtained through a
hospital committee, said
Blackmore.
In Quebec, abortions can be procured in both public and private
free-standing clinics.
Free-standing clinics were set up
in Winnipeg and Toronto by Dr.
Henry Morgentaler and other independent doctors and nurses. Both
clinics were raided and then closed
down this summer, after police seized records and confiscated equipment.
Charges of conspiracy to procure
abortions have been filed against
nine staff members of the Winnipeg
clinic, and three staff from the
Toronto clinic. Morgentaler has
been charged in both clinic incidents.
"The Pro-Choice movement has
committed itself to supporting their
defense," said Blackmore. The expense will be approximately
$500,000 she said.
We are lobbying the two provincial governments involved to
legalize the clinics, which they have
the power to do, and drop the
charges," she said.
According to Statistics Canada,
72 per cent of all Canadians are pro
choice, said Blackmore.
"We just want to make sure these
voices are heard by legislatures and
judges."
The Vancouver pro choice march
begins at the Queen Elizabeth
Plaza, corner of Georgia and
Hamilton, at noon, and will be
followed by a rally at the Commodore Ballroom at 1 p.m.
If employees are terminated
because they are critical of the
government or radical, they can
take their dismissal to court, said
the civil servant who requested
anonymity.
"I think there are enough checks
and balances to prevent flagrant
abuses," he said.
"There is nothing that can be
done by the government to the
university."
George Reamsbottom, B.C.
Government employees union
spokesperson said the changes to
Bill 3 ignore existing seniority provisions in collective agreements.
"Any   employee   can    be   ter
minated irrespective of seniority
and qualification," he said.
Many of the people already fired
under the provisions of the act had
many years of seniority, he said.
They included two senior union executives with more than ten years of
seniority.
Bill 3 has passed a second reading
in the B.C. legislature and still must
be scrutinized clause by clause
before another vote will make it
law.
The Social Credit government
has indicated it will be making
technical amendments to the act
before reintroducing it, said the
civil servant.
Nicaragua needs
help from Canada
By SARAH COX
If you were a student in
Nicaragua, you wouldn't be worrying about missing a few textbooks
and having overcrowded labs.
Instead, you might find yourself
sharing one textbook with your entire class and working in labs with
almost, no equipment.
Money that should be spent in
areas such as education is being
diverted to protect Nicaragua from
a U.S. economic blockade and attacks from Honduras, said a
member of UBC's Latin American
Solidarity Committee.
Laurence Kootnikoff is one of
several UBC students to join a
Canadian coalition for aid to
Nicaragua, a group which is attempting to raise $500,000 in
material aid while educating people
about Nicaragua.
"Nicaragua is probably one of
the most misunderstood countries
in the world," said Kootnikoff.
"■;U.S. president Ronald) Reagan
claims it's a Russian satellite, but
it's not even a socialist country.
Seventy-five per cent of the
economic activity is in the private
sector."
Coalition member Phil Westman
said most Canadians are unaware
their government gives almost three
times as much aid to Honduras as
they give to Nicaragua.
"We're asking the federal
government to increase their
bilateral aid to Nicaragua," said
Westman. "We would like to show
the government there is public support for them to do more."
The Canadian government
should also be pressured to cut
bilateral aid to Honduras, which is
trying to destabilize the Nicaraguan
government, Westman said.
Canada recently approved a loan
of credit to Nicaragua, which will
help the country purchase badly
needed equipment on the world
market, said Westman.
"It's a step in the right
direction," he said. "But we've got
to carry it further."
The medical, office, school, and
agricultural supplies collected by
the coalition will be sent to
Nicaragua and distributed by the
Sandino Foundation, the agency in
charge of distributing nongovernmental aid, said Westman.
Student organizations will receive
a portion of the goods, he added.
More than $100,000 worth of
goods have already been collected
from across Canada, said
Westman. Some of this is from the
30 or 40 B.C. groups involved in the
project, he said.
Cruise control
TORONTO (CUP)—Student peace
activists from across Ontario met
here Sept. 17-18 to build an inter-
campus unity in the fight against
cruise missile testing in Canada.
But among the thirty representatives from seven institutions, student government leaders were
noticeably absent and many
delegates admitted their councils
were not committed to the peace
movement.
Recycling dollars
UBC's environment interest group has plans for a paper recycling
project that could make $50,000 a year for UBC, an EIG member
said Thursday.
The group will be approaching the administration with a feasibility
study of office waste paper conducted over the summer, said Leslie
Sigardson.
The study was compiled by students hired through a federal grant
and focuses on finding the quality and amount of recoverable paper
at UBC, she said.
"Eighty-seven per cent of high quality campus paper, such as computer printouts, can be recovered," Sigardson said.
The study recommends that the new administration building be the
guinea-pig for a six month trial of the project, she said.
The proposed recycling system is patterned after environment
Canada's "at-source separation" program already in effect at Laval
University and the University of Alberta, said Sigardson.
Office workers at these universities have a separate receptacle on
their desks to collect paper. The paper is then shipped to paper mills
to be recycled into packaging and tissue paper, she said.
The only costs to the administration are the annual operating costs
and start-up costs of $5,400, said Sigardson.
And at least one delegate complained his student council actually
hindered the peace movement on
campus.
Graham Beck, a disarmament activist from Carleton University, said
the student government "refused to
distribute any information about
this conference beforehand, or to
send anybody from the council."
Despite the absence of student
politicians, organizers from the Ontario region of the Canadian
Federation of Students called the
conference a success.
"I think it's clear there is a lot of
work being done out there, but it is
being done without much interconnection or provincial planning,"
said John Marcoccio, CFS-Ontario
peace and disarmament committee
chair.
"I hope we integrate our activities and gain a higher profile on
campuses," he said.
Terry Gardner told conference
delegates he wants to establish a
chair of peace studies at the University of Toronto.
Gardner criticized the seeming
lack of concern for disarmament
issues.
"I think it's a damnable responsibility on the part of the academic
community and I don't think
students should put up with it and I
don't think faculty should put up
with it," Gardner said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
Food fad fraud
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) — The latest
fad diet is under investigation by
the federal food and drug
authorities.
Complaints about the Herbalife
Nutritional  Program  range  from,
dizziness, nausea and diarrhea to
seizures.
The program includes a
powdered meal replacement and
five different formulas of various
vitamins, minerals and herbs and its
growing popularity has Newfoundland health officials worried.
Eleanor Swanson, Provincial
Nutrition director, said she "would
not recommend the Herbalife
Nutritional Program as a suitable
weight-loss program."
The meal replacement combined
with the vitamin and mineral formulas can cause excessive doses of
such nutrients as vitamin A, she
said.
This can result in an electrolyte
imbalance which can cause shock.
Electrolytes transmit neural
messages through the body, and are
important to vital organs.
The mineral and vitamin formulas contain several potent herbs,
such as the laxatives linseed oil and
aloe vera and the diuretics juniper
and hydrangea. The combined
cathartic effect of these herbs can
lead to dehydration and electrolyte
imbalance.
Swanson criticized the plan
because it does not alter poor eating
habits or offer an exercise program,
so that the lost weight returns
quickly when the program is finished.
She also said the products are
often illegally sold together, while
federal food and drug standards
prohibit a meal replacement being
sold in combination with other
nutrient supplements. Distributors
sometimes imply that the vitamin
formulas are needed in addition to
the meal replacement.
Herbalife is sold by multi-level
private distributors, similar to the
Amway selling structure. Incentives
like money, health and new friends
are used to attract new distributors,
who in turn seek new recruits.
Swanson said the emphasis of
Herbalife's advertising campaign
was on the "pure and natural", but
few people realize a 100 per cent
natural herb can be toxic and deadly.
"What's natural about taking
pills anyway," she said. "Humans
were meant to chew food or else
they wouldn't have teeth."
"The less processed a food is, the
more nutritious it is and what can be
more processed than a powdered
meal?"
According to Theresa McCloud
of the food and drug authorities,
the product was refused entry in
1982 because it did not meet national nutritional standards. The
company upgraded the product's
nutritional level and it is now readily available in Canada.
She said the main problems with
the product are the claims individual distributors make about it.
Federal authorities say they are
now studying the product and will
try to introduce more stringent laws
to control such products.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
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Computer students face rejection
Deep in the bowels of the University of
Victoria's Clearihue building lurks a
dimly lit, cavernous room filled with
shadowy figures wearing intent expressions.
A buzz of activity and an insistent clicking
sound penetrates this room — home of the
computer terminal centre.
One of the figures, a first-year student, sits
hunched over her terminal, punching
vigorously at the keys. She knows her future
in computer science is being determined with
each punch. If her first year marks are too
low, there may not be room for her in second
year. Rejection is a real and threatening
possibility.
By MONICA SMITH
Canadian University Press
"The pressure is discouraging, but I want
to major in computer science so I'm just hoping for the best," she says.
She is one of hundreds of computer science
students who are affected by new admission
regulations. The regulations are the result of
rising enrolment in the department without
corresponding increases in staff and equipment. The computer science department is
now unable and unwilling to expand. Instead
they are looking at ways to limit enrolment
and in turn, they limit opportunities for
many students.
The new regulations effect students at all
levels in the department. Registration in first-
year courses is now on a first-come, first-
serve basis. In upper-level courses admission
depends on high standings achieved in prerequisite courses.
Close to 1,000 students are registered in
first year, but no more than 150 will enter second year. Of those only 75 will be able to
proceed to senior courses because of the new-
rules. A B-grade is needed to continue in the
program, and a B to pass from first to second
year.
Despite these drastic enrolment restrictions, the department is still swamped, says
computer science professor Dale Olesky.
"We're going out of our way now to accommodate as many students as we can. We
have to limit the numbers in all fairness to
those who get in," Olesky says.
Similar measures were taken at UBC.
Students whose marks fell below the accepted
standard were refused admission into certain
computer science courses. One fourth year
course accepted 55 students and rejected 51
whose marks were below the cutoff point of
as enrolment soars
CO
"It wouldn't hurt to open up a few more
sections in a couple of the third year courses.
