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The Ubyssey Feb 4, 1986

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Array lJti(.' Archives Serk
Bleed for the Red Cross today and tomorrow in SUB 207
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 35
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 4,1986
.,<m^
228-2301
Faculty vote affirms firing policy
By JENNIFER LYALL
The UBC faculty association
voted Friday to give the university
administration the power to lay-off
tenured faculty during periods of
financial crisis.
Faculty association president
Sidney Mindess said the results of
the vote—which passed 655 to
336 — indicate faculty believe the
motion was a reasonable proposal.
"It is the first step towards normalization of relations between the
faculty and administration," said
Mindess. "Relations with the administration   have   been   getting
worse over the past years."
The proposal, which has been
negotiated since the summer, incudes a description of the procedure
by which tenured faculty can be laid-
off. Once a financial crisis has been
determined a committee chaired by
the president will divide cutbacks
among faculties and departments.
Departmental committees will then
determine which, if any, faculty
members "performance is
significantly less than satisfactory."
If delinquent members can not be
identified, lay offs will proceed according to seniority.
Mindess said a "strong and binding appeal procedure which will
require the administration to prove
its case" will be used if a faculty
member wishes to appeal a committee decision.
Philosophy professor Gary
Wedeking opposed Friday's motion
which   he   said   "guarantees   that
there   will   be   victimization"   of
faculty members.
Wedeking said the university
should not wait for a financial crisis
to eliminate incompetent faculty.
"Tenure is a completely different
issue from financial exigency. . .the
two should not be linked."
He said in the event of a financial
crisis, layoffs should be made according to seniority, adding incompetency should play no part in
the decision.
UBC's board of governors approved the redundency policy last
year in July, without negotiations
between the faculty and administration.
Seshadri wins AMS
presidential
• :%\z
Lucky Simon Seshadri gets to run the Alma Mater Society for the next
year.
"It feels good, but I don't think it's really sunk in yet," said Seshadri
Monday.
Seshadri won the Friday election with 1,636 votes. Blair Longley was
second with 911 votes followed by Mercer and Jackson.
The vice-presidency was much more competitive. Rebecca Nevraumont
slipped by Nindy Duggal 1,783 votes to 1,596.
Incumbent Jamie Collins gets yet another chance to dazzle us with his
stunning portrayal of a Director of Finance. Collins had 1,470 votes to
Richard Fitzpatrick's 1,163.
"A student not a politician," Carol Pedlar, gets the opportunity to be a
politician after winning thecoordinatorof external affairs laurels. Pedlar
grabbed 1,239 votes to Chris Friesen's 1,094.
Martin Cocking defeated No Vote 2,268 to 836 for director of the administration.
No Vote took defeat as graciously as could be expected and intends to
run again in some capacity next year.
The new president, Seshadri, says he plans on getting together with the
new student council on Valentine's Day.
In the meantime Seshadri said he will be hitting the books for the next
few days in preparation for upcoming mid-terms. He will no doubt be an
inspiration to us all.
"Selfishly speaking, this is a really good year to be President with it being the city's centennial," he said. "I'm really looking forward to the coming year."
A. Pathy was unavailalbe for comment but rumour has it he was rather
perturbed that the AMS was too cowardly to put him on the ballot.
"Whether the polls show it or not, I'm in charge here," he said.
V
PLASMA
PHYSICS
— steve engler photo
AS SCIENTIST PREPARES for subatomic realm, he contemplates how mirror bought cheap from NASA solved
multiple problems. It amuses first year Physics students; it shrinks pride to proper Scientific attitude; it reduces the
occurrence of the tardiness-corner collision principle; and don't steal the neutrons!
BA builds foundation sotid
Attaining a bachelor of arts
degree is the stepping stone to a successful career said five UBC
graduates Friday.
In a forum entitled Life After a
B.A., five panelists including Ron
Langstaffe,   ex-vice   president   of
B.C. Forest Products; Ray
Williston, B.C. Cellulose president;
Murray Budd, Merrill Lynch vice-
president; Diane Millen, of D.
Millen and Associates; and Donald
Hudson, Vancouver Stock Exchange president, told about  100
Education ministers blast federal report
TORONTO (CUP) — Provincial
education ministers across Canada
have requested a meeting with
Secretary of State Benoit Bouchard
to review a federal report on post-
secondary funding they fear is "erroneous, incomplete and
misleading."
Bouchard will table the report,
which deals with funding levels in
1984-85, in the House of Commons
in the first week of February.
At a Jan. 28 news conference that
wrapped up a two-day meeting of
the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC), the
ministers said Ottawa understated
provincial expenditure by some $1.8
billion.
Asked about the request, Marie-
Josee Lapointe, Bouchard's press
secretary, said "I would not want to
comment before the report is tabled
in the House this week."
Nigel Chippindale, director of
policy and analysis in the educational support sector of the
secretary of state, called the report
a "factual accounting of federal
and provincial support of post-
secondary education" and said it
represented a "serious effort to
provide information."
CMEC chair Jean-Pierre Ouellet
said the provinces have seen only
part of the report, but that the inac
curacy "leads us to believe that
much of the statistical data
developed for use in the report are
erroneous, incomplete and
misleading."
Oullet, who is also Minister of
Education for New Brunswick, said
the provinces should have been consulted when the report was being
prepared.
However, the ministers stopped
short of accusing Ottawa of trying
to use faulty numbers to support its
plan to substantially reduce health
and education tranfer payments to
the provinces.
Instead, they dealt with transfer
payments separately and warned
that if the federal government goes
ahead with the scheme to cut $2
billion per year in payments by 1999
(a total of $6 billion), "the effects
on post-secondary education could
be severe."
"Provinces have developed a
variety of institutions—universities,
community colleges, technical institutions — capable of serving the
needs of our citizens," said a communique from the ministers. "It
seems counter-productive to erode
their basic funding support while at
the same time expecting them to address new priorities for the future."
New non-partisan group in Manitoba
has trouble fighting education cutbacks
By RICHARD SANDHURST
Canadian University Press
WINNIPEG — A unique attempt to link students, administrators and the provincial
government in fighting planned cutbacks to federal education funding
is failing because of internal
disagreements.
"Most of the groups involved
have been reluctant to take concrete
action," said Sean MacDonald,
University of Winnipeg student
council president. "Because of the
group's non-partisan nature, we've
had a lot of trouble coming up with
policies that everyone agrees with.
That's   why   we   haven't   done
much."
MacDonald said the group
represents students and administrations of Manitoba universities and
colleges and the Provincial Nurses
and Hospital Presidents. The group
is working with Manitoba's NDP
government, MacDonald said.
"It's essential to the future of
Manitoba that we stop the cuts,"
MacDonald said. "The cost of running universities and hospitals is increasing at a rate of 11 per cent a
year and it's just ridiculous to think
we can maintain the level of services
if the federal government goes hog
with the cuts."
Thirty-six per cent of the province's revenues in 1985-86 came
from federal transfer payments.
Tim Sale, Manitoba's federal-
provincial relations analyst, said 50
per cent of Manitoba's expenses are
in health care and education. Sale
said any further reduction in
transfer payments will directly affect the quality of these services.
A major problem for the students
is the government's priorities.
While Manitoba acknowledges the
importance of post-secondary
education, health care is the top
priority because it directly affects
everyone in Manitoba.
students at Cecil Green Park the
years they spent studying the arts
allowed them time to mature.
Langstaffe said his arts degree
gave him a solid foundation on
which to build a house, and added it
takes diligence and intelligence to
complete the degree.
Langstaffe encouraged B.A.
graduates to apply for jobs in fields
they are unfamiliar with.
Williston said an arts degree is extremely flexible and most things are
learned by performance.
Millen said arts graduates have an
advantage over other faculty
graduates because employers don't
want to hire people with "tunnel visions".
Arts graduates are "upwardly
mobile," she said.
Hudson said he, like other arts
students, had an inferiority complex when studying the arts.
"I felt very uncomfortable about
my middle of the road course," he
said, adding unless a job has special
knowledge requirements, the type
of degree pursued is not important.
"Students should have absolute
confidence in a B.A., he said.
"Once you're hired its achievement
that counts."
Arts undergraduate society president Mark Reder said the event was
"extremely positive."
