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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1968

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Array GOD   BLESS   PRE-MARITAL   SEX-KASSIS
By JUDY YOUNG
"God bless pre-marital sex."
, The  bearded Moslem's powerful voice bounced
tround the Arts I lecture room as 150 students sat
till before him.
Dr. Hanna Kassis, UBC associate professor of
eligious studies, was speaking in a panel discussion
»n love sponsored by Arts I students Thursday noon.
"Pre-marital intercourse is allright if a condition
exists whereby two persons have contact with each
ither on an I—thou basis," he said.
"There should be a total union and flow of I
Qto thou and it should go beyond the I — thou
elationship.
"God bless marriage if there is an I — thou
elationship.
"God damn marriage if there is not an I—thou
elationship."
Rabbi Marvin Hier of Schara Tzedeck Synagogue
aid an I—it relationship was not satisfactory since
t was the making of love just for lovemaking's
ake.
"An I—it sexual intercourse is only for a week-
— bob brown photo
Kassis, McGuigan, Hier debate sexually.
end. An I—thou relationship usually comes with
marriage."
Father Gerald McGuigan, co-chairman of Arts I,
presented the Catholic viewpoint.
"Love is the maturation of people in association,"
he said.
"It takes many years to really know a person.
How to be a good lover with one person can not
be learned in a weekend. Compassion and sensitivity
for a person cannot be learned overnight."
"The word love is never used in Islam because of
possible connotations," Kassis said. "Saying a sister
loves a brother would imply incest.
"Homosexuality is taboo in the Islamic religion.
There are enough women in the world."
"Love should be interior," said Hier.
"A man can give up his seat for an old lady
because of society's cry of righteousness but it does
not mean he has love for her."
Scheduled panelist, Dave Ristich, arts 4, of the
International Meditation Society deferred to participants in the discussion.
"I do not want to compete," he said.
"Instead of sitting around and talking about it,
go and make love."
tuum
est
THE U8YSSEY
/ol. XLIX, No. 42
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1968
48
224-3916
^mmm^:
'WORKMAN RAKING SQUARED* is the title of this seemingly endless geometric progression.
Bushes and barrow add to the arty loveliness of this pastoral scene outside Buchanan on
a  cold  grey  day.	
No Arts IT met with sighs
encore asked by Arts Iers
Cet's keep a good thing going.
This was the reaction of Arts I students
sked if they would like an Arts II.
Father Gerald McGuigan, co-chairman of the
rogram, earlier said an Arts II is being con-
dered, but that it's impossible to have a pro-
ram ready by next September.
"I really feel badly about  it,"  said Aubin
outhwell.  "I'm seriously considering skipping
year and  coming  back  in  '69,  when  there
light be an Arts II."
i Peter Gard said Arts I introduces a student
owly to university, making him discover for
imself what he wants to learn.
"When you don't get enough out of the
>urse it's very likely that the problem isn't in
rts I, it's what's wrong with you," he said.
"It's been the most worthwhile year of my
life," said Brenda Thompson.
"In Arts. I my education and my life are
united, they are one," said Frank Greenall.
"In regular courses what you learn in class
and life are two different things that don't
relate."
Not all Arts I students think an extension
of this year's program would be of any benefit,
however.
"Unless you could extend it into a four year
course, you should cut it off after one year,"
said Debbie Fraser.
Arts I curriculum is based on themes of love,
war, utopia and freedom, giving the student
freedom to do extensive research into any of
them.
The nine-credit course will run for at least
two more years.
April
world-wide
strike set
CHICAGO (CUP-CPS) — More than 900 student activists
from the U.S. and Latin America have called for a world-wide
student strike against the war in Vietnam and racism.
The students announced plans for the strike during a conference here Jan. 26-28 sponsored by the Student Mobilization
Committee, a New York based organization which helped plan
large-scale demonstrations in New York and California last
Apr. 15 and the massive demonstration at the Pentagon last
Oct. 21.
The strike will be held Apr. 26—in the midst of ten days
of concentrated anti-war activity scheduled from Apr. 20-30.
The ten-day period coincides with the Ten Days to Shake
the Empire program announced at a national meeting of the
Students for a Democratic Society last December.
The Black caucus at the conference said its strike was
against imperialism, racism and the draft.
The majority of students attending the conference strongly
supported the strike, but there was some opposition. It centred
largely around charges that the Student Mobilization Committee
was a manipulative, elitist organization without a broad-based
constituency.
Some students also said that the call for a world-wide strike
is a bad tactic because it does not stem from nor does it contribute to building the grass roots anti-war movement.
Amateur pols apply now
to undergraduate councils
'Tis the season to be polling.
Education and science undergraduate societies have
begun their annual campaigns to fill their respective
council seats.
Education nominations will close Thursday.
Offices open are those of president, vice-president,
secretary, treasurer, public relations officer, and Alma
Mater Society council representative.
Mouser elections will be held Feb. 15 and 16.
Science nominations, now open, will close Feb. 14.
Elections will be held Feb. 20 and 21.
Positions are open for president, first vice-president,
second vice-president (who sits on student council), treasurer, secretary, and three executive members.
Also open in science council are the jobs of men's
sports representative, women's representative, and public
relations officer. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2,  196>
Editor sacked over reprint
SACKVILLE, N.B. (CUP) — Argosy Weekly
editor Allan Rimoin was fired by his university
president Wednesday.
Rimoin had been charged with inability to
work with both his editorial staff and the paper's
advisory committee, and with having caused a
crisis situation which could have been avoided.
The charges were laid by the advisory committee Jan. 26, which asked Mount Allison president Dr. L. H. Cragg to fire the editor. Under
the paper's constitution, the university president
has this right.
The advisory board is made up of two students and two professors.
The controversy erupted when Rimoin's local
printer refused to print Jerry Farber's Student
as Nigger article.
He carried a page one story about his printer difficulties and printed the offending article
in Montreal.
Three senior editors — Don Fleming, Doug
Prince and Lesley Smith — disagreed with
Rimoin's actions and resigned late last week.
After the advisory board's request to Cragg,
the student council met twice and recommended
an impartial committee be struck to investigate
the paper's governing structure and sort out
the dispute.
Said Cragg as he asked for the editor's resignation, "I am convinced after discussion with
persons directly concerned that had the editor's
recent decisions and actions been made with
wise and responsible concern for the well-being
of the university community, the necessity for
such an action would not have arisen."
"They all know the structure is lousy.
They're just firing me because it's expedient,"
Rimoin said.
Canadian University Press vice-president
John Kelsey, in a letter late Wednesday to advisory committee chairman professor John
Houtsma, said:
"The evidence we've got indicates the Argosy
is not student controlled, that your committee
has implied censorship powers and the power
to set policy, that the editor has been removed
without due process, and the removal was not
done by the students who appointed him."
Students at 62 campuses
protest Dow, CIA and food
WASHINGTON (UNS) —
Students, disgruntled over a
variety of things, staged 71
demonstrations at 62 universities last October and November according to a survey made
by the National Students Association.
The issues ranged from recruiting by the Dow chemical
company to cafeteria food.
NSA reported that 14,500 students took part in the demonstrations representing 2.7 per
cent of the combined undergraduate enrolment at the universities involved.
Dow chemical company,
manufacturers of napalm, was
the favorite target, accounting for 27 demonstrations.
Military recruiters were demonstrated against in eight
cases. Other U.S. government
agencies such as the CIA tied
for third with defence department contract work; six demonstrations were attributed
to each.
Black power and racial in-
tegrationists staged four demonstrations. Compulsory
ROTC and the quality of cafeteria food were blamed for
four each.
The figures were released
by association president Edward Schwartz. He used them
along  with   a   petition  signed
by more than 50 university
student presidents to urge the
adoption of a statement on student rights and freedoms by a
committee of the Association
of American Colleges.
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ADRIENNE CAMERON
School   of   Charm  and
Modelling
1386 Burrard 688-1301
68 GRAD CLASS
Nominations are now being called for candidates for
the following honourary student positions for the Graduating class of 1968:
1. Historian
2. Class Poet
3. Class Prophet
4. Class Will Writer
Nominations sent in by Grad Class members in good
standing or by members of the faculty will be received
up to and including February 14, 1968. Replies should
be sent to Box 44, Brock Hall.
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
at the
BAVARIAN
ROOM
Delightful food —
Excellent service
in an
Intimate Atmosphere
phone for reservation
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Bavarian Room   —   3005 W. Broadway   —   RE 6-9012
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MU2-1919 Friday, February 2,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
STOP SPOON-FEEDING
— bob brown photo
"THE EGG AND I . . . hmmm," muses Joe Workman while
preparing   exhibit  for   seventh   annual   Contemporay   Arts
Festival in the armory starting Wednesday.
Reagan's 'up Cal fees'
slowed by new plans
BERKELEY (UNS) — A year-long fight by governor Ronald
Reagan to impose tuition or its equivalent on students at the
University of California has become more  complex.
The outcome is now less predictable since the board of
regents postponed a decision  on tuition Jan. 19.
Opponents of the governor had conceded privately that he
had enough votes to put through a recommendation of a regents
committee to increase nominal student fees by $156 a year from
che present $75 per nine week quarter.
A factor in the delay is a rival plan prepared by Republican
assembly minority leader Robert Monagan. It involves a sliding
student fee scale from $30 a year up to a maximum of $630 for
a student whose family's income is more than $50,000.
A Reagan critic on the board put the regents line-up at
nine or 10 of the 24 members opposed to any charge for students
with 11 or 12 favoring it.
Before the regents meeting the Los Angeles Times, which
supported Reagan when he ran in 1966, editorially attacked
either tuition or the plan of the regents committee to increase
student fees. Mrs. Norman Chandler, whose family owns and
publishes the newspaper, is a regent.
At their August meeting, the regents rejected tuition and
Reagan moved for adoption of a student charge. A committee
on student charges and student aid was appointed to consider
a student fee.
It recommended that the present fee of $75 per quarter
be renamed the university registration fee and increased by $52
a quarter. The increase would be used to aid needy students
and to support a new counselling program.
'Learning  is exciting'
By FRED CAWSEY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Merely covering course material is not the
true function of a lecturer, says UBC math prof
Dr.  Nathan Divinsky.
Instead, a lecturer should reveal the joy he
derives from working in his field.
"If a lecturer can show
how his mind approaches a
subject, and can introduce his
students to the excitement involved in academic activity;
that is all that is necessary,"
Divinsky said in an interview
Thursday.
Students should pursue the
course work themselves, he
said. DIVINSKY
"Many students, however, aren't interested
in academic activity, they seem to want to be
spoon-fed."
At a time of student emphasis on academic
reform and changing the system, Divinsky
thinks students should pay more attention to
their  own attitudes.
"If students would quit worrying about
marks and try to involve themselves more with
the excitement of academic discovery, they
would get a lot more out of university life,"
he said.