And we could probably do with a few more
staff members for graduate studies.
"As it is now, we've cut staff in the
graduate program in order to better handle
the large first year classes," says Olesky.
Olesky says the department has more computer terminals than last year and are more
careful about allocating computer time for
each course. Students may not have much extra time to try out new ideas, or play games,
or do work for other courses, but they
definitely have enough time to do the work
for their computer science courses, he says.
Olesky's view that the department
shouldn't expand simply to meet the increasing demand has supporters in the business
world. A systems analyst who works with the
AtUVicl.OOO
students are
currently registered
in first year computer
science. Yet less than
a tenth of these will
be able to graduate
in this field. What's
•more department
officials feel the
program's size
is adequate.
At UVic, the idea of implementing
■ academic standards first came up two
years ago when the computer science
department experienced a 50 per cent enrolment increase. Discussion among university
officials the following spring led to the imposition of the standards.
Now faced with  meeting academic standards, students are understandably worried.
"1 don't know whether I'll be able to continue next year. To keep my marks up I have
to put in a lot of work for this course, and my
"It's like automobiles everybody
drives them, but how many actually
know what goes on under the hood?
Only a given number of people are
mechanically inclined enough to
become auto mechanics. It's the same
way with computers. Lots of people
can use them, but not everyone should
be trying to get a degree in computer
science."
65 per cent, according to acting computer
science chair James Varah.
These figures are indicative of other computer science courses, says Varah. About
one-third to one-half of all applicants to the
departments courses were rejected. And at
least the same number were turned away, he
says.
Varah blames UBC's critical financial
situation and the recently imposed hiring
freeze for the imposition of the academic
standards.
other courses may start to suffer," said one
first year student.
But one second year student is not worried.
"I think if you get less than B- you're not
really interested in computer science
anyway."
Olesky agrees and says even if more funds
were available he wouldn't want the department to let in more students.
"We're close to what we feel is the proper
size for the department. We have the number
of quality students we can get.
"If we let more in, they wouldn't be
qualified or oriented to computer science,
but merely compelled into the field by job
prospects."
That is exactly the cause of rising enrollment in computer science courses, says
Olesky.
"Right now the country is experiencing a
poor economic situation. People can't find
jobs. Some have been out to work and then
laid off. Nov/ they want to change their field
or upgrade themselves.
"Even though the computer industry has
been hard-hit by the recession and it's not as
promising a situation as it was five years ago,
the job prospects are still better than in other
fields. And things are now starting to pick up
again, so many hope there will be improvements by the time they graduate," explained Olesky.
Olesky says there is a growing number of
application areas for computers, such as
engineering and commerce.
"Computers are being used in new ways.
There will be more and more computer-
oriented jobs in the long run, all requiring
special skills."
But, he stresses computer science is not
a sure way to landing a job. "The
program we offer is academic,
theoretical and not just a preparation for the
job market. If students want job training
they should be going to BCIT. We provide a
strong theoretical base for education in computer science, not just job marketing skills,"
says Olesky.
Olesky says the department should not ask
for more resources to support their diverse
program, he adds expansion is needed.
provincial government agrees that only a certain number of students are inclined toward
computer science beyond the rudimentary
level of data processing.
"It's like automobiles. Everybody drives
them, but how many actually know what
goes on under the hood? Only a given
number of people are mechanically-inclined
enough to become auto mechanics. It's the
same way with computers. Lots of people can
use them, but not everyone should be trying to
get a degree in computer science."
However, one university administrator
doesn't agree with that view and maintains
that, given the funds, the computer science
department should open its doors to more
students.
James Currie, UVic Executive Assistant to
the President says computer science is now a
popular area. "I am sure that the students
heading into a computer science program are
aware of the work involved and are willing to
study and achieve a theoretical knowledge of
computers," he says.
"But resources are limited. There is not the
space or the people to service student demand. We can't allow one discipline to grow
disproportionately to the others. Liberal arts
programs are important too. We don't want
to become the MIT of Canada."
Currie says people expect a diverse education from a university.
"Universities should provide a universality
of knowledge. That means involvement in
three areas: teaching, research and community service. No one of them should take over
and become the prime function of the university."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
Housing fraud
TORONTO (CUP) — More than
50 Humber College students who
were defrauded of about $20,000 in
a housing scam are taking civil and
criminal actions to recover their
money.
The students, some from Africa
and the Caribbean, paid the first
and last month's rent for apartments in six area houses. They were
told the houses were fully equipped
and they would live in single or double rooms.
When they arrived, after paying
$440, they found unfurnished
rooms occupied by up to nine other
women and men.
In one case, the students who had
paid for the overcrowded unfurnished apartment found there were
no utilities either, and lived for
several days without water or electricity.
The students complained to a
Humber College official and police
subsequently arrested a 39 year old
Toronto man, Ernest Selent, Sept.
16. Selent has been charged with 14
counts of fraud.
The houses had been rented from
six local landlords for $700 a
month. Rooms in the houses were
then rented to the students for $220.
The students said on one occasion Selent, after receiving complaints, arrived at a house with a
table and mattress that looked as if
they had been salvaged from a garbage dump.
Humber students and staff have
rallied to help the defrauded
students. The college has hired
lawyers and will take Selent to
small claims court in an attempt to
recover the money.
The Humber Students' Association has set aside $1,400 for
emergency loans to the students.
The administration has made an undisclosed amount of money
available, and teachers and administrators have made private
donations.
Some of the students have decided to remain in the houses at the
rent they agreed to pay when they
moved in. The rest have been put
up in a hotel about two miles from
the college.
Students will pay no cost at the
hotel until the end of September,
after which they will be allowed to
stay at the same rent they would
have paid in the houses, said
Humber vice-president Jim
Davison.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Waiting for polish
By ROBERT BEYNON
Samuel Beckett's Waiting for
Godot is a fascinating tragi-comedy
about the futility of life.
But the Frederic Wood Theatre's
production fails to accentuate the
play's full tragic or comic elements,
and lacks a degree of polish.
Waiting for Godot
by Samuel Beckett
directed by Stanley Weese
at Frederic Wood Theatre
Irish expatriate Samuel Beckett,
strongly influenced by existentialism, wrote the play in Paris in
1952 in a Europe unable to explain
World War II's atrocities or the ensuing injustices. First produced in
Paris in 1953, the play received local
then international acclaim almost
immediately.
It portrays Didi and Gogo, two
hobos, fulfilling an absurd routine
in an absurd universe — waiting for
Godot, whom neither knows, to
come. The play doesn't build to a
climax, and Beckett never even explained what it means.
But this production fails to portray the absurd tragedy and comedy
of human existence, intended by
Beckett.
Both Didi (Bruce Dow) and Gogo
(Pat Blaney) can tell a quick line,
but they fail to maintain the comedy and it only pops out in fits and
starts.
Dow and Blaney muffed comic
routines by speaking too quickly,
failing to use creative pauses and
failing to catch the play's rhythmic
diction.
The resultant lack of comedy,
negates the absurdity of Didi and
Gogo's routines, and therefore
weakens Beckett's message of life's
absurdity. At times Dow caught the
comic spirit but failed to hold it.
But when Pozzo (Luc Corbeil)
-and Lucky (Michael Robinson)
entered in the first act, the play goes
flat because Corbeil, who
dominates the scene, shouts rather
than projects his voice and doesn't
vary his intonation.
Robinson did provide some pleasant comic moments as his hoarse
breathing grew louder and his actions choppier in response to Poz
zo's demands.
The play also lacked a certain
degree of veneer.
For example, although the set (a
willow tree atop an angular stage)
was effective, the moon mismatched the unspecific set with it's detailed, almost photographic appearances. And a lack of lighting in
certain areas of the stage left the actors in a shadow.
The actors also dealt clumsily
with the audience when speaking to
them and moving off stage, which
left a viewer feeling uncomfortable.
These shortcomings could have
been overcome with a kilocalorie of
energy, but they weren't.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Hairy
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yet another issue of the island
newspaper, The Daily Blah.
"Oooga booga," said one blorg,
"more bird cage liner."
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Register by October 12th.
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the Employment Centre On Campus until October 3rd. Applications should be accompanied by recent course transcripts. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
Chem reaction
UBC is really turning into a chemical stew. Just when we thought
modern science had cutbacks under control .  .  .
Forty first-year students have, figuratively speaking, been thrown from
the petri dish into the bunsen burner. Informed that their Chem 103 lab is
nonexistent, they now find they cannot get credit for the course. Talk
about rubbing NaCI into the wound.
Somewhere, during the experiment that is academic year 1983/84, the
learned scientists who run the chemistry department became confused
about their ingredients. ("Now was that 0.002 grams of labs, or 0.002
grams of students?")
Whatever the cause of the mismeasurement, obviously there isn't
enough room in the test tube. Luckily, the reactions so far have been mild
— no cracked beakers or torn gas hoses.
The administration is no doubt hoping the mixture stays stable. After all,
it was their meagre dispensation of elements that caused the whole mess
to begin with. They tried to cram too much fluid into the container, and
now students are scattered on the floor like experimental by-products.
But what if they turn out to be charged particles? With a little bit of induced energy, they could really put the heat where it belongs — on the
Social Credit government, the real catalyst of this whole debacle.
Administration and chemistry department officials may be just misguided lab assistants, but the doctors in Victoria are bonafide mad scientists. If
they had their way, they would cutback the number of known elements.
Perhaps they should put their own actions under a microscope and examine the results.
What UBC, and indeed the province, really needs is less reaction and
more solution.
Any first-year chemistry student (at least those who manage to stay in
their courses can tell you that a mixture is only as good as its solubles. An
education won't get those 40 students much if they can't get the prerequisites they need to follow their chosen line of study.
The men in the white lab coats better be careful. One more bad ingredient and their whole ugly experiment may blow up in their faces.
Choose right
A blood soaked fetus flashes on the screen. Its tiny body drips mucus
onto the pure white linen supporting it. The audience gasps and the
women in the crowd vow never to have an abortion.
