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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1983

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UBC Archives Serial
Students to receive less money
By HOLLY NATHAN
The provincial government's contribution to Canada's student aid
program may be insufficient to
cover all B.C. students eligible for
grants, financial aid officers
predict.
The government is expected to
decide whether or not to increase
funding for student grants in the
next seven to 10 days, according to
Dick Melville, information services
director for the education ministry.
"It's under review."
Byron Hender, UBC's financial
aid director, said he is concerned
about the possible lack of grant
money for eligible students, and attributed the problem to the government decreasing its contribution to
the aid program by 40 per cent —
from $24.2 million to $14.6 million.
If the government does not approve the additional money needed,
students will receive smaller grants,
and those currently applying may
receive even less, said Hender.
"We might have to lop dollars
off each student's grant. Students
would be short money in a real
sense," he said.
Financial aid officers have
suspected a problem of inadequate
funding for the past two weeks, he
said, adding he doubts the government will increase its contribution.
"We have not had a whole lot of
consultation."
Verne Lowen, Simon Fraser
University financial aid director,
said he too is uncertain if the
government will increase funding
for grants. But he added it is too
early to warn students about their
potential loss of grant money.
"We are as anxious about this as
you. We want to make every effort
to lessen the impact on students,"
he said.
Hender said the additional
money required to cover all
students eligible for grants may be
as much as $1 million. But both
Lowen and he estimated that the
amount of money students could
lose is "not very high."
"I don't think it's big enough to
be a crisis," said Hender.
Lowen attributed the inadequate
funding problem to the fact that the
government is intent on carrying
out its program of restraint.
"Things are tightening up
generally. The government was
taken off guard a bit by the number
of student aid applications," he
said.
"It really seems to be committed
to staying within the budget and
that's where the problem has
arisen."
The government may consider increasing the ratio of loans to grants,
to make up the difference Hender
said. "If the loan — grant ratio
changes, it means students will accumulate more debt. Down the
road this will be a problem for both
government and students."
In the summer, the federal
government increased its loan portion from $56.25 to $100 a week,
thus enabling the provincial government to decrease its contribution.
The Social Credit government
also tightened eligibility criteria and
introduced new academic standards
for students requiring assistance.
^^™
mmmm
Vol. LXVI, No. 20      Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November22,1983
228-2301/
OTEU strike ends
By GORDON CLARK
Picket lines surrounding SUB
were taken down Saturday after
members of the Office and
Technical Employees Union Local
15 signed a contract with the Alma
Mater Society.
Although the final contract does
not reflect the union's original
demands in several ways, union
members said they were pleased to
return to work.
In the final settlement the one
year contract originally sought by
the OTEU was abandoned for a two
year contract, and wage increases
were lower than the union had
hoped for.
The union entered the first set of
negotiations in June asking for a
one year contract with an overall
salary increase of 15 per cent.
Members said the AM could easily
afford the increase because
management had received a similar
salary due to greater SUB revenue.
OTEU salaries were also lower than
those of other office workers, they
said.
The final contract did include in
cremental increases based on
seniority—which the AMS had
previously tried to omit from the
contract.
These increases which are granted
in the first four years of employment average three percent per step,
according to the AMS director of
finance James Hollis.
The raises are spread through the
term of the contract in three increments. The first, from June 1,
1983 to Dec. 31, 1983, equals an increase of five per cent. From Jan. 1,
1984 to May 31, 1984, a three per
cent increase is given. This arrangement results in an overall raise of
6.5 per cent in the first year of the
contract said Hollis.
In the second year the OTEU
members receive an increase of five
per cent.
"I think that it is a very generous
contract," said Hollis.
Union members declined comment on the settlement.
"There seems to be minimal ill
feeling," said another union
member.
■ V
—jack burns photo
,#■>■■■% ■       I ■ ■ ■     LATEST DISTRIBUTION METHOD for campus rag is displayed by skydiving club member. Fifteen thousand
^fe I IEZ    |%||%|#AV^    l01HAIlAn     copies will be dumped from low-flying plane in attempt to enlighten students and provide more places for people
4mmW%m¥mmW    pivllvl9    IKIlVl CU    to trip over twice-weekly publication. And what is that, a Ubyssey photographer taking the picture? No way. We
*^ get high in other ways. Thanks to Jack Burns for showing The Ubyssey is flying high (but quickly coming down
to ground).
