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The Ubyssey Mar 14, 1963

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 Professors ready to bolt
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1963
No. 67
Faculty
morale
ebbing
By PAT HORROBIN
UBC could lose two-thirds of
its present faculty members
unless the university's operating grant is increased.
- These faculty members feel
they receive little recognition of
their worth here and have little
chance for promotion.
.They also complain that UBC
is losing its academic atmosphere and developing a second
rate graduate school.
Unless conditions improve
they are prepared to leave this
University and work elsewhere.
. These facts I learned Wednesday from a high-ranking member of the university faculty.
He requested he not be identified.
RECOGNITION
He said the faculty members
that are protesting are the
younger ones, the lecturers and
assistant professors.
"They want recognition, by
promotion, of their worth," he
said.
"A great many faculty members have been recommended
for advancement by their department heads and approved
by the administration only tp
be told the budget can't be
stretched this far."
Graduate students and research fellows will not be attracted to a shoestring-financed,
second-class university, and this
is what depresses the faculty,
he said.
As a result, he said, it is the
great pool of promising assistant
professors UBC will begin to
lose, in May, rather than full
professors and deans.
BACKBONE
Other academic centers can't
afford to hire our deans and full
professors, even if they wanted
to go — but they are eager for
our younger men, the present
backbone of the  teaching staff.
These men have been courted
by other institutions at various
times in the last few years.
But they have stayed because
of the new administration, and
a new, realistic arrangement
with the government, he said.
The faculty feels the University has been betrayed, he said,
because Dr. Macdonald'was invited to become president on the
understanding that he would try
to remedy UBC's ills.
"We-see the budget UBC was
Continued on r-a^e 3
SEE: MORALE
—Don Hume  photo
PERCHED on a stack of sandwiches, Moira Johnston, Ed I,
does one of a thousand and one tasks which Mac Backers
have had to do in the last week. Moira is cutting string to
tack together sandwich signs which will be used in Vancouver  petition-signing  blitz.
Dr. Macdonald gets pinned
-- with a Back Mac button
UBC President John B. Macdonald- was pinned last
night—with an "I Back Mac" sign.
Just before the annual Big Block Club's Award banquet
AMS treasurer Malcolm: Scott offered the action slogan card
to the President and he accepted.
Macdonald wore the card on his lapel throughout the
dinner but took it off before photographers had a chance
to record it for posterity.
He told the Ubyssey photographer on the scene that the
students  would  probably  take   it  the wrong  way.
H TODAY!
General meeting
starts at noon
Operation Crisis goes today.
The student battle for higher education begins at the AMS
general meeting at noon in the armory.
Students   are   requested   not
to attend classes until Monday
and to gel out and support the
Back Mac campaign.;
The campaign has the full
support of faculty and' alumni.
About 5,000 students are expected  to attend the meeting.
Student action committee reported late Wednesday that
every part of the campaign is
ready  to slip  into  action.
Faculty  members  have  been-
asked to join the march to the
courthouse following  the meeting.
Dr.  John   Norris   of   the   department of history, will speak
i to  the  marchers on  the  court-
i house  steps.
"We   will   make   history  this
j day,"  said Doug Stewart, AMS
president. "No one will fail to
take notice of us."
The general meeting will be
asked to- pass AMS constitutional revisions carried on page
7 and 8 of today's Ubyssey.
Present and future student
councils will attend.
Future
hangs in
ance'
ba!
By   DOUG   STEWART
AMS  President
Higher education in B.C.
faces a  crisis.
The people of this province,
particularly the university students, can and must attempt -to
overcome this  crisis.
In the past, the provincial
government has never provided
the existing public institutions
of higher learning with the
funds desperately   required.
This year the University of
British Columbia received only
34 per cent of the additional
operating grant needed to meet
its commitments and the demand which the province's
youth has made on it. Moreover, the University of Victoria
received only 40 per cent of its
operational require ments—
money urgently needed to
implement an academic program of sufficient and satisfactory   standards.
If the universities of this
province do not receive the
funds requested this year, and
if the present inadequacy of
academic facilities is not alleviated, the inevitable consequences will be:
• Considerably higher tuition fees will have to be paid.
• The province's present aca-
Conlinued on Papre 3
SEE: STEWART
THIS
IS THE
PLAN
Here's   today's   program
of   action    for    Operation.'
Crisis:
• The Alma Mater Society general meeting begins at 12:30 p.m. today in
the armory.
• Following the meeting, 500 students will leave
by hired bus for their
home-towns to begin a
province-wide petition
blitz.
• About 600 more students and faculty will
gather in front of Brock
Hall, proceed from there
io Sunset Beach then
march to the courthouse,
Georgia and Howe.
• Five thousand more
students are scheduled to
begin a city-wide canvass
for signatures.
• The remaining students are advised to join
in the petition campaign
by signing up at Brock
Hall.
• Faculty will decide individually whether to cancel, classes Thursday afternoon and Friday and Saturday.
• Students could be penalized for missing classes
if they were not cancelled
by the professor. However
this is unlikely.
• AMS president Doug
Stewart said there is a job
for every student at UBC.
"We must canvass every
single block in Vancouver," he said.
Action Committe coordinator Ed Lavalle said
out-of-town students who
have not been contacted by
the committee should come
to Brock Hall and pick up
petition forms. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  14,  1963
JWs
EDITORIAL: This m action day
TThis is action day.
And the action begins in a couple of hours.
Students will embark on one of the biggest, most ambitious and most urgent -projects they have been involved in
in a long time.
But many students are confused. They don't know how
they fit into the massive pattern which has been drawn up
over the past week.
This is what is happening.
All students leave classes at 12:30 and have been asked
not to return until Monday morning.
During the time they are not attending classes they will
take part in circulating a petition through every city, town
and village in B.C.
Most professors are trying to accomodate the circulation
of the petition by:
1. cancelling classes.
2: holding classes but urging students to skip them to
take part in circulation of the petition.
The result should be, if the students truly realize the
implication pf the present situation, that no professor on
the campus should have a class to teach if he shows up between noon today a±id noon Saturday.
Five hundred students will be the shock troop which
leads high school students and alumni in petitioning in all
the interior towns.
Another five thousand will lead the city petition.
Three thousand had signed up by Wednesday afternoon,
and another two thousand are expected to register in Brock.
Lounge all day today.
The students, it seems, have been roused to action.
The alumni are behind us. The faculty, even those who
feel required to continue holding lectures, are behind us.
Now its up to the student body.
Fifty signatures each isn't very much. But fifty signatures multiplied by 13,000 is a Hell of a lot.
Especially to  a politician.
Sfoedf a tear for lost punch
By  MIKE VALPY
Ubyssey City Editor
Shed a tear for the Back
Mac   campaign.
It lost its punch before it
ever got  into the ring.
And next week, if the campaign fails, student councillors and members of the so-
called action committee will
gnash their teeth and tear
their hair and blame everyone but  themselves.
For Operation Crisis was
bungled. It was sO badly
bungled by such a colossal display of stupidity and lack of
co-ordination that it will be
lucky to get off the ground.
_ These are not the opinions
of this newspaper. They are
mine. And I have seen enough
of Opration Crisis to know
they are valid.
This campaign needed two
things to be successful: a
strong united front—understood and supported by everyone connected with the University—and   good   publicity.
It  had neither.
So far it has managed only
to confuse the people whose
support it wants.
Mind you, everything began
smoothly.
Up until Monday afternoon
everyone had at least a basic
idea of What was going on and
the ad hoc student action committee should be commended.
In three days the committee
built an organization and
established a policy: boycott;
petiton;  demonstrate.
Then student council — reluctant as ever to take a
strong stand without being
prodded—got   into   the   act.