But the horrible images don't stop. The film reels off more pictures of
dismembered babies, their feet no bigger than toenails. The audience
becomes sickened and some leave the room.
What they aren't seeing, however, is the blood of women who have had
unwanted children. Their blood, tears and frustration doesn't fill the screen
because pro-lifers aren't concerned with women's rights. They are concerned with producing guilt and drawing on the emotions.
The graphic images, shown to Catholic children, displayed at the P.N.E.
and often erected in SUB, are designed to blur the issue of choice. One
cannot discuss the dilemma facing pregnant women when being bombarded with gory images.
And such films ignore the horror of self-induced, coat hanger abortions.
The image of tiny helpless "babies" blots out the mental and physical
agony of women wanting to terminate an unwanted pregnancy. The rush
to legislate morality tramples into the ground women's right to choose.
But as tomorrow's rally indicates, women are not going to watch the
pro-lifers destroy their reproductive freedoms. They are speaking out
because the church and the state should not dictate what happens to a
women's body.
And we urge you to attend. Even if you don't believe in abortion, go to
protect women's right to choose. Don't let the crusader Joe Borowski impose his morality onto Canadian law.
THE UBYSSEY
September 30, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
They came in ones at first; Craig Brooks, Brian Jones and Verne McDonald — trickling in
reluctantly into the office. "I'm not sure I like this idea," said Brian. "It's too alien," said
Stephen Wiesenthal and Neil Lucente. Robby Robertson and Patti Flather just giggled. "It
will never work," groaned Chris Wong, resting his weary head on a convenient typewriter.
"Of course it will," said Sarah Cox and Robert Beynon. Muriel Draaisma just shook her head.
"It isn't possible," she said, as people began walking into the office in twos. Peter Berlin
gasped when he saw the wire baskets filled with copy and the eager faces all set to troop
down to the printers, "tt never used to be like this," he said. "I'm just going to write the
sports now. "We'll help you," shouted Stuart Dee and Peter Coupland. "So will we," added
Charlie Fidelman, Marcia G., Frances Lew and Sarah Miilin, who had arrived in a quartet.
Thor Anderson, Jack Tielman, Peter Prongos and Neil Dowie looked on in amazement as the
edits and layouts were done in a flash, and more spread hope through the hearts of Ubyssey
staffers past and present.
Letters
Are you our type?
Oct. 3-7 is the Red Cross Blood Drive, co-sponsored by the engineers.
This year our goal is 2500 pints of blood, which would make UBC's blood
drive the largest in B.C.
Once again there is an interfaculty challenge where the faculty with the
highest percentage turnout of donors will direct the proceeds to the charity
of their choice.
The clinic is from Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in
SUB 207, 209, 211, 213, and 215. Prizes for blood donors will be drawn
daily. These will include Keg dinners and theatre tickets. Also, radio station
CFMI has donated their Pinto car as an additional prize to be drawn at the
end of the drive!
Thanks for giving!
Stan Reimer, Oonna Chan
civil engineering,
blood drive co-ordinators
Population growth 'a problem
I am still a bit shaken after an
argument with a Dutch immigrant,
the proud father of nine. In this
world, I pointed out, there are over
half a billion starving children.
"So?" he said. "It's not my
fault."
To challenge anyone's right to a
large family remains a powerful
taboo in our culture. How many
children a couple has, one hears, is
a totally private decision.
But a decision is private only if it
has no adverse effects on others. So
far as 1 can see, a couple's decision
tohave more than two children will
have a number of adverse effects.
The Canadian population grows
by a quarter million people a year,
half of whom are immigrants. As an
immigrant from an overcrowded
country myself, I would be the first
to admit that population growth is
not a critical problem for Canada;
but I differ sharply with those who
think it is not a problem at all for
several reasons.
• to provide housing, education,
jobs and recreation for an additional million people every three
years diverts substantial resources
that we could better use to help
disadvantaged Canadians often living in appalling misery now.
• an expanding population is
used to justify never-ending industrial expansion, with its familiar
spillovers, like polluted waters and
denuded forests, urban sprawl and
ultimately a lower quality of life.
• having more people to support
will increase Canada's dependence
on imports and exports, making us
more and more vulnerable to the
impact of economic problems
abroad.
• only if we manage to have a
considerably smaller population
than we could actually support will
we have the surplus to help poorer
countries.    Because   the   average
Canadian consumes vastly more
resources than the average third
world inhabitant, poor countries
become understandably resentful
when we preach to them against
overpopulation while multiplying
ourselves.
perspectives
But, as the proud father of nine
said: "What does anyone care
about famine in Africa? Canada
has lots of land and not enough
people."
Travel around Canada, and you
will find almost all the reasonably
fertile and hospitable land occupied
and rapidly getting crowded. Try to
visualize that in the next twenty
years as much open land will get
built up as in the past twenty years.
To assess our population needs, we
should not aim at the maximum
number that the country can
possibly   feed,   but   the   optimum
number for whom it can provide a
decent living — and by that standard, Canada has more than
enough people. The fact is that it
does not provide a decent living for
several hundred thousand of its
citizens now.
Canada's economic malaise has,
of course, many complicated
causes. If you say that our
economic situation is already so bad
that a few million more people will
make the crowding in our cities,
schools, hospitals and unemployment offices only marginally worse,
1 concede the point.
But consider this. Governments
and economists tell us that our consumption habits are too wasteful,
that we have to make sacrifices,
practise restraint, conserve
resources. But clearly, economic
restraint and conservation make little sense as long as only the per
capita consumption is reduced,
See page 11: NUCLEAR
Interesting conflicts
It seems that Mitch Hetman with his after working hours summer
job and Mona Abed with her solicitation for the Maranathas, both
have a shaky grasp of "conflict of interest." It is when a person with
influence uses it for personal gain as opposed for the majority.
Abed has influence since she got Hetman to sign the request. Hetman has influence since he was moonlighting in the midst of
unemployed students. Abed is a Christian first, Hetman has to pay
his tuition fees first. It is very unlikely that their actions were not for
personal gain.
When a U.S. president has to remove himself from controlling his
peanut farm because of potential, real or imaginary, conflict of interest; there really can be no question that some people in the Alma
Mater Society prefer us to turn the other cheek.
Jim Davies
applied science 1 Friday, September 30, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Will Watt weather Washington White House whipping?
By WAYNE NIKITUK
Last week in Washington yet
another in a long series of
public relations disasters was
committed by the Reagan administration. James Watt,
Secretary of the Interior commented on the creation of a new
committee within his department saying it was politically
well composed and diverse
because it had: "a black, a
woman, two Jews and a cripple".
Watt, with his usual flare for
words, made this statement in a
public speech he gave. Many in
the audience almost literally fell
off their chairs in disbelief.
Once again Watt is the ever
bountiful source of problems
for the Reagan administration.
Several senators and congressmen on Capital Hill have
demanded Watt's resignation or
better yet that he be fired. Many
of these politicians are
Republicans who strongly feel
that Watt is a political liability
that can only hinder the
chances of Republican success
in the 1984 election. They point
out that Watt's public popularity
is virtually the lowest of any
high level bureaucrat in
Washington.
perspectives
Of course Watt once again
sent out an apology, one that
will do little good. Simply put,
he has had such a negative
public image for so long that it
would be very difficult, if not impossible, to substantially
change that now. This fact,
along with what his fellow-
Republicans have said is all the
more reason to fire James Watt.
Since    Watt    was    first    ap-
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* Microcomputer Systems + Peripherals
* Passive Electronic Components
* Hand Tools, Wire Wrapping,
Soldering Equipment + Hardware
10% DISCOUNT
j OFF ALL BOOKS
\        Present your student I.D.
^      and receive 10% OFF
"l all purchases of books
from Active's Data and
Reference library-
open Mon. to Thurs.   9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
3070 KINGSWAY — VANCOUVER
TEL.: 438-3321
AMPLE FREE PARKING
VISA AND MASTERCARD WELCOME
Book Discount valid until Oct. 15,1983.
ACAREER
AS A CHARTERED
ACCOUNTANT
Today, the chartered accountant is a valued
business advisor. Inflation, intricate tax
laws, new corporate legislation, and the fast
pace of decision-making, challenge the CA
to use his or her skills to the fullest. Clarkson
Gordon, with 22 offices across Canada,
employs more university graduates training
as CAs than any other accounting firm. As
a member of Arthur Young International,
with operations in 66 countries, we are
global in scope. Discuss career opportunities with Clarkson Gordon representatives
on campus O'-t. 19/20& 21.
Arrangements should be made through
your Student Placement Office prior to
Oct. 3.
A
A MEMBER OF ARTHUR YOUNG INTERNATIONAL
pointed Secretary of the Interior
in 1980 he has consistently
been in the news. Not for what
he has accomplished, only for
what he has said. He has insulted a wide range of the
American public including many
interest groups. He hates the
Beach Boys, something even
Nancy Reagan found grounds to
quarrel with.
Right from the beginning of
Watt's tenure in government he
set out to dismantle a barrage of
federal regulations giving
private companies greater access to public wilderness
lands all over the lower 48
states. More than the sweeping
proposals themselves Wait's
obnoxious attitude infuriated
environmental interest groups
and they rose up in strident opposition. This first confrontation brought Watt's face and
ideals    into    the    homes    of
millions of Americans who probably weren't as concerned
about the environment, but
never the less found his aloof,
domineering attitude disturbing. Hence, this image of Watt
began to solidify in the mind of
many Americans.
Later, Watt took on a new
dimension as an overbearing
clod of sorts who always
managed to say the wrong
things at the wrong time in
public. He did this by expanding
his circle of criticism to include
women, blacks and Indians. If a
television camera or
microphone were nowhere in sight,
words of his remarks usually
travelled through the Washington
grapevine upon which it would end
up in the media anyway.
Undoubtedly many people all
over the country just wish Watt
would disappear from federal
politics. Well, the one thing James
Watt has demonstrated is his ability
to weather any public relations
storm, and come out as opinionated
as ever. It's hard to say if Watt is
truly racist or just loose lipped.