By SARAH MILLIN
Most non-union workers
employed in SUB crossed picket
lines surrounding the building last
week and say business did not suffer as a result of the strike.
"No one was worried about
crossing the lines," said Bob Gray,
a clerk in the Thunderbird shop
downstairs.
"There were fewer students in the
store but that may have been due to
the sale before the strike," he added.
Although none of the shop's
workers respected picket lines set up
by striking Office and Technical
Employees Union members, some
sales people encountered problems
transporting goods, he said.
Across the hall at the Alma Mater
Society's games room, cashier
Sheenagh Pietorpruno said just as
many students as usual flocked to
the video machines.
"Everyone crossed the lines,"
she claimed. "If you went through
the bank you missed the pickets."
At the Pit, students continued to
be as noisy as ever. The only difficulty that arose was that draft
beer ran out. "Beer didn't come
through but we have a big room at
the back full of bottled beer," said
bartender Greg Mulvey.
"A few students asked why the
Pit was still open, but they were
kind of contradicting themselves by
being there drinking," he said.
Most students were ignorant about
the   dispute   between   the   OTEU
and the AMS, he added.
Meanwhile at the Deli, profits
rose because some prices were increased. Students who wished to remain anonymous said coffee during
the strike cost 40 cents, instead of
the usual 35.
Deliveries to the specialty food
stores also were disrupted, said Deli
worker Zaher Raj an.
Upstairs at UBC's radio station,
only two CITR workers respected
picket lines. Station manager Sonia
Mysko said that the electronic
media did not want to involve itself
in a labor dispute.
"If the media stopped providing
a news service the public would be
even more in the dark," she said.
Mysko admitted that CITR
helped promote the concert of the
Gang of Four, a unionized British
band which refused to respect
picket lines set up during its
scheduled performance.
"We helped promote the concert
but all that work was done before
the strike."
But the other media in the
building, The Ubyssey, was forced
to move off campus to continue
publishing. All advertising and
copy handled behind picket lines
would have been considered "hot"
and therefore its unionized printers
would have refused to touch it.
"We would have changed our
location anyway, on a matter of
principle," said Muriel Draaisma, a
member of the editonal collective.
Government pressures admin
By JOEL PECCHIOLI
The administration's failure to
develop a policy outlining academic
consequences for students who
respected picket lines last week is
partly due to provincial government
pressure, a campus chaplain charged Monday.
"There is government pressure
on UBC, and the university can only fight so many battles at one
time," said United and Anglican
church chaplain George Herman-
son.
Administration George Pederson
has taken a "courageous stand
against the government and he is
taking flack for this," he added.
Hermanson said he has received
up to 15 complaints from students
regarding  unfair  treatment  from
their professors. "I arrived at a
satisfactory solution for all the people I talked to."
Some professors were able to intimidate their students into crossing
the line because neither knew the
administration's policy, he said.
AMS external affairs coordinator
Lisa Hebert said she dealt with six
complaints from students, including one who reported that her
psychology professor scheduled a
midterm worth 50 per cent of the
course grade during the week of the
Operation Solidarity's escalating
job action.
"This issue is very important.
For some students, crossing the
picket line is the worst thing they
have to do, but some people don't
understand this," she said.
CFS moves to political right
OTTAWA (CUP)—Canada's national student organization took
a slow but deliberate political step to the right at its semi-annual
general meeting Nov. 8-14.
About 100 delegates from 40 post secondary institutions across the
country elected Beth Olley, a self-proclaimed moderate from the
University of Saskatchewan, to be the next chair of the Canadian
Federation of Students.
Olley, who is president of the student council that killed its
women's directorate last month, will be the first federation chair who
^. See page 2: DELEGATIONS	
Hebert said she is urging Pederson to issue a statement supporting
the right to cross picket lines
without penalty. Student council
unanimously passed a motion with
this intent, she added
Academic vice-president Robert
Smith, said the administration's
position was outlined in a Nov. 7
memo to deans and department
heads. The memo stated that "the
situation of students should be
monitored carefully and reviewed if
necessary," Smith said.
In issuing this policy the administration was "trying to be as
reasonable and purposeful as possible" considering the uncertainty of
the strike, Smith added.
Smith said he is unaware of any
students who were penalized
because they missed classes during
the strike. Vice-provost Neil
Riseborough also said he has not
heard of any students penalized.
"If anyone has suffered or has
had problems because of professors
arbitrarily giving zeros for missed
exams or late papers, I'd like to
know about it," Risborough added.