From then on the campaign
began to crumble.
Council     decided     not     to
strike or boycott classes (a rational decision) but to sacrifice classes so that students
could go on a signature hunt.
The only thing is, no one
bothered to tell the people
about  the change-up.
The Ubyssey, with a 4 p.m.
deadline, came out with its
boycott  story  unchanged.
The Province has an 11 p.m.
deadline. Council finished
meeting long before that but
no one bothered calling the
newspaper.
A Sun reporter was speaking to councillors after the
meeting and no one told him.
'So this is What  happened.
First of all, radio stations
and the three newspapers
carried stories on something
that  wasn't  right.
Secondly, students (and the
public) were convinced they
were taking the very action
council had discarded.
I presume councillors then
went into a huddle—after
blaming the press for inaccurate reporting,—to decide how
things  should  be  set  straight.
Their decision was ludicrous: subtly—but very subtly
—ask everyone to read sacrifice for boycott. Doublethink
revisited.
An Official Press Release
from the Official Office was
issued saying there had been
a change, period.
No explanation why council had changed things. Not
even a clear explanation that
things had been changed.
The downtown media saw
the press release and laughed.
A Sun reporter was given an
assignment telling him about
the wording change. On the
bottom was the notation:
Make it a funny.
It is easy to iihagine the public reaction. Who do these kids
think they're kidding? Two
days off from classes to get
drunk and they call it a sacrifice?
And consider the students.
All day Wednesday people
flooded into The Ubyssey office and asked 'what are we
doing.
Some students thought the
AMS was forcing them out of
their classes. Most thought the
boycott was still on.
Today The Ubyssey is carrying a front page story circled
in black pointing out there is
not a boycott and explaining
what student council me'aris.
On the day of whatever you
call  it.
Even though newspapers
tried to clarify council's policy, first stories always make
the  first   impression.
•
Talk of a faculty boycott
roused the anger of Dr. Macdonald, compelling him to issue a statement which, to be
honest, only confused things
more.
There was still no clarification of Thursday's program
and the faculty didn't help
either. They voted to support
the student campaign. Okay.
How?
Are classes cancelled or are
they still on? Will you be
penalized for missing a lab to
collect signatures?
Does Farmer Brown in
Moose Gulch, B.C. know what
we're doing? Or does John
Businessman   in   Vancouver?
Just , let one student get
drunk anywhere or do one
thing suggesting youthful
spirits and—kaboom! There
goes Back Mac, public respect
for us, and the increase in the
operating budget.
THE
Winner of the Southani Trophy. 1961 and 1962
Winner of the Bracken Trophy. 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star Trophy, 11J62
Authorized as second class mail by the Pest Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Publisher! three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Uhyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3241,
Locals:   Editor—25;   News—23;   Photography—24.
Editer-in-chief:  Keith, Bradbury
Managing Editor  ~ Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor Mike Hunter
City Editor Mike Valpy
Picture Editor     Don Hume
Layout Editor -   Bob  McDonald
Sports Editor  Ron Kydd
REPORTERS   AND   DESK:    Dave   Ablett,    Ron   Riter, .
George Railton, Ann Burge, Gerard Hivon, Lorraine
Shore,   Graeme   Matheson,   Tim   Padmore,  Richard
Simeon, Greydon Moore, Nicki Phillips, Karen Mac-
Connachie, Heather Virtue, Gail Andersen.
TECHNICAL:   Mike Atchison.
Letters to the Editor
Forward March
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In planning their campaign
of protest, the students have
deliberately avoided striking,
boycotting and parading. As
their spokesmen have explained, they believe such action to
be "irresponsible" and to have
"undesirable connotations".
It is my duty as an historian
to remind them that they are
insulting the legions of ordinary men and women who have
struck, boycotted and paraded
for the sake of freedom and
justice during the past hundred and fifty years. Strikes,
boycotts and parades are
peaceful means—not violent
ones—and they are among tne
few methods which indignant
but peaceful folk may  use.
Of course the students may
be right in deciding not to use
such methods to win more
money for higher education;
but that is quite another matter. Let them not despise the
methods of the Chartists, the
Irish Home Rulers, the suffragettes, generations of students
at the University of Paris and
elsewhere, and untold numbers
of the underpaid, the unemployed, the hungry, the oppressed and the neglected.
This   would   have   been   the
text of my history lectures on
Saturday morning — had I felt
well enough to give them.
Yours truly,
JOHN BOSHER,
Department of History.
T
Taxes up!
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am just an ordinary, common, ^miserable university student. In my heart I believe in
Christian ethics but my mind
is telling me to become damn
rebellious. Take this strike for
instance. The only reason I will
participate in its because I do
not want my fees to be raised
$100 (figure quoted). I realize
that the university needs finances for such questionable
things as a Student Union
Building.
However, let's look at this
whole issue with an objective
eye. When we strike for a few
days and get the publicity desired, and in the near future
the money desired, the Socreds
will be forced to find other
sources for revenue. After all,
we B.C. taxpayers want to be
kept debt-free, don't we?
To obtain the needed revenue, our sales tax could be
bumped up 2% — making 7%.
When you calculate the average student's expenses for one
year, you'll find that the $100
saved on fees, is paid out in
student taxes. But not only
students would pay the extra
2 % —all freedom-loving, debt-
free, B.C. taxpayers would pay.
If taxes aren't raised the
Socreds will find more devious
methods of raising cash. They
will cut down on Health and
Welfare and Hospital payments; they will raise the price
of licence plates to $30; they
would raid more bingo games;
they will introduce "new kickapoo joy juice" to compete
with "calona wines"; they have
already raised gas taxes and
formed a "government Econo-
gas Stations".
How would your freedom-
loving, taxpaying parents like
that?
Good heavens — it's enough
to make a man turn downright
Bolshevik.
Yours truly,
HOWARD RAFFERTY,
Member,
Student Brotherhood.
Selfish
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
With reference to the "unanimous" support being exhibited
by the faculties and students
for the proposals of the Action
Committee:
thousands of mouths roared
"revolution"
yet
no revolution came
for
one concerted roar turned
out
to be thousands of feeble
squeaks
dispersing
into the dark forest
which '
self-seeking man inhabits.
Yours truly,
OREST  NOVIK,
Forestry   4. Thursday, March 14, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
No better way
Gov't will heed
blitz' - McGeer
VICTORIA—The government should be influenced by a
public   demonstration for UBC,  Liberal  MLA  Pat  McGeer
said Wednesday.
#»BpiH«  __#__.   _F^ ■»■        "It is important to know how
STEWART
(Continued from  Page   1)
of     the"     increase
asked) as a deliberate insult to
duced to a much lower standard
than they have  now.
• Enrolment will have to be  Payer's   money   as thel  ff*   ls
limite'd—thus      preventing      a  in  the best  interests of all the
people.
the public feels about the
higher education problem," he
said, "and I can think of no bet-
Macdonald ter way to determine this than
the student blitz."
"We    elect    the   government,
knowing they will spend the tax-
— Don   Hume  pluiln
MASS OF BACK MAC LITERATURE was stuffed into kits which
bus trekkers will carry to people of B.C. after today's
general meeting. Sylvia Melamed, Arts I, above, was one
of hundreds who helped get the massive campaign rolling
Wednesday.
As usual
Prep hoop kickoff
was — like quiet
By IAN CAMERON
The  B.C.   High  School  Basketball  Tournament   arrived
like a lamb Wednesday.
As in past years, there were
almost as many players as spectators for the opener.
The few who did turn out to
watch saw a powerful Courten-
ay beat Prince Rupert by a score
of 50-37.
The second game drew a few
more people,  but not many.
Most of the noise came from
a trumpet in the stands, played
by a musician with a tin ear.