Reder, also an event coordinator,
said the forum series, which includes a Feb. 6 law and civil service
discussion, and a Feb. 13 journalism and fine arts discussion, is
designed to improve the image of
the B.A.
The AUS, faculty of arts, and
UBC Alumni association have
jointly sponsored the events. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
Engineers monthly dies
campus groups cheer
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP) —
The engineering society at the
University of Waterloo has ceased
publication of its controversial
monthly newspaper, Enginews,
after years of complaints about sexist and racist content from the administration and Campus Women's
Groups.
"It is no longer feasible in this
day and age to publish a newspaper
that exhibits these biases," said
society president John Stephenson.
The UBC engineering society's
Red Rag, was officially "killed" in
March, 1982.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce Blorgs on this tiny
island kingdom said the soul of
Talkathon Merciless stormed out of
the operating room after his agonizing failure and subsequent death. I
should have succeeded in the
breakthrough brain transplant
operation, not that Slimy Soshod-
dy, screeched the crazed doctor all
the while destroying the equipment
of his past successes. Flunken
Doodleart says that vile rag may not
mention this poor man's failure due
to incredible moment of never-
before-seen pity caused by fever
brought on by much-abused piece
of literature. Photographers may
not enter the trashed site for fear of
further exclamations from
Doodleart such as: such immature
behaviour from so tragic a doctor
are not for children's eyes. The past
glories of the doctor are all forgotten as he remains in hiding,
pleading with the rag for Mercy,
Mercy, Mercy.
Stephenson said he wanted to
produce a high quality humour
magazine for engineers, but after
meetings with U of W vice president
academic Tom Brzustowski, realise
ed it wasn't possible. Brzustowski
was pleased with the society's decision.
"(The society) has made a good
choice. Attempts at improving
Enginews always slid back."
Stephenson said the newspaper
was folded to prevent the administration from closing down the
society. The newspaper was banned
from campus in 1983, and had consistently been criticised by administrators, including engineering
dean William Lennox, ironically
one of the paper's contributors during its first year of publication 27
years ago.
Reaction from campus women's
groups was positive. "Good stuff!"
said Angela Evans, student federation    women's    commissioner.
GRADUATION
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choose from   18 previews (proofs!
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The Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus is meeting in front of the
Main Library today, February 4, at
12:30 p.m. to continue their protest
against the Godiva ride and give
concerned students a chance to express their disapproval of the event.
|   THE DINER
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Tickets: $5.00 Students
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AMS BOX OFFICE
or Phone 228-5656
228-6902
Although Evans found it "scary to
see the university administration
force a publication to stop" she
considers such action to be a
smaller evil than the newspaper
itself.
Some students and past paper
staff were disappointed the paper
closed. Former editor Tom Fulton
said the paper had potential to
develop, and it was unfortunate
some previous editors "went out of
their way to offend people."
Johnny Myc, a fourth year
engineer, said "it's a shame. I looked forward to Enginews as a break,
as an outlet, and now it's gone."
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Accepted Tuesday, February 4, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Board urged to sell investments
Ubyssey Staff and
Canadian University Press
UBC Students for a Free South Africa want
to make sure UBC's board of governors pulls
the university's investments out of South
Africa by rallying at Thursday's board
meeting.
The board is considering a policy of
"selective divestment," selling shares in
those companies which refuse to comply with
the Canadian Code of Conduct for companies operating in South Africa.
The code, last changed in 1977, advises
companies to pay blacks equally to whites
and allows blacks to unionize. Alcan is the
only Canadian company which has filed a
report of compliance with the code.
"We want to tell the board that we want to
keep our hands out of South Africa," said
SFSA member horacio de la cueva Monday,
adding the rally will be 1:30 p.m. Thursday
outside the board meeting in the old administration building. "The only way to end
apartheid is to press economic sanctions," he
said.
The student councils of McGill university
in Montreal and the University of Prince Edward Island have stopped stocking Carling
O'Keefe and Rothman's products in their
pubs and campus stores in protest against
these companies' control by the South Africa
Rembrandt Group.
UBC's SFSA will be holding a referendum
in March to press the Alma Mater Society to
boycott O'Keefe's and Rothman's products,
said du la cueva.
South African law is based on apartheid,
which ensures supremacy to five million
whites, denies rights to 24 million blacks and
restricts the rights of almost four million
Asians and people of mixed race.
Meanwhile, contrary to CUP reports last
week, Dalhousie University in Halifax and
not York University in Toronto became, Jan.
21, the second university in Canada to "completely divest all holdings in corporations
which have economic interests in South
Africa."
At Dalhousie, board members disagree
about what divestment means. The university's vice-president for finance says $3 million
in investments is involved. Others say $6
million, and a committee of four board
members, two senate members, and two
students will sort out the dispute.
McGill's board will not tell students exactly how they will divest McGill funds for corporations linked to South Africa.
The board's committee on matters of
social responsibility told student representatives Jan. 20 they will rely on quarterly
financial reports to determine if the university is divesting.
"Divestment is going ahead," said McGill
anti-apartheid activist Nigel Crawhill, "but
the board has not changed its policy that
students do not have the right to know about
the internal workings of McGill's finances.
Fee vote Thursday
UBC's board of governors plans to raise student fees 3.6 per cent at their
meeting Thursday. The Alma Mater Society and the Graduate Student's
Society will both be presenting proposals about the increase.
Students want to see student aid increased at least as fast as tuition fees.
"Ontario is raising admission fees four per cent a year for the next three
years but at the same time increasing student aid eight per cent," said student science senator Kirk Hancock.
The average increase is 3.6 per cent, but average UBC undergraduate fees
are already the highest in Canada, especially in professional faculties, Hancock said. He added one fourth of UBC students receive Canada government loans and the average debt on graduation is $10,000.
Student board of governors representative Don Holubitsky said the increase is reasonable considering the financial pressure on the university
from the provincial government.
"I'm glad it's limited to inflation. Practically, I don't think we have a
choice," said Holubitsky. "The problem is we don't know what the
government finances will be. We have no indications they will increase
funding."
Weiner blames others
W i& fiS E
By ANGELA WONG
Gerry Weiner waxed and waned
during his speech to UBC students
Friday, but mostly he whined, as he
shifted blame away from the Conservative government for its current
political woes.
Weiner told 24 people in SUB 207
Friday, that affirmative action, a
policy which requires employers to
meet quotas when hiring minorities,
is a low priority. He wants people to
work in a "free, open, fair society
and not force compulsory quotas."
Said Weiner, "Give people a chance
based on merit."
As parliamentary Secretary of
Employment and Immigration,
Gerry Weiner has surprisingly little
to say about employment opportunities for graduating students, but
said "society should make room for
today's graduates so they can utilize
the skills they have learned in
school."
Weiner's work in External Affairs during Joe Clark's term has
taken him to Russia, China and
Central America. He said his travels
have helped Canada open new
markets. He said the Pacific Rim
will open up a new market for B.C.
"They need the technology and expertise beneficial to you and B.C."
He praised the Conservative
government for already decreasing
the national debt by 3-4 billion
dollars, and added people can expect a similar decrease in another
five years.
He said people should not assume
unemployment insurance is a basic
right. "Who can afford Unemployment Insurance and pensions to the
year 2000?" he asked.
Weiner did not apologize for the
mistakes his fellow MPs have made.
"Good people make mistakes and
they get blown out of proportion.
Maybe they should go to a can-
didate's college.     :   ;   f
Weiner also rel^i^ to; the
Suzanne Blais-Grenier anatr (Blais-
Grenier resigned her post when a
refinery in Quebec was shut down)
and said MP's should be judged on
jobs and unemployment, not
mistakes made in tuna, the refinery
in Quebec or a tape given by someone 25 years ago."
Weiner   defended   the   govern
ment's policy of privatizing Canadian industries and putting them in
Canadian hands. "We're going to
sell Petro-Canada and Canadair,"
he said.
"Dehavilland ... is the sweetest
deal the Canadian government gave
to people," said Weiner.
- susce pekt photo
FACULTY LOUNGE TEMPORARILY closed for renovations after attacks by paint-wielding vandals. U.F.O.s
sighted in the area have officially been charged but students in the vicinity at the time claim militant groundhogs
are to blame for the dastardly deed. Reports of random earthquake activity are also in being investigated.