At Simon Fraser University, the
administration has clearly stated
that no student be penalized for
missing an exam because they
respected picket lines. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22,1983
Delegations leave in protest
From page 1
does not take a left-leaning stance.
Her term starts in May.
Her only opponent Ann Travers
from Guelph University, ran on a
left-activist ticket but soundly lost
the 25-18 vote.
Brian Chadwick, a representative
of the Queen's University
graduates, was elected to chair the
board of CFS-Services. His constituency has long decried the federation for its leftist policies.
Delegates also took steps to halt
debate within the federation on
issues that do not directly affect
students. They defeated a motion to
condemn the U.S. invasion of
Grenada, and decided that CFS
could not be officially represented
on a national committee to solicit
peace petitions.
The week-long conference in Ottawa's plush Holiday Inn ended
with an 18-hour final plenary Nov.
13. Debate was mostly dull and
slow until the final hour, when one
delegation walked out to protest
lack of debate on important issues,
and another delegate was just storming out the door when the chair
declared that quorum was lost.
Several agenda items were left
uncompleted.
But Olley said she was pleased for
the most part with the general
meeting. She applauded the federation's shift away from debating international issues or the peace
movement.
"Right now, the organization has
a lot of its own difficulties to deal
with," she said. "The (past)
frustrations  (with  the  federation)
resulted from the fact people were
so idealistic, they forgot they were
running a big organization.
Olley said many people would
consider her student council "right
wing to fascist", but added "personally, I think I'm pretty middle of
the road."
Delegates voted to start giving the
federation chair a $20,801 per year
salary. They failed a motion to
recognize the Canadian University
Press statement of principles, and
refused to debate a motion to condemn the UBC administration for
stalling negotiations with the
Teaching Assistants Union.
The UBC motion was brought
forward  by the president of the
LovE -
&    ,
QuicheS
at
, A W MS
UBC graduate society who angrily
stormed out of the room when
delegates said they did not want to
debate the motion unless they could
hear the administrator's side of the
story.
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THE    UBYS'SEY
Page 3
Nuclear movie
i  *
ks 100 million
By SARAH COX
Vancouver disarmament groups
are experiencing the fallout from a
Sunday television movie depicting
the aftermath of a nuclear war.
A UBC students for peace and
mutual disarmament information
table was unusually busy Monday
and phones at the End the Arms
Race office rang ceaselessly all day.
SPMD member Don Olds said
The Day After, which was watched
by an estimated 100 million people,
finally shocked viewers into action.
"I heard a lot of people express
disbelief and say they'd never
thought about things like that
before.
"If it makes some of those people
wake up and do something, it Will
have done some good."
SPMD member Jennifer Kinlock
said many students bought disarmament buttons and asked how they
could become involved in the disarmament movement.
"People would walk by and
you'd see this semi-guilty concerned
look on their faces. It was obvious
they'd seen the movie," she said.
"Quite a few of them stopped or
came back later."
Kinlock said the movie "wasn't
all that great" but she thinks its impact will be "phenomenal". People
who were reticent to deal with the
nuclear issue are realizing they can't
avoid it she said.
Graduate society
calls by-election
By SUE McILROY
Amidst confusion and
misunderstanding the graduate student society has called a by-election
for a new president.
The GSS decided to hold a by-
election after receiving an appeal
from zoology graduate student
Mark Varley made three attempts
to obtain a nomination form before
the original election. A mixup caused by a change in office staff
prevented him from obtaining the
form.
The GSS president deals with external matters affecting the grad
student centre, provides general
leadership and works with the
various committees in the GSS.
The biggest problem currently
facing the grad centre is the deficit
from last year's budget.
Varley said "the curent GSS
council has made some progress on
To hell with week
SASKATOON (CUP)—Engineering students at the university of
Saskatchewan were forced to
remove the slogan "Rape and
Plunder" from their van, the Tank.
Pressure from the faculty of
education and Labbatt's breweries,
sponsors of the engineers' Hell
Week, resulted in the slogan's
removal.
But it appears that the slogan is
still being flashed prominently on
engineering college jackets.
"We were dismayed at the manner in which a serious problem like
sexual harassment was trivialized,"
said Ken Cochrane, an education
professor.
"Several people phoned Labatt's
and they felt they were not taken
seriously; but when we outlined our
concerns in a letter, they responded
very promptly, in full, and with
understanding," said Cochrane.