Readiness of students to blame the govern
ment, the system, and their professors for making them pass exams is a source of constant
agitation for Divinsky.
"Exams are inaccurate, crude, and unfair,
but how else are you going to make an evaluation? No one has yet offered a better system."
He cited a proposal from the University of
Toronto to abolish exams at the end of second
year.
The university found it couldn't abolish final
exams at the end of fourth year because graduating students needed marks for job  purposes.
It also had to retain third year finals because
all federal grants are based on third year exam
marks. Abolishing first year finals was regarded
as   unfeasible,   Divinsky   said.
That left second year, after which every student would be automatically advanced to third
year.
Divinsky shook his head at the thought of
such a system.
A solution would be the government allowing students to write finals only in their major
or honours subjects, he said. Other courses
would be graded on a pass-fail basis.
The provincial government presently
awards scholarships only for a graded average
over 15 units.
"I don't think, however, that there is much
radically wrong with our present teaching system," Divinsky said.
All  the  hats   in  the   ring
campus  politics  fight on
The last hurrah in the Alma Mater Society
elections next week will not ring until after
voting next Thursday, but cheers and jeers officially start today.
Nominations for the first slate closed at
noon Thursday with all five positions contested.
A total of 15 students entered the race for
the positions of president, internal affairs officer,
external affairs officer, secretary and senator.
Nominated for president are Brian Abraham,
law 1, Harry Clare, science 4, Russell Grier-
son, commerce 3, and Stan Persky, arts 3.
Persky was arts president this year. Clare
is president of the UBC Social Credit Club.
Grierson is editor of the commerce undergraduate newsletter Cavalier.
Internal affairs officer candidates include
Barry Milavsky, commerce 2, Charles Hulton,
science 2, and Ruth Dworkin, science 3.
Tobin Robins, arts 3, and Paul Dampier,
arts 2, are running for external affairs officer.
The position of secretary is contested by
Heather Soles, arts 2, Sally Coleman, arts 2, and
Penny Cairns, arts 4, who is seeking re-election.
The senate seat vacated by Kirsten Emmott
a month ago will be sought by Jane Fulton,
home ec 3, AMS first vice-president Don Munton, grad studies 1, and Mark Warrior, arts 2,
newly-elected arts secretary.
Voting for the AMS second slate will be
Feb. 14. Included on the second slate are vice-
president, treasurer, co-ordinator of activities
and student ombudsman.
In other election developments, Persky was
declared eligible for the position of AMS president by the eligibility committee, chaired by
AMS secretary Penny Cairns.
It was suggested that Persky did not meet
the requirements of being in third year and of
having been on campus for two years.
"Stan is registered in arts 3 according to
the registrar," Miss Cairns said Thursday. She
said he has been on camipus for about two years
if his summer session is included in the count.
"I think the intention of the ruling was to
insure the candidate knew the university," she
said. "No-one in their right mind can say he
doesn't know the university."
The eligibility of candidates must be approved by student council on Monday. If the
ruling of the committee is not upheld, the issue
will go to student court later in the week.
In such a case, Miss Cairns said the presidential election would probably be postponed
to the second slate pending the decision of the
student court.
Revolutionary  education-
panel highlights symposium
One hundred persons leave UBC tonight to
attend an academic symposium at Shawnigan
Lake on Vancouver Island.
The symposium, sponsored by UBC's extension department, features two panel discussions
with several radical points of view represented.
Highlight of the symposium is a discussion,
Current Revolutionary Methods in Education.
Panelists are architecture department head
Henry Elder, zoology prof. Dr. D. H. Chitty,
prof. G. F. McGuigan of the arts I program, and
Dr. Tom Mallinson of Simon Fraser University's
communications department.
Also at the symposium will be representatives of three Vancouver free schools discussing
Turned-On Education.
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Tb 8E COMCUJQEP THE IIBYSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific 9tudent Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
FEBRUARY 2, 1968
i<>
.*, .> $«.*&,*
A lesson
McGill University's Kingsbury Report on Course
Design, as described on Page 13 of today's Ubyssey, is
an intriguing new approach to the much-talked-about,
little-acted-upon problem of academic reform.
But even more intriguing than the report's approach
and conclusions is the fact that it was financed and organized as a project of the McGill Students' Society,
the equivalent of our own Alma Mater Society. The
Kingsbury Report is an object lesson to the AMS about
the kind of thing student government should be doing
in the multiversity of 1968.
The report is the result of a two-year experiment by
mathematics lecturer Donald Kingsbury who wanted to
test whether or not the lecture system was as dispensable
as its critics claimed it was. He discovered, as several
other reports this year have discovered, that lectures
are not only dispensable but damaging to students.
Chief among the evils of the lecture system, Kingsbury
and his students who participated in the experiment
found, is that it destroys the student's critical faculties.
This student-financed project reminds us of a report
called Academics and the Alma Mater Society, prepared
last year for student council by then Ubyssey editor
John Kelsey. Among the report's recommendations was
that the AMS should set up a trust fund which would
pay $1,000 annually to finance a project aimed at solution of a specific academic problem, either of curriculum
or physical plant.
Although the report was formally accepted by council as official AMS policy, nothing has come of its recommendations.
The current AMS council is following an unwritten
/ policy of avoiding the real academic problems that seri-
' ously affect all students. We suggest students look for
candidates   in  next  week's   AMS  elections   who  show
promise of ending this policy.
Resurrection of the Kelsey Report and a start on a
research project — aimed at a reform of the UBC
academic system — would be the best way to start.
SECONDERS' STATEMENTS
The following statements appear with all their original
grammatical errors. No statement was received for candidate Russell Grierson.
BRIAN ABRAHAM
For the following reasons I
have seconded Brian Abraham's nomination for AMS
President: — five years at
U.B.C, currently in law after
graduating geology — solid
academic record — willing to
devote his time to the office of
President — responsible, conscientious, imaginative, critical.
Brian wants to develop a
progressive and responsible
image for students toward the
administration and the general
public while furthering student participation in campus
affairs.
P. B. TABERNER
HARRY CLARE
Harry Clare, fourth year
science, stands for effective
senate negotiations rather than
unproductive sit-ins. He proposes a strong campaign to
gain public support for universities rather than demonstrations alienating that support.
In working on AMS committees, university clubs' committee, and parliamentary council, his record as a constructive
organizer and excellent administrator is outstanding. Harry's
abilities, capacity for hard
work, and knowledge of AMS
affairs are vital qualifications
for a student president.
MIKE COLEMAN
law 3
STAN PERSKY
I have found Stan Persky to
be an intellectually able and
exciting person. He has the
knack of very quickly sorting
through masses of detail and
getting right down to the issues which are at stake, and
what is even more important
he has a good grasp of what
the real issues facing the university are.
His whole emphasis will be
on adding a very human element to what has become a
very sterile process.
RAY LARSEN
arts 4
LETTERS TO THE E0&OR
Go  WUSC
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Provincialism is the number
one killer in North America.
It strikes its victims in the
head, and seriously blinding
their vision, restricts their
outlook on ways of life different from their own. The number one cure for this crippling
ailment, which threatens all of
us in our formative university
years, is a number of scholarships, to Japan, Yugoslavia,
and   the   USSR.   To   undergo
son between various groups,
one being between youth and
th YMCA. He is presently in
a political science program
which gives him a working
knowledge of how political
structures operate.
FRANK WINTER
TOBIN   ROBINS
External Affairs Officer is an
important position on the AMS
executive. Tobin Robins, in
my opinion, is the best person
for the job. He is a third year
international relations student
who is concerned about student relations inside and outside the university.
Tobin stands for: the extended use of the CUS information monopoly to aid UBC
on things like ISEP, bookstore
reform, residence reform and
curriculum development; a
new look at student government.
GERALD  CANNON
arts 4
treatment, students must apply
until Feb. 21, at the World
University Committee.
One may ask, is a year in
Japan, Yugoslavia, or the
USSR, worth interrupting the
60 unit way of life to which
we all subscribe on this campus? Yes, because unlike summer travel in Europe, a year
in one place allows the student
to receive the kind of education which this campus, so
earnestly devoted to the purposes of higher education, cannot   provide.   Among   other
public image of UBC. Her past
experiences and successes
qualifies her well for this position. I feel that she will be a
very real asset to the AMS and
particularly to the university.
MARK WALDMAN
grad studies
CHARLES HULTON
I recommend Charles Hulton
for internal affairs officer because he is a very able student
and certainly qualified to fulfil the position. He has maintained a first class average and
has had previous experience
in student affairs. Moreover,
Charles has no qualms about
speaking his mind and would
be an asset to the AMS council,
"which needs people to handle
their jobs conscientiously. In
my association with Charles,
I have never had any reason
to  doubt  his  integrity  and   I
things, the student will find
, out what other people think
of North America, what a
second language can do for
you, beside fulfill a require-
quirement, and why a lot of
things like Mustangs, pastel
toilet paper, and flush toilets,
are really not that indispensable to life on Earth.
ANDREW   HORVAT.
Japan   1966
MAUREEN  SAGER,
ISSR  1966
>ELLJ VALAIR.
Yugoslavia  1966
urge all students who want an
outgoing and capable officer,
to support him.
HUGH MADDIN
BARRY MILAVSKY
At no time has the need for
public relations with those
outside the university, and
within the student body, been
greater than it is now. This
job requires real interest and
experience. Barry Milavsky
has both.
During three years at the
university, Barry has served
on the Commerce U.S. Council.
He has worked in the present
public relations office. He has
participated actively in the
operation of the Radio Society.
He brings with him interest
and experience.
DAVE SMYTH
arts 2
PAUL DAMPIER
Paul Dampier is running for
a new office which involves
working with government and
other groups off campus. This
position will be what the first
holder makes of it and I know
that Paul is capable of setting
a high precedent. He has had
previous  experience  as  a  lia-
RUTH DWORKIN
Ruth Dworkin has, for three
years, actively participated in
university affairs. She brings
to the office a wide range of
experiences but particularly in
the area of public relations.
Ruth has committed herself to
the idea of reform — both of
the university and of the poor
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman to  rescue by carting most away for
City   Stuart Gray campus coffee.
News   Susan Gransby „ Paul Knox took stock and found his
. false teeth missing, while Mike Finlay
Managing   Murray McMillan lost thrce crutches to the mad maids.
Photo  _  Kurt Hilger Judy Young lost a wedding ring and
Senior   Pat Hrushowy a   monopoly   set;    and   Ann   Arky's
.. clothes lost Ann  Arky.  Fred Cawsey
sPorts   MiKe J**an discovered his  parachute  gone   ("Oh.