The tournament seems to be
following its normal pattern,
with larger and larger crowds
appearing as the finals draw
near.
About 4,000 turned out to last
year's    final   between    Victoria
High and Vancouver College.
The  tourney  started in   1946,
(Continued from Page   1)        , when    Vancouver    College    and
given for 1963-1964  (34 percent! Kamloops played in New West-
the University on the part of the minster.
premier," he said. since   then   it  has   grown   to
"The   operating   budget   was , 16 teams in tne final, from 114
supposed to allow for some new schools.
books   for   the   library,   not   to    —	
mention some new profesors for
the   1,000  new  students we ex-
Magazine sold out
in hour and half
OTTAWA (CUP)—Campus
Canada, the new bilingual national student magazine, completely sold out at Ottawa's
Carleton University within 90 _
minutes of going on the news
stand.
The magazine is published
by the National Federation of
Canadian University Students,
and was printed by the University of B.C   student society.
The Carleton allotment was
200 magazines, a number
equal to about 10 percent of
its student enrolment.
MORALE
considerable percentage of high
school students from receiving
a university education in British   Columbia.
• A number of our best professors  will undoubtedly  leave.
Our purpose should therefore be clear—to support and
further the development of
higher education in the province
by requesting that the provincial government:
• Take immediate steps to
provide the financial support
necessary to implement a comprehensive plan for province-
wide higher education.
• And provide immediately
the requested operating budgets oi the existing public institutions of higher education
in  B.C.
In order to insure the success
of this monumental undertaking I urge every student concerned to accept his responsibility, to sacrifice a few hours
of study time and miss classes
this afternoon, Friday and
Saturday morning.
I ask you to do this so that
we, as responsible students and
citizens of the province of
B.C. might:
• Better inform the people
of B.C. as to the gravity of the
situation.
• Ask the residents of B.C.
to write to their respective
MLA's supporting a fair deal
for higher  education.
• Circulate a petition requesting signatures from every
interested   individual.
"Their feeling however,
should be influenced by a genuine demonstration of public support for the cause of higher education," he said.
Dr. McGeer is an assistant
professor in the faculty of medicine at UBC as well as the Liberal member for Point Grey.
He was the subject of a scathing attack by Premier W. A. C.
Bennett in the legislature Friday, after he called for an end to
a "conspiracy of silence" between UBC's Board of Governors and the provincial government.
Wednesday, McGeer told the
Ubyssey: "I am trying to represent the people who elected me
as best I know how."
"If this is not satisfactory, as
the premier has more than once
suggested in the legislature, then
I am sure I will be replaced in
a general election which the
premier may call at any time,"
McGeer stated.
Action committee
needs 40 cars
Action Committee co-chairman Jim Ward is looking for
40 students with cars.
Ward said the cars are
needed to help transport student petitioners from UBC to
their allocated areas.
Interested students should
register at Action Committee
co-ordinating office above the
AMS office in Brock.
ARMED with a megaphone,
soap-boxer Dietrich Luth is
continuing to talk up operation crisis on the library lawn.
Bus blitz
ready to roll
on schedule
UBC's bus blitz will roll today  on  schedule.
Transportation organizer
Bryan Belfont said Wednesday
his quota of 500 students for
the out-of-town campaign is
nearly reached.
Buses will range from a 41-
seat express job to Prince
George to a seven-seater van to
Powell River.
Four cars left Wednesday for
more inaccessable points of the
province.
One is going to Prince Rupert
and others to the Peace River
country, Kimberley, Kitimat,
Cranbrook, Terrace and Smith-
ers.
Buses will leave from outside
the Armory at 2:30 p.m. today
(followins the general meeting)
and return to campus Sunday
night.
Whatever "became of:
Jess E. James,
CLASS OF '67?
pect next year," he said.
"And what do we get, instead?
"This obvious demonstration
that the government believes
there is no political use \ to be
got from even maintaining
UBC's status quo," he said.
"President Macdonald is not
exaggerating when he says this
is a time of crisis. This week's
action could' w«ll decide the
University's fate."
Chem Students
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A life-long student of transportation systems, James will be best remembered for
his provocative major thesis "Iron Hosses
I Have Broke In." Working towards his
doctorate, he formed a research team
with his brother and toured the West,
'akjng copious quantities of notes as
hey went. Soon the whole country was,
talking about the James boys and they !
were in great demand as guests of honour i
at civic parties (neckties to be worn).
Despite a reputation which grew by leaps
and bounds (mainly on to passing trains)
Jess E. James remained an elusive, retiring
person who spurned formal gatherings no
matter how pressing the invitation. A
superb horseman, Mr. James had a way
with colts. His untimely end came when
be was engaged in breaking in a new
one — a 45, to be exact.
Keep your sights on success M|iy DftMU'
by forming a good bank
connection -- a "must" for   'n3Jmuo^M^
success in any profession or
business.
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK WHERE STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS ARE WARMLY  WELCOMED
Campus Braneh in the Administration Building i-
MERLE C. KiRBY, Manager Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, ,
  —Bob   Flick  photo
DAVE AND ADA SIMMONS (Derek Allen and Joan  Haggerty)  perform the  symbolic  recreation of Genesis in this scene from I'm Ta Iking About Jerusalem. They are playing the
j    "game of life" with  their son  Danny.
talk about Jerusalem'
-■■". . (. * -,
v They'll',he Talking About play, opens Wednesday night,, -of^disillusionment and bitter-
Jerusalem in the Auditorium plays to a student audience ness; a commentary on the
next  week.                                          Thursday , noon    and   finishes state of our society today.
Friday and Saturday evenings. In it Dave Simmons  (Derek
The Players Club spring of-         rm   Taiking   About   Jeruaa- Allen) and his wife Ada (Joan
fering,     an     Arnold     Wesker     lem is the story of a failure, Haggerty),  two ex-communists
whose ideals have been tarnished by their experiences in
the Second World War, try tp
create their own socialist society.
As the play opens in 1946
they are moving into a Norfolk country house where
Dave, a carpenter, will adopt
the William Morris, ideal of
Socialism, building furniture
with the pride in workmanship of an old-fashioned craftsman.
As time passes—13 years
go by before the play ends
—the couple endure opposition from "the cynics, the locals, the family," and their
idealism and intellectual socialism learn to cope with a
pragmatic world.
The "rustic ideal" was
doomed from the start, and
when they finally realize this
the Simmons' move back to
London.
I'm Talking About Jerusalem is directed by Vancouver
actress-director Gay Scrivner.
well known in provincial adjudicating  circles.
In addition to those mentioned above, Patsy Mallek,
Larry Kent, Leo Buxdak, Walt-
ier Shynkaryk, Pat Dahlquist,
Sue Baldwin, Neil McKenzie,
Jamie Reid and Eric Green
will be in the cast.
The set has been designed
by Players' Club resident de-
singer, John Madill.
^ * r
malcolm lowry
The following is nothing more than a
brief attempt to characterize Lowry's
writing, with particular attention to these
two latest volumes of his work. Lowry
is indeed a writer; all of his work that
I have read is one vast connected and
self-conscious (in the best sense of the
word) monologue. It is not really fiction
that he writes—the various narrators of
these seven stories are only aliases for
the writer, only a formality to give a discreet aesthetic distance. Lowry's writing
could be said to constitute one journal in
various forms, moods, and tones.
Which is not to say that he has no conventional achievements. I think many
people who have read Under The Volcano
feel that it is the finest novel written in
English since Ulysses. Some of these
stories might be similarly acclaimed, except that they are not what one usually
thinks of the "short story" as being; they
are more of the type of Dostoyevski's
Notes From The Underground—discursive
writing which employs the mask of fiction and which has not the shape and certainty of the essay. Lowry is at any rate
a lyric writer, by Christopher Caudwell's
definition, writing himself rather than the
world. His character in each of these
stories is defined from inside, by thought
rather than by action.