Federal government dumps
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Katimavik youth volunteer program,
which involved 20,000 young people during its ten years of existence,
died last week without a sound of
protest in the House of Commons.
But down the hall Senator Jacques Hebert, who founded the program, read his colleagues a blistering open letter to prime minister
Brian Mulroney, attacking the decision "on the pretext that times are
hard, to pass up this marvelous investment in the future."
Secretary of State Benoit
Bouchard met Hebert and
Katimavik administrators Jan. 28 to
inform them the $19 million funding for the program was being cut.
"He said after ten years we have
to try something different," Hebert
said.
Bouchard's office said the money
would be redirected to job creation
programs from the ministry of
employment and immigration, or to
other programs that will soon be
announced by the ministry of
youth.
But   Lisa   Van   Deusen,   press
secretary to minister of youth An-
dree Champagne, would not supply
any details of these future programs. And she said Champagne
took no part in the decision to close
Katimavik.
"This was a decision of the
secretary of state," Van Deusen
said.
"Priority number one is jobs,"
said Bouchard's press secretary,
Marie-Josee Lapointe. "For a $20
million program that reaches 2,000
people, we thing that we can do bet
can turn into a Volkswagen program .''
Youth's main concern is jobs,
she said, and Katimavik is not a job
creation program.
"Bullshit!" said Hebert when
asked about Bouchard's statement
he had replacements for Katimavik.
"I don't believe a word of it."
The Liberal and New Democratic
parties have been silent on the cut.
The day after Katimavik was shut
down, the parties instead spent 45
course
about   a  bugging  of the   Liberal
caucus 23 years ago.
The program pays the shelter and
food costs for 2,000 young people a
year, to work for nine months on
community projects and in social
work in three different provinces.
One of these three-month periods is
spent in a French-speaking region.
Hebert predicted the House of
Commons would be flooded with
petitions from the 20,000 or more
Katimavik    participants   across
people, we tning tnat we can ao oet-    uown, me parties instead spent 43     Katima
ter. It's a Cadillac program that we    minutes asking the prime minister    Canada
B.C.'s wilderness threatened by logging
By DENNIS SELDER
Saving Moresby Island from logging gives British Columbians a
chance to do something special,
David Suzuki said before the Provincial Wilderness Advisory Committee Saturday.
Although plants would grow on
the island again if it were logged,
the plants would be different ones;
so would many of the animals, he
llitoves steed irreplucocibles
The RCMP has still not caught the thieves who stole 130 data discs
which contain irreplaceable information from the UBC based wood
products research institute, FORINTEK, last week.
Pat Bottomley, FORTINEK officer, said the discs contained between five to 10 years of research on field results of wood preservatives. ' ..'".,  . '•'ii?ft
Two apple computers were also stolen.
Bottomley said she could place a dollar value on the missing discs
which contain the work of about 90 researchers.
Bottomley suspects someone wanted to use the discs for blanks,
because the theft included two computers.
"I have no idea if we will get it back," she said.
Forintek currently has a contract with the federal government,
most of the provincial governments national research funding, and
members of the public.
said.
Moresby Island is in its pristine
state, making it one of the rarest
places in the world, said Suzuki, adding science is never absolute; our
most sophisticated models of nature
fall far short of their actual complexity.
To predict the effects of even
careful logging in places such as
Moresby is gross optimism and
pompousness, he said.
The Wilderness Advisory Committee, a group of eight panelists set
up by B.C. environment minister
Austin Pelton will recommend to
the provincial government how
many of the wilderness sites they
are considering should be logged,
and to what extent;
• ;ld*ly five and* a half per ceni<>f
B.C.'s land area is protected from
logging now, said B.C. heritage
caucus member Peter Dooling, asking the committee recommend some
of these areas not to be logged. The
legislation protecting those areas
could be changed, he said. Peter
Sansburn, mayor of Port Alice, is
certain his town will face serious
unemploymeni problems if
prevented from logging Moresby.
He demonstrated what percentage
of B.C. land area Moresby
represents by dumping five
millilitres of water into a large
measuring cup.
The Haida artist Bill Reid called
Moresby "A place to go to heal us
of all our wounds," a place where
we see "ancient murrelets and puffins with fish dripping from their
bills."
He said the theft of this aldn
which was first an accident, would
now become conscious. If the land
is given over to logging, "the Haida
will lose the only link they have with
their distinguished past," said Reid.
Dooling said: "The wilderness is
a unique Canadian metaphor,
capable of representing to the world
who we are and what we
represent."
The heritage caucus made 10
recommendations to the advisory
committee calling for specific
legislation to determine the relative
importance of parts of B.C.'s
natural space. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
Generalize
B.C. Cellulose and the Vancouver Stock Exchange have
something other than capitalism in common.
They, along with many other companies, have presidents who
originally got a bachelor of arts degree.
Along with three other successful business people at a faculty of
arts forum Thursday, they said their B.A.'s helped them in their
careers, while overspecialization wouldn't have.
But they did more than just work for a job while they were studying at UBC. They expanded their awareness of the ideas necessary
to be full members of society. They studied arts.
Instead, of slogging away at an accounting degree, they did
something and worthwhile and took courses about how people live
and think from departments like political science, history,
philosophy, english and geography.
And since arts courses prepare people to fully appreciate their
role in society, students in professional programs should be encouraged to take in at least a few of the intellectual delights over in
the Buchanan building.
Former British prime minister Harold McMillan had an interesting
insight on what studies are important:
"Nothing that you can learn in your studies will be of the
slightest use to you in afterlife — save only this; that if you work
hard and intelligently, you should be able to detect when a person
is talking rot and that in my view, is the main, if not the sole purpose of education."
Letters
Stewart imitates bomb, provoking a reaction
Duncan Stewart's article, "Was
disaster inevitable" (Ubyssey Jan.
31) provoked a lot of different reactions in people. The explosive
power of his prose affected
everybody and it is a little hard to
understand all of their reactions.
Some who read the article after
their first class (Friday) raised their
eyebrows, shrugged, and went
about their usual business. They,
like all of us, knew that a disaster
like this was bound to happen
sooner or later, and that each successive Ubyssey was merely a
postponement of the inevitable.
But not everyone reacted in this
accepting way. Some older students
compared this disaster with the feelings that they had when they first
read 'The National Enquirer'. Friday will turn out to be a day that
some people will remember the rest
of their lives, and will always
remember where they were when
they first read the article. I don't
know about you, but I felt that
way. That edition of the Ubyssey
meant a lot more to me than the
destruction of a billion dollars
worth of technology. I wonder why
I spent my first hours that morning rereading the article, trying to
make some sense of it. Time after
time, I read the words, examined
the syntax, and watched those tiny
flames creep up the paper as I set
fire to copy after copy. Within
milliseconds the article was all gone,
only a foul vapour and black ashes
remained. No matter how often it
was explained and analysed, I still
refused to accept what I'd read.
Then I had to take a walk across
campus to deliver a letter bomb.
Going past students, even people
just walking from one place to
another. They probably knew all
about it, but it just didn't make
sense, that they could walk as if
nothing had happened. I wanted to
run up and grab them, to shake
them, to ask them, didn't they
know what had happened?
I'm not really sure what it was I
wanted them to do. How should
they react differently? How should
they move, how should they talk
after "the article"? The problem
was, my world had changed, but the
people hadn't.
The Ubyssey was the culmination
of everything we have stood for
since we first left high school a step
and a light year behind.
Newspapers contain thought and
reason, and the Ubyssey was the
ultimate. Maybe not the ultimate
hope of the future, those are Expo
and the ALRT. Maybe not the
ultimate of creativity, those are
B-lot and the numbering system in
the Buchanan buildings. The
Ubyssey was the ultimate reading
experience. It was our most complex creation, and as I saw it, as
close to perfection as we have ever
attained.
I'm not saying I believe in the
following, but the whole thing
makes some kind of sense if you
believe that humans were not meant
to read and write. If we are being
presumptuous, and some God or
Goddess disapproves of what we
are doing, what better way of showing it? This article shows a brain cell
annihilation that was so swift and
so complete that one can almost imagine a divine hand of retribution at
work.