Wire       Norman   Gidney chute!" he said), and Jade Eden lost
Page Friday   Judy Bing half of sixpence. Ass't city ogre Steve
,.   _..           _     . . Jackson    sobbed    that    his   Reader's
Asst. City   Bom tee Digest   How   to   Live   with   Life   had
First, a low rumble. Editorial walls vanished.  All  items  are   expected  to
quiver ominously. Typewriters rattle, turn up in food  services  coffee  this
paper  falls   on   floor,   ceiling  cracks. morning.
A shreik from the stairs. What looks Robert (Rudyard Kipling) Brown,
like a flood of sugar surges into Lawrence Woodd and Chris Blake
room, five feet deep. It IS sugar. were in the dark at the time of the
Bodies become submerged in a white, flood. Brandishing huge spoons, they
relentless torrent. Soon all is white. waded through the white, making stir-
One voice—Ann Arky's—saying: "How ring speeches. Jim Maddin, Bob Ban-
sweet it is." Luckily food services no and Chester Gould slaved in the
staff, yipping hysterically, soon came jock shop. mwssirs
mmsrn
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SD [TD 8£l (3]A®®^** pf  2WO
By TOM SIMPSON
George and Martha Blogg, volunteers in Tanzania for Canadian University Service Overseas,
are having a dreadful servant problem. They fired
their last houseboy for stupidity and are unable
to find a replacement. The Goodpennys, however,
have been extremely fortunate. Their servant
understands English. Both the Bloggs and the
Goodpennys have recently bought cars so they
were able to tour East Africa during the Christmas holidays. In one of her postcards Martha
wrote that "the scenery is just lovely."
ONWARD
CUSO's image in Canada is a curious mixture
of altruism  and  a  pragmatic approach  to  underdevelopment.   The   organization's   pamphlets   and
advertising copy emphasize the challenge of volunteer work to Canada's most competent, virile, and
humanitarian youth. Last year one of their advertisements  depicted  a  wholesome  young  Canadian
lad pushing a cart out of some deep muddy hole
in  India.  The   copy  asked  one   of  those   piercing
questions such as "Have you got the guts?" This
type of appeal, usually associated with the chauvinism of war propaganda, tends to leave the reader
with a desire to hum a few bars of "Onward Christian   Soldiers".   The   impression   of  selfless   young
psople   willingly   exiling  themselves   to   an   alien
culture to do their small part in making a better
world is irresistible to a Christian mentality. CUSO
becomes linked with  all the  remaining forces   of
"good" in a dubious society.
The  organization's secondary approach is embodied   in  the  platitude   "serve   and  learn".   This
pitch,  usually  reserved  for those  who have  sent
away for more information,  emphasizes the reciprocal   benefits   of   volunteer   work.   Not   only   is
the CUSO volunteer useful to others, he is also
in a position to practice those ideas he apparently
has.  CUSO is  able to  offer the potential martyr
self-sacrifice,   the  humanitarian   good   deeds,   and
the career-minded a laboratory. The world's underprivileged get all this at a very reasonable price.
Some returned CUSO volunteers seem slightly
embarrassed by the organization's image and would
rather emphasize  the  immensely practical  aspect
of the volunteer effort — that CUSO is an employment   agency  that  offers  worthwhile  jobs  in
interesting parts of the world. This attitude raises
some   intriguing   questions.   First,   what   accounts
for the mysterious disappearance of those altruistic motives? Second, are underdeveloped countries
FEBRUARY 2, 1968
On the cover: This week's playmate enjoys camping, bicycling,
cooking and is an ardent suffragette. She is currently working
toward her degree in phys. ed.
This week's issue was custom
made for you by the elegant
French house of La Page Ven-
dredi out of pure paper fibers
in off white trimmed with black.
Cutting and stitching were
Stephen Scobie, Judy Bing, Bert
Hill, Arnold Saba, Gordon Fidler and Peter Lincoln.
We hope it fits.
really   able   to   afford   inexeperienced   Canadians
looking for work in an hospitable climate?
PEANUT BUTTER
The reality of CUSO's effort in Tanzania does
not  resemble  the   Canadian   image.  The  majority
of volunteers live in large well furnished houses
built   during  the   colonialist   era.   Cars,   servants,
and peanut butter sandwiches are not uncommon.
Membership   in   the   local   tennis  and   swimming
clubs usually follows the volunteers' introduction
into the local, polite, expatriate society. The proximity of Hollywood movies, the stores, beer, and
gin-and-tonic   effectively   precludes   any   necessity
to   become   involved   in   the   indigenous   culture.
African   children   remain   "cute"   and   lepers   "obscene" to the satiated North American mind. It is
not surprising  that middle  class people  strive  to
maintain  middle  class  values  regardless   of their
locality. But it does isolate them from the poor
black  Africans  who  have  some  difficulty  in  distinguishing  volunteers from colonialists.
schoolteacher who doesn't understand socialism in
a socialist country is minimal. And the value of
a volunteer who is a member of an economic and
social elite in a society striving to obliterate class
distinctions  is dubious.
CUSO proudly states that its volunteers are
free from bureaucratic demands while in the field.
Unlike the Peace Corps which has supposedly a
maze of umbilical cords, CUSO allows its volunteers to be individually responsible for their activity. This policy is successful only in the sense
that its precludes all communication between volunteer and organization and between the volunteers themselves. Any attempt to develop a dialogue
concerning CUSO's volunteer effort or any discussion of group action is impossible. The policy
is forgotten if a volunteer should behave in a
manner unacceptable to the nearest CUSO administrator. As one administrator put it, "just as in
business in CUSO there are workers and there are
managers." Edicts were passed down from CUSO's
SHILLINGS
The really important thing is the volunteers'
work. Volunteer Givemore, an administrator,
spent a month touring northern Tanzania in a
chauffeured Landrover at government expense.
He spent two thousand shillings on hotel accomodation which is equal to the yearly income of two
Tanzanian families. For the next month he only
went to work to pick up his mail. Volunteer Glick,
who teaches a full 12 hours a week has been unable to find a suitable house. Consequently he
has been forced to stay in Dar es Salaam's best
hotel at a daily rate of 70 shillings for the last
four months. The burden of the volunteers' salary
and accommodation expense is assumed by the
Tanzanian government.
It is generally agreed that CUSO policy must
be non-political. It is CUSO policy that "the volunteers determine" CUSO policy. And apparently,
CUSO policy demands that any statement on
CUSO policy be naive and banal. Hugh Christie,
the executive secretary of CUSO, in a statement to
the 1967 East African volunteer troop said, "when
more people from this part of the world get to
know more from that part of the world, the world
will be a better place to live in."
EMASCULATED
The rationale for this politically emasculated
stance seems to be founded on the notion that no
political orientation offends the least people. Good
intentions presumably rise above the squalor of
politics. However, the context in which CUSO
operates is intensely political. In underdeveloped
countries political decisions and policies have a
profound effect on the population, the volunteer
and his function. Tanzania is attempting to build
a state free from exploitation and class antagonisms. If a volunteer organization and its volunteers
are insensitive to these aspirations its influence
is  at  least   partially  pejorative.   The value   of  a
Tanzanian administrators on such varying subjects
as drugs, job changes and proper behavior.
PARASITIC
Volunteer Givemore, realizing his volunteer
role was nothing but parasitic, was silly enough
to suggest his position be changed. The local CUSO
administrator was incensed! He, in righteous wrath,
accused the heretic of "not possessing middle class
values!"
He further accused poor Givemore of being a
drug fiend, a lousy volunteer, and a victim of culture shock. Volunteer Givemore impaled by the
flaming sword of middle class morality, crawled
away in utter confusion. Later he realized the
ironic truth of this accusation.
Middle class values are the amorphous collection of attitudes on which CUSO is founded. The
desire to be politically innocuous is one of the
finest middle class values. So is prating about
democracy while submitting to edicts from an
estranged authority. So is individual responsibility
when it means obedience. And of course so is banality. CUSO policy has a middle class bias and so
do CUSO volunteers.
INEPTITUDE
The implications of this mighty moral force
became devious to Givemore a month after he was
exposed. He and a few others of similar guilt,
suggested to a group of volunteers that they should
have more control over CUSO, and furthermore,
that the present administration should be criticized
for its ineptitude. In subsequent meetings the
"left wing radicals", as they were labeled, were
defeated because of their "rude, destructive
attitude."
A mind embued with middle class values is
very well insulated. But in Tanzania where the
development of mass political consciousness is so
crucially important to a national development,
heads stuffed with insulation are useless. Tanzania
cannot afford to support political eunuchs, in
prominent teaching and civil service positions. In
fact, Tanzania cannot afford CUSO. pf   3hree
[H-AGAS^^     All week at the Kiki
ftAf VrTINl
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
In the darkest days of World War II, a fiendish plan
is conceived. Cardboard tanks are built on Salisbury Plain,
to deceive the Germans into wasting bombs on them. The
Germans respond: and drop hundreds of cardboard bombs.
Undismayed, our heroes use these vast amounts of
cardboard to build a full-size replica of En-gland, which is
then launched out to sea. When the Germans invade, the
plug is pulled out, and the war won!!
(Fiendish cunning, these Chinese.)
The above is, as aficionados will recognize, a standard
plot premise of the famous Goon Show, the ultimate radio
program, which can now be heard again on OBU-FM on
Saturday evenings at 9:30.
The Goon Show is a completely anarchic form oif
humor. Logic, or the standard continuity and sound-effects
of radio drama, creep in only to be parodied, or directed
to entirely illogical or discontinuous   ends.
Plots are usually flimsy, mere excuses for the introduction of the standard characters who appear every week:
Neddy Seagoon; Gryptpipe Thynne and Moriarty; Major
Dennis Bloodnok; Henry Crun and Minnie Bannister; Eccles
and Bluebottle.
Grotesque puns alternate with flashes of surrealistic
invention, in a world at once familiar (due to the recurring
characters) and menacingly strange, chaotic, illogical, a
world created by chance, by the whims of madmen.
The Goon Show is the ultimate form of existential
humor: Sartre expounded in maniacal chuckles from aboard
a rapidly sinking full-size cardboard replica of England.
At the very end of side one of the Rolling Stones
album, Their Satanic Majesties' Request, there is a snatch
of slow and rather beautiful electronic music. If you play
it at 78 rpm, however, it turns out to be a cheerily whistled
version of "We Wish You a Merry Christmas".
Sinus of the times: a new pop group has infected the
land, called Nasal Mist and the Cough Drops. Be sure to
hear their versions of "Phlim Phlam Phlegm" and "Flu?s
Blues", with the Smith Bros, on electric catarrh.
This week's recipe is for "Toast".
First, you need (or knead) some "bread". Bread is a
white, doughy substance, close imitations of which can be
bought at various specialized shops throughout Vancouver.
Hold slices of bread close to a source of heat, such
as a fire of old, or preferably new, Ubysseys. The bread
should not be more than .357 of an inch away from the
heat.  Keep it there for ten minutes.
Now scrape away the black ash-like substance, until
you come to a crisp brown substance. This is called "toast".
It goes very well with butter.