And the consciousness which is presented is undeniably a tragic one; his
agony is in a full and sensitive awareness
of the world in the face of a condition of
personal doom. The impatience with the
modern world which he feels is incidental
to his concern with a metaphysical anguish which he feels in common with
writers ranging from Sophocles to Melville. His ability to project a somewhat
incoherent sense of torment and impending damnation is reminiscent of John
Webster. One remembers the Consul being a Webster fan (people should read
Webster more, if they have any realization of the place of terror in even mundane   existence).
Continuous, zodiacally subtle and
beautiful, as in Under The Volcano, are
his references to the stars—Lowry's mind
is omnivorous for metaphor; he demands
and finds correspondence everywhere in
the cosmos for his state of being. His subject is, not to put it too fine, a drunk on
his way down, but the mood of these
stories is predominantly pastoral, even
when they are set in cities. One, set in
Pompeii, is elegaic in mood, though fantastically complex in psychology and
structure. The material source of damnation is only occasionally, if ominously,
in the background, and all of the stories
move to a calm or even ecstatic close.
This does not inhibit but rather makes
more severe the tension between his apprehension of the world and his gnawing
consciousness of his own condition.
The profound agitations of the soul are
brought into high relief by t h e man's
worldly circumstances. This is of course
Hear  us   O   Lord   from   heaven   thy
dwelling  place
J. P. Lippincott, Philadelphia,  1961,
283pp.
Collected poems
C-\ty   Light   Books,   San   Francisco,
1962, 79pp.
the only way in which such a preoccupation as' Lowry's could be meaningful; we
go again to the Elizabethans, to Faustus'
cry to the horses of the night.
But in spite of the agility of Lowry's
mind, one never gets the feeling that he
is over-ingenious, trying to tease more
meaning out of his experience than is
warranted. He deals with his perceptions
with a winning sort of clumsiness and the
most frequent point of rest for him is in
a feeling of awe, as when Cosnahan, a
writer from the Isle of Man (sic) wandering through Rome, scourges himself of
petty preoccupations to arrive, at the
sight of a zoo elephant, at the wonderful
(in the fine archaic sense of the word)
source of his creative energy. The rhythm
of Lowry's realizations is a movement
from excitement to wonder, from agitation to calm. And these movements of: the
mind, though tortured and torturous, are
absorbing; they are crafted, and have pace
and high humor. He is classically, even
Homerically serious—agile, and ironic in
the most positive sense. His pun is the pun
raised to its highest power. Repeated
themes, images, motifs and emblems run
a complicted riot through the stories: "I
speak a sinister Spanish," he says, and
readers of Under The Volcano are caught
between a giggle and a shiver. This invocation of the sinister is another means
for getting aesthetic distance; by giving
events and thoughts such an import he
can at once achieve both the humor and
heightening he wants. >
Where he is most bald and discursive
.--WRITER
Lowry can slip into the sort of incredible
naivete and crassness which is the special
provincialism of the unchecked English
mind. But he is capable of denudation
which truly rings and hurts: from the
marginal gloss which counterpoints
"Through The Panama" . . . thus is able—■
ghastly image of the modern world—to
see what is happening at every moment."
And I mean biuris, assuming that Lowry
is talking about the plague of incessant
watchful consciousness that haunts and
is a part of all or each of us. And he disposes of Canada in just such summary and
brutal terms as have long been needed:
"Heart of England, soul of Labrador." In
"The Bravest Boat," a story primarily a
lyric and simple celebration of the fantastic circularities of existence, the city
of Vancouver is described without mercy,
only slightly and satirically disguised as
"Enochvilleport." But if this area ever
achieves immortality in words it will be
through the profound feeling for the inlet
and its shores expresssed in the concluding story, "The Forest Path To The
Spring."
Lowry's poems are mostly composed
of wit, drunken bric-a-brac and terrific
earnestness. They lack the substance, the
concrete experience which gives the
stories their emotional validity. They
show the quality of the writer's mind but
not the quantity of it, depending for full
effect too much on reference to the moods
and discoveries of his fiction, presenting
effects without the causes. The anguish
is derived from perfunctory symbols, the
compression gotten not from simplicity
but by resort to esoteric diction and allusions which demand special knowledge.
Directness is their virtue, but it leads
them too often into flatness. At his best,
directness isn't Lowry's way.
He  is  not a  symbolic  writer in t h e
sense of having an ordered and fully coherent symbolic system, though he seems
to have wanted most to be nothing more
astonishing than a good Christian man—
cariias is in almost every word of these
stories and poems, and the great fun and
exhilaration  of reading Lowry is in  his
moral realism; describe your hell in whatever terms,  the soul exists. His symbols
come inevitably as his  mind encounters
the world, and they  are universal symbols.   The   very  title   of   the  final   story.
| suggests   the   stillness   which   the   writer
i reached.   Whether   the   man   reachd   this
f stillness   is  entirely,   entirely  beside  the
j /point. —michael matthews
dawson/hogg
read friday
Dave Dawson, bearded
Tish poet, and perhaps, Bobby Hogg, will read Friday
in Bu. 202 at noon. Dawson's
work is characterized by a
sensitive evocation of the
Northwest locale through the
use of natural and historical
details.
Hogg's, work has in the.
past shown a bouncing energy. More recent work deals
with remembrances of romantic characters and places,
from  his  childhood.
To the Tish poets, Dawson
has provided the method of
finding and defining the locale, the poetic environment-
in which they live.
critic1
Layout:   Bob   Macdonald
i
VC5 eh 14, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
faust...
The legend of the aged
scholar who sells his soul to
the devil in return for earthly gain has roots that antedate Christianity. But it remained for the greatest of
German writers, Goethe, to
modify the tale by the addition of a love story and provide thereby the framev/ork
for Gounod's lyric masterpiece, the  opera  Faust.
Perhaps as much as any
other, this work epitomizes
the virtues and flaws of
nineteenth century opera and
the problems encountered in
wedding drama and music,
•j-ie compromises in Faust
lave resulted in something
which is not fully convinc-
ng as a stage piece and not
;venly conceived as music
)ut which somehow, especial-
y in the second act, triumphs
ts lyric theatre.
►t:W-.-
Editor:   BILL   LITTLER
The stage director is required to pull off magical
transformations and prevent
the plot from seeming ridiculous while the conductor
must give as much attention
to a warhorse melody like
the Soldier's Chorus as to the
exalted phrases of the second
act love duet, in order to
keep the musical continuity
at a consistant level.
It is to their credit that
the Vancouver Opera Association achieved as much success as they did in these difficult tasks. I felt only a little
disappointed that through
lapses in imagination they
didn't achieve more.
To   begin   with,   Gail   Mc-
Cance's sets were very traditional—and I admit that this
is a difficult mould to avoid
in   Faust.   Still   the   problem,
of depicting the old philosopher's gloomy  Gothic  chamber on the huge Queen Elizabeth Theatre stage was quite
well' solved" by- lighting,  the
prison scene less so.j.In fact
lighting was used, albeit imperfectly,     throughout     the
opera as a tool for dramatic
emphasis.     Suzanne      Mess's
costumes    and    Grace    Mac-
Donald's simple, briskly executed choreography provided
effective   embellishments.