We took steps with the
engineers," said Labatt's representative Harvey Nelson, "and they
agreed they would remove the
slogan from the "Tank."
Nelson said he has no objection
to the slogan on the jackets because
Mies get higher
(RNR/CUP)—Police in the
Chicago suburb of Park Forest
have finally solved the case of the
pot-pilfering mouse.
The pesky rodent had been
breaking into evidence lockers to
nibble confiscated marijuana.
When the mouse refused to go for a
trap baited with cheese, the cops
decided to use a joint of California
dope instead.
"Snap" went the better mouse
trap, said police chief Michael
Dooley, adding, "that mouse probably doesn't know he's dead."
it "can be 'Rice and Potatoes' or
whatever you want."
As far as I'm concerned, the issue
is dead," he said.
But the issue is far from dead for
the student union. Engineering
representative Craig Hanson said
they have not made a final decision
yet on what to do about the slogan.
Meanwhile, the student union has
recently passed motions to clamp
down on the antics of engineering
and agricultural students.
Council directed president Beth
OUey to write letters to both
groups, protesting their activities
during Hell Week.
One councillor also wants Olley's
letters published "to make
students on campus aware that the
(students' union) won't tolerate
willful violence or hatred against
any group on campus."
Some of these antics include a
bash dedicated to murdering
homosexuals, pulling down
students' pants in public, hosing
down passing students and a staged
simulated rape.
But Kinlock had many criticisms
of the movie itself.
"It didn't deal with the issue as a
political thing. It treated the problem almost as though it was a
natural disaster."
She also condemned a panel
discussion following the movie,
which included Henry Kissinger,
former U.S. secretary of state, and
Robert McNamara, former U.S.
secretary of defence for failing to
have a representative from the
disarmament movement.
Trevor Hughes, arts 4, stopped at
the SPMD table to talk about the
movie. The Day After lacked
analysis, and may create more
apathy because people feel there is
nothing they can do, he said. CBC's
recent series War was much more
impressive, said Hughes.
"In the Gwynne Dyer series
there was a message that the more
you prepare for war, the greater are
the chances it will happen."
"I think our entire attitude about
war has to change."
EAR spokesperson James
McBride said the movie would
definitely add to the momentum of
the peace movement.
"I think it's safe to assume that a
lot of people have been awakened
from their slumber and want to do
something."
this matter and expects to be in the
black again soon".
Ramesh said he will act as vice-
president after the election, added
academic pressures prevent him
from spending more time working
for the GSS.
"As a foreign student I am under
a lot of pressure to maintain a certain level of marks.
Varley has worked with the Alma
Mater Society and was recently involved in the housing proposal
given tentative approval this
month.
The winner of the election will
serve as president until February,
when the annual election is held.
The position is one of nineteen
currently open for nominations.
Student representatives are needed
to serve on the Board of Governors
and the Senate. Nominations must
be handed in to the Registrar by 4
p.m. on Dec. 9.
—tlm langmMd photo
IT'S A DOG'S LIFE for arts students hanging around Buchanan courtyard. Dog announced intention to run for
AMS presidency after numerous students said canine offered new political alternative. Residence meals would
change under new administration. Dog said. 'Cinnamon buns for breakfast, Milkbones for lunch, and dog chow
for dinner."
U of A overturns CFS referendum
EDMONTON (CUP)—The
Canadian Federation of Students
has lost its largest full member.
In a move that left student
leaders shocked, the University of
Alberta's Discipline, Interpretation
and Enforcement board has overturned the results of an Oct. 21
referendum where students voted 56
per cent in favor of joining the
federation.
The ramifications of the decision'
are unclear, but it means the student council put about $6,000 into a
meaningless referendum. It will
likely be run again in February.
If the referendum passes again,
CFS   will   not   suffer   financially
because the U of A was not scheduled to pay full membership fees until
September, 1984.
The referendum was contested by
U of A student Gordon Stamp, who
argued the was insufficient advertising fo the opportunity to form a
"no" campaign. He also said the
"yes" campaigners made unfair use
of CFS posters and buttons.
"It is not the fact that I won—
the students won," said an over
joyed Stamp. "I made a lot of
enemies and had to drop a few
courses (to contest the referendum),
but it was worth it."
Don Miller, Alberta representative on the federation's central
committee, said he was angry with
the results. He said all campaign
material had been approved by the
chief returning officer, and "there
was no logical grounds whatsoever
to overturn the referendum."