Finally, a short poem, called "Peanuts".
The warm puppy of happiness
scampered away from us
chasing a ball. It, was unfair
to put him on a leash,
we  thought.  Later we discovered
it was only impossible.
By FRED CAWSEY
Vancouverites, for some
reason, seem reluctant to go
out on week nights. Night
clubs and movie theatres
have to count on big Friday
and Saturday nights if they
are going to make any
money. In fact, some places
now open only on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday because
they don't even make enough
money to cover expenses on
other nights. This provincial
attitude of the public is not
confined to clubs and movies;
art galleries have experienced a severe drought of people
in recent years and live
theatre groups are so poorly
patronized that even on weekends only a handful of viewers show up to many productions.
Many critics have blamed
the idiot box, television, for
keeping people home. If they
just looked at the horrendous
programs TV viewers are
subjected to they would see
the flaw in their reasoning.
The parochial attitude of our
provincial government to entertainment, unless it be driving on roads, and the apathy
generated by being isolated
geographically and otherwise
are probably closer to the
real reasons for our city of
stay-at-homes.
People are always complaining that there is no place
to go in Vancouver. That may
be so if you ignore the umpteen shows, movie theatres,
the Queenie, the Cave, Isy's,
the Johan Strauss, the King
of Clubs, the Marco Polo, the
newly opened Play Pen A-go-
go, the Playhouse, Metro, and
Freddy Wood theatre groups,
and the numerous art galleries around town.
All of these places provide
reasonable entertainment at
reasonable prices. Why don't
people attend art shows and
live theatre performances?
Why don't they go to movies
on week nights? Even many
touring Broadway productions by-pass Vancouver because we are considered the
doldrums   of   the   entertain
ment circuit. Before Vancouverites complain about the
lack of good entertainment
they'd better open their eyes
and ears to what's happening
around them.
There are some excellent
entertainment opportunities
in Vancouver. When people
adequately use the facilities
we have now, then, and only
then will they be entitled to
ask for more and better.
On Granville Street, just
north of the Granville bridge,
is an exciting new place called the Kiki Rouge. It is a
discotheque, and for Vancouver, a new idea. Aimed at the
20-25 age group, the Kiki
Rouge is open seven days a
week for those who want
somewhere to go to dance
and drink coffee. The number one advantage of this
place for university students
is the small cost involved for
a night's entertainment. If
you buy a $2.50 membership
it costs only a dollar per per
son, for non-members it is
two dollars per person. The
coffee and pizza are good and
the music is great. The Kiki's
owners, Mike and Pat Mc-
Grath, want it to be a place
where young people can go
and feel -# welcome without
putting out five bucks a
couple.
They would also like to
organize ski trips for members or anyone else who is
interested. Tentatively planned for the future are entertainers such as Jose Feliciano
and 3's A Crowd.
Much time has been spent
in creating a warm atmosphere in the Kiki. Another
nice aspect is the absence of
shirt and tie regulations. Casual dress is the by-word here,
or if you want to come more
formally attired that's fine
too. It recommends itself
highly for those who -would
like something different In
the way of night activities
 even on week nights.
FREIMAN'S FLOWER-CHILD
SPADED INTO BOOB-TUBE
MARIKO VAN CAMPEN in A Scent of Flowers.
By KEITH FRASER
While James Saunders kicks religion and
society in the fundamentals, his heroine
watches her own funeral with rose-colored
tenacity. A Scent of Flowers is an abbreviated
season of Peyton Place in search of obscurity.
A lengthy contemporary play, directed by
Judith Freiman, this drama garners its effect
by imposing flashback upon the ritual of
burial. The repercussions, if any, are limited
only to this technique. Unfortunately the play
seems too lightweight, too pat. When in the
final act it attempts to move in linear fashion,
any movement at all appears superfluous; we
discover nothing new, there is no suspense.
The first act blends a what-happened
quality with a leisurely refusal to say more
than   it   must.   The   tension   created   leaves
clinging ambiguities that demand interest.
But act two comes over like a broken
harmonica. Soap operatic in the truest sense
it has the weekly regulars: a bitchy stepmother, a lecherous uncle, a skinny-minded
priest. When our heroine is told, "It's a hard
world" the truth is too much for her and too
obvious for us. Perhaps unfairly her adultery
and suicide become mere manifestations of a
boob-tube script.
Miss Freiman obviously understands the
role of Zoe and has spent considerable time
with Mariko Van Campen studying pace and
shading. The young lady remains springy
throughout, until her fatuous relatives vanish
and she descends irrevocably to her grave.
Unfortunately the play chosen for this
thesis production presupposes that its originality of technique might bury an ineffectively spaded plot.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1968 pf   4ou*
You and Me and the Pueblo
By JOHN MATE
The world is divided into little
people and big people. We little
people have very limited access to
information on big happenings which
affect all of our lives, so, all we can
do is 'speculate'. Since we are little
people, our speculation will have no
dire consequences and thus we can
afford the luxury of speculating
about an infinite number of things.
Why don't we, for a start, speculate
about what the hell is going on in
Korea?
Our limited information tells us
that the nasty North Koreans, seeing
that their mean plot to assassinate
President Chung Hee Park of South
Korea has failed, went out to catch
themselves a ship, preferably a defenceless American ship with electronic spy equipment on board, sailing in international waters.
By sheer luck they chanced upon
the unsuspecting Pueblo which just
happened to be floating around minding her own business. The mean
North Koreans pulled up to the Pueblo with their formidable gunboat
and asked her to identify herself. The
Pueblo meekly replied, "I am a defenceless American ship with electronic spy equipment aboard, sailing
in international waters." The unscrupulous North Koreans continued
their belligerence by asking if the
Pueblo would please stick around for
another hour and a half, until more
North Korean gunboats could arrive.
The Pueblo complied with the wishes
of the North Koreans, when all of
a sudden, unexpectedly, after an
hour and a half, more North Korean
gunboats made the scene.
Quickly comprehending the situation, the captain of the Pueblo told
his men that the dirty, double crossing North Koreans have brought in
more gunboats, but not wanting to
shed blood on either side, he is surrendering  the   ship.
Just as the Pueblo was hoisting
up the white flag, and the ship's
thirty piece band was getting ready
to play the North Korean anthem,
the North Koreans opened up fire,
wounding the piccolo player, the tuba
player, and the drummer. Then they
arrogantly declared that if the Americans pull one more trick like that
then they will have nothing to do
with   the   Pueblo   anymore.   At   this
point the captain got scared and
ordered all musical instruments to be
thrown overboard. Even the North
Koreans could not maintain their
usual frigidness at the sight of such
obvious goodwill, they boarded the
Pueblo, and invited the captain and
entire crew to  come ashore.
The captain replied that he and
his crew would be delighted to accept the kind invitation, since they
have been floating around there for
the past fifteen years without once
setting foot on land, but that unfortunately he wouldn't know how to
explain it to the state department
and the CIA in case they ever found
out.
"What? You work for the state
department and the CIA?" asked the
North Koreans suspiciously.
"Yes. In fact we have been spying on you for the past fifteen years,"
answered the captain.
"No?" shrieked the North Koreans
in utter disbelief.
"Yes," affirmed the captain, "and
we think that if you have any self
respect at all then you would capture
us."
Suddenly the North Koreans drew
their guns, and without provocation,
in clear view, in an open act of
piracy, venomously hi-jacked the
Pueblo from the open sea.
Being very little people, who have
very limited access to information,
we can only speculate as to 'why the
Pueblo was seized.
Our speculation has led us to
think that, following a new strategy,
the North Koreans are deliberately
trying to provoke the Americans.
They are deliberately trying to trick
the Americans into dropping atom
bombs all over North Korea and in
the process to destroy their own ship,
the Pueblo, as well.
We may be wrong, but if we are,
then there must be some other reason
why the Pueblo was captured.
Maybe the Americans wanted it
captured so as to have a good excuse
to get even more involved militarily
in that part of the world. Maybe another war with North Korea will be
just one more step towards the final,
inevitable, confrontation with China.
Who knows? All we can do is
speculate. We are little people.
r   .- /■   ft
•r
**M '       g(*»      __
By ANDREW HORVAT
To some student leaders, the foreign language
requirement has become one of the most important points of confrontation between students and
the administration.
What has not been made clear by either the
student leaders or any of the administrators, is
whether the fight has been over the concept of
required courses in general, or the concept of studying foreign languages.
If the relaxing of the language requirement has
been a victory for the Arts Council, in a long standing fight against requirements in general, it has
been a loss for the ideals of language study at UBC.
If the Arts Council considers requirements in
general to be contradictory to the ideal of a liberal
arts education, one might wonder why it has not
chosen to attack the English requirement or the
Science requirement. Or has the Arts Council,
and now the Senate as well, decided that the study
of foreign languages is unnecessary in the mental
development of UBC undergraduates?
The language requirement has not been abolished at all. The ruling on foreign languages is going
to be relaxed in order to take into consideration
language study completed in High School. In effect, this means that prerequisites, materialistic
formulae, that UBC administrators insist on perpetrating on the student body, have not been done
away with at all. But language teaching has been
shelved. It is a well known fact that quality language teaching in High Schools is the exception and
not the rule.
To even consider the experience of learning
French in High School, as having equivalent value
to learning languages at good institutions, is tantamount to accepting English 40 as an equivalent
of English 310.
No, the principle of prerequisites has not been
kdone away with, what has gone is  even the pos
sibility of well attended, well taught, seminar type
foreign language classes, improvements which could
have been made with more funds, and with greater
student interest in curriculum. This present ruling
is the result of student lack of interest.
One point in favour of the Arts Council, is that
language has been a loser for some time at UBC.
Language teaching facilities at UBC are badly
overcrowded in most departments. The exceptions
are the Oriental languages, which appear too difficult for most students, and are usually not the target of credit collectors. In the French Department,
the student to professor ratio, is 90 to 1. The Spanish 200 course contains undisguised pieces of American chauvinism. I am referring to the lesson dealing with the OAS in Action. This lesson describes
how several Latin American banana republics unanimously condemn Cuban communist aggression in
the Western Hemisphere.
If the Arts Council had directed its criticism
of language studies in these specific directions, or
if it would have criticized the language lab, for the
impersonal brand of programmed teaching it broadcasts, if, indeed the council would have clamored
for any kind of reform in the language curriculum,
it would have accomplished more than by having
totally ignored the problems of people interested
in the study of foreign languages.
It is a shame that the useless fripperies of the
administration, such as credits, requirements, percentage marks, and mechanical teaching have
obscured the truly humanitarian aspects of foreign
language studies, in the eyes of student leaders.
Linguistics Professor Bernard Saint Jacques,
concerned over the apparent lack of interest in
foreign languages at UBC, describes the values of
learning a foreign language in these terms:
"The purpose Of language study is to be able
to see the world through new eyes. A foreign language is not just a set of new labels for old realities.