The greatest non musical
problem in Faust lies with
the stage director, who
should try to make the large
operatic choruses look not
too unnatural and should
give soloists a feeling that
the stage is not merely a concert platform: Irving Guttman performed these tasks
well in previous VOA productions and capably enough
this time also. One might
prefer a marching to a static chorus of soldiers and I
for one was more than a little
amused to see Faust's transformation into a young man
accompanied by the emission
of enough smoke to conceal a
troop landing, but these were
minor points. Similarly, from
where I was sitting it was
impossible to see Mephisto's
wine gush from the tavern
sign. I also think it was a
bad   idea   to  microphone the
•—-Barry  Glass  photo
"I'LL SCRATCH your back if you'll scratch  m ine," says Richard Cross (right) to John Alexander in this scene from The Vancouver Opera Association's production of Gounod's
•    •    •
VOA's fine chorus in their
offstage scenes. If a spiritual
illusion was intended it
didn't come off. On the other
hand tricks like the devil's
first entrance, accompanied
by flashes of red and sinister
orchestral chords, worked
splendidly.
Now to the heart of the
matter, the music of Gounod's opera, the feature that-
compensates for many of its
theatrical weaknesses.
Richard Bonynge brought
to the pivotal function of conductor an appreciation of the
dramatic values of the score.
This could be heard particularly in the orchestral introduction, where the passages
portraying Faust's melancholy brooding were especially well developed even if the
lyrical theme of Valentin's
aria flowed less freely. Mr.
Bonynge's accompaniments
seemed at times a bit brisk
in lyrical passages and sometimes dominated the singers
but there is no denying he
kept the pace from dragging,
built climaxes skilfully, and
evoked good playing from
his  orchestra.
John Alexander's tenor is
a fine instrument, with a
ringing top, but a certain
elegance of style, a feeling
for smooth phrasing, needs to
be devoloped for Faust's
cavatina and love, duet.
Doris,; Yaiick's soprano is
suited to the role of Marguerite, the object of Faust's affections. One might prefer a
more sparkling rendition of
the Jewell Song though its
innocence and delight were
captured. I don't feel however that Miss Yarick was
quite able to summon the
soaring phrases necessary to
make Marguerite's plea for
forgiveness in the final scene
a moving experience.
Probably the singer who
made the most of his role was
Victor Braun as Marguerite's
brother Valentin. The possessor of an unusually clear and
vibrant baritone, Mr. Braun
always sang with an appreciation of dramatic context.
As for Richard Cros.s, who
as  Mephistopheles  dominates
the   action,   we   note   in   his
tall imposing figure and
large bass-baritone voice the
ideal components for the
role. His almost balletic
movements captured one's
attention almost as easily as
did his powerful, if not always subtle,, singing. Here
was a strong characterization which shows great promise- -7:»<fl
To produce an op^ra like
Faust, with all its stage difficulties and not a few artificialities and yet emerge victorious is no mean accomplishment. There probably is
no such thing as an ideal
production. In its favor the
present one makes a few
wise omissions and a change
for the better dramatically
in the order of scenes, away
from' tradition and back to
the original. The opera's
strength, aside from colorful
spectacle, which the VOA always gives its fair place, lies
with the vocal Tightness of
the music. And whatever
criticisms I have made of the
singing are made while believing that the general performance level is solidly professional.      —william   littler
Stanley Kramer's A Child is
Waiting is the first film in a
long time that I have seen and
felt that I have been cheated
out of the admission price. It
is the worst film of Kramer's
mediocre, socially - conscious
trilogy — On The Beach, Judgment at Nuremburg and A
Child Is Waiting.
The particularly soapy intro
ductory music gave me a forewarning of what was to come
— a sickly sentimental melodrama about the poor little retarded kids that act funny.
Kramer wants us tQ squirm
and feel sorry for these kids,
to do this he indulges in lingering close-ups of the children.
He even sends us on a visit to
the adult wing for the mentally
retarded. Here, again, the cam-
WAITING
susana y jose
Since 1959 when they first performed in Madrid, the
company of SUSANA Y JOSE has become synonymous
with the best in Spanish dance—with all its elegance, charm,
color, stateliness and verve. On the occasion of that debut,
Spanish critics spoke of a "fireworks of temperament and
fantasy," and in this, their own medium, Spanish critics
rarely misjudge.
Since that time, SUSANA Y JOSE have conquered the
dance loving nations of the world. They return for their
second North American tour with a brilliant history of international triumphs, capped with their recent EDINBURGH
FESTIVAL acclaim.
era lingers on the faces of the
patients. This method of storytelling reveals a distinct lack
of the objectivity found in
other documentaries on the
mentally incapable. Thursdays
Children is the best example,
although it is a film about deaf
and dumb children.
In the story of A Child . . .,
an attractive woman in her
mid-thirties (Judy Garland)
who has lost purpose in life
goes to the mentally-retarded
centre to seek a job. The head
doctor (no pun intended),
played by Burt Lancaster, has
a completely different set of
methods for teaching the children while Miss Garland adheres to the old ways. Hence
we have a conflict, a plot and a
melodrama on which Stanley
Kramer and his carry-on gang
can hang all the "holier-than-
thou" opinions. Just to give an
example, the understanding
mother   is   represented   by   a
Negro woman with six kids
while the incapable parents are
represented by Mr. and Mrs.
Widdicombe, both white, both
have college degrees and only
two children in the family.
As a result, the acting and
characters are typed and usually either underplayed or overplayed. As is typical of the
Kramer film, there is no character development throughout.
The characters at the beginning are the same as the characters at the end. Also Kramer
doesn't even bother to resolve
his conflict. Instead, with the
rather dubious help of director
John Cassavettes, he drags
some sickly sentimental scenes
on the screen in no particular
order except to keep up the
threadbare plot and the result
is a completely unsuccessful,
and even unentertaining film.
Stanley Kramer's cup runneth
over but it runneth over with
syrup. Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  14,  1963
PROPOSED   CONSTITUTIONAL   REVISIONS
By-Law 1 - Membership at Present
The  Alma  Mater  Society  of the, University   of
British Columbia hereinafter referred to as "The Society" shall be composed of active members and honorary members.
(1)    "Active Members" shall comprise:
(a) All registered undergraduate students of the University of British Columbia. An undergraduate
student shall mean a student who has not received
a degree from the University, taking a regular
full course in any faculty or taking a course partly in one full year and partly in another year in
any faculty or faculties, and a graduate student
doing work for a double degree.
(b) All students of affiliated colleges who have paid
the fees of the Society for the current University
session.
(c) All graduate and partial students who have paid
the fees of the Society for the current University
session.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 1 (1) (c) All graduate and occasional students
who have paid the fees of the Society for the
current University session.
By-Law 2 - Meetings at Present
(3) The President shall eall a special general meeting:
(a) Upon resolution of the  Students'  Council.
(b) Upon written request duly signed by 5 per cent
.   of the student body.
(c) Upon the written request duly signed by 100
active members of the Society with the approval
of the  Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 2 (3) (b) Upon the written request duly signed by 500 active members of the Society.
Social Work Students Association, (xx) Presidents
of Future Degree granting Faculties, Colleges and
Schools.
By-Law 3-— Executive at Present
(4) The duties of members of the Students' Council
shall be:
(b) The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Society and of the Students' Council. He shall be
an ex-officio member of all committees of the Society and shall undertake all such other duties
as usually fall to the office of a President of a
Society. . ■ .
(ii) The President may also appoint such further
members of the Students' Council to act in advisory and non-voting capacities on such other
and further committees and subsidiary organizations of the Society, as he shall from time to time
see fit.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 3 (4) (b) (ii) The President may also appoint
such further members of the Students' Council
to act in an advisory capacity on such and other
and further committees and subsidiary organizations of the Society, as he shall from time to time
see fit.
By-Law 3 - Executive at Present
(4)    The duties of members of Students' Council shall
be:
(h)    The Editor-in-Chief of the Editorial Board shall
CLIP THESE PAGES,
TAKE THEM TO AMS
GENERAL MEETING
lined  in  Section  (4)  of  tb,° Alma Mater  Society
Code.