At any rate, his obvious lack of
tact and complete insensitivity to
the legitimate concerns of average
citizens is one more strong argument against his right to hold such a
prestigious government job.
President Reagan will not fire
Watt because Reagan doesn't want
to give the public the impression of
strong disagreement within the executive ranks. Reagan is also widely
known for his extremely strong
sense of loyalty to those he has
hand picked for top jobs. He also
expects, and apparently gets such
loyalty back in return. Even the risk
of lost votes is not enough to persuade Reagan to fire Watt.
So, for now Watt remains.
Perhaps next week he'll pick on invalids.
(MtnhrrfEust '33
COME TO THE ENTERTAINMENT
EXTRAVAGANZA OF THE
CENTURY!!
7:30 P.M. IN SUB BALLROOM
OCT. 7 & 8 {TWO BIG, BIG NIGHTS)
FREE STEIN FULL
OF BEER!!
DOOR PRIZES!
TWO BANDS
EACH NITE!
POLKA TILL YOUR
LEGS DROP OFF!!
TICKETS: $6.00 AT AMS BOX OFFICE. SUB
PtxiVO    1.0,   KEcST
I*
Public Service Commission
of Canada
Commission de la Fonction
publique du Canada
4
V
To the
Class
of 1984
As a university graduate, you have something of interest to offer us: your degree,
plus a wish to succeed in a professional environment. As one of Canada's major
employers, we, too, have something of value to offer you: a respect for your academic
achievement and a working milieu for your meaningful contribution.
We usually follow the same hiring patterns as the private sector; our recruitment
activities, however, are currently affected by a low rate of employee departures and
shrinking departmental budgets. We will be interviewing some candidates for
anticipated vacancies; in other cases, we will be assessing applications and placing
them in inventory, for future consideration.
We Invite you to apply, if your degree is in one of the following areas:
Administration
Commerce
Computer Science
Economics
Engineering
Library Science
Mathematics/Statistics
The closing date for applications is 14 October 1983 The Financial
Administration Test of Technical Knowledge will be held on 20 October 1983
at 19:00. Please ask your placement office about the exam location.
Pick up your copy of the Careers Public Serince Canada publications at your
campus placement office or at an office of the Public Service Commission of
Canada.
Note: In light of the current reorganization within External Affairs Canada and the
ongoing assessment by the department of its future personnel needs, there will be no
Foreign Service Officer recruitment competition this year.
The Public Service of Canada is
an equal opportunity employer
Canada Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
Letters
How I spent the fateful morning
Wow! You sure know how to
make a girl's day. And I thought
Monday was a bummer! Tuesday,
when I opened your paper to find
my assignment had been published,
I could be described as suicidal!
Any guilt yet? Just a twinge,
maybe? It took a hot bath, a pint of
ice cream and half a mickey of rye
to restore my good humour. And
things are still touch and go. My
roomate is talking fast to prevent
me from wearing a bag over my
head for the next week. Isn't life
wonderful?
How could I do it? Leave my
assignment lying about at the mercy
of an obviously desperate press!
Well folks, it doesn't rain but it
pours! Monday morning I crawled
from my bed to the bus stop, in
plenty of time for my 8:30 class.
Ever try holding your umbrella in
your teeth?
While I am laying at the bus stop,
disregarding shocked looks from
the three piece suit brigade, two (yes
count 'em folks) two full buses
cruise by. Well, I'll catch another.
Thinking I will transfer to a Tenth.
Silly me! The pedal set have taken
to the bus in a big way. Fickle
hearts.
After watching yet another full
bus pass me by, happiness! Sort of.
Due to Vancouver's marvy transit
system I have missed one and a half
lectures. The first time! Shit!
After snarling at the folks asking
for donations at the SUB door, I
spend fifteen thrilling minutes
feeding nickels into a copying
machine. When the agony was over
I left, and left behind my first piece
of published work. Do I get my
M.A. now? Or how about my own
column.
T.F.T.
(the first time)
P.S. Out of guilt I gave to the
plackards at the door. Only now I
can't remember who they were.
Probably Maranathas. That's
another story. How I was
Maranathed on a Friday afternoon.
Is no place safe?
DANCE
WHAT A FEELING!
JOIN THE UBC DANCE CLUB
SUB PARTY ROOM EVERY NOON HOUR
[87orvirvi911
2:15, 4:40, 7:15. 9:40
Ulimm<Am>'Ul>3mm& WWkt!LlM*VIL*JGi!im,itZ&*~T&g!»MVV.\**W.^M
ifor Theatre Information call 687-16151
JTASLWARl"
RETURNS
S81   GRANVILLE
682-7468
■^fi^a::?
WARNING,   SOME   NUDITY   AND
SUGGESTIVE SCENES.
B.C. DIRECTOR       2.15, 4, 6, 8. 10
"THE BIG CHILL"
[ "-tr^**A
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
WARNING: SOME COARSE   LANGUAGE,
OCCASIONAL NUDITY AND SUGGESTIVE SCENES.
B.C. DIRECTOR
-i-ajtil- # ~'>~F>a'*-
• j-raff-jfa^-i -jfefls*^*-?- -
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"EDDIE AND THE
rmmi    cruisers"
WARNING, OCC
(M£tm§)
151   GRANVILLE
6B5-6828
WARNING, OCCASIONAL COARSE LANGUAGE.
B.C. DIRECTOR
CAW.BIE   AT   16th
876 2747
La Traviata
WINNER OF 8 ACADEMY AWARDS
ris^o Gandhi
DUNBAR   AT   30th >*—*A      * *"      '   *-~* M  M
(mature)
BKST ACTRESS — Meryl Streep
broadway
707  W.  BROADWAY
8741927
I'SOPHIES CHOICE'
(' . .-....A   WARNING:    SOME    VERY    COARSE
MATURE!   LANGUAGE AND SUGGESTIVE SCENES.
^    7.9 30 B.C. DIRECTOR
,„, w   .on.nwiyWARNING:  SOME VIOLENCE; OCCASIONAL SUGGESTIVE
707   W.   BROADWAY LANG(JAGE B.C. DIRECTOR
(74-1927 7.10-9.25
BECOME A MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT
YOU COULD QUALIFY IN AS LITTLE AS 2 YEARS
If you have successfully completed any of the following subjects you could
qualify for partial or complete exemption in the applicable R.I.A. course
listed below.
In order to be eligible, STUDENTS MUST HAVE OBTAINED A MINIMUM
MARK OF 60%, or equivalent, in the relevant subject identified.
R.I.A. COURSES
University of British Columbia
UNIVERSITY SUBJECTS!
111 Introductory Accounting
122 Commercial Law
123 Organizational Behaviour
212 Economics
213 Communications & Case Analysis
229 Intermediate Accounting I
232 Quantitative Methods I
314 Data Processing
331 Cost & Management Accounting
333 Quantitative Methods II
339 Intermediate Accounting II
424 Taxation
442 Financial Management
451 Accounting Information Systems
452 Internal Auditing
541 Advanced Management Accounting
543 Advanced Financial Accounting
553 Management: Processes & Problems
Com. 151 or 350 (L) or 351 (MBA)
Com. 331
Com. 120 or 323 (MBA)
Econ. 100 or 301 (MBA) or 302 (MBA)
Engl. 100 plus graduation
Com. 353
Com. (110 + 211) or 318 (L) or 311 (MBA)
Com. 291 or 336 (MBA)
Com. (354 + 358) or [352 (MBA) + 556 (MBA)]
Com. 212 or 418 (L) or 311 (MBA)
Com. 353
Com. 355
Com. 271 or 373 (MBA)
Com. 356 or Com. 534 (MBA)
Com. 455
Com. 358* + 454*
Com. 453* or [Com. 552* (MBA) + Com. 553* (MBA)]
No equivalent subject
(L) = Licentiate Program
(MBA)    = Master of Business Administration Degree Program
tTHESE EXEMPTIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.
'COURSE EXEMPTION ONLY, CANDIDATES MUST CHALLENGE THE R.I.A. EXAMINATION.
I would like more information on the R.I.A. Program of Studies. Could you send me a list of the
courses I would receive exemptions in (transcripts enclosed) and a registration package.
The Society of Management Accountants
of British Columbia
P.O. Box 11548
1575 - 650 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 4W7
Telephone: Vancouver area (604) 687-5891
Other British Columbia locations (112-800) 663-9646
Name	
' Affiliated with the Society of
Management Accountants of
Canada and all Provinces.
Address.
City	
Postal Code-
. Prov._
. Tel	 Friday, September 30, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Nuclear war 'only answer'
From page 8
while the total population keeps
growing. The resources saved per
person are sooner or later lost to the
increase in the number of persons.
Moreover, in an age when family
size is easily planned, it is not clear
why a large family should have a
claim to more resources of a society
than a childless couple. Many people are unwilling to curb their consumption habits as long as others
are not willing to curb their family
size. Can you blame them if, instead of cooperating with government restraint programs, they continue to waste whatever resources
they can lay their hands on?
In this way, large families
sabotage economic reforms both
directly and indirectly, and propel
Canada further along the same path
of disaster as the rest of the world.
But my main objection to large
families is moral rather than narrowly economic.
In discussing the evils of overpopulation in an already deeply afflicted world, everyone is naturally
tempted to conclude, especially in
affluent countries, that their own
children make no difference — and
millions drawing this same conclusion are breeding humanity into
oblivion. Pleading that your share
of the evil is small will never absolve
you from responsibility for it.
If a responsible life requires us to
behave in such a way that
widespread behavior of a similar
kind would not be disastrous — an
essential moral principle — then the
attitude that "my children make no
difference" is sadly immoral. It is
especially offensive when immigrants from overcrowded countries seek refuge in Canada, only to
continue their tradition of large
families here.
You may insist, as defenders of
large families always do, that you
have an inalienable natural right to
produce children. But a right to
reproduce does not give you a right
to overreproduce. Why is it so terribly hard to grasp that giving up
one's right to children can be a
good thing, and that parenthood —
beyond two children — has become
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As leaders in Canada in the development of advanced communications systems we offer a wide variety of careers to
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the supreme act of selfishness?