It is a way of looking at a new reality, as culture
reflected through language represents a view of
reality.
"Of course, you forget the history, the geography and the mathematics that you learn at university, but the purpose of an undergraduate education is to learn to think freely, not to retain facts.
You are bound to forget a foreign language too, if
you don't use it but during the time you learn the
language, you see something greater than what your
mother tongue permits.
"Of course if the language is badly taught it
is better not taught at all."
Perhaps the Arts Council is not aware of the
real implications of its agitation for abolition. By
giving a bad name to language requirements, it has
given a bad name to language study itself.
In Canada, to destroy any transmitter of culture
is to add to the already acute case of provincialism
from which this country suffers. Thus, any discouraging of language study, is a perpetuation of the
monolingual myth, that WASPish misconception
which "lets the foreigners  learn English."
Unwittingly, UBC Arts students now hold the
same attitude towards foreign languages, as that
fine old government organ, the External Affairs
Department. This organization regularly fills high
salaried positions all over the world with Canadians
who for all intents and purposes are, deaf, dumb
and consequently blind to conditions from Japan
to the Soviet Union, in fact in almost any non-
English speaking country. UBC graduates have
filled many of these positions, and by their silence,
Canada is admirably if incompetently served.
The "abolition" that has taken place, seems to
have had little effect on the attitude of the administrators to requirements, but it has had and will
have an adverse effect on the attitude of many students to the study of foreign languages. On the
political front nothing has changed. No one has
gained any new freedoms except the freedom to
enjoy the tyranny of his mother tongue.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1968 Page Friday presents this play in four acts
with introduction. All the statements are originals by the principal actors and are drawn from
numerous sources. The scene of the play is the
University of British Columbia. Engineering is
by Bert Hill.
DRAMATIS PERSONAE:
JOHN B. Macdonald, former president of the
University of British Columbia.
Robert Maynard Hutchins, former president
of the University of Chicago and presently
head of the Centre for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Santa Barbara, California.
Karl. Jaspers, German philosopher.
Brad Cleaveland, a student.
W. H. Ferry, of the Centre for the Study of
Democratic Institutions.
JOHN R. Seeley, of the Centre for the Study
of Democratic Institutions.
JACQUES Barzun, of Columbia University.
Claude Coleman, of Southern Illinois University.
THORSTEIN Veblen, social scientist and critic.
C. Wright Mills, social scientist and critic.
Kenneth Hare,  UBC's  new president.
INTRODUCTION:
(Parking Lot A, late at night)
Jaspers: The university must face the great
problem of modern man: how out of technology there can arise that metaphysical foundation of a new way of life which technology
has made possible.
Macdonald: A university offers not what is
accepted but what will become accepted. It
seeks the truth not in immutable and permanent, but the truth that is forever on the horizon
and changing, maturing as society grows and as
man's knowledge increases.
(In another part of the lot)
Cleaveland: At best the university is a pathway to the club of "tough-minded-liberal-
realists" . . . who sit in comfortable armchairs
talking radical while clutching hysterically at
respectability in a world explosive with revolution. At worst the university destroys your desires to see reality, and to suffer reality with
optimism, at the same time when you need
most to learn that painful art.
ACT ONE:
(In the chambers of the academic senate)
Macdonald: Advanced education in Canada
must become a national goal. Our economy depends on it. Our way of life depends on it
Hutchins: It is difficult for a (North) American university to concern itself with thought.
In the first place, thought implies criticism;
and criticism of a social, political, economic
system to which one is looking for admiration
and support is impossible unless the public,
through a long course of education and demonstration, has become convinced that thought,
including criticism, is the purpose of the university, that this is what it exists for, and that
independent thought and criticism are indispensable to the improvement, and perhaps even
the survival, of any society. This long course
of education and demonstration has never gotten started.
Macdonald: But, the university is not and
must not be the instrument of social reform; the
university can not adopt ideology or become the
captive of special interest; the university cannot
support political pressure.
Hutchins: The present interest of government
and business in the higher learning does not
flow from their love of truth. Government and
business have their reasons for supporting the
universities, but the advancement of knowledge
for its own sake is not one of them.
ACT TWO:
(In the administration building)
JASPERS: The university achieves its objectives
within the framework of an institution. This
framework is basic to its very existence and is
reflected in its procedural and administrative
practices. The institution is simultaneously indispensable and a standing threat to the idea
of a university.
Student: Bureaucracies are tools, means of
certain legitimate goals, and they end up feeding their own existence. The conception that
bureaucrats have is that history has in fact
come to an end.
Ferry: I would think it far more advisable to
break up the system than to continue patching
its defects, no matter how ingeniously. Bigness
will ultimately extort its human cost, whether
in meglopolis, the corporation or the university.
Just as we may one day decide to break General
Motors into smaller, more intelligible, more
human-sized pieces, we might today for the
same reason decide to divide up our over-
swollen universities.
Macdonald : The university has a much clearer
view of its destiny now. I think UBC's administration, from an organizational standpoint, has
been considerably strengthened. As a business
venture, UBC could compare favorably with
any corporation in the province.
Hutchins: What is the object toward which
the procedures of the (North) American university are directed? I am reminded of a recent cartoon depicting a group of cavemen arranged in
heirarchical order. The caption underneath is,
"Now that we're organized, what the hell do
we do?"
ACT  THREE:
(The chambers of the Board Of Governors)
Seeley (alone): The word "service" ranks high
in the vocabulary of motives, but the number
who want to "serve" only as commanders is
curiously high. The university which is a consensual society, necessarily, of the competent
needs no commanders. Under this benign and
efficient oversight, we have hardly a university
left that has a describable direction, a unifying
and coherent logic, the proper relations that
education requires and engenders, presupposes
and ensures. The more high-powered the management seemingly the worse—or, at least, the
less like a university—the product.
ACT  FOUR:
(The faculty club)
Coleman: Nine-tenths of the faculty at any
university are bores, simply because they become complete nincompoops outside their specialties. Most of them take their coffee breaks
with their own colleagues in order to avoid,
the viruses of other disciplines. They are not
happy until their undergraduate majors become
as narrow as they are themselves.
Veblen: Social scientists are free to give the
fullest expression to any conclusions or convictions to which their inquiries may carry them.
That they are able to do so is a fortunate circumstance, due to the fact that their intellectual
horizon is bounded by the same limits of common place insight and preconceptions as are
in the prevailing opinions of the conservative
middle class.
Barzun: The mandarin system is now in the
saddle everywhere and with all its usual features: vanity, self-seeking, faddishness, and
punishment for the naive, who are usually the
geniuses of the faculty.
Hare: Yet I welcome this mingling of university, government and industry, because I think
we prosper best when we are seeking the real
world, everyday, at close quarters.
Mills: They live and work in a benumbing
society without living and working in protest
and in tension with its moral and cultural insensibilities. They use the liberal rhetoric to
cover the conservative default. They do not
make available the knowledge and the sensibility required by publics, if publics are to hold
responsibility those who make decisions 'in
the name of the nation". They do not set forth
reasons for human anger and give to it suitable
targets.
w
TOM NORTHCOTT
at VILLAGE BISTRO
2081 W. 4th
THURS. - SUN.
8 p.m. till wee hours
Reduced  rate for students
ALL STUDENTS AND FACULTY
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In The New MUSIC BUILDING Recital Hall
TONIGHT - 8 p.m. - UNIVERSITY CHAMBER BAND
directed  by   Paul   Douglas
music of Mozart  (Serenade,  K361), Weber and  Donizetti
FEB. 7 ■ 8 p.m. - FACULTY PIANO RECITAL
Kathryn  Bailey—Music of John Cage
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
U.S.S.R.
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Moscow,  Leningrad,   Samarkand,
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HAGEN'S
Open 9-5  p.m.  Ind.  Saturday
FILMSOC      PRESENTS
HELP-2:15,6:00,9:15
Hard Day's Night-12:30,4:00,7:30
50c
TODAY, FRI., FEB. 2
AUDITORIUM
Literature and
Contemporary Thought
A Relevant SYMPOSIUM Open to Everyone
FEB. 9, 10, 11 (FRI. 5:30 p.m. - SUN 5 p.m.)
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NAME	
PHONE	
Application (plus $9) submitted to A.A.C. Office (Brock Ext.)
by Monday, February 5.
friday, February 2, 1968 Academic  Activities
Committee
Teachers  Committee
on   Vietnam
ALL   LECTURES   IN   HENRY   ANGUS    110
AT   12:30   P.M.
LEARN ABOUT SOUTHEAST USER
FEB.   6 DR. W. E. WILLMOTT - Cambodia and the War in Vietnam
I
I
«3
FEB.   7 PETER BELL (Economics) - Thailand-Second Vietnam?
FEB. 14 CLIVE ANSLEY (Asian Studies) - Credibility Gap and S.E. Asia
FEB. 21 TONY GR1NKUS (Researcher) - Structure of National Liberation Front of S. Vietnam «
FEB. 26-MARCH 3-DR. JOHN PORTER - "Cultural Oppression" Conference
MARCH 6 CHARLES BURCHILL (Victoria University) - Chinese Aggression, Myth or Menace    £
MARCH 13 DR. PAUL IVORY (S.F.U.) - China as Economic Model for Underdeveloped Countries J
MARCH 20 DR. CARL KLINE (Psychology) - The Psychopathology Game They Play in U.S.A.
MARCH 27 PANEL OF FIVE - Prospects of Peace in S.E. Asia
8
!
5
I
§>
s
I
LEARN ABOUT VIETNAM
By   DR.   BILL   WILLMOTT
TUESDAYS
FEB. 13 DOES VIETNAM EXIST?
FEB. 20 NATIONALISM AND COMMUNISM IN S.E. ASIA
MARCH 5 FROM DIEN-BIEM-PHU TO NGO DINH DIEM
MARCH 12 THE SECOND. INDO-CHINESE WAR
MARCH 19 BUDDHISTS, ELECTIONS, AND POLITICS IN SOUTH VIETNAM
MARCH 26 THE POLITICS OF ESCALATION
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1968 :■'£!!&£$>!*!£
m<m
p&  7even
conducted ey   Uncle   (joRDie, uncle ARhiitg^JDcbusiti AL
"g^     Read this    scenes
and stop bellyaching!
iqh Bones , k , < „ , O ,
Popula
V|
Hough odnes to mate soup
istead *>l cold meats to make up
alad dishes are the popular choice
with    Edinburgh    housewives    (his
week.
The reason?—return of chilly
weather to the capital.
Cold meats have taken. a
tumble," said one butcher, ** and
many housewives have returned to
tine ' heavier ' dishes."
Greengrocers,  too, have felt the
draught"   this   week   with   fewer
housewives    buying    lettuces,    but
sales of leeks and carrots for soup
have rocketed.    ,
But," said one greengrocer,-" I
have found no difference with the
sale of lettuces. Some of my customers never seem to tire of
them."