Even if such is not the case, the
Ubysseys to which we had grown so
accustomed were not perfect. While
I knew that newspapers could not
be failure proof, I subconsciously
believed that nothing could go
wrong with the Ubyssey. It may
have been foolish, but I believed in
the Ubyssey and in newspapers in
general. The atomic bomb must
have caused similar feelings to those
alive in 1945. But all I know is that
the printing of this article brought
to an end all my ultimate belief in
reading.
Other articles will go to press,
and newspaper writing will rise to
new heights and accomplishments.
1 do believe that human destiny
transcends one very small article
and that human accomplishments
will number more than Friday's
Ubyssey. But the failure of this article makes this harder to believe than
before. E.T. left a message on this
planet that all can aspire to.
"Phone home." Duncan Stewart's
article hasn't changed that ideal, it
has just made the other party more
difficult to reach. And maybe that's
the biggest tragedy of the episode.
Maybe that's why I want to reach
out and touch someone . . .
Cathy Hunt
arts 9
Engineer objects to peeping torn parade petitioners
February is quickly approaching
and with it comes the Lady Godiva
ride. This ride has been deemed by
some as sexist and responsible for
much of the sexism and sexual
discrimination that exist on this
campus, by some others as plain
and harmless fun outside the
classroom, and by still others as indicative of the lack of morals and
self-government on the part of the
Engineering Undergraduate Society
(EUS). I would like to point out a
few things on behalf of the EUS.
In her letter, "Why can't
engineers think less selfishly," (The
Ubyssey, Jan. 17) Sara Scott mentioned that we, the engineers, don't
think about the people we "hope"
to offend through the event, implying that the ride is staged to purposely offend them. Perhaps he/she
(I don't wish to be labelled as sexist
by presuming the sex of this person
on the basis of the first name alone)
ought to revise his/her line of thinking. No one in his/her right mind
will do anything for the sole purpose of offending others. He/she
also seems to think that the
engineers are all driving Mercedes-
Benzes and wearing custom made
shirts — where daddy has paid for
everything since day one.
Are you saying Sara, that all
those who choose to enter the faculty of Applied Science are non-self-
supporting or are you saying we
have no notion of the real world?
That we are not aware that there are
some such things as rape, incest,
and secretary has to go to bed with
boss to get raise, and that they still
exist today? This 36th day of 1986?
If you must know, we are as aware
of these problems as anyone else is,
and are more than happy to see
them stamped out for good. Having
the ride stopped, however, is not
going to do it.
Furthermore, I still cannot appreciate why some people are so
provoked by this supposedly non-
offending event. I can see their line
of reasoning behind it, but I don't
feel the same way they do, threatened, frustrated or otherwise, nor do
those female engineers whom I
know.
In fact, I have reasons to believe
that not all people who signed the
petition of CASC are willing to take
a deterministic stand. Firstly, if I
am neutral on this issue, when someone comes up to me asking me to
scrawl my John Henry on that
sheet, I am really being forced to
take a stand. Signing it would mean
I am con and not signing it would
mean I am pro. Also, it would be
hard for me to refuse to sign once
the pen is in my hand, and many
people would say "what the heck!"
and sign it anyway.
You may ask what happens when
you don't wish to sign. The following was what happened to me as I
was leaving SUB the other day.
"Excuse me. Would you like to
sign this petition to have the Godiva
ride stopped?"
The lady was right in my
pathway, and I tried to veer my way
past her, only to have her stop right
in front of me, with her pad and
pen. Now, I had to tell her.
"Well, actually, I'm really for
the ride. But would you care to explain to me, briefly perhaps, what is
it that really bothers you?"
"Well, . . . it's degrading to
women and . . . (and she spots her
partner) . . . here, we have this pamphlet and it can probably explain it
better than I can."
"Oh! OK! Thank you."
The exchange brings up two
points. By stopping me in my path
again, she has, in effect, applied
pressure (albeit soft pressure) on me
so I had to come up with a decision.
Secondly, even the petitioners do
not seem to know the issue very
well. The letter of Bonnie Yoon,
"Geers nice but Godiva isn't,"
(The Ubyssey, Jan. 17) has exactly
the same characteristic (. . . blatantly promotes sexism (which does not
need) further elaboration . . .). Of
course, only Bonnie can tell us
whether he/she was simply trying to
keep the letter brief or was avoiding
the discussion altogether.
Finally, I would also like to point
out that a large number of people
who oppose the ride do so because
they were misled in one way or
another. For example, iceballs and
eggs suggest premeditated violence;
no woman department heads is
another popular belief. These have
already been discussed by other letters to The Ubyssey. The point is,
all you have to back yourselves up
with is pretty well the issue of the
degradation of women as a whole,
and knowing that it is not a very
robust excuse, you had to add a little gas and a little paper to get the
fire going.
Degradation of women may not
be a small issue, and yes, it does exist. It is alive and kicking. Killing
the ride, however, is not gonna help
much. Rape and incest and sexual
discrimination and sexism and what
not existed long before the ride
came along, and I personally don't
think we'd have any less of that no
matter what happened to the ride.
Give the geers a break.
Yung-Tsin Hsi
civil engineering 4
THE UBYSSEY
February 4, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"The moon is blue in June" ranted Ed Mou. Steve Chan tripped the lighter side of fantastic.
Trumpets blared and banners flew as David Ferman and Michael Groberman strode into the room.
You've aged before our eyes cried Gordon Clark, bursting into tears Lise Magee and Steve Neufeld
formed a line (a short line) as Debbie Lo changed ancient incantations. Camile Dionne passed the
torch to Stephen Wisenthal who combusted, not so spontaneously, and Karen Gram chortled with
glee. Renate Boerman, Amanda Wong, and Jennifer Lyall decided that Coke is it and the room began
to swim before their eyes. Svetozar Kontic saved the day by tilting it back but not before Gordana
Rasic had discovered gravity. Dalbir Tiwana, Corinne Bjorge and Joel Silverman disappeared in a puff
of smoke. Dennis Selder, a bright-eyed newstaffer, was concerned about masthead linguistics. Tuesday, February 4, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
mmmmmfmmmmmm
fetters
Dancing feet will aid Vancouver food bank
A group of students from UBC,
through the auspices of International House, are organizing a
food and cash drive with all proceeds going to the Vancouver Food
Bank. A 28-hour Dance Marathon
will be held at International House,
1783 West Mall, UBC beginning at
8:00 p.m., Friday, February 14th,
Valentine's Day and ending at 12:00
midnight, Saturday, Feb. 15th.
Sponsorship of Dance-a-thon
participants by their friends either
with canned food or cash, as well as
Election delays bursary
an admission charge in canned food
or cash will all go to assist the Food
Bank.
Sponsorship is on a per half hour
basis or with a pre-fixed total
amount. While the Dance-a-thon is
for 28 hours, participants may
dance for as long as they wish, with
as many breaks in between their
total dance time as they want.
Sleeping bags are welcome and food
will be available at International
House. A pancake breakfast will be
served at 9 p.m., Saturday.
Even  without  sponsorship,  the
admission charge of $3.00 in cann-
I wish to thank the thousand
students who voted for me and
assure them that the availability of
the Rhino bursary has only been
somewhat postponed by the reelection of the incumbent AMS executives.
Their likely continuation of the
de facto veto of Student Council's
motion to "help promote the programme" could hamper the need
for more publicity to communicate
the complexity of tax credit benefits
to students, their friends and
families.
But, I already have my letters
from Ottawa confirming the opinion that what I have done is correct. More importantly, in the last
few weeks of 1985 I managed to
create five bursaries worth more
than $500 each for UBC students.
By the summer of 1986 two
things will have been demonstrated;
first the 1985 tax return will prove
Rhino bursaries are actually legal,
which is more than the present
theoretical legality, and second the
federal government is not going to
be able to change the legislation
within 1986.
Assuming these two events
transpire as I predict, the precedent
will be firmly established and the
stage set for a large scale utilization
of tax credits to create Rhino Bursaries (and Jacques Ferron
Memorial Scholarships) for
September of 1986.
It is important to realize that the
aggregate potential for Rhino bursaries on UBC's campus is orders of
magnitude greater than the annual
AMS budget. Moreover, the financial potential could be doubled if we
had a Rhino B.C. party to complement the federal Rhinoceros Party's
willingness to use its registered
status to create bursaries for
students.