Students send books
Research cloves fly the coop
The disappearance of less than a dozen rock doves from a colony
room in the psychology annex has left the researcher responsible
completely mystified.
"We really don't know what has happened to them. They went
missing," said associate psychology professor Donald Wilkie.
Asked if an animal rights group could have turned the birds loose,
the researcher replied: "I don't know. I wish I did, then I could do
something about it."
Students used the doves for research purposes, but at the time of
their disappearance, they were "resting," said Wilkie.
"They weren't being used in any experiments . . . I'm not willing
to talk about this anymore," he said.
James Grove, assistant to the psychology department head, said
doves and pigeons are used by the department for behavioral
research.
"But they aren't cut up or tortured," he add.
MONTREAL (CUP) — Canadian students are helping to rebuild
the shattered National University of
El Salvador.
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers and various
student groups have organized a
Canada-wide book drive to collect
textbooks to help restore the library
destroyed when government troops
overran the campus in 1980.
David Alper, spokesperson of the
Concordia El Salvador Committee,
said the first priority of the National University is to collect math,
science, engineering and medical
texts.
"Other textbooks, because they
are in English, may not be as relevant to their society," he said.
About 300 books have been col
lected so far.
Students at Dalhousie University
in Halifax donated 1,500 texts.
Faculty, students and the student
union collected $2,100 to ship the
books to El Salvador.
"It's important to be involved
with things like this," said student
union president Tim Hill. "It's
apolitical and it's supporting education."
When security forces overran the
university in 1980, they killed more
than 40 student "dissidents" and
inflicted up to $30 million in
damages. Until the government
agreed to reopen the university this
year, classes continued in rented or
donated premises but risks of arrest
and detention for both faculty and
students were high. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
The Day to Act
An estimated 100 million people tuned in Sunday night to witness The
Day After, a film graphically depicting life after a nuclear war. Although the
film was fictional, it was based on scientific fact, and the filmmakers warned audiences that the likely outcome of a nuclear exchange would be far
more severe than that depicted by the movie.
At the very least. The Day After shatters the illusion that nuclear war is
something anyone would want to survive. We follow the dazed survivors
on their aimless paths through the barren leftovers of our civilization,
unable to comprehend that the unthinkable has actually happened.
The movie makers accomplished their objective without detailing the
events leading to the launching of the missiles, and without laying the
blame on either side. The film simply conveys the final outcome of a
nuclear war. It doesn't matter which side pushed the button first, or which
side won. The human race has not only committed suicide, but has pushed
all species into extinction.
You couldn't help but feel depressed after viewing this movie. Many
people who have tried to ignore the issue may have been shocked by the
graphic explicitness of what they were shown on the otherwise escapist
tube. People may despair at the seeming inevitability of such a fate. But
many have yet to question the wisdom of their governments continuing the
arms race. Many who desire to see a change are simply overwhelmed by
the size of the problem.
On ABC, viewers were told by a panel of "experts" that there is a problem,
but they were left with the same vacant feeling of inevitability they felt
from the movie.
If we are to gain anything more than fear from the film, we must act on
our despair and anger, by asking ourselves if we are upset enough to put
aside our regular arguments, and work to rid the world of these terrible
weapons. Each one of us must look for ways in which we can have an impact.
We must join committees, write letters or do anything as long as each
one of us makes a commitment to work for peace. We have two choices.
We can try to do something about our problem, or we can sit idly and let
our world be destroyed.
Hot Lines
After picking up The Ubyssey last Friday, the staff was dismayed and
shocked to see a full page ad for the secret charms of SUB. Staffers were
embarrassed to say the least, in light of the paper's adament stand on
respecting picket lines during the strike, and avoiding both hot ads and
copy.
The explanation for the SUB promo is that full page ads disappear into
a drawer before staffers see it. The paper was forced to run ads because of
financial reasons. And it was only agreed to run local ads after an arrangement was made with the ad manager so she could work outside SUB. In
this way. The Ubyssey could both stay afloat, and keep the printers happy
at the same time.
The entire staff of The Ubyssey would like to thank George, Ray and
John of the Lutheran Campus Centre who offered us room to work at a
time when it was dearly needed.
Tuesday, November 22,1983
V I^THe  HOC16 >.«
£>« 7D TK;K.