OONT VOU
WANT A SPIN IN
THE BUMPERS,
TED?
zz=rz
EH-lb BATHER NOT-IF
YOU OONT Ml NO, JOAN.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with     1
Store Farm's1
low insurance
rates for
careful driven.
See me.
8455 GRANVILLE ST..
VANCOUVER 14. B.C.
261-4255
STATi  HIM
ARIS—A  man  named   Prevot   broke
lUtcher's shop run by a M. Richard
VIISS WADE IN
BREMEN (AP) — A 15-year-
old girl was found dying in the
balcony of a Bremen movie
house Wednesday night, wearing only a brassiere.
into   a i
in the rue S"ngar!?n . _YJ?zula
h~ 4   j     -        ■       .   ..    * . i   ,   ,Phone 467-4397.
Boucry, yesterday morning at about one o clock. 1
iHe was engaged in picking the lock of the till
when the rustling of a dress caused him to look
Up. It was M. Richard's daughter who was
waiting for him, armed with a revolver and a
flask of sulphuric acid. She fired at him. but
as the man uttered no cry she concluded   to ^	
have missed: whereupon she threw the vitriol. —"*"*   ~~~~~  ~   -"""Tl
He remained silent no longer,  and  his   cries HlnkjT  SOMtiOlt
brought in the police. It appears that the bullet "HfV   9f*<nr*9di *E
had ehtered his left shoulder. He was taken to •Jaoyisg mo<|ich "Z
the Hopital Lariboisiere-in • very   dangerous
Bunrl le   of
may   i l»im
'Phone 467-4533.
insulation,
by  paying
Owner
for  ad.
15
OUR. CANDIDATE
Nineteen-year-old Ronald Smith,
Dalbeattie, Kirkcudbright, -who has
'jeatiTiesrl !Deen   appointed   station-master  ,a*
•■      **  Kilkejrran. neat Maybole, is believed
.llll|HIIJIHliHJlUII«IfflI»!IIIHIIIl!lll!to ■b»- fcitainVKOuajert. *
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
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KDIAN  HEAD OFFIC
TORONTO, ONT.
GOOD STUDENT? 25% DISCOUNT
HELD OVER 2nd
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NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
Times Sunday door
12:10,   1:45,   3:20,  4:4* 1:30  p*n.
6:30,  8:05,  9:40.
Students $1.00
Adults $2.00
4'
HWe
Just Published!
THE
NAKED
APE
by Desmond Morriss
A brilliant account of man
and his motivations, tJK
|0«t&-B()OKS
4560 W. 10th Ave.-224-7012
514 Hornby Street-684-4496
Paperback Cellar-681-8713
670 Seymour Street—685-3627
Friday, February 2,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY p£   Sight
BKISIBS
RECORDINGS
Eagerly awaited LPs from Bob Dylan
and Leonard Cohen still have not arrived
in town, but are expected "soon", "any
day now", "next week perhaps", or "God
knows when".
Both halves of the new Donovan record
have arrived, and may be bought together
(in a box with a dutiful photograph of the
Maharishi) or singly: if you only want (or
can afford) one, Backside recommends the
"For Little Ones" half, which includes "Isle
of Islay", Donovan's best song since "Jersey
Thursday".
Religious leanings may be bent towards
the "Mass in F Minor" as performed by the
Electric Prunes. —S.S.
MAGAZINES
The press has been contemplating its
navel in two current magazines. In the Toronto Globe and Mail's Globe Magarine,
January 27, there is an informative analysis
of Canada's student press by ex-TJbyssey-
staffer-made-good Mike Valpy. He writes
that "today's student editors, far more
socially aware than their predecessors of
five years back, are losing interest in filling
their papers with bland junk, cute college-
isms and club meeting reports." The Ubyssey, he says "improved in content under
editor Danny Stoffman." January's Saturday Night analyzes entertainment coverage
in Canadian newspapers. "Criticism is not
a skill that has earned the respect of editors" in this country, concludes the writer
Wendy Michener. In the same issue, William Nicholls of UBC's religious studies
department writes an article about the town
fool Joachim Foikis, which has resulted in
a "Save the Fool" fund and speaking engagements for him in Toronto. Which goes
to show that a fool is ever without honour
in his home town.
As you can see, Page Friday's education
special has been postponed for some weeks
due to problems of distribution. Next week
however there is a super poetry issue to
blow all minds within reading distance.
Original poems and analyses of the current
poetry scene are all ecstatically welcome.
F.B.
FESTIVAL
The Contemporary Arts Festival is the
only relevant University - sponsored event
this year. In the first few years of this annual event, when audience-participation art
was new, people used to get very excited
about it. Recently the advance publicity has
been feeble; but that is not to disparage the
festival itself.
The armoury is being dressed up by
architecture students, to form a gigantic
bowl for us all to get inside, to mix with
the lights and sound. Poets will again sell
their works, alongside the dancers and
multi-media shows. Films from the Vancouver area will be shown every day for five
days, and there are appropriate affairs in
the Freddy Wood and the Fine Arts Gallery.
And Robert Creeley is coming to visit.
An official programme is available from
the Fine Arts department. Starts February 8.
Brought to you by your friendly university
—A.i
FILMSOC      PRESENTS
Hard Day's Night-12:30,4:00,7:30
HELP-2:15,6:00,9:15
TODAY, FRI.# FEB. 2
AUDITORIUM
50c
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSOCIATION
presents—in German
WAGNER'S
THE FLYING DUTCHMAN
(Der Fliegende Hollander)
STARRING
DAVID WARD NANCY TATUM
RICHARD CROSS VILEM PRIBYL
Queen   Elizabeth  Theatre
FEBRUARY 3, 7, 10, 13, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets  available  at  all   Eaton's  Stores
Any  unsold  tickets   the   evening  of   the  performance   are
available to Students for $1.00 at 7:45 p.m.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
NUB
First Year Arts and Science
students interested in entering
First Year Nursing in September are invited to come to
the School of Nursing for information about our program.
We hope you will stay for
coffee.
Tuesday, February 6
7:30 p.m.
WESBROOK 237
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 2,500  GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
• Full Drat* (Tail*)
• Morning Coal*
• Directors' Coatt
• Whit* and Coloured Coats
• Shirts and Accessor!**
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
University   Hill
United Church
ON THE BOULEVARD
11
"Church at the
Crossroads'7
Reverend Harold MacKay
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
| THE VILLAGE CAFE |
- Where Friends Meet & Dine
I
I
I
DISCOUNT ON
PIZZA TO GO
ft Block East
of Memorial Gym
at 5778 University Blvd.
Phone 224-0640
I
I
I
I
TURTLE
NECK SWEATERS
Now in Stock
f w MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
The House of Seagram
Interviews
will be conducted
the afternoon of
FEBRUARY 5th
for students graduating in
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
for Information and Interview Appointment
See The University Placement Service
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Committee Appointments
Wanted! A Homecoming Chairman!! All those interested
please submit letters of application to Penny Cairns,
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 54, Brock.
A.M.S. Elections
First Slate
Wednesday,  Feb.   7,   1968
Second  Slate
Wednesday, Feb. 14, 1968
President
External  Affairs  Officer
Internal   Affairs   Officer
Secretary
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
Nominations for first slate will open on January 24, 1968
and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968;
for second slate, nominations will open on January 31,
1968 and close at 12 noon on February 8, 1968. Nominations forms, certificates of eligibility and copies of the
election rules and procedures are available from the
A.M.S.  Office.
Friday, January 26, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2. 1968 Friday, February 2,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Lectures knocked
lecture system fails to fulfill aims of education and impedes the confrontation of values'
MONTREAL (UNS)—The lecture system severely limits a student's ability to intellectually discuss
a new subject with a fellow student.
A report on course design at McGill University,
co-ordinated by McGill lecturer Donald Kingsbury
and issued Sunday, makes this statement.
The project was started in May, 1966 with a
$960 student society grant. The organizers began
with 18 students divided into groups of two who
were given printed material designed by Kingsbury to prompt their behavior and discussion.
The organizers found that some students carried
over lecture behavior such as being too shy to ask
clarifying questions because they didn't want to
appear stupid.
"It became more and more evident as we brought
other groups into the project that almost every university student shows severe behavior deficiencies
in areas of activity suppressed during lectures and
during study activities like writing papers and reading.
"Some students can write with ease about subjects they cannot discuss. Some students can Think
Along With Mitch perfectly, but are at a loss when
their partner asks them a question that requires
thought."
The report mentions that the communication
course was never totally successful, but "we did
demonstrate the feasibility of breaking up large
classes into active twos and threes.
"Imagine a room of thirty students formed into
groups of two, humming like the union cafeteria,
one or two consultants wandering around the room
helping with problems, the students working with
sheets which structure their discussion, probing,
questioning, reading, clarifying, summarizing, too
deeply involved in each other to notice the noise.
We had that for many weeks, twice a week," it
states.
The second phase of the program was that of
"course design". Six groups were set up: English,
philosophy, psychology, chemistry, communication,
and sociology. The overriding conclusion of these
groups was that the aims of education in these fields
could not be fulfilled in the lecture context.
In an afterword, the authors of the report conclude "We do believe that activity at the university should at once lead to and arise from the conscious considerations of questions of value: what is
needed, and how it is to be achieved.
"We believe it can be shown that the university
now acts as the agent of the social order towards
an end quite different from the one we suggest; that
in fact its role is effectively to select and provide
elite managerial labor for society.
"The easiest way for the present social order to
propagate itself stably is to prevent a significant
number of people from critically examining its basic
assumptions. As agent of the existing social order,
the university serves to impede the confrontation
of values.
"The university could use course design to. become a competent technical training school, which
it is not now; the present social order could use it—
in some places is already using it — to propagate
itself with much less friction than it now encounters.
SUNDAY, FEB. 4TH
INDOOR
AUTO
RACING
North American
Championship
270  miles  of  championship   racing
P.N.E.
AGR0D0ME
Time Trials 1:00 p.m. Races Q:00 p.m.
Adults $1.50, Students $1.00
Family  $3.00
lllillcis
COURTESY DISCOUNTS
TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
AND   PERSONNEL
IlWlers
VANCOUVER
• 655  Granville St., 683-6651
• 47 W. Hastings St., 689-3801
NEW  WESTMINSTER
• 622 Columbia St.,   526-3771
Your chance to
work overseas for two years.
CUSO—Canadian University Service
Overseas—sends qualified people to 40
developing nations around the world...
for a lot of good reasons. Money isn't
one of them. Salaries are lower than
you'd earn in Canada. But if you can
qualify, maybe you'll like one of the
other reasons \vh> about 900 CUSO
people are at work abroad. To help
close the knowledge gap. To gain
priceless experience in their chosen field.
To play a small but practical part in
the nation-building going on in Africa,
Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.