Being president of the AMS
could have assisted me greatly in the
short-term in promoting the idea
that paying a particular student's
tuition fees is a bona fide registered
political activity that contributors
may choose to do. But nevertheless,
perhaps the new members of the
AMS executive or the new students'
council members will realize and
have it sink in by summer of 1986
that I am offering students
something of extraordinary value,
namely an original and creative idea
with immediate practical applications.
A thousand student voters had
faith in the resourcefulness of new
ideas, but several hundred more
wanted to stay within the confines
of the old bureaucratic procedures,
which was the social habit that
everyone, including myself, expected as the outcome of this election.
Therefore, at present I am caught
in a Catch 22 of implementation
obstacles. I don't have the funds
nor the personal time and energy to
singlehandedly promote and
publicize this opportunity enough
to make it popular and it will not be
popularly participated in until it is
promoted and publicized.
As long as the AMS executive
continues their de facto veto of student council's motion to "help promote the program" it will be much
slower in getting started and
students at UBC will miss out on
millions of dollars of bursaries that
they could otherwise have claimed.
Pro-choice movement sensationalizes porn
ed food or cash will help the Food
Bank. With a sponsorship card,
available from the International
House office, the admission charge
is $1.50 in canned food or cash.
Every pair of dancing feet will
help, along with your support and
promotion of the event. For more
information, please contact the
I.H. Office at 228-5021. Together
we can all make Valentine's a success for the Food Bank.
Rorri McBlane
director, international house
Kevin Shelly
dance-a-thon coordinator
Blair T.
Longley
arts 3
There are few social issues that
arouse controversy like abortion.
With such a controversial issue,
many people are adamant in their
beliefs. However, a lot of people
are not aware of both sides of the
issue. Debbie Lo's article in the
Nov. 28 Ubyssey, "Inquiry Puts
Abortion Law on Trial," is very
convincing unless one is aware of
the other side of the issue.
This article gives the impression
that women seeking an abortion
must battle to all ends of the earih
to obtain their desired operation. In
fact, the reporter goes as far as to
state that abortions are illegal. The
law states, and I paraphrase, that a
woman may be granted an abortion, if carrying the baby will affect
her health. Health, in this case, can
mean mental, physical or emotional
health. Hospitals have taken advantage of the ambiguity of the term
health, and approving abortions
has become a matter of rubber
stamping.
Give blood between classes
This week, the Forestry Undergraduate Society is co-sponsoring a blood
drive for the Red Cross. Giving blood requires very little effort, just a half
hour, between classes, and the result could be a life saved. Everybody
counts in this game, nobody's just a drop in the bucket.
During this week, we will be giving away two dinners from the Keg Coal
Harbour, two Canuck game tickets, and six burger cards for P.J. Burger
and Sons. We will also be challenging all other faculties to beat our percent
participation in or annual Molson challenge.
So come on out to SUB 207 from Monday to Wednesday, Feb. 5, lie
back and feel good.
Tim Salkeld
external coordinator
forestry undergraduate society
Abortions are not only legal, but
easy to obtain as well. The pro-
choice movement is trying to give
the impression that we have harsh
laws that do not allow any abortions at all. In fact, there were
62,000 abortions in Canada alone
last year. What the pro-choice
movement wants is for slaughterhouses like Dr. Morgenthaler's
abortion clinics to be made legal.
The pro-choice movement is guilty of sensationalism. The article
quoted women who said they used
"coat hangers, knitting needles,
ball point pens, and silver pills to
perform procedures on themselves
. . ." This is a shocking, horrific
description of self-induced abortions. Hospital abortions are,
however, no better. The suction
method of abortion involves inserting a vacuum tube into the womb
and sucking the baby out piece by
piece. The saline method involves
injecting a highly concentrated salt-
solution into the womb so that the
baby is poisoned to death. If the
pro-choice movement wishes to use
the gross-out method to gain
followers, then go ahead. Hospital-
induced abortions are just as horrible as self-induced abortions.
The ultimate fallacy lies in the
feminist movement's desire for
freer abortion laws. Feminists want
equal rights for women. More
power to them! But by supporting
abortion on demand, they are hurting their own cause. Abortion on
demand allows the male population
to screw around as they please, and
leave the responsibility to women.
It does take two to tango, but the
women gets left holding the bag.
Unwanted pregnancies are difficult to deal with. But killing 55
million babies per year (worldwide)
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1986 SPRING LECTURES
HERBERT SIMON
Dr. Herbert Simon, Nobel Laureate, is a Professor of Computer Science and
Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. A scientist of world-wide
renown, his work has made important contributions in economics, as well as in
cognitive psychology and computer science with emphasis on artificial intelligence.
His extensive publication list attests to his extraordinary intellectual versatility and
curiosity.
Series Title: "INTELLIGENCE IN PEOPLE AND COMPUTERS"
THE MIND AS AN INFORMATION PROCESSING SYSTEM
Tuesday, February 4—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
SOME RESEARCH FRONTIERS OF COGNITIVE, MOTIVATION, EMOTION, IMAGERY
Thursday, February 6—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
EXPERT SYSTEMS AND THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Friday, February 7—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
WHY ECONOMISTS DISAGREE
Saturday, February 8—In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resourses Centre, at 8:15 PM
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
is no solution. There are two very
simple solutions: carrying the baby
to term (with help), then adoption;
or chastity. There is a place called
the Crisis Pregnancy Centre
located at 1037 W. Broadway, near
the Vancouver General Hospital. If
you are pregnant and feel that you
cannot care for the baby, or you
cannot cope with the mental, financial or situational pressures of
pregnancy, this centre offers
counselling, prenatal care, and provides homes for mothers during
their pregnancies. Once the baby is
born, the arrangements with an
adoption agency are taken care of.
The reporter was deceived by the
pro-choice movement with the
statement "even today there is no
perfect birth control method." this
is partly true — the condom and the
pill are 98% effective (give or take).
However, abstinence is still 100%
effective, even in 1986. The solution
to avoiding unwanted pregnancies
is simple: don't have intercourse. I
realize this is an unrealistic statement in our permissive society, but
a simple solution nevertheless. The
pro-choice movement desires
freedom of choice for women.
Well, they do have freedom of
choice — intercourse or no intercourse.
This is not an easy issue to
resolve, I grant you. Because of
people's extreme polarization on
this issue, there are inherent problems in the pro-choice and pro-life
movements. Hitler, however proved
the solution is not millions of
deaths. To those who believe in the
sanctity of life, please speak out for
those who cannot speak for
themselves.
Peter Reynolds
psychology 3
AFTER THE B.A.
A Forum
An opportunity for Arts Undergraduates to meet
with notable graduates of programmes in which
they are now enrolled.
Keynote Speaker:
Hon. Nathan T. Nemetz, B.A. '34
Chief Justice, Prov. of B.C.
Panelists:
Mr. Michael Horsey
Deputy Minister of Tourism, B.C.
Hon. J. V. Clyne, B.A. '23
former Chancellor of UBC
Ms. Gayle Stewart-Gray, B.A. 76
Manager of Public Affairs, First City
Financial Corp. Ltd.
Thursday, February 6th, 5:00 p.m.
Cecil Green Park
6251 Cecil Green Park Rd., UBC
Sponsored by: Arts Undergraduate Society
Faculty of Arts
UBC Alumni Association Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
folA
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TODAY
THE UBYSSEY
Screenings for WRCUP, noon, SUB 241K.
JSA/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel house,
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Meeting, new members welcome,  noon,  Buch
B223.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on cardiology with guest speaker Dr
Sandor, noon. Woodward 1
cuso
Development    Education    Series,    "Overseas
Education" film: Paulo Freire'swork in Peru and
perspectives  from  CUSO  returned volunteers,
7:30 p.m.. International house
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners'  Mandarin conversation class,  noon,
Buch B317.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 205
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorials, 5:30-6:30 p.m.. Brock hall 350.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes.
you may take any or all of the classes offered for
just $45. 11:30 a.m. 12:20 p.m., SUB 208
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock hall 302
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Lecture by Daniel Liebskind on "three lessons in
architecture" noon, Lassere 102.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, executive office
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Wednesday night dinner, 5:30 p.m., Hillel house.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture:    "The    integrated   woman",    guest
speaker: Susan Maranda, noon, Buch B221.