The ecosystem of our planet, according to the findings of
biologists, can support a permanent
human population in the order of
two billion. We have now almost
five billion people trampling this
earth and, unless there is a nuclear
war, we cannot possibly hope to
halt this growth at fewer than ten
billion wretched human beings. If
there are, in such a world, still a few
islands with enough living space —
such as Canada — does that give individuals living there or moving
there from more crowded places the
right to have large families? I think
the answer is clearly no.
Kurt Preinsperger
philosophy 4
"You are going off to join the what!?"
"The Ubyssey. I long for fame, fortune and fun."
"Then let me join you."
"Sure, come along. The Ubyssey needs everyone.
Reporters, photographers, artists, proofreaders and
more."
"Will it take long?"
"Just step into SUB 241k Monday or Thursday and the
magic will whisk you away."
Imagine a machine that records
sights... sounds.. .sensations,
thoughts.. .feelings.. .emotions,
even your dreams and nightmares.
Then, at the touch of a button,
transfers these personal experiences
from one mind to another.
Any person.
Any experience.
Anything you can imagine.
...The Ultimate Experience
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER presents
a J F PRODUCTION a DOUGLAS TRUMBULL film "BRAINSTORM"
CHRISTOPHER WALKEN NATALIE WOOD LOUISE FLETCHER CLIFF ROBERTSON
screenplay by ROBERT STITZEL and PHILIP FRANK MESSINA story by BRUCE JOEL RUBIN
Music by JAMES HORNER  Director of Photography RICHARD YURICICH, AS.C.
Executive in Charge ot Production JACK GROSSBERG
uttve Producer JOEL L. FREEDMAN Produced and Directed by DOUGLAS TRUMBULL
[original miction picture score album available
I onvabese sarabande records j
Filmed in Super Panavtston
© 1883 MGM/UA Entortah
MGM/UA
iiirilTitwMiPtT eo
STARTS TODAY!
[f7orvtrvi!
Shoppers Coupons Not Valid
For This Engagement
"SIX-TRACK nniPO'-BYSTE'Rio'
GRANVILLE atUrh
STANLEY
Evenings—7:15, 9:45
MATS. Sat/Sun-2:Q0 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30,1983
w
Vancouver
after Classes ...
Il J
BCOfl
CAFE
l00^ 2 FOR 1 SPECIAL
(        * VALID FOR ONE PERSON ONLY
PURCHASE ANY ONE OF OUR
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AND GET THE SECOND ONE FREE!
UPON PRESENTATION
OF THIS AD
— Lunches
Desserts & Coffees
Dinners
- & Coffees!
Continental Breakfast
3525W. 4TH        731-8522
9 A.M. - MIDNIGHT DAILY
cinema 16
presents
[PG]<3^>    United Artists Classics
Mon., Oct. 3 only
6:30 & 9:00
SUB Auditorium
IIBG Ganspas
■JS!1    Pizza
 i
Steak & Pizza       Lasagna
Spare Bibs       Ravioli
Chicken       Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4210 - 224-0529
Hours Mon   Thurs   11:30 B.m   -   2:00a.m.
Fri   11:30 a.m.   -   3:00 a.m
Sal  4:00 p.m.  - 3:00 am
Sun. 4:00pm        1:00 a.m
2136 Western Parkway
voiiinis
T'"2
from
3 to 4
$2 50
$125
FULL MEAL
DEAL
$3
Dairti
Queen
It's the best meal deal going. Our 100% pure
beef single burger with "More Burger Than
BunTM". a small order of crispy, golden fries.
Your favorite small drink. And, to top it all off,
a cool and creamy 5 oz. DAIRY QUEEN*
Sundae. All for only $3.39. Get a good deal
on a full meal. Head for the corner of 2601 W. Broadwav
at Trafalgar
brazier
Broadway and Trafalgar
AM D.Q   Corp   1981
New & popular on the Kits-Pt. Grey
scene, the Eatery is considered by a
discriminating many to be the only
place to eat.
The Eatery has an astonishing menu
containing great meals, phenomenal
snacks, dessert that Grandma would
be envious of, an espresso machine,
and is fully licenced on top of all
that.
A highly recommended restaurant.
Treat yourself!
(P.S.   Not at  all  to  imply  that  our
customers are hawgs. Just liked the
cartoon.)
3431 W   Broadway
i not f,u east ot Alma
Sun. only til 10
(HNvipCiNE
(HAMS pub
Pasta Shoppe & Delicatessen
OUR SPECIALITIES ARE:
• Fresh Pasta and Assorted Sauces
(Made Daily   - Herb Cream Sauce. White Clam with White Wine & Garlic,
Pesto, Tomato, Meat Sauce with Red Wine. Red Clam Sauce)
• Ready Made Pasta Dishes to Go.
(Lasagna & Daily Specials)
• Sandwiches, Quiches, Cold Meats,
Salads & Cheeses
• Assorted Home Made Desserts
OPEN: Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat. 9:00 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Thurs.. Fri. until 7:00 p.m.. Sun. Noon ■ 5:00 p.m.
3625 W. 4th Ave. 738-0122
UBC Students/Faculty/Staff
10% off on pasta
Experience Vancouver's Greatest Downtown Pub
For Lunch, After Dinner & Evening Entertainment
Monday and Tuesday
PUB NIGHT
Live Entertainment
"Much More Than A Pub"
(Open from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 a.m. No Cove
681-6341         1006 Granville St.
 Valet Parking     	
r Chargdjj
SEPT. 29
OCT. 2
SUB
AUD.
His triumph changed the world forever.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114       i
10°v DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Men Fri 11 30 9 00 p ni
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00 p m   9 00 p m
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
HONG KONG
CHINESE
FOODS
Mon
-Fri.           11:30 a.m.-2:00
p.m.
4:00 p.m.-10:00
p.m.
Sat.
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p.m.
tf
EAT IN
/>>
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A-
5732 University Bouleva
rd
TEL. 224-1313
fl PI€C€
OF CflK€
3788 W. 10th Avenue
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Cakes whole and by
the piece.
Snacks, pastries.
Espresso Bar.
10% off with UBC I.D. card
for purchases over $2.50
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-1:00 a.m.
Monday - Saturday
ph. 228-9816
THE KEG
An experience in dining
An adventure in working.  ThS SDIf/t
Lifters
Energetic and fun loving
THAT'S US!
HOW ABOUT YOU?
596 Hornby St
If you're looking for part time
work and think you'd have
something to offer us, we may
have a place for you.
We are looking for young men
and women. People oriented
and active, to join us as a
bartender, hostess or host, or as
a waiter or waitress.
Join us for the day for the evening. Either way we'll teach you
everything you'll need to know
to get along!
If we belong together come
down and see us.
Applications and interviews
will be conducted Wed., Oct. 5
between 3 p.m. Er 6 p.m. at
Brandy's — 581 Hornby Friday, September 30, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Woody develops
chameleon colors
By PETER PRONGOS
Woody Allen's newest film,
Zelig, is one of the most original
movies to come out in recent time.
It may not be a great film, but Allen
succeeds in his attempt to tell a
story with unique style and some
fascinating technical innovations.
In Zelig, Allen adhered to Aristotle's insight that an audience will
believe a plot that is impossible
more easily that one which is illogical. Allen's impossible situation
takes place in the late 1920's and
early 30's and concerns Leonard
Zelig, a human chameleon played
by Allen.
Zelig
Directed by Woody Allen
Playing at Capitol 6
Because of a repressed childhood
trauma Zelig has developed the
ability to change physically until he
resembles people around him. It
makes no difference if his model is
overweight or Chinese, a Black or a
rabbi - Zelig's body will metamor-
phosize itself to resemble theirs.
Impossible
but authentic
Allen plot
makes
cinematic
history
When his secret is discovered,
Zelig is hospitalized, and a young
doctor named Eudore Fletcher (Mia
Farrow) becomes keenly interested
in this bizarre case. She is not the
only one. The western world has
found another diversion from the
miseries of the great depression,
and soon there are chameleon toys,
chameleon games, and even a
ridiculous   chameleon   dance.   All
this activity makes Zelig a celebrity.
Dr. Fletcher eventually gets to the
psychological root of Zelig's problem — the need to be liked, to feel
safe, and to fit in. With her help,
Zelig's condition begins to improve.
But events cause a ralapse, and only
Dr. Fletcher's love for Zelig saves
him from the ultimate betrayal of
himself — becoming a Nazi in prewar Germany.
Zelig is a simple story, one which
doesn't give insights into relationships like earlier Allen movies Annie Hall and Interiors. Instead, he
concentrates on two elements in his
film, one of which is essentially
technical — he creates a fictional
documentary of Zelig's life complete with a narrator, similar in
form to his earlier effort, Take the
Money and Run.
But this time Allen makes
cinematic history through his use of
authentic documentary film and
stills from the pre-war period.
Zelig, for instance, appears in an
actual film of Hitler and later on
with an actor playing Der Fuhrer.
He appears in a ticker tape parade
in New York after being the first
person to fly across the Atlantic upside down and he is seen talking to
Jack Dempsey. The results are convincing enough.
Allen's other focus is predictably
on the issue of individuals and
society. There are the usual jibes at
the dominant culture and middle
class values, though they are more
subtle than usual. But Allen's main
thrust is highlighting the dilemma
of personal authenticity in a mass
culture. This is not new, but Allen
illustrates the problem in a bold and
creative manner. He emphasizes
how the need to fit in and feel safe
can lead to gross distortions in a
person by making those changes
visible.
The tragedy is underlined when
Zelig, who is partly Jewish,
becomes a Nazi. There is still much
humour in this work, but the concern in clear and straightforward.
Allen has used the freedom his
previous films have allowed to experiment with a new form of film,
while at the same time addressing a
major social and personal issue. His
attack on mass thinking and conformity come at a significant time
with the approach of 1984.
MESSENJAH
obvious talent but little drive
nail lucent* photo
SUB reggae dancing returns
By JACK TIELEMAN
Reggae returned Monday to the SUB ballroom with
the sounds of Messenjah — a six piece band from Kitchener.