Tell us what you can do.
We'll tell vou where vou are needed.
I am interested in learning more about CUSO
and the kind of overseas work available.
My qualifications are as follows.
I (will) hold	
in
(degree, diploma, certificate or other verification of skill)
from	
(course)
Date of birth-
(university, college, trade or technical institute, etc.)
 Sex	
Citizenship-
Marital status-
Xhildren, if any
Other languages, if any_
Name-
Address-
_Prov..
Send to:
Mr. Jack Thomas,
International House,
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C.
(B-68) Page 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
The Wise thing to do
FINE ARTS
The Jack Wise thing — interview with artist Jack Wise
with slides  and   music,  noon,
today, Lass.  104.
LSM
Will  engineers  rule the
world? Panel with Dr. Ian Ross,
Dr.   Noakes   and   Dr.   Chitty,
Monday, noon, Ang.  110.
DEBATING UNION
Resolved: The Canadian
armed forces have no role to
play in Canada. Affirmative—
Royal Roads Military College;
negative — UBC. Tuesday,
noon, Bu. 102.
VCTSTNLFOSVN
Formation    meeting    for    a
committee to support the Vietnamese   NLF,   Monday,   noon,
Bu. 226.
FORESTRY US
Last bloody chance today to
get free coke, cookies and coffee    in    the    armory.    Blood
drive ends today at 4:30 p.m.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Venez parler francais a IH,
a 12:30, aujourd'hui.
DANCE CLUB
Friday,   open   dance,   Satur-
■ day,    casual   dance,   Monday,
jive, Tuesday, samba Wednesday, cha-cha.
COLLEGE LIFE
CATGIF  party  tonight  7:30
p.m., 1962 Acadia Road. Help
us celebrate Covie's birthday.
LSM
Jest Fooling Around with
Vancouver's self - appointed
town fool Joachim Foikis,
Lutheran Campus Centre, Sunday night 6 p.m., dinner; discussion, 7 p.m.
UN CLUB
Discussion    group    Monday
noon   IH:   The   Problem   in
Korea, with Clive Ansley.
EDUCATION
Grad   class   meeting,   noon,
today, ed. 1008.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Regular   meeting,  noon,   today, IH 106.
ALPHA OMEGA
General   meeting,   Monday,
noon, Bu. 223.
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Communications     workshop
at
TURTLE
NECK SWEATERS
Now in Slock
T^ MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
Saturday,   10   a.m.   to 4  p.m.,
IH.
CONSTITUTION
REVISIONS  COMMITTEE
Meeting noon, today, in the
first vice-president's office. All
interested attend.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Speaker from the Company
of Young Canadians, Monday,
noon, Bu.  203.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Regular   meeting   noon,   today, Bu. 223.
MALAYSIA-SINGAPORE
STUDENTS   ASSOCIATION
Malaysia-Singapore night tonight, IH, 7:30.
FILM  SOC
Last day for Help and Hard
Day's Night. Three double bills,
auditorium, 12:30, 4, and 7:30
p.m.
Ed  action campaign
alerts  public  interest'
More people are hearing about the student education program this year than ever before, claims Alma Mater Society
first vice-president Don Munton.
Munton is chairman of the UBC education action committee,
similar to ones in each B.C. university.
Last year's campaign, which was highlighted by a march
of 2,000 students to Victoria, got one-day coverage in a few
papers, Munton said.
This year's campaign, which began in November, has received attention throughout the province, he said.
"If the public doesn't know the crisis now, it is deaf and
blind."
Most of the calls he received when he appeared on a radio
open line show this week were sympathetic to higher education's
needs, he said.
"People are beginning to realize that their children won't
be able to go to university.
"An enrolment cut hits more people than a fifty dollar fee
increase."
The government may make a small increase in their grant
and snow the public into thinking it adequate, he said.
The campaign is designed to alert the public to education
needs, and to press for more funds for higher education.
CLASSIFIED
Rat**: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days 92.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE WITH THE EPICS FRIDAY,
Feb. 2 at Place Vanier, 9:00-12:30.
Admission $1.25.	
DON'T MISS THE INTERNATIONAL
Ball at the Hotel Vancouver, with
the Trinidad Moonlighters and the
George Cuba Quartet; Floorshow.
Tickets 6.00/couple, 3.25 single, from
A.M.S. or I.H. Friday, February 9th,
nine  p.m.         	
POINT GREY DeMOLAY DANCE
Feb. 3 at Hotel Vancouver with the
Spectres, $4.00 per couple, tickets
niT  232,   noon   or  733-8897.
TONIGHT
that fabulous R&B group that played Mardi Gras, Mr. Action and The
In-Tensions at Vancouver's newest
nightclub, "The Lion's Tale" 726
Seymour.
Greetings
12
HAVE AN INTERNATIONAL BALL
on February ninth at the 3rd Annual International Ball at the Hotel
Vancouver. Moonlighters Steel
Band, George Cuba Quartet, floor-
show. Tickets from AMS or International   House.
Lost & Found
19
ANYONE FINDING PAIR OF WOOD
framed classes near Angus please
ph. 738-2046 after six (6:00) Reward.
TO BE FOUND AT VANIER, ON
Friday, Feb. 2: The Epics, be there
at   9:00.
BROWN DOG W/WHITE NECK,
foot, tail tip, big ears, med. size.
Reward,   738-5942.   Lost   23   Jan.
OUR BELOVED SCOBIE PASSED
away peacefully at 1:25 a.m. Monday. Services will be held Friday
at  "The  Mortuary"  West  Fourth.
A RED WIG AT MARDI GRAS SAT.
night, reward offered, return to
Mardi Gras office or call 224-3242,
No.   59.
INDIAN DINERS
Fri. and Sal. 6:30-10:30 p.m.
• Macrobiotic supplies
• Health Foods
• Vegetarian Meals
• Juice  and  Salad Bar
Monday through  Saturday
11 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Try something good
and different ! ! !
THE
Golden Lotus
2936 West 4th
Vancouver B.C.
733-2920
r
Ontological Symposium
THE
SCIENCE OF SURVIVAL
Saturday, February 3rd, 2:00 — 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, February 4th, 10:00 — 11:30 a.m.
Key Speakers
Lord Martin Cecil
Mr.  Michael  Cecil
Mr.  LeRoy Jensen
Mr. Wm. Thompson
Dr. Ronald Polack
For Information
and
Registration
Call
731-3505
PERSON WHO TOOK THE ORGANIC chemistry text from the library
please return it to where you got
it—I'm   broke   and   desperate.
LOST COSMETIC CASE CONTAIN-
ing pair of green contact lenses.
deeded   urgently  phone   731-7154.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
N.V.C. SKATING PARTY TONIGHT
from 8:00-10:00 at the Forum. Members 50c. Non-members 75c, every-
on<i   welcome.
Scandals
97
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.
YOU'LL KATE YOURSELF IF YOU
miss Hotel Van Dance, Feb. 3.
Tickets  BU  232   (Noon)   or  733-8897.
BEATLES RETURN TO CAMPUS IN
Help and Hard Day's Night. 3
Shows daily 12:30, 4:00, 7:30 today
aud.  50c. 	
THE   EPICS   SWING   AT   VANIER!
Join   them!   Tonight   at   9:00.	
LOOK — WEDNESDAY — FOR A
sign on your car—It may be very
advantageous to you . . . especially
V.W.  owners.
CRETINS: KENT AND McKNIGHT
have been avenged by Spence. Who
will be next? We are shaking in
our  sandals.    Animals!
Typewriters & Repairs
39
LOST — BLUE UMBRELLA WITH
name around leather handle with
white stitching. Phone Nancy in
Room 464, 224-9746. Was lost in auditorium    cafeteria.
LOST SAT. IN FIELD HOUSE —
Black wood frame glasses, Phone
943-4692,   reward.
LOST  —   DIAMOND   ENGAGEMENT
ring.   Finder  please  phone  872-7901.
Rides & Car Pools
14
2   DRIVERS   NEEDED  FOR  NORTH
Van car pool.  Call Sharon,  988-3835.
Special Notices
15
CHARTER FLIGHT TO
LONDON
May 28th - June 19th, 1968
FARE $310.00
There are still some seats available on the
Charter Flight organized for Faculty and
Staff of the University, leaving for London
on May 28th, 1968.
Cost is $310 per person return.
For further information call 732-6429
after 6 p.m. and weekends
MRS. J. PAUL,
Suite No. 508
2370 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.
INFORMATION BULLETIN AND APPLICATION WILL BE
MAILED ON REQUEST
~~~~—j
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY AND
staff are invited to the 3rd Annual
International Ball, Friday, Feb. 9th
at 9:00 p.m. in the Hotel Vancouver,
Trinidad Moonlighters, George Cuba,
Flamenco    Dancers,    Tickets    from
A.M.S.  or I.H.
HELP IS HERE TODAY. ALSO A
Hard Day's Night. Aud. 50c. 12:30,
4:00,   7:30.
EVERYONE WELCOME AT THE
Malaysian-Singapore night at International House, Friday, Feb. 2nd
at 7:30 p.m. Malaysian food and
dance.   $1.00   single,   $1.75   couple.
COMMUNICATE THIS SATURDAY.
Personal—International • Beauro-
cratio • Persuasive Communications. All under discussion Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at a special
workshop. International House on
West   Mall.   Come.
OPEN DOOR DROP-IN CENTRE
(Coffee house in Church cellar.)
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner   of  11th  and   Fir.
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES? A
role in Canada? BU 102, 12:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   6   Feb.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
91
1955 DODGE 2 DOOR HARDTOP.
Cheap transportation. $100 or best
offer. Phone Norm 224-7298 after
7:00  p.m.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
'65    HONDA    50   SPORT   $200.00.    300
original  miles.   Call  Peter,   298-4330,
evenings.
Typing
40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC   —
224-6129   -   228-8384.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday to  Friday.	
LET JEAN TYPE YOUR THESES,
term papers, etc. French translating
and     abstracting,     evenings    phone
738-5076.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING—ESSAYS, THESIS, STEN-
cils, etc. Close to University. 224-
0244.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST (in West
End), neat, accurate. Reasonable
rates, essays, etc. Telephone 681-
6871	
"GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call 277-5640".
ESSAYS, MASTERS & PH.D.'s EX-
pertly typed in form and style as
recommended by Campbell. RE 1-
3700 — 3478 W.   19th  Ave.
ESSAY   AND   THESIS   TYPING
Campus Pickup — 434-9558
SECRETARIAL SERVICES — SPE-
cializing in Thesis typing. Highest
quality. Reasonable rates. Accuracy
and   production   guaranteed.   Phone
731-1804.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Male
59
THE ACADIA CAMP GENERAL
Council requires a manager for its
canteen. Duties to start Sept. 1, '68
include all aspects of managing the
operation. This is an excellent opportunity for a married man to gain
experience in management and administration while attending university. Housing is supplied. Applicants are asked to send a confidential complete resume of qualifications and experience, before Feb.