By-Law 4 — Liability of the Society
at Present
(1) The Society shall not be responsible for the action and behaviour of any students unless:
(a) the acts are performed during and in connection
with an Alma Mater Society event, or
(b) the acts are performed in connection with a past
or future Alma Mater Society event.
(2) The Society shall only assume financial liability
for those acts which fall within subsections (a)
and (b) of section one above, and for damage inflicted on the campus by a student, if that student
can be determined.
Proposed Revision
By-Law 23 (1) The Society shall not be responsible
to the University for the action and behaviour of
any student or students unless:
(a) The acts, are performed during and in connection
with an Alma Mater Society event
(b) The acts are performed in connection with a past
or future Alma Mater Society event.
(2) The Society shall only assume financial liability
to the University for those acts which fall within
subsections (a) and (b) of section one above and
for damage inflicted on the campus by a student,
if that student can be determined.
By-Law 5 - Executive at Present
(2) The signing officers of the Society shall be any
two of the President, First Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer; provided that any one person does not sign in two different capacities.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 5 (2) The signing officers of the Society shall
be any two of the President, First Vice-President,
Secretary, Second Vice-Presid'eni, Co-ordinator
of Activities, and Treasurer provided that any one
person does not sign in two different capacities.
By-Law 2 - Meetings at Present
(9) The signatures of five hundred (500) active members of the Society shall be required for the calling of a special general meeting or referendum.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 2 (9) The signatures of five hundred (500)
active members of the Society shall be required
for the calling of a referendum.
By-Law 3 — Executive Council at
Present
(3) The members of the Students' Council shall be:
(h) The duly elected President of each of the following- Faculties, Colleges, or Schools: (i) Agriculture Undergraduate Society, (ii) Architecture
Undergraduate Society, (iii) Arts Undergraduate
Society, (iv) Commerce Undergraduate Society,
(v) Education Undergraduate Society, (vi) Engineering Undergraduate Society, (vii) Forestry Undergraduate Society, (viii) Frosh Undergraduate
Society, (ix) Graduate Students Association, (x)
Home Economics Undergraduate Society, (xi)
Law Undergraduate Society, (xii) Medical Undergraduate Society, (xiii) Nursing Undergraduate
Society, (xiv) Pharmacy Undergraduate Society,
(xv) Physical Education Undergraduate Society,
(xvi) Science Undergraduate Society, (xvii) Social
Work Students Association.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 3 (3) The members of the Students' Council
shall be:
(h) The duly elected President of the Frosh, Under
graduate Society and the President of the following degree granting Faculties, Colleges, or
Schools: (i) Agriculture Undergraduate Society,
(ii) Architecture Undergraduate Society, (iii) Arts
Undergraduate Society, (iv) Commerce Undergraduate Society, (v) Education Undergraduate
Society, (vi) Engineering Undergraduate Society,
(vii) Forestry Undergraduate Society, (viii) Graduate Students Association, (ix) Home Economics
Undergraduate Society, (x) Law Undergraduate
Society, (xi) Library Undergraduate Society, (xii)
Medical Undergraduate Society, (xiii) Music Students' Association, (xiv) Nursing Undergraduate
Society, fxv) Pharmacy Undergraduate Society,
(xvi) Physical Education Undergraduate Society,
(xvii) Rehabilitation Medicine Undergraduate Society, (xviiij Science Undergraduate Society, (xix)
be  responsible to the  Students'  Council  for  the
activities of the Editorial Board.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 3 (4) (h) The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey
shall be responsible to the Students' Council for
the activities of the Editorial Board.
By-Law 3 - Executive at Present
(6)    The Students' Council shall:
(g) (i) In accordance with the provisions of Section 28
of the Societies Act R.S.B.C. 1961, c. 362, the Society shall have the power to impose a fine not
exceeding $5.00 on any member who has contravened any By-Law of the Society.
(ii) For the purposes of this section, the Alma Mater
Society Code shall be deemed a By-Law of the
Society.
Proposed Revision
Delete By-Law 3 (6) (g) (ii).
By-Law 3 - Executive at Present
(6)    The Students' Council shall:
(h)    Have the power to amend or  alter the Alma
Mater Society Code by a three-quarter majority
vote.
Proposed Revision
Delete By-Law 3 (6) (h).
By-Law 3 - Executive at Present
(6)    The Students' Council shall:
(i) Have power to appoint Committees to control
student activities or for any other purpose, and
in particular, but without limiting the generality
of the foregoing, shall appoint the following committees: (i) Elections, (ii) Homecoming, (iii Frosh
Orientation, (iv) Brock Management, (v) Honorary
Activities Awards, (vi) Accident Benefit Fund,
(vii) Housing, (viii) Food Services, (ix) College
Shop, (x) National Federation of Canadian University Students, (xi) World University Service,
(xii) High School Conference, (xiii) Student Court,
(xiv) Discipline, (xv) Finance, (xvi) Constitution
Revisions, (xvii) Employment, (xviii) Publications
Board, (xix) Special Events.
By-Law 6 - Election of Executive
at Present
(1) The election of the Executive of the Students'
Council shall be conducted as follows:
(b) The first election shall be held on the first or
second Wednesday in February, and all elections
under this By-Law shall be completed not later
than, the third Wednesday in February. Provided
that if the University is not in session on the
first Wednesday the particular election shall be
held on the next day on which the University is in
session.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 6 (1) (b) The first election shall be held on
the first or second Wednesday in February, and
all elections under this By-Law shall be completed
not later than the third Wednesday in February.
Provided that if the University is not in session
on the day elections should be held the particular
election shall be held on the next day on which
the University is in session.
By-Law 7 - Election of Councillors
other than Executive at Present
(2) With the exception of the President of the Frosh
Undergraduate Society, President of the Social
Work Students Association and the President of
the Nursing Undergraduate Society, nominations
for all such elections shall not close before the
Monday following the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council. All elections under
this By-Law shall be completed within two weeks
of the completion of the last election of the Executive of the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
Proposed Revision
By-Law 3 (6) The Studeflts' Council shall:
(i)   Have  power  to   appointC^roitteis  to  control
student activities, ot for any other purpose as out-
BY-LAW 7 (2) With the exception of the President of
the Frosh Undergraduate Society, President of the
Social Work Students Association and the President of the Nursing Undergraduate Society, nominations for all such elections shall not close before the Friday following the last election of the
Executive of the Students' Council. All elections
under this By-Law shall be completed within two
weeks of the completion of the last election of
the Executive of the Students' Council.
(C0^riNU^ OH RA£§ 7) Thursday, March 14, ly<S3
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
(CONTtffUtD FROM PAGE 6)
By-Law 11 6) (f) - Discipline at
Present
(iii)   Judges and alternate judges shall be 3 unit officers of the Society.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW  11  (6)  (f) (iii) Judges and alternate judges
shall be 6 unit officers of the Society.
By-Law 11 — Discipline at Present
(6) (f) (ix) The Court shall be the sole interpreter of
the meaning of the Constitution, Code and By-
Laws of the Society and shall deliver written
opinion upon any portions thereof at the request
of the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
"BY-LAW 11 (6) (f) (ix) The Court shall be sole interpreter of the meaning of the Constitution, Code
and By-Laws of the Society and shall deliver written opinion upon any portions thereof at the request of the Students' Council or any active member of the Society.