Decked out in traditional attire and long dreadlocks,
the band started the show with a jam session, followed
by a set of pure reggae. With few exceptions, there was
little drive behind the songs despite obvious talent.
Rock High and Rock Ya Children were two of the
notable tunes. But the band couldn't keep the pace set
by these songs.
Although Messenjah's material is original, their
sound resembles many other bands. The band offers
the predictable music which casts a shadow over so
many up and coming reggae bands while paying
homage to the reggae masters.
But the fair-sized crowd who attended the show
seemed to enjoy dancing and grooving.
The opening act for the show was Asiyah, a local
reggae band who provided a short, tight, and well-
rehearsed set. Like Messenjah, Asiyah are still
developing, and if they incorporate more original ideas
they will be a force in the local music scene.
Cool jazz relic swings at QE
BRUBECK
grandpa of classical jazz     -c- *<<*••'»>■'< Ph°«°
By CHRIS WONG
Backstage at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, Dave Brubeck looks relaxed and cool as a jazz musician can
be. Politely posing in front of
photographers, he walks on the
mammoth stage.
Brubeck resembles an aging
Liberace. His grey hair and his
tacky red and black blazer give no
hint to his talents. Displaying a
pleasant smile next to the dressing
room's lighted mirror, he could
pass easily for your grandfather.
But on stage Brubeck would
outlast most grandpas at his age of
63. His concert Monday was full of
the energy and style which led
Brubeck to commercial success, a
rarity in jazz.
His success, however, sparked a
heated debate between jazz enthusiasts who argued over the
validity of Brubeck's fusion of jazz
and classical elements. The influence of classical composers like
Darius Milhaud has always been a
large part of Brubeck's sound. Like
a perfectly structured novel, his
music employs moments of rising
tension, followed by a climax and a
release — a format which is often
heard in a dramatic classical piece.
Because of the classical aide to
his playing, Brubeck has been accused of not being able to swing —
playing with a steady but adventurous sense of rhythm. But at the
Q.E. swing was the thing with
Brubeck and his trio.
A perfect example was during
one of the encores, Take The A
Train. Brubeck maintained a bouncy, upbeat pace throughout this
tune penned by Duke Ellington who
said "It Don't Mean A Thing, if it
ain't got that swing.
Before the sparse crowd in the
majestic theatre, Brubeck and his
group gave a solid performance of
old and new songs. Throughout the
concert Brubeck displayed his unique approach to swing which made
his name.
At the time of his major success
Brubeck began experimenting with
odd time signatures, albeit others
were doing the same thing and with
more innovations. But Brubeck
received recognition particularly
with the tunes Blue Rondo a la Turk
and Take Five, both given noteworthy treatments Monday.
These two songs were packaged
together   and   became   the   first
million selling jazz instrumental
single. The snappy melodies and the
odd rhythms give these tunes an
unique appeal.
Behind these elements is
Brubeck's grandiose piano style.
During the performance he
displayed his trademark: the use of
heavy, dense chords as opposed to
fleet, fast-moving runs which many
modern jazz pianists employ. Such
"block-chording" inevitably
becomes bland, but Brubeck's unique melody lines and sense of experimentation make up for it.
Clarinetist Bill Smith contributes
to Brubeck's experimental vigour.
Smith, who was an original member
of one of Brubeck's earliest groups,
plays in a slightly avant-garde vein.
Bassist and trombonist Chris
Brubeck is steady but plays in a
lacklustre fashion in comparison to
his partners.
Drummer Randy Jones succeeds
in keeping a steady tempo
throughout the unusual time
changes. His solos are also not done
in the typical "thrash-bang-break"
bass drum style. Like the elder
Brubeck, he can achieve a swing
feel in the most extraordinary circumstances. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Ytsfa.
Friday, September 30, 1983
W*£
Dave Robert Jazz Band: ooh, my hands are
so cold I can barely type out these fine, fine
bands, this is dixieland by the way, Oct. 1,
Hot Jazz Club, 36 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
Jam Session: no, this is not the name of a
group, but rather a time when the dark,
ruthless, and competitive instincts of a jazz
musician are most apparent - when everyone
has a chance to cut each other down and
throw one another off the stage - it's fun,
even Charlie Parker had a cymbal thrown at
him for his playing at one of these sessions,
bring your horn and join in the proceedings,
Oct. 5, Hot Jazz.
French Letters: Vancouver's answer to
Sweet/ A Flock of Seagulls combined, only
God, or Godess knows how I came up with
that combo, Sept. 30, Soft Rock Cafe. 1925
W. 4th, 734-2822.
Tom Keenlyside Quintet: this is a hot, hot
group and also, case anyone gives a fuck this
guy's brother was French teacher in high
school, and a damn good one at that, that
alone should be enough for you to attend this
very hip and hep gig, Oct. 3-8, 10 p.m.
Sheraton Landmark Jazz Bar.
Cast of Thousands/Living Colours:
esoteric-modern-neo-baroque-but modern
sounds, Sept. 30, The Waterfront, 684-8494.
Themba Tana/Uhuru: African sounds, if
you see a big friendly looking guy about to fall
over from over-indulgence in alcohol, his
name is probably Jack - help him, it's be kind
to Jack week, Sept. 30, 8:30 p.m., New York
Theatre, 639 Commercial, 879-2931.
Ernestine Anderson/Betty Carter: still
growing strong, till Oct. 1, Plazazz
Showroom,
Robert Plant: aah yes, this old cronie who
hung around with devil worshippers and drug
addicts (Led Zeppelin! is back, with Phil Collins whom we love to hate on drums, Oct. 1,
Pacific Coliseum.
Miguel Angel Estrella: the concert is an expression of thanks to supporters of this man
who was held without trial by the Uruguay army for two years, Oct. 1, 8 p.m., SFU
Theatre, 291-3514.
Music for Strings: presented by the Cecilian
Ensemble, Oct. 1, 8:30 p.m. Epiphany Chapel,
6050 Chancellor Boulevard, 224-1438.
Swingshift: an all-woman jazz band from
Berkley, California, Oct. 2, Granville Island
Arts Club, 731-9566.
Nikhil Banerjee/Zakir Husain: hey you
hipsters get out of your sterilized and
sheltered musical evnironment, get out and se
this very different concert of Indian music
from these masters of the sitar and table, Oct.
6, 7:30 p.m.. Music Building recital hall.
Grant Street Stringband: spirited fiddling,
Oct 7, Oddfellows (persons) Hall, 1720
Gravely, 530-5181
Wpv&s
SUBFilms (SUB Auditorium, 228 3697) Sept
29-Oct.  2:  Gandhi  (G).  Thurs.  and  Sun   7
p.m.;  Fri.-Sat. 6:30 and 9:45 p.m. Oct. 6-9:
Sophies Choice, 7 p.m.; Frances, 9:30 p.m
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Oct.
3: The Grey Fox, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver International Film Festival for
Children and Young People: a unique op
portunity to witness up to 82 internationally
reknowned films, Oct. 1-10, Robson Square
Media Centre, 689-1989.
National   Film   Board   (1161   W.   Georgia,
666-1716) a new lunch-time film series featuring films of one of them each day of the week,
starts Oct. 3, 11:30 a.m., phone for info.
Pacific  Cinemetheque  (1155 W.  Georgia,
732-6119) Sept. 30: The Exterminating Angel,
7:30 p.m.; Diary of a Chambermaid, 9:30 p.m.
Oct. 5: Umberto D, 7:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Draughtsman's Contract, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Heart Like a Wheel next film.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial,  253-5455)  Sept.  30-Oct. 2:  Fanny and
Alexander,  7:30 p.m.  Oct.  3-4:   Diary of a
Chambermaid, 7:30 p.m.; Tristana, 9:15 p.m.
Oct.  5-6:  Monsieur Verdoux,  7:30 p.m.;  A
King in New York, 9:45 p.m.
Savoy    Cinema    (Main    and    Kingsway,
872-2124)   Sept.   30-Oct.6:   The   Decline   of
Western    Civilization,    7:30    p.m.;    Blank
Generation, 9:30 p.m.; Urgh    A Music War,
11:15 p.m.
•
Pa^„a«e - Etchings and Cords: a series of et
chings and an octagon of cord by FM.
Hogan, Oct. 23-15, Carnegie Centre Gallery,
401 Main.
Chris August: an exhibition of painted
photographic images, Oct. 5-29, Artists
Gallery, 555 Hamilton, 687-1345.
Death   of   a   Salesman:    Arthur    Miller's
classic, till Oct. 22, Q.E. Playhouse, 872-6622.
The Store Detective:  a brutally frank and
profoundly  silly  play,   as  the  press  release
says, till Oct.  15, Waterfront Theatre, Gran
ville Island, 685-6217.
Good: a play by CP. Taylor, original and in
telligent, also very good, Oct. 5-22, Studio 58,
100 W. 49th, 324-5227.
Waiting   For   Godot:   Shariff  and   Beynor
have polarized views on this little gem from
the theatre of the absurd, you decide, till Oct.
1, Frederic Wood Theatre, 228-2678.
Ever Loving: the lives of war brides, opens
tonight, Arts Club Seymour, 687-5315.
TODAY
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Dance,    8    p.m..    Graduate    Student    Centre
ballroom.
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, green room, basement
Freddy Wood Theatre annex.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Dance and fashion snow, 8;30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m..
Holiday Inn Harborside.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
First general meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS FIELD HOCKEY FESTIVAL
Invitational tournament, all afternoon, Warren,
MacGregor fields.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT
Invitational boys tournament, check if your old
high school has entered, all day, War Memorial
Gym, Osbourne centre.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Bzzr Gardens, cheap drinks, good music,  new
members welcome, 7p.m. to 10p.m., SUB 211.
BALLET UBC^AZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon to 1:30 p.m.,
SUB 216.
MUSSOC
Drop m, the new clubroom is open, all prospective   people   please   drop   by,    11:30   and   on,
clubroom,    northeast    basement    corner.    Old
Auditorium.