15, '68 to: Vice-President, Acadia
Camp General Council, Acadia
Camp,   U.B.C,  Vancouver  8,  B.C.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
94
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by B.A.,   M.A.,  B.L.S.  736-6923.
PIANO AND THEORY LESSONS
Dawne Milligan, B.A., A.R.T.C.
3258 East 45th Avenue, 3878 West
38th   Avenue.   Phone  434-1189.	
ENGLISH TUTORING BY M.A. Experienced in teaching. Undergraduates   only.   Phone   682-5127.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
'65 TELEFUNKEN STEREO MULTI-
plex.   $235.   Phone 434-1814.
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
at International House. 1 mil. My-
lan Acetate. 5" reel for $1.25. Hurry
while  they last.
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE   —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications   Off.,
Brock   Hall
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
91
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.
SLEEPING ROOM: SINGLE MALE
student. Private entrance, 3917 W.
11th   Ave.,   224-5883    (after   6   p.m.)
HOUSE WITH 11 BEDROOMS. AUD.
Feb. 8-10, 13-17. Student perform.
75c.   Half   A   Sixpence.
ROOM FOR RENT — IDEAL FOR
study, kitchen facilities, male students, near 4th & Burrard, 738-0784.
Room & Board
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Zeta Beta Tau. Phone 224-9660 be-
tween   5-7   p.m.
COMFORTABLE PRIVATE ROOM
and board for 2 male students In
good home. Single or sharing, 261-
1191. Friday, February 2,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
. &z$$*f$^^&%:
?i^#/:'iii*A/V.#>
J*|*V- .-.v
&.'•
By MIKE JESSES
Vbytwey Sports Editor
The biggest games of the season for the UBC basketball
Thunderbirds have to be their upcoming run-ins with the Simon
Fraser Clansmen.
It's now only a week and a day until the first meeting between these two teams in War Memorial Gym and there seems
to be only one problem — seating.
On Feb. 10, 3,344 bodies will pack the UBC gym to view
the Simon Fraser-UBC contest. All others will have to be
satisfied to read about the game in The Ubyssey. So if you want
to go to the game read on.
Because so many students will want to attend the game,
tickets will be made available to 2,000 UBC students all day
Friday and perhaps Thursday of next week on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
The tickets are free upon presentation of an Alma Mater
Society card. They will be released from the athletic office in
Memorial Gym.
The experience of the athletic department when tickets
were released on the same basis for the homecoming football
game was that many tickets were picked up and never used.
Hence they are not giving out tickets till just before the game
to ensure that they will be used.
Simon Fraser students will receive another 600 tickets and
244 reserved tickets will go on sale at $1.50 each. The remaining 500 or so seats will be taken up (by pass holders and
emergencies.
So if you're planning to go to the game, make plans now
and be ready to rush to get your tickets.
SPORTS  SHORTS "
ICE HOCKEY THUNDERBIRDS
The birds travel to "Winnipeg this weekend to play the
University of Manitoba Bisons and defend their share of first
place in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
The Birds,  after beating   Saskatchewan last weekend,  are
looking for a similar pair of victories this weekend.
SWIMMING
The swimming Birds take on the SFU Clansmen tonight at
the Birds'  home  pool,   Percy  Norman   Memorial,  at  30th  and
Ontario. Starting time will be just after 6 p.m.
ICE HOCKEY BRAVES
The Braves will also be playing the SFU Clansmen today
as they take to the ice at 1:30 p.m. at the Burnaby rink. Other
games for the Braves over this weekend include games against
Steveston on Monday at the Winter Sports Center starting at
7:30 p.m.
3
1UTH£«AM      services:     a0:0o i 12:15- a*.
NE*T     to     NEW    ADPMN.     TJUil-DlHG-
WORLD WIDE TRAVEL
OFFICE ON THE CAMPUS
at 5700 University Blvd.
can look after ALL your
arrangements in Europe after
your Charter or Group flight arrives.
Save Time and Trouble
CALL ON USI
WORLD-WIDE
ON CAMPUS
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD — 224-4391
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE  -   PARTS   -   ACCESSORIES
3627 W.  Broadway 731-7510
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
1 block from gatoi
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, whit* dinner lackets, morning
coats . . . complete six*
rang*.
We   also   male*   made-to-
measure suits.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUISH   FOAM/j^WIA*
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
THE
EPICS
at
PLACE VANIER
TONIGHT
9:00
Admission $1.25
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
The Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.75
Ifs Really Good!
Full course meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
*^^^^»* mm mm.
Alan Botes
••
De Broca's
Crowning Touch!
kiNG^H^Ajtjjs
Varsity
224-3730«»
4375 W. 10th
COLOR by DELUXE
Times
7:30,   9:30
HILARIOUS
N.Y.   Times
■~\
Do YOU require assistance
in 1st- & 2nd-Year English
for the oncoming examinations?
If so, HUBERMAN'S can help you
We also offer assistance in language study
GERMAN - FRENCH - SPANISH
For further information or an appointment, phone
HUBERMAN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE LTD.
732-5535 or 263-4808
2158 W. 12 Ave.
M
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses .. .
look to
Prescription. Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
JVr=T=Jr=Jr=i[=Ji=Jr=Jr=ir=J[=J
Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr=T
r=Jr=]Fnl
fl
E
E
a
Solitaire" from $100
SWEEP her off her feet...
with a fine
I
Convenient Budget
Terms—10%   Down
Balance In 12 Months
DIAMOND
from
LIMITED
Granville at Pender Since 1904
REGISTERED  JEWELLER, AMERICAN  GEM  SOCIETY
ir^rar=ir^r=^r=Jr^r^r=Jr^r=^r^r^r^r==ir^i^r^r^r^r=^
i
0
I
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision ran mean better marks! Start ihe new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
lew frame can do wonders
for the  disposition.
t^Otf^W-
1701 W. Broadway
731-3021
3195
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT Page  16
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1968
SPORTS
UBC   RUGBY   THUNDERBIRD   Don   Crompton   (heading groundward) will be out to increase
his   team-leading   point   total  today   at   12:30   p.m.  and  Saturday  at 2:30  p.m.
IN STADIUM TODAY
Rugby takes a lunch break
What are you doing during lunch hour today? Like to see an interesting rugby game?
Then go over to Thunderbird Stadium and take
' your sandwiches and your friends with you.
At 12:30 p.m. the UBC rugby Thunderbirds
will meet the Oregon State University Beavers
in the Birds' first Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate Conference game.
The game was originally scheduled for
January 13 but snow forced its cancellation.
Today almost everything will be back to
normal for the Birds,  weather included.
Most players who had been out with injuries will see action, although two still out are
being replaced for today's game.
Breakaway Rob Hungerford, who suffered a
slight concussion in his last game, will play as
will Dave Austin, who had missed one game
with a thigh bruise.
Fullback Gary Hoskins, however, will miss
Friday's contest at least. He has a severe hip
bruise. Bill Black has been brought up from the
Braves to replace Hoskins.
Walt De Boni, a strong, first-year player, is
also up from the Braves. He will replace front
row prop Rick Evans who has a sore neck and
a dislocated finger.
The Birds also have a conference game on
Saturday at 2:30 p.m. in the stadium. This time
the Birds meet the University of Oregon Ducks.
The Ducks have two Vancouver boys on
their team. Jack Tasaka formerly played for
UBC and Meralomas before going south. Lefty
Hendrickson is a product of Squamish and West
Vancouver.
The Ducks will be no pushover. Their lineup
includes former Australian national team member Len Diett and ex-basketball star Bill
Thomas. Thomas is 6'6" and weighs 220 lbs.
Bisons bring own Ball for hoop game
THE SKI  BUM
By BJORN SIMONSEN
Tuesday will see the opening ceremonies of the tenth Winter
Olympic Games in Grenoble, France.
The host city with a population of 170,000 is situated in the
foothills of the French Alps and boasts several fine ski areas
within a 30-mile reach. The best known of these is Chamrousse,
a fairly new but well established area with a wide variety of
slopes.
Just to give you an idea of how steep this year's courses
are, the men's downhill has an average gradient of 30 per cent
with a maximum of 65 per cent. It is expected that several
record times will be set with speeds up to 90 miles per hour on
the men's downhill.
The Nordic events which include cross-country skiing and
jumping will be held at three separate sites.
The French have geared this year's Olympics in favor of
the spectator. All alpine events end up at a specially constructed
snow stadium while the Nordic events are even better endowed
with accommodation for nearly 70,000 spectators at the 90 meter
jump site at St. Nizier. <Who said skiing was an individual
thing?)
Alternate standby trails have been readied at Alpe D'Huez
in case conditions at Chamrousse are not satisfactory.
A good prediction for the outcome of this year's games
would be a clean sweep for the French. (So what else is new?)
The second place honors could be a toss-up between the Aus-
trians, the Swiss and probably the Americans who are going
all out this year to bring home the medals.
What about Canada? As far as the skiing events go, Nancy
Greene may win some medals but she will be under the great
pressure of defending her world champion status and she might
also have trouble with the ankle she injured at Badgastein
about a month ago.
We may get some pleasant surprises from the team this
year, notably from Karen Dokka of Vancouver, who is skiing
almost on a par with Nancy Greene. Karen has been doing well
in the European racing circuit already this year and she has
the experience and confidence to win.
The games will be televised via Early Bird satellite with
the most coverage to be seen on the ABC network. If you are
just sitting around waiting to go to your 8:30 on Tuesday you
can also be an early bird by watching the opening ceremonies
at 5:45 a.m.
GOING BY CHARTER?
WHY NOT
LEASE A CAR?
Rates for Britain and Europe
Now Available
WORLD-WIDE
ON CAMPUS
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD — 224-4391
Manitoba's basketball Bisons roll into War Memorial
Gym for a pair of weekend
matches with the UBC Thunderbirds and the herd will be
trying to settle a score.
The Birds are tied for first
place in WCIAA standings
with the prairie club.
UBC coach Peter Mullins
expressed confidence his team
will take the Bisons. "We
should beat them. We were
without Ian Dixon when we
played them in Winnipeg and,
he makes a big difference,"
he said.
Mullins' club split with Manitoba in January, winning 73-
69  and losing 79-76.
The series gives UBC fans
a chance to see Manitoba's
outstanding guard Terry Ball.
"Ball's one of the finest players  I've seen   —  anywhere,"
said Mullins.
UBC athletic director Bus
Phillips is preparing for a
large turnout of spectators.
"We're   getting   much   bigger
crowds this year than we did
last year and these games
(with Manitoba) are the Birds'
most important so far," he said.
Both games start at 8:30 p.m.
eattft
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service
• Try Our
Pizza
"Pick Up"
ChooASL (L (Diamond
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal

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