By-Law 13 -Subsidiary Organizations
at Present
(12) Minutes and reports of both general and executive meetings of the Undergraduate Societies
Committee, Associated Woman Students, the
Men's Athletic Association, the Women's Athletic
Association, the University Radio and Television
Society, and the University Clubs Committee,
shall be forwarded to the Students' Council immediately after the said meetings, for consideration, ultimate approval, amendment, or rejection,
by the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 13 (12) Minutes and reports of both general
and executive meetings of the Undergraduate Societies Committee, Associated Woman Students,
the Man's Athletic Association, the University
Clubs Committee, and all Committees as outlined
in By-Law 3 (6) (i) and other subsidiary organizations w-hich tb,e Students' Council sees fit to review shall be forwarded to the Students' Council
immediately after the said meetings, for consideration, ultimate approval, amendment, or rejection, by the Students' Council.
By-Law 14 — Injuries at Present
(1) The Society shall not be liable for, nor assume
any obligation in respect of, any injury sustained
by any member or other person participating in
any student activity and a member shall not be
entitled to make any claim upon the Society, or
any of its subsidiary organizations, in respect
thereof.  Without limiting  the  generality  of  the
. foregoing, the Students' Council may in its absolute discretion pay or authorize payment to
any member or other person the amount of any
portion of the expenses of any member in respect
of any injury suffered by that payment in or
about the University, or elsewhere, if having to
do with the University activities, whether as a
result of participation in any student activity or
not. Provided that the total amount which the
Students' Concil shall have authority to pay for
and in respect of injuries during any college year
shall not exceed the monies in a fund to be known
as the Accident Benefit Fund. Council shall have
power in its absolute discretion to prefer one or
more than one case to the others, or to pay the
same in order of priority, or in any proportion
which it may deem fit. Such payments shall be
ex gratia: The foregoing shall be deemed to confer no right upon any member for any expenses
incurred by reason of injury as aforesaid.
(2) Requests for a benefit from this fund shall be
made to the Accident Benefit Committee who
shall be empowered to make recommendations
concerning any request to the Students' Council.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 14 (1) Notwithstanding anything contained
in By-Law 4, the Society shall not be liable for
nor assume any obligation in respect of any injury sustained by any member  or other person
as a result of any student activity, and a member
or any other person shallnot be entitled to make
any claim upon the Society or any of the subsid-
• iary organizations, in respect thereof. Without
limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Students' Council may in its absolute discretion pay
or authorize payment to any member or other
person the amount of any portion of the expenses
of any such member or person in respect of any
injuries suffered by the member or person in or
about the University, or elsewhere, as a result
of any University or Society activity. Provided
that the total amount which the Students' Council shall have authority to pay for and in respect
of injuries during any college year shall not exceed the monies in a fund to be known as the
Accident Benefit Fund. Council shall have the
power in its absolute discretion to prefer one or
more than one case to the others, or to pay the
same in order of priority, or in any proportion
which it may deem fit. Such payments shall be
ex gratia. The foregoing shall be deemed to confer
no right upon any member for any expenses in-
currd by reason of injury as aforesaid.
an active member of the Alma Mater Society as
defined in  By-Law 1   (1).
By-Law 22 -Eligibility for Office
Holding and Of ice Ranking
at Present
(1)    Student offices shall be ranked as follows:
(a) 20 Units—Student Councillors.
(b) 14 Units—Co-ordinator of Publications; Advertising Manager of the Society; Editor of Totem;
President of University Radio and Television Society; President—Associated Women Students,
Men's Atheltic Association, Women's Athletic Association, University Clubs Committee; Chairman Undergraduate Societies Committee; College
Shop Manager; Chairman—National Federation
of Canadian University Students, World University Service, Open House.
(c) 10 Units—Chairman: Academic Symposium,
Homecoming, Frosh Orientation, High School
Conference, Leadership Conference, Special
Events Student Union Building; Winter Sports
Committee members; Editor of Tuum Est and
Raven; Games Room Manager; Mamooks Manager; Editorial Board members: Ubyssey, Totem.
(d) 6 Units—Members of committees enumerated in
By-Law 3 (6) (i) and sub sections (b) and (c) above.
Club presidents; Executive members—University
Clubs Committee, Undergraduate Societies Committee, Men's Athletic Association, Women's Athletic Association and the Undergraduate Societies;
Justices and Clerk of Student Court; Chairman of
Undergraduate Society Committees; Editor of
Student Telephone Directory.
(e) 3 Units—Staff: The College Shop, all publications Advertising Department, Games Room, Mamooks; Club Executives; All members of the
Women's Athletic Directorate; All other student
offices.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 22 (1) (c) 10 Units—Chairman: Academic
Symposium, Homecoming, Frosh Orientation,
High School Conference, Leadership Conference, Special Events, Student Union Building;
Winter Sports Committee members; Editor of
Tuum Est, Raven, Campus Canada and all Undergraduate Society Yearbooks; Games Room Manager; Mamooks Manager; Editorial Board members: Ubyssey, Totem.
BY-LAW 22 (1) (f) Positions created during the course
of the year shall be evaluated by the Eligibility
Committee subject to ratification by the subsequent General Meeting.
By-Law 22 (3) Eligibility for Office
Holding and Office Ranking at
Present
(3) A student to hold any Alma Mater Society office as defined in Section (1) must be an active
member of the Alma Mater Society as defined
in By-Law 1 (1) (a) and (b).
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 22  (3) A student to hold any Alma Mater
Society office as defined in Section (1)  must be
By-Law 22 (4) -Eligibility for Office
Holding and Office Ranking at
Present
(4) A student to be a candidate for an Alma Mater
Society office must be eligible in one of the following categories:
(a) If his immediately previous Christmas examination marks have been registered with the Registrar he must have passed the equivalent number
of units required by the Registrar for the attainment of credit at sessional or supplemental examinations and a 60% average for 15 units and
more, 65% for less than 15 units. If he did not
pass his immediately previous sessional examinations he must in addition to the unit requirement
stated above achieve  a  65%   average.
(b) If his immediately previous Christmas examination marks have not been registered with the
Registrar or if his election is in the fall, he must
have passed the number of units required by the
Registrar for the attainment of credit at his immediately previous sessional examinations and a
60% average for 15 units and more, 65% for less
than  15 units.
(c) If he is not eligible as to his immediately previous sessional examinations and his Christmas
examination marks have not been registered with
the Registrar he may demonstrate eligibility by
presenting a letter from the professor of each
of his courses to show that he is passing the
equivalent number of units required by the Registrar for the attainment of credit at sessional
examinations and a 65%   average.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 22 (4) A Student to be a candidate for an
Alma Mater Society office must be eligible in one
of the following  categories:
(a) He must have a 55% average of the marks registered with the Registrar if 15 units or more
have been written during his Christmas examinations, or a.60% average of the marks registered
with the Registrar if less than 15 units and 9 or
more units have been written during his Christmas examinations. In instances where credit is
not given on a unit basis, the equivalent credit
will be at the discretion of the Registrar.
(b) If he writes less than 9 units of Christmas examinations or if his election is in the fall, he
must have passed the number of units required
by the Registrar for the attainment of credit at
his immediately previous sessional examinations
with an average of 55% for 15 units and more,
60% for less than 15 units.
(c) If he is not eligible under either of the two
above sections, he may demonstrate eligibility
by presenting a letter from the professor of each
of his courses to show that he is passing the
equivalent number of units required by the Registrar for the attainment of credit at sessional
examinations with  an average of  60%.
By-Law 22 - Eligibility for Office
Holding and Office Ranking at
Present
(6) Freshmen and sophomore students as defined in
By-Law 1, (except Student Councillors), must,
in addition, maintain this minimal scholastic
standing through the Christmas examinations ojE
their term of office.
Proposed Revision
BY-LAW 22 (6) (a) Freshmen and sophomore students
as defined in By-Law 1, (except Student Councillors, must, in addition, maintain this minimal
scholastic standing and an average of 50% in
examinations scheduled and registered with the
Registrar through the Christmas examinations
of their term of office.