,'>-<-K
THE UBYSSEY
November 22, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Ahhh, it's good to be home," Muriel Draaisma sighed. "Speak for yourself!" the two Sarah's (Millin and Cox-Albany) chimed in. "This place is a
mess! Holly Nathan said, surveying two weeks worth of built-up dust, forgotten bologna sandwiches, and decaying newsprint. "I don't know," Doug
Schmidt mused, "it does have a bit of charm." "It sure could be worse," Sue Mcllroy said. "How?" asked Victor Wong, as he discovered the term
paper that was due last week. "Well, it could be raining," Joel Pecchioli said. "What has that got to do with anything," Robby Robertson asked,
much to Gordon Clark's amusement. "Well, it's kind of metaphysical," Chris Wong answered. "And involves the relationship between the probability
that the universe will continue to expand forever and next week's episode of Cheers," Verne McDonald added. That left Peter Berlin a bit confused,
not that anyone could tell otherwise anyway. "Does anybody have a broom?" Bruce Campbell asked.
See you at Debutantes' Ball
By VERNE McDONALD
Chibby, Babs, Popsie and I weren't
worried when the sirens started
yowling like some freshie who arrives in class to find the midterm
was yesterday.
Letters
'Council rejects scab labor'
Dear name withheld by request:
We were taken completely by surprise when you recently nominated
us for the ignominious distinction
scab-of-the-year (Nov. 15). Since
the competition is likely to be fierce
and we have not had a chance to
lobby our support, please allow us
this opportunity to gain some votes.
Even though we don't feel deserving of this distinction we are none
the less flattered that you would
think of us.
Two weeks ago a very poorly
worded motion was brought to
students' council asking the Alma
Mater Society general manager to
maintain as many AMS operations
as possible in the event of a strike.
The nominees for scab-of-the-year
came from the roll call vote after
this motion was passed. We supported that motion and would do so
again.
Our reasons were to maintain services for students on campus and to
give all students the freedom of
choice on whether to cross or not to
cross a picket line according to their
individual consciences. Finally, on
a practical level there is no damn
way that we were going to tell 150
student employees that they
couldn't come to work. We feel
very strongly on this point, especially since many of them need these
jobs for their day-to-day survival. If
this qualifies us for scab-of-the-year
then we should be given serious
consideration.
Unfortunately, a second motion
was introduced to council at the tail
end of the meeting, the defeat of
which could quite rightiy be interpreted as evidence that council sup
ported the hiring of scabs to keep
SUB open. We are, however, both
guilty of leaving the meeting early
and therefore we did not vote on
this motion. We would not have
been in favour of scab labour. The
situation was further complicated
by confusion between the general
strike and a potential (but at that
point undeclared) legal strike by our
own Office and Technical
Employees Union employees. In
any case, the result was a mess.
The general manager's position
throughout is best summarized by
this quote, "I have enough problems to deal with without hiring
scabs."
At the last meeting of council,
Jon Gates and ourselves provided
an opportunity for council to make
a definite statement on this issue,
and a motion prohibiting the AMS
from hiring additional workers to
perform the duties of striking
OTEU employees or, from forcing
anyone to perform those duties,
was passed unanimously. We hope
that the name (or lack thereof) of
the AMS council has been sanitized
and we understand that a settlement
has been reached with the strike.
After closely reading this,
Mr. /Mrs. /Ms. /Miss/Other Name
Withheld by Request, we hope that
we are still eligible for scab-of-the-
year especially if the award is
monetary, because we are both supported by Mastercard/Visa, and
girlfriend/wife and we are sinking
fast!
Dave Frank
Don Holubitsky
maybe scabs and student
council members
address withheld by request
People's paper press
I have to agree completely with a
letter written to your publication
regarding its left-of-centre and
feminist bent. Frankly, all one has
to do with your paper is glance at
the title of the article and read a few
lines to realize it is biased beyond
measure. Even the fact you gave a
heading to Sheldon Clare's letter
(November 18), Anti-government
stance unpopular, poses Clare
against many of your writers and
some of your readers. The letter
wasn't condemning your anti-
government bias, but your bias
period.
Either you should rename your
paper, giving a prospective reader
what he or she is in for (i.e. The
UBC People's Press),^r just list all
of your material as editorial. Two
years ago I used to clip out articles
from The Ubyssey because I felt they
were insightful, now it is an indulgence on my part to even pick
one up. I'm darn (supressed rage)
sure that you are supported by student fees: if you keep up the way
you have been I'm sure you will
become an issue. Let's have some
news instead of telling us to take to
the streets. Mike Hunt
English 4
P.S..'' 'Wanna a drink?'!1'
We were across from Gage to
SUB before even one person had
thrown themself out of a window
and were pleased as punch to see we
were the only ones who thought of
it that Sunday morning.