JSA/HILLEL
Rabbi M. Feurerstein on Jewish divorce, noon,
Hillel house.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION
Pacific Rim seminar series, noon, International
house.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Whhhine garden, all welcome, 4-6:30 p.m., Hillel
house.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
New ideas from Vancouver  East's next  MLA,
noon, SUB 205.
UBC HAND GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, 6:30 p.m., SUB 125.
AMS ROCKERS
Organizational   meeting   for   Saturday's   party,
noon, SUB241B.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 237.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring Avi Gross, 8:30-11 p.m..
Graduate student centre, garden room lounge.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Grey eminence Nancy Campbell on how to write
news, everyone welcome, noon, SUB 241K.
THURSDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m.,  1868 Knox
Road.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediates'    Mandarin   conversation    class,
noon, Buch B317.
FOURTH YEAR DIETETICS STUDENTS
"Tropical    Night"    dinner,    4:30    p.m.,    SUB
cafeteria.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Advanced debating workshop, noon, SUB 125.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING
Nominations for all positions accepted, get involved, noon, Hebb 12.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Video:  The  dating  story,   all  welcome,   noon,
Scarfe 209.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Feminist  herostorian  Kandace  Kerr  speaks  on
"Women and direct action", noon, Buch A104.
DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Sideshow '86 is a series of 14 short plays by UBC
creative writing students.   If you would like to
audition please sign up at .he theater dept. main
office. Auditions, noorv2:30 p.m.  and 4:30-7:30
p.m.,  theatre department  main office (Freddy
Wood theatre 207).
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Organizational  meeting   re  Pride  week,   noon,
SUB 205.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30-6 p.m., Asian centre
604.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Tour of the dental clinic, noon, main lobby, Macdonald.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Hockey night, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Osbourne gym F.
GREAT TRIALS ON THE SILVER SCREEN
"A Man For AH Seasons", noon, Law Building,
Rm. 101.
ARCHITECTURE
Lecture:    Peter   Busby   "The   Challenge   of
Quality", noon, Lasserre 202.
ARCHITECTURE/FINE ARTS
Lecture: Work of artist Shelagh Keeley — mud
architecture/wall paintings, noon, Lasserre 202.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Committee   meeting,    noon,    SUB    119,    all
members welcome.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time  meeting,   special  training,   noon,
Brock 302.
UBYSSEY
Production, writing and general interesting work
for Friday's paper, everyone welcome, aft day^
SUB241K.
FRIDAY
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, 3:30 p.m
CHWCSE STUDENTS' AS
Beginners' Cantonese corr
Bucn B317.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m., Buchanan lounge.
AUDIOPHILE CLUB
Organizational meeting for club of connoisseurs
of fine art audio equipment, noon, SUB 224.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Bob Hackett and Jim Sands: "The News Media
and Peace: Responsibility and Performance",
noon, SUB 205.
INTRAMURALS
Rick Hansen run, 3 km and 6.8 km, noon, SUB
plaza.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC   hockey  team   host  the  league's  hottest
scorer Tim Lenardon and the Brandon University
Bobcats  in   Canada   West   action,   7:30  p.m ,
Thunderbird arena.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC men's and women's team battle it out with
the University of Alberta for one of four Canada
West playoff spots. Tonight is Rick Hansen night
where gate proceeds will be donated to the Man
in Motion campaign. Also, the Wheeled Wings
wheelchair basketball team will play the UBC Ail-
star Women at 6:45 p.m. and Men at 8:30 p.m.
at War Memorial gym.
Attention all you rocking poets
and rolling fools! Check out Rebel
Rhythms starring Montreal poet
Norman Nawrocki with his original,
hilarious poems on such important
topics as Vancouver's own Expo
'86. The rhythm behind the rhythms
is supplied by Vancouver's own
Animal Slave, Rachel Melas. The
Rebel Rhythms will be performing
at Vancouver's own Laquena (1111
Commercial), Wednesday, Feb. 5
at 8:30. Donations of one dollar will
be graciously accepted.
The self-proclaimed smartest
human being on earth, Nancy
Campbell will show her intelligence
off to the world on Wednesday
afternoon in SUB 241K. Since Nancy is a former Ubyssey editor and
Sun staffer, of course she would
know everything there was to know
on the planet earth. Moreover being an Aggie she would know every
single thing about the biological
makeup of a somewhat rural world.
Therefore being incredibly worldly
and wise, having lived at least ten
lifetimes already, nobody could
possibly know more about news.
And news is exactly what Nancy is
going to enrich the feeble minds of
stunned onlookers with. Prospective staffers will be left gasping for
breath having finally seen the light
of their intellectual poverty. If you
ever felt a little unsure about your
life and the way it was going, 50
minutes with Nancy Campbell will
clear all that up. Come one, come
all — make the pilgrimage to the
Wednesday news seminar. Receive
the greatest gift of life from the one
who has it all.
Who loves ya, BABY!
The Ubyssey is now
accepting Valentine
messages. Forms
available in Rm. 266 SUB
$2.50 for 3 lines
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut    I^Cokhr        $30 Perm
"Remember it's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St., Vancouver, 738-0519
Our Art  Director is also interviewing hair models with potential for
photographic and demonstration work.
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
Wolf Systems
8 Sessions 10 Sessions 20 Sessions
ONLY    $39   $49   $79
5784 University Blvd.
(in UBC Village) Vj Blk. Away
Ph. 224-1922
224-9116
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
"SHAME THE DEVIL" is a career woman's
novel. Lyn Morrow writes it inside House of
Commons, Press Gallery, W.P.T.B., Civil
Service, sex, & liquor. Publicity, Buttle
Lake, S. James. $15.95 postpaid, ISBN
0-9692282-0-1. Lynmor Publishing,
Osoyoos, B.C.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
'72 VW VAN. Good cond., 2nd motor,
radials & 2 snows. AM/FM cassette, $950.
922-8238 after 6 p.m.
20% OFF USED BOOKS (floor models) from
now until 4th April when the "Prop" will
close for 5 mths. while the manager buys in
Europe. Proprioception Books, 1956 W.
Broadway. 734-4112. Open 2-6, Mon. Sat.
Park in rear betw. Maple & Cypress.
WEIGHT TRAINING WORKSHOP
Weight-training workshop with REC.
UBC Saturday, Feb. 8th, 10:00 a..-4:00
p.m. War Memorial Gym, Room 211 &
213. Register EARLY Room 203 War
Memorial Gym. Students $15.00. Others
$20.00. Suits ALL strength training
needs. Fabulous instructor.
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Friendly, energetic person for
part-time reception work in family doctor's
office. Good telephone manner & typing
skills essential. 731-8201.
JOB HUNTING? Our intensive one-day
job search skills seminar will get you results!
Only $85 including complete manual. Call
Advanced, Communications Network for
details, 684-6845.
35 - LOST
JAN. 13/86 — pair prescription glasses in
rusty-brown hard case. Near Math.
Bldg. or SUB. Call 434-7679 after 6.
LADY'S CHINESE yellow gold bracelet, lost
possibly on Campus Jan. 28/29. Heirloom.
Am able to identify. Call 251-4558 aft. 8:30
p.m. Please return, very urgent. Reward.
LADIES black wallet, SUB Main Concourse.
Reward. Wed., Jan. 28. 1:15 p.m. Ph.
Lenore, 277-3951 eves.
40 - MESSAGES
PREGNANT? 731 1122
Free tests—confidential help.
NEEDED: Witnesses to Wesbrook Mall
accident 6 p.m. Mon. Jan. 27 involving
silver sports car. 228-3393 or 224-3036.
PREGNANT Er DISTRESSED? We are a
childless couple desiring to adopt. Perhaps
we can assist each other. Please respond in
confidence with your name & address to
Pauline, P.O. Box 48552. Bentail Centre.
Vane, B.C. V7X 1A3.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new AIESEC
executive! "Those who reach, touch the
stars." The 1985 Exec.
MACHIAVELLI, The Prince; buttons on
pack; B of M Fri., Jan. 31 — let's meet: The
Gallery, Thurs., Feb. 6, 1 p.m.