By-Law 4—Alma Mater Society Code
(1) The Alma Mater Society Code shall be a code
of procedure of the Students' Council.
(2) The Students' Council shall have the power to
amend or alter the Code by a two-thirds majority
vote of a quorum of Students' Council. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 1.4, 1963
'tween classes
Squash finals
played tonight
UBC squash finals will be held today with men's novice
event starting at 5:30 p.m. at Racquets Club, 25th and Oak.
' . . .  . '■■      Men's     and    Women's     open
r+       I    I     i ± events   get   underway   at   6:15
Guetph to get
new residences
GUELPH (CUP) — Two
new residences, to cost almost
$2 million will be built at the
Guelph Federated College.
The residences will contain
200 beds each and construction will start immediately.
One residence will house
males, the other females.
£hinese
antagonism
only stall
■■■■ EDMONTON (CUP) — "The
;Sino-Sbviet dispute will not die
I .quickly, but it will probably
■have no more tragic consequences than the exchange of
sharp insults," said an Australian historian.
', Professor C. P. Fitzgerald,
'chairman of the Department of
Far Eastern History at the Australian National University,, told
J St UAE audience the first Clear
■^evidence of a split was shown
iover two years ago at a Moscow
meeting when Russian: criticism
«€ Albania brought Chinese complaints, and China walked out of
the meeting.
, Prof. Fitzgerald said China's
"opposition to the U.S.S.R. is a
stall for time until she is in a
.better bargaining position.
China, wthout nuclear arms,
fears compromising her position
in any disarmament talks, the
historian said.
By putting Russia in a position
where co-operation is unikely
she will be able to build her
own strength and be in a much
'better bargaining position, Fitzgerald  said.
1 The historian compared Communist China's position within
the Communist bloc with that of
;France within the Western Al-
"liance.
! Both nations have little regard for the United Nations, as
both oppose dealing with their
main ally and both want nuclear
power, not as a deterrent, but
for its prestige value.
Admission is free.
* *     *
NEWMAN CENTRE
St. Patrick's Day talent show,
Friday, 8 p.m., Newman Lounge.
Dance will follow. Everybody
welcome.
* *     *
TRC
Film and commentary on Venezuela by Leslie Rohringer, 8
tonight.
* *     *
UBC DEPARTMENT
OF MUSIC
Graduation recital of new
music by UBC composer, Peter
Huse, today, 8' p.m., Buchanan
106.
* *     *
IHC
Croatian night, Friday at 8
p.m. — songs — dances — full
orchestra, dance and refreshments.
* *     *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Miss Bernice Gerard speaks
on "The Death and Resurrection
of Jesus Christ," noon Fri. Buchanan 106.
•k       -k       *
WRITER'S WORKSHIP,
TISH
i David Dawson and Bob Hogg
read Friday  noon  in Buchanan
•k       k      -k
BIOLOGY CLUB
TElection meeting, Friday noon,
Bio. Sc. 2321. All members at-
tend.
•k       -k       k
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
Applications for positions on
the Leadership Conference Committee will be accepted until 4
p.m., Mon., March 8. All students  are  invited  to apply.
•k       -k      *
EAST ASIA SOCIETY, WUS
JV-miya Chakravarty discusses
the Sino-lndian border dispute
at 12:30 Friday in International
House.
Open discussion on Modern
Trends in Indian Philosophy,
3-4:30 in Lasserre Building,
room 311.
Fellowships awarded
to 15 UBC students
Fifteen UBC students planning careers in university teaching have been awarded Woodrow Wilson fellowships.
The   fellowships,    valued   at
LA PRESSE editor Gerard Pel-
letier will speak to Vancouver •
Institute Saturday at 8:1 5 p,m.
in Auditorium on "What does
French-Canada want?"
Cigaret
speculator
smoked out
PHILADELPHIA (CUP-CPS)
—A Russian student newspaper
has attacked an American exchange student from the University of Chicago for "speculating" in old clothes and cigarets.
No Soviet government action
was taken against Joel Picheny,
25, who allegedly brought the
material in from the U.S. and
West Germany.
The student paper, Smytena,
said "It is time to take this insolent American by the scruff of
the neck and toss him back behind the ocean. Maybe then
some of his compatriots will remember their conduct . . . some
students come to study, some
come to engage in this kind of
activity."
$1,500 plus tuition costs and dependency allowances, will allow the students to undertake
graduate work at universities
of their choice in the United
States  and  Canada.
UBC stands second in the total number awarded in Canada.
Toronto    received    24,    nine
more than UBC.
The awards are made by the
Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, New Jersey, to prospective
college teachers in an attempt
to close the gap between short
supply and increasing demand
ior future instructors-
Student winners are: Charles
N- Brown, physics, Victoria;
John M. Curtis, economics, -Vancouver; Dennis C. Healey, physics,    Abbotsford;    Terence    M
minster;  Cyril D. Hodgins, economics,   Vancouver.
Robert G. Laird, English,
Vancouver; Francis M. Lever-
sedge, geography, Vancouver;
Michael Stephen Mepham, physics, Osoyoos, a UBC graduate
now living in Quebec City.
Geoffrey T. Molyneaux, English, Langley; Rory O'Day,
psychology, North Vancouver;
Miklos Porkolab, physics, Vancouver; John L. Scadding, economics, Victoria; Denis K.
Sj.erve, mathematics, Penticton;
Robinson Taylor, history, Vancouver; James M. Varah, mathematics,  West  Vancouver,   B.C.
CORRECTION:
The date of the meeting for
"GOING :TO EUROPE", as advertised in Wednesday's newspaper should be Monday, Mar.
18 Noon in Bu 220—NOT Fri-.
Heaps, mathematics, New West-'day noon.
UBC CLASSIFIED
TUiOR Will tutoi English 100 and
200 LA 1 7227 Vancouver and New
"W estmmster.
WANTED:   Would   the   couple   who
■   ^rented   their  Mardi   Gras  costumes
from   Freda Butcher  of Whiterock
return  them  immediately or phone
)    Mitzi  at CA   4-9973  or  CA 4-9047.
FOR SALE: 2 Goodyear tires. 5.00x
16" with tubes, almost new, fit
Austin, etc. All for $18. Phone John
Bryan,  CA  4-9013.
FOE SALE: Vikingr record player,
nearly new, $40. Also table, chairs',
bamboo drapes, kitehenware. Phone
Ken,   MU   3-1460.
LOST: A set of Hi 101 notes in Bu.
100 March 7 at 9:30. I will need
these notes to . pass the course.
Please leave them in Lost and
Found  or phone  AM   6-6386.
AMONr woikin" at I xke Louise or
g-ential area this summer, mt°i
ested in taking a bike up tor das-
lonR ride? please call Judy G..
CY S-34H5 after 10 p.m. during
week,   not   Friday.
STOLEN. Will the kleptom •niac who
borrowed my briefcase from Science div. please return it there.
Take what wvou need but have pity
and leave me what you don't—Case
and  Contents.
LOST: Slide-rule Acru-math in college library, Monday. Reward. Call
Richard. CA 4T1519. Raincoat lost
some time ago. I have yours. Same
number.
TAKEN accidentally last Sat. 8:30
at Psych 100 lecture, Bu. 104—
olive-green jacket. Please phone
Pete,  CA   4-7700.   I  have   yours.
Your Career
If you are in your final year of any Arts course
you are invited to enquire about positions with National
Trust Company, Limited which present attractive opportunities for a career in trust business .
»
You may obtain information about the company
and arrange for an interview with its representative
through the University Placement Service.
FOR MORE
JACK
th. MILDEST BFST-TASTING c.oar.tt.

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