THE INCREDIBLE SWINGS ON AIR FARE TO
HONG KONG OPEN TO ANYONE GROUP
General   meeting,   1:30   p.m..   Armories,   room
115.
PSI UPSILON FRATERNITY
Our  second  rush  function,   games  night,   7 30
p.m . Psi U house.
THUNDER BIRD SOCCER
Canada West Universities Athletic  Association
league game vs    University  l>f Vu;K na  Vik-nj,
200 p m , 0   J   Todd field UBC
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada Whs! Universities Athletic Association
league game vs University of Victoria Vikings, 2
p m     0   J   Todd field.
THUNDER FIELD HOCKEY
Women's early bird invitational tournament,  all
day,   Warren.   MacGregor   Fields.   Thunderbird
park
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs. Old boys for the Moore Mug, 2:30 p.m ,
Thunderbird Stadium.
Sl5M5l5l5l5El5l5\5l5l5EBSl5l5l5lffl5\^il
IWERfclAJ
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
4510 West 10th Ave.
■SpHILIk1
The Diary of Adam and Eve: I am sick ot
doing this, let's get this over with quickly, oh
yeah.great play, next, till Oct. 1, 12:10 p.m.
City Stage, 751 Thurlow, 688-1436.
COOL
SUDS
All the chili
&
bread you can eat
(at the back of the village)
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT
Invitational boys volleyball tournament. Check if
your old high school has entered, all day, final at
9 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
OXFAM
Benefit concert for Nicaraguan boat project,
music by Kin Lalat, tickets $5 available at Octopus East, 8 p.m., Ukranian Hall, 805 E  Pender
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Beginners   clinic,   all   equipment   provided,   10
p.m., aquatic centre.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
Women's early bird invitational tournament, all
day,   Warren,    McGregor   fields,   Thunderbird
park.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Don't miss our welcome back party, 2 p.m. to 5
p.m., see all your friends and make new ones,
SUB partyroom.
MONDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice sessions are scheduled every noon
hour, come out and dance, no partner
necessary, noon, SUB Partyroom.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Speaker — Andrew Spence of Science for Peace
speaking on the cruise missile, noon, SUB 206.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon, SUB 216E,
modern dance class, 6:30 p.m., SUB Partyroom.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Video showing of Helen Caldicott's speech of
July 26, 11:30, noon, and 1:30 p.m.. International House.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, all are welcome,
noon, SUB 212A.
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Red Cross blood drive, all week,  10 a.m. to 4
p.m., SUB 207, 209, 211, 213, and 215.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bzzr and bull, cheap dnnks, music, and poli sci
profs, all are welcome, 4-8 p.m., Buchanan Pen
thouse.
TUESDAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship and sharing, noon, SUB 211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon, SUB 216E.
HILLEL
Free salami lunch, noon, Hillel House.
GRAD STUDENT CENTER
Fireside  discussion:   T.  McAdam,   S.P.E.C.   -
"Unintended outcomes of research activity, the
case of pesticides, 8 p.m.. Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Regular  meeting,   12  p.m.,   Lutheran  Campus
Centre, conference room.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film:   "The new alchemists,"  noon,   Buchanan
A204.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on volunteering, noon, IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
HILLEL
Rap with the Rabbi, noon, dinner and planning
meeting, 6 p.m., Hillel House.
ROCKERS CO-OP
General meeting for all members new and old,
noon, SUB 119.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, chem 150.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon, SUB 216E.
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Pot-luck dinner and program — follow-up on
World Council of Churches with Ray Schultz, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Pub nite, 4 p.m., come to SUB 230.
ISMALI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Basketball, indoor soccer for men and women,
5:30 p.m., Gym, F. Osborne Center.
THURSDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
Buch D3S2.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon, SUB 216.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Ex-human rights commissioner talking on the effects of Bill 27, all interested welcome, noon,
Brock Hall 304.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Meeting, Dr. Yorsh speaking on hypnosis, noon,
IRC 1.
UBC CHESS CLUB
Fifteen-minute chess championship, free for all
members, prize for top rated player and top
unrated player, registration closes at 12:35,
noon, SUB 206
FRIDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, noon, SUB 216E.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Bzzr   and   teshila   garden,   4   p.m.,   Buchanan
Lounge.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRATERNITY
Homecoming parry, 8 p.m., 828 E. Hastings
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC,  Van., B.C. V6T2A5
SDi Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977. VISA
COMING EVENTS
MODERN DANCE CLASSES
by Janice LeBlond
director of Pacific Motion Dance Co,
* LBC GKAD CENTRE
$60/10 classes
Mon. & Wed. 5-7 p.m.
Thurs. 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Register at first class
Info: 263-1287
Oktoberfeust '83
7:30 p.m. in SUB Ballroom
Oct. 7 and 8
FREE STEIN FULL
OF BZZR!!!
Door Prizes!
Tickets $6.00 at AMS
Box Office, SUB
'Photu I  D    -equiren
30 - JOBS
EARN EXTRA MONEY in your spare time!
Recruiting sub-agents to sell Canada Savings Bonds. Commission on $5,00 per
$1,000 sold. Contact Jose Carmona at
Levesque, Beaubien Inc.: tel. 687-0456.
35
LOST
CAMEO BROACH. Lost between Totem
Park & Fred Wood Theatre, Sept, 26,
REWARD   Kim 224-9059.
40 - MESSAGES
ST. MARK'S
CHURCH, Kitsilano
Anglican-Episcopal
1805 Larch St.,
731-3811
SUNDA Y CELEBRA TIONS
8:00 a.m. HOLY EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG MASS
Contemporary Catholic
Worship
BAHA'I FAITH, Building a United
World Community, Formal and informal
discussions on selected topics every Fndav
For more information phone 222-0261
BOOK SALE!
St, Mary's Church iKerrisdale), 37th &
Larch. Sat., Oct, 1 — 11 a.m to 8 p.m.
Bargains! Bargains! ALL PROCEEDS FOR
VILLAGE REGENERATION IN INDIA!
11 - FOR SALE - Private
WITNESSES of the accident between a bike
and a tandem cycle Wednesday, Sept 21 at
8:20 am on Main Mall, just south of Scarfe
Bldg. call Bruce 734-8809 after 6pm
ENJOY SINGING? Then come and |om the
choir at West Point Grey Presbyterian
Church (12th &■ Tnmble). Choir practises on
Thurs. nights at 8 p.m. For more information call E   Inglis at 733-1797,
MARY.
Do you want to POOL around?
Scott
60 - RIDES
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
A TUDOR WARSHIP:
KING HENRY VIM'S
MARY ROSE
Dr. Margaret Rule, The
Mary Rose Trust, England
SATURDAY, OCT. 1 at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2,
FREE
GET AQUAINTED DINNER
Thursday, Oct. 6, 1963 6:00 p.m.
FOODI FUN! FELLOWSHIP!
3638 West 16th Ave.
RSVP 731-7500
Sponsored by Charismatic Christian
Fellowship.
ASTROLOGY CLASSES
Beginner's Level
8 weeks $65
Saturday: 10 a.m. - noon
Tuesday: 7:30 - 9:30 p.m,
Kory Varlen, 738-8376
MUST    SELL   TL-55-11    CALCULATOR.
Bought from UBC Bookstore for $64.95,
never once been used. Asking $50 obo.
Phone Brian 681-5000 around 6 p.m.
BSMT. SALE SAT. OCT. 1st 11-3. 1819
Acadia Rd. Above Chancellor Blvd. Lots of
books, electronics equip., household items,
records.
MINI FRIDGE. Like new, 1 yr. old w/freezer,
crisper, 33"H x 22"W x 25"D. $180. Even-
ings, 226-7497.	
WOODGRAIN arborite kitchen table with
4 chairs, good cond., $75. Chuck, 738-2790
between 10 and 11 p.m.
20 - HOUSING
TIRED    OF    COMMUTING    ALREADY?
Come and live on campus. Vacancies
available now in the student residences.
Room and board for Ladies. Come to the
Ponderosa Housing Office or call 228-2811.
ROOM: Young couple seek responsible student to share three bedroom suite near City
Hall. Transportation and board negotiable.
$207/month includes heat. 873-4015.
MALE STUDENT needs suite for rent near
UBC campus. Needed by November 1st.
Please phone 321-0982.
HOUSE TO SHARE: 3rd person wanted to
share house with 2 male dent, students
$265/mo. 261-5467 after 7 p.m.	
TIRED    OF    COMMUTING    ALREADY?
Come and live on campus. Vacancies
available now in the student residences.
Room and board for Ladies. Come to the
Ponderosa Housing Office or call 228-2811.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander.
Graduate of Julliard School of Music.
731-8323 or 261-8514.
NEED RIDE FROM CHAMPLAIN Heights,
Mon.-Wed. Call W. Linden, 228-6733 (bus.)
473-3082 (res.) Share expenses.
65 - SCANDALS
DO POLITICS and religion go together like
Scotch and water? (Does a moose have a
hat rack?)
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
80 - TUTORING
TUTORESS WANTED IN MATH and French
for 15 yr. old highschool girl. White Rock/
Cloverdale area. Telephone Mr. Forbes at
688-0401 or Mrs. at home 536-9147.
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.	
TYPING SERVICE. Essays, term papers,
theses etc. $1.00/pg. 228-0219.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. IBM selectric, by
by experienced secretary. $1.25/pg. Bing
224-1567.
WORD PROCESSING: & Typing: term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl,
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes, Bilinguai. Clemy,"266-6641. Friday, September 30, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
TH£
PIT PUB
0T
Hi
INTRODUCING NEW MUSIC
Sponsored by:
rams
<#
pirns
CENTRE
FULL SERVICE DUPLICATING
AVAILABLE TO ALL
<#
• Coloured papers
• Free stapling and collating
• Various paper sizes
• Reductions of maps, diagrams,
drawings and graphs
• Two-sided copies
• Reasonable rates
• Cash, Mastercard or Visa
• Internal charges for faculties
can be arranged
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY, HIGH SPEED DUPLICATING
FOR LESS
Exams,, class handouts, reports, theses, notices -
our state-of-the-art copier can handle it all.