40 - MESSAGES
ROSES ARE RED, violets are blue, I'm
telling the world, that I love you. Send a
message to your Valentine in The Ubyssey.
Deadline 4:00 p.m. Feb. 10th. SUB Rm.
266.
70 - SERVICES
FREE FACIALS!!! Introduction offer by a
major skin care company. No obligation!
Call Jean at 224-4706.
75 - WANTED
LEFT HANDERS needed for Neurological
Study. UBC. Involves MRI Brain Scan.
Volunteers call 228-7390 or 228-7367.
COMPLETE SET SCUBA GEAR excluding
wet suit, $400. Ellen, 682-3014. 1 pr. Ladies
Galibier hiking boots, 7'/2, $20.
15 - FOUND
ASTHMATICS: Well paid volunteers are
needed for a study at St. Paul's Hospital.
Contact 682-2344, ext. 2259.
80 - TUTORING
ON DEC. 23/85 a recovered stolen pocket
calculator was taken into RCMP custody.
The pocket calculator was stolen from an
unlocked locker in a hallway of Computer
Science Bldg. No one has reported this property as stolen. Anyone who had a
calculator stolen at this time from the
Comp. Sc. Bldg. please call 224-1322 or attend in person to identify.
25 - INSTRUCTION
ARE YOU A TUTOR?
Want to Earn Extra Income?
For Contacts Unlimited
Send Resume to:
G. & C. Associates
#110, 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver. B.C. V6H 1E5
Ph. 736-3399
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac
turns, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731 9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway'Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. lat Alma)
222 2661
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing
(Bilingual! Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
TERM PAPERS & ESSAYS. Minimum
notice. 222-4661, Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. and
weekends before noon.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
SPEAKEASY TYPIST REGISTRY. Find a
typist or register as a typist. No charge.
SUB Concourse.
TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, theses, etc.
$1.25 page. Min. notice reqd. Call 736-0052
after 6:00.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statistical. 271-6755 Richmond.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reasonable rates. 261-2337.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resunStfs,
mail lists/labeta. ;Dav», eves., wkends.
731-1252. v -■■«
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       Ihrs. 9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703 Tuesday, February 4, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC
MUSSOC . . . the good old days. The society's first full scale operetta. Garden of the Shah.
UBC's musical theatre
society: 70 year spirit
By LISE MAGEE
Come on, go ahead, admit it —
you've cried at one of those
schlocky Broadway musicals.
Maybe it was South Pacific at
Malkin Bowl, maybe it was Fiddler
on the Roof, or maybe it was an
amateur high school production of
Hello Dolly, but no matter how
horrid it was, come on, admit it,
your heart turned to mush
sometime during the finale.
Yessiree, there is something infectious about the unabashed emotion,
gaiety and energy of amateur
musical theatre.
MUSSOC, the musical theatre
society of UBC, has been around
since 1916, the year the university
was established. Its first performance in 1917 was at the Hotel
Vancouver, in aid of the Red Cross.
Concerts were staged annually and
in 1930, they produced their first
operetta, The Garden of the Shah.
In 1952 Grace MacDonald, Vancouver's well know choreographer,
arrived on the scene and MUSSOC
began to produce "modern"
musical comedies such as Hello
Dolly, West Side Story, South
Pacific, and No, No Nanette.
At a gala reunion Saturday,
MUSSOC Alumni celebrated the
society's 70th anniversary. It was
everything   you'd   expect    from
MUSSOC in full swing
furry canine.
Sweet Charity dancers (1971) upstaged by
the people who create those
wonderfully sappy sweet productions — brimming with warm feelings, happy memories, enthusiasm,
accolades, comraderie, friendliness
— sort of like one big happy family.
The list of MUSSOC's "top 40"
alumni reads like the Who's Who of
Vancouver performers — Ed
Astley, Brent Carver, Jeff Hyslop,
Margot Kidder, David Y. H. Lui,
Ken McDonald, Bill Millerd, Ann
and Jane Mortifee, Ruth Nicol,
Richard Ouzonian and Pat Rose —
to list a few. For these people
MUSSOC was where the learnt their
craft and the starting point of their
careers. For many others it was
just a good time. One thing is consistent though — fond memories
and a great deal of respect and affection for Grace MacDonald, the
inimitable Grace.
Mark Hopkins, Tevye, in this
year's production, Fiddler on the
Roof, is a recent graduate of the acting programme in the UBC theatre
department. His sentiments are
characteristic of MUSSOC Alumni.
"Even after graduating with my
acting degree I still learn plenty during a MUSSOC production. Besides
that it's fun and, sorry for the
cliche, a lot like working with one
big happy family," he said. "In a
lot of other shows I've been in it's
like you punch a clock after rehearsals and performances. With a
MUSSOC show we all invariably
end up at some pizza place in the
wee hours of the morning."
The Grand Dame of MUSSOC,
Grace, is largely responsible for this
spirit of good will. She possesses
boundless energy and does indeed
seem to embody the spirit of
MUSSOC. She is retiring this year
to move on to new things and there
is no doubt her presence will be
missed.
MUSSOC's 70th anniversary
celebration is, in part, an
acknowledgement by the hundreds
of Alumni who attended; a chance
to say how important the club was
to them. It is a reminder to one and
all about what kind of tradition
they are a part of.
Yessiree, it's sweet and sappy
but, aw shucks, who can resist.
rj-i (E-X-C-E ■ L- L-E-N -T) xr
Th e  eat erY
1 FREE BURGER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF & TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HA VE A NICE DA Y!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
r
-#~   i%   $Jk   J£
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(One block from campus in the Village)
-?*3&#&J£1:
4^0^
_>* *r
Mon.-Fri. 11:00 a.m.-lO p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays 4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
224-1313
HiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMimiimiiH
~ HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS |
| HOT LUNCH TODAY-12:30 |
| WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 |
| Part II on Jewish Divorce series with |
| Rabbi Mordechai Feuerstein. §
| 12:30 1
| WINE GARDEN. ALL WELCOME! |
| 4-6:30 P.M. 1
| AND OUR USUAL |
| WEDNESDAY NIGHT DINNER 1
1 5:30-7:00 P.M. |
= We are located behind Brock Hall =
| Phone 224-4748 £
^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIn
Dependable
(di#pen»da«bul)adj. 1. trustworthy
2. reliable 3. responsible 4. Kinko's
kinko's
Great copies Great people
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
You won't get to graduation
.without one.
Rent it.
By the day, week, or month.
=F±1= -
BUSINESS
MACHINES
534 West Pender, Vancouver, Rentals 683-2237
WE DELIVER Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 4, 1986
Birds too little too late
By STEVE NEUFELD
Any math major will tell that
your team's playoff hopes cannot
improve if you consistently spot
your opponents 10-0 leads. Such
was the case this weekend as the
Thunderbird women's basketball
team dropped two games to playoff
rivals Lethbridge and Calgary.
In both games UBC could not
overcome early deficits in a 78-51
drubbing by Calgary and a heartbreaking 70-68 loss to Lethbridge.
Both losses mean that all three
teams are tied for third place in conference standings leaving UBC and
Calgary to   battle  it  out  for  the
playoffs.
Once again, officiating played a
major role. Differences in decision
making across provincial borders in
western Canada loomed their ugly
head. In the Calgary game, UBC
doubled the Dinosaurs in personal
fouls while in Lethbridge visiting
teams find it very difficult to win.
The main concern for UBC coach
Jack Pomfret was not so much the
UBC fouls as "the ones the ref
didn't call on the other team."
Nadine Fedorak continued to improve her play at a higher level by
scoring 31 points during both games
(including 20 against Lethbridge).
Teammates Andrea Belczyk and
Joanne Devlin added 16 and 12
respectively against Lethbridge.
The Lethbridge game saw a spirited
late game comeback by UBC fall
short of the mark. A UBC shot with
7 seconds left and the Thunderbirds
down 69-68 hit the back of the rim
and fell out.
The upcoming weekend, the team
hosts the University of Alberta on
Friday night and the University of
Saskatchewan on Saturday. At the
same time Lethbridge will host
Calgary in a game that Lethbridge
must win if UBC is to have a chance
at the fourth and final playoff spot.
Breweries battle on slopes
By WENDY MORRISON
The great battle of the breweries
will take place this weekend on the
slopes of Whistler.
Molson's, Labatt's and Carling
O'Keefe will go head to head in a
war of corporate sponsorship.
Molson's, which has been a long
time supporter of the UBC ski team
will be competing with Labatt's,
corporate sponsors of Simon Fraser
University.
The entire meet is sponsored by
Carling O'Keefe whose American
affiliate, Millers, is sponsoring all
National Collegiate Ski Association
ski meets with some big money.
Last weekend the UBC Thunderbirds dominated the field in the
regular season Northwest Collegiate
Ski Conference race at Snoqualmie
Summit in Washington. The T-Bird
women clinched their first overall
Alpine-Nordic combined title while
the men captured the alpine combined and finished third overall.
SPORTS
Skiing in dense fog, both the
men's and women's teams won in
the Giant slalom. Ken Stevens had
the fastest time of 1:49:34. Stu
Gairns finished second with 1:49.70
and rookie Bob Walton was 8th.
Kenny 'La Coupe' Stevens was
beaming after winning his first race
this season. "I just stayed loose and
let my skis go," said Stevens.
Hoogewarf victorious
By JOEL SILVERMAN
This weekend members of the
UBC track team dominated events
at both Toronto Star Indoor Games
and The Sled Dog Invitational in
Saskatoon.
Simon Hoogewarf got the Maple
Leaf Gardens' crowd on their feet
as he blew by an international field
to win the 1000 m in 2:24.62. Not
content to run anybody else's race,
Hoogewarf gamely took the lead
after a slow first 400 m. "The pace
was ridiculously slow at first. I
came here to win but I also wanted
a good time," said Hoogewarf.
Hoogewarf's time in Toronto was
just outside his own Canadian
record of 2:21.54.
The balance of the team competed in Saskatoon. It was hoped
that more team members would
achieve Standards in their events
that would qualify them to compete
in the CIAU's. Many did including
Ed Neeland who placed first in the
60 m in 6.00s. Dave Wilkinson who
won the 60 m hurdles in 8.53s, and
Boyd Mason vaulted a personal best
of 4.70 m to win the event as well.
Other strong performances were
by Franca Luongo who placed second in the 300 m (women). Linda
Diano finished second in the 1000
m, Viki Agar was second in the
1500 m, Bob Dalton won the 300 m
(men) and Ed Booth won the 3000
m.
Wendy Morrison led the
women's team in the GS, winning
over Elke Socher of SFU. Andrea
Jaegli was 8th and Susan Hagen
finished 12th. In the slalom the
women put together a strong team
performance capturing five of the
top 10 spots. UBC's main goal was
to concentrate on finishing the races
in preparation for the upcoming
regional championships at
Whistler. "We feel that we have a
very strong team, one that could
qualify and even win the national
championships in Killington, Vermont in March. But we were lacking concentration during the races
and falling, causing disqualification. We can win the Whistler
regionals if we don't fall," said
Jaegli.
Field hockey
UBC men's field hockey teams
returned to action Saturday in the
Vancouver league with a clean
sweep, after a two month winter
break. Playing through a thunder
storm and torrential rain the first
team scored a 2-1 win over Richmond with their two goals coming
from Steve Ingvaldson.
This game saw the return to action of ex-national player, Robby
Smith, and the last game this month
for current national players, Steve
Ingvaldson and Doug Harris. Steve
and Doug leave next Saturday with
the Canadian squad for a tour of
Pakistan as part of their preparation for the World Cup to be played
in London in October.
Hansen moves past heat
Rick Hansen is approaching the
grueling halfway point (12,340.5
miles) on his "Man in Motion
World Tour" to raise money for
spinal cord research. He is currently
in the second week of the
Australian leg of his tour and is expected to reach Melbourne by
February 11th. The 100° f weather
has made this a particularly difficult
section of the world tour, however
Rick continues to persevere in good
spirits despite tendon problems with
his shoulders.
So far he has had a tremendous
response with donations reaching
the $640,000 mark. Support remains overwhelming with people
lining the route and others wheeling
and running with Rick. After crossing Australia, Rick heads for
China, Korea and Japan.
UBC is honoring Rick Hansen's
Man in Motion World Tour with
Rick Hansen Fundraising Days on
February 5, 6 and 7. As part of this
event, Intramural Sports is
dedicating The Boulevard Road
Run to Rick Hansen's cause — to
raise money for spinal cord
research. Two distances are
available — 3.0 km and 6.8 km. A
$5.00 donation from each runner is
suggested. The funds collected will
be forwarded to Rick Hansen in
Australia. On February 7, lets show
Rick Hansen some hometown
spirit.
Y* JERRY RUBIN
i      H,  "The Debate of the Decade"        ~&&
*     SAT. FEB. 8      ,'*4SM*
ORPHEUM
Networking 7 pm
Great Debate 8 pm
Yippie vs Yuppie
Questions 9-11 pm
v - RESERVE YOUR
% TICKETS NOW
All VTC/CBO outlets, Eaton's, Woodward's, Mall Info Centres, AMS UBC or charge
by phone 280-4444; Common Ground, Healthy Gourmet, Banyen & Duthie Books
TRIUMF ROAD RUN
6.   Lindsay Hall, P.E.
13:37
Men's 3 km
7.  Ann Cervi, Nursing
14:09
1. Paul Rapp, Georox
12:00
8.   Liza Grinder, Science
14:13
2.  David Greig, Roma
12:10
9.  Heather Pickering, P.E.
14:27
3.  Cal Merry, MMPE
12:11
10.  Nancy Linburg, Phrateres
14:48
4.  Rod Samson, Phi Delts
12:19
Women's 5 km
5.  Doug Harris, Roma
12:24
1.  Janine Toneff, EUS
22:06
6.  P. Nielsen, Rowing
12:29
2.  Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
23:51
7. Jack Bryson, Science
8. Steve Gustavson, Beta
12:31
12:37
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
12:45
12:52
2.    Commerce
3.     Phrateres
1.  Paul Quinn, Beta
19:08
4.    Recreation
2.  Paul Heintzman, Regent College
19:20
5.    Forestry
3. Stephen Chu, EUS
19:24
6. Japan Exchange
7. Nursing
DIV. 2
1.    Delta Gamma
4. Rob Hasegawa, Science
19:25
5. Andy Zalkow, ZBT
6. Carl Withler, 3rd Salish Alumni
19:31
19:45
7.  Blair Mercer, P.E.
20:03
20:04
9.  Rim Richardson, Georox
20:15
4.    Alpha Gamma Delta
DIV. 3
1.    Phrateres
10. John Lindsay Maroie, Commerce
20:16
1. Theresa Godin, Science
13:07
2.    Kappa Kappa Gamma
2. Winona Bishop, EUS
13:09
4. EUS 2
5. Gamma Phi Beta
6. Delta Gamma
3. Kathleen Staples, Gamma Phi
4. Elizabeth Hasegawa, Nursing
5. Sherry Wright, P.E.
13:10
13:15
13:24
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P*»tf»
UBC Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
____ 228-6121
TRY
CURLING
ICE TIME AVAILABLE
DURING THE WEEK ~"'
AND WEEKENDS TOO
* EASY TO LEARN RULES     *  REASONABLE RATES
* A GREAT WAY TO MEET PEOPLE AND SOCIALIZE
* LICENSED LOUNGE OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
* SPACE AVAILABLE FOR:
-WOMEN'S DAY TIME PLAY
-MIXED MALE AND FEMALE LEAGUES
-MEN'S TEAMS
Rental Brooms Available for just $1.00
Interested? Call Sharon or Paul at 228-6121 to Book Ice Time
"MAN IN MOTION" RUN
Support  Rick  in  his  campaign   to  raise
money for spinal cord research.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7th
12:30
SUB PLAZA (Race Centre)
Come out and support Rick's "Man in Motion"
World Tour. Take part in this run and help Rick
help others. There will be two distances of 3.0 km
and 6.8 km. A $5 donation is suggested. All
proceeds go directly to Rick.
Sponsored bV-    ^^
BROOKS L>^J
OfBC f/tthmuAcds... fab good ^tn&f

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