Also available 18 hours a day, seven days a week.
ELEVEN COIN-OPERATED COPIERS STILL ONLY
50
A COPY
Located in the heart of the Campus in the
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
MAIN CONCOURSE
For more information call:
228-4388
MONDAY
NIGHTS
SPECIAL
9:00 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.
MlirQ       STUDENT UNION BUILDING        pgl
"■■ UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA   EPJ
LOWER CONCOURSE
UBC
Now at the newly renovated AMS games room
GAMfs
eCWAVAGANsi ,
LOWER LEVEL STUDENT UNION BUILDING Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1983
Soccer 'Birds on right foot
By PETER BERLIN
The UBC men's soccer team
returned from its first two league
games of the season last weekend
with two wins. Suddenly their home
game against reigning western
champions, the University of Victoria Vikings, assumes a much
greater significance than anyone
might have dreamed a week ago.
While the 'Birds were beating
Alberta 2-0 on Friday and Saskatchewan 3-1 on Saturday, Victoria
played the same two teams in the
reverse order. The beat Saskatchewan 4-0 on Friday and the
Golden Bears 2-0 on Saturday.
Calgary, who beat lowly Lethbridge
4-0 are also unbeaten. But the
'Birds have emerged as the Vikes
likeliest challengers and Sunday's
game will see their pretensions
seriously examined.
On Friday UBC overcame a
rough pitch and tough opposition
to score a comfortable two goal win
in Edmonton. Both goals were
scored in the second half by Louis
Miljanovich. They were ' 'two of the
better goals we've scored in a long
time," said coach Joe Johnson.
Miljanovich's first goal was a
beautiful header from a pass by
Bruce Shearer. The second capped
a seven man passing movement
which swept the ball from one
penalty spot to the other before
Miljanovich drove it into the goal.
"I was quite happy about the performance of the 'Birds," said
Johnson. The field's lack of space
-IP r~ * fit
n j d   photo
THUNDERBIRD'S FLANKER CHRIS Ordina, on the run, escapes the paws of a Golden Bear while lineman Don
Adamic throws a block. The T-Birds romped to an easy 33-1 win over Alberta last Friday and take on leading
Huskies in Saskatchewan this Saturday.
Two teams suffer first defeats
By PETER BERLIN
UBC started the new year with
two teams which had survived last
year unbeaten by Canadian collegiate opposition.
But now both teams have suffered a defeat. The women's field
hockey team lasted just two weeks
and two games longer than their
football counterparts before
sucumming to defeat.
In Canada West action in
Calgary last weekend, the 'Birds
started in fine style. On the Saturday they dismissed Alberta 5-0 and
went on to destroy Manitoba 7-0.
This was the kind of domination
that they have enjoyed over all the
western teams except the University
of Victoria during the past two
years.
On Sunday the 'Birds took on
Calgary and Victoria and lost both
games. Coach Gail Wilson said she
didn't think that the team was mentally prepared for the Calgary
game. Accustomed to rolling over
the Dinos by big scores they were
looking forward to the afternoon
game.
Wilson said she wasn't unduly
disappointed by the two defeats.
This was UBC's first tournament of
the year and with many new players
it will take a while to mould a
cohesive team, she said.
Calgary, on the ojher hand, have
practically the same team as last
year.
There are still two Canada West
tournaments left. In the first, wins
were worth 3 points each but in the
second they are worth 3.5 and they
go up to 4 in the last.
Wilson said she concentrated on
coaching the defensive side of the
game and the Calgary tournament,
in which the team conceded just
two goals.
Jody Blaxland, who scored six
goals for the 'Birds in the tournament, was voted Canadian College
athlete of the week. "I'm sure she'd
be the first to say that it was a good
team effort that made the award
possible," said Wilson.
Two teams go on from the west
to compete in the national championships. Wilson said that Victoria
is the strongest opposition team.
Wilson continues to mould the
team this weekend when UBC hosts
the Early Bird invitational at Warren and McGregor fields. Eight
teams will compete in the fourth annual tournament, including one
from Simon Fraser University. The
'Birds play at 9 a.m., 1:30 and 4:30
p.m. on Saturday. This will be their
only home tournament of the year.
Canada West Standings
'Bird
droppings
TEAM   GP
W
L
T
F    A    Pts
Victoria
4
4
0
0  17    0  12
Calgary
4
2
1
14    6    7
BC
4
2
2
0 12    2    6
Manitoba
4
1
2
1    5  13    4
Alberta
4
0
4
0    1   18    0
and the irregular surface, a result of
the football team practising their
every day, should have favoured the
Bears more physical style, but the
'Birds still controlled the game.
The same night the 'Birds drove
to Saskatoon. The next day they
were able to outlast the Huskies
who started out eager to put the
previous day's humiliation at the
feet of the Vikes behind them.
The 'Birds opened the scoring
with a goal by Mike Milana, who
followed up a 25 yard shot by
Jonathan Perry which the goalie
could only block and stuck the rebound into the net.
Saskatchewan fought back and
equalized from a corner. But the
'Birds were in front to stay by half-
time. Joel Johnson, cutting in from
the right wing, controlled a through
pass on his chest and, catching it as
it dropped, hit a volley past the
Huskies' 'keeper.
The 'Birds third insurance goal
against Saskatchewan was also Miljanovich's third of the weekend. It
was an impressive solo effort as
Miljanovich dribbled the ball past
several defenders, before lofting the
ball over the charging goalkeeper.
Johnson said that what had
pleased him about the 'Birds
displays was that although they
didn't turn all their chances into
goals, he said they might easily have
had ten, still "people were where
they were supposed to be."
And that must be music to the
ears of the frustrated UBC supporters who despaired last year of
ever seeing a 'Bird and the ball in
the opponents penalty area at the
same time.
Another positive aspect of the
weekend's play was Johnson was
able to take a good look at all fifteen of the players he took. With
the pressure off for large parts of
both games every player was given
at least thirty minutes action.
"We've a very adaptable tern," said
Johnson, who was still deciding on
the starting line-up for the big
game.
Standings
GP W    L    T GF GA PTS
Victoria         2
2
0
0
6
0
4
UBC               2
2
0
0
5
1
4
Calgary          1
1
0
0
4
0
2
Lethbridge     1
0
0
0
0
4
0
Alberta          2
0
0
2
0
4
0
Saskatchewan!
0
0
2
1
7
0
Rugby suffers
serious cracks
By PETER BERLIN
The UBC rugby team's season
has hardly begun but already they
are desperately papering over the
cracks.
On Wednesday night the 'Birds,
deprived of several players in key
positions, went down to their first
defeat in the Vancouver league in
nearly two years, 12-18 to the Rowing Club at home.
In addition to the usual problem
of players graduating, UBC have
lost two outstanding veterans to the
Canadian national junior team
which is touring England. Lock
Rob Strang and winger Pat Palmer
are representing their country,
while another Canadian international lock forward, Chris Fowler,
and B.C. winger John Devlin are injured.
Without two of their best forwards, the UBC pack, which is
young and very light, was
dominated by the Rowing Club forwards. The Rowers quickly grasped
their opponents weakness and
played eight man rugby
throughout.
UBC had the advantage of the
wind in the first half but missed
three good penalty chances and failed to convert young left winger Lee
King's try. They turned around the
half tied at 4-4.
Taking advantage of the wind the
Rowers quickly scored a try and a
penalty before UBC fought back
with a brace of tries, by Adam Kendall   and   Matt   Kokkan,   to   lead
12-11. But in the end they couldn't
hold the opposing pack.
After retaking the lead with
another penalty the Rowers wrapped up the game with a late pushover try. The Rowers won the ball
in a scrum near the UBC goal-line
and kept it in the scrum as they
shoved the 'Birds pack over their
own line.
The defeat left the 'Birds with a
2-1 won-lost record and was their
last mid-week game. They had
played the previous Saturday
beating Tsawassen 22-6.
In Saturday's game, the 'Birds
grabbed an early lead with Ian
Busfield's try, converted by Adam
Kendall, and never relinquished it.
They were 12-6 up by half-time as a
result of two penalty kicks by Kendall. In the second half, Simon
Koval and Pat Palmer each scored a
try, Kendall converted the second
and UBC won 22-6.
Coach Donn Spence said he was
quite pleased with the team's performance.
UBC's next game is on Saturday
at
:30   p.m.
Thunderbird
stadium where they take on the
UBC old boys in the annual Moore
Mug game. UBC picked up a couple
of injuries on Wednesday night, so
they will field a weakened team
Saturday, Spence said.
Both of last year's other top
league teams, the Meralomas and
the Rowing Club have already lost,
so UBC is not too many games
behind.
SOCCER
The UBC women's soccer team
started their season in a winning
manner last Sunday, with a late
come-from-behind win against
Richmond Hotspurs.
The 'Birds conceded a goal early
on but were level before half-time
with a goal by Debbie Nielsen.
The 'Spurs made it 2-1 with a
goal at the beginning of the second
half before Jane Lovell scored
twice, the second with twelve
minutes left, to put UBC into a 3-2
lead.
The 'Birds nearly allowed Richmond back into the game when they
conceded a penalty in the last two
minutes. But goalie Marion Nyberg
made the save.
"Marion did an outstanding
job," said coach Dave Fales. He
added the play of their mid-field
was what swung the game to the
'Birds.
UBC plays the Ladner Babes,
who eliminated them from the
playoffs last year, in Ladner on
Sunday.
FOOTBALL
UBC's football season reaches its
half-way stage with a real four-
pointer in Saskatoon Saturday. The
'Birds, who are 2-1 this season, take
on the league leading Huskies who
are 3-0.
The game will be broadcast live
on UBC student operated radio
CITR 101.9 and cable 101. Should
be a real corker.
■ *#*■
- peter coupland photo
I KNOW THE FOOTBALL is somewhere down here says Alberta player after a massive pile of bodies crushed
pigskin oval into oblivion. After much effort, Alberta player eventually found contact lens he lost last year in exactly the same spot.

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