We got the proctor to lock all the
outside portals, then Babs held the
door while Chibby and I took the
old lad for a dip in the pond to get
rid of him. The neat .44 Chibby's
Dad sent him was just the thing to
clear everyone else out.
Not that we couldn't have used
even some lowbrow company in the
time to come, but Popsie started
shouting Smegma Fies Only and we
got carried away. There's a lot of
basements around the campus, so 1
suppose they made out all right.
But we knew why we'd decided
on SUB. The architecture, a cross
between an Egyptian temple and a
Berlin flak tower, was just the
thing. Though it had translated into
poor utilization of space when it
(freestyle)
was built, there were only the four
of us and we were oh-so-glad of all
that reinforced concrete keeping
out the nasty old video-active particles.
I think we had just broken into
the Pit cooler when they turned all
those spiffy nightclubs downtown
into permanent mud clubs. I
remember Babs and Chibby went a
little overboard and did the
technicolor yawn all over the
Kokanee, no loss.
After a couple of days we were all
doing the big spit even when we
weren't drinking beer, and Popsie
realized the ventilation system was
still going full bore, a real bore if
you'll pardon the wit.
We turned it off and threw out
the burgers we had thawed for the
next week's debauch.
What we mostly spent our time
doing was tuning in the satellite
receiver to whatever was on. First
Choice went blank right after T.O.
was hit, but ESPN kept going from
an underground bunker in Atlanta
until we'd all seen the '84 Super
Bowl six times.
Then evervthine was blank tor a
week. At last some drone receiver
ship from Australia gave us a bunch
of boring political news—not one
video of the war—and some real
television.
Some sheepish professor type did
a big boo-hoo for a few minutes
and, all choked up, said he hoped
we survivors would not think it bad
taste if we saw some old familiar reruns, to give us hope so to speak.
Bonanza was first, in Japanese
for chrissake, then Bewitched and
Happy Days. It wasn't bad until
they started doing MASH and all
these hospital soaps, which really
got Popsie in a bad way though 1
think it was mostly because her hair
started falling out and below the
waist she smelted like a Gear-Aggie
chariot race.
Babs wasn't too pleased either
when Chibby and she broke out in
running sores where the sun doesn't
shine.
But we were out as soon as they
told us Gilligan's Island and All in
the Family that it was safe.
I was rather pleased that I had a
clean tie to knot properly for our
emergence from the video game
room, and I was eventually gratified
to know that only the right people
had made it through.
See you at the Debutantes' Ball.
Grey tie and toupee.
Verne McDonald is an old hack
who is not a Sigma Chi.
Letters
A chilling thought
Now that ABC has illuminated
one side of the nuclear debate with
"The Day After," I would hope
that they will now film a version of
The Gulag Archipelago to show the
danger of not having nuclear
weapons. jeff Baturin
engineering 1
Now that the labor relations
scene at the good-old Alma Mater
Society is back to its regular old
hum-drum routine, you can once
again meet all your favorite
Ubyssey staffers in SUB 241k. If
you are dropping by, why don't you
bring u- s letter to print" Tuesday, November 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Female engineers should stand up to sexism
By GREG HARMS
Some days it seems as if the shit
falls harder and flows faster than on
others. And some days it seems as if
the shit is oozing out of your own
back yard. Pausing to think about
such things can be very depressing.
But I don't want to depress you today. Instead I want to make you
mad — especially if you are a
woman in engineering. I want to get
you angry enough so that when you
get dumped on by another in a long
line of macho jerks, you'll fight
back.
Most people at UBC have heard
of the Engineer's annual newspaper
of hate, racism, and sexual
depravation, the Red Rag. Fewer
people know about a similar, but
weekly publication called the
NEUSletter. This little gem is normally composed by the usual crew
of roving male-maniacs-in-red that
seem to think that their red jackets
give them free license to be the biggest pricks in the Western
hemisphere. A recent edition of the
NEUSletter, however, was compiled by a group of women engineers
who tongue-in-cheek call
themselves the Independent
Women's League. Here is an example of their writing:
What is it like to be a female in a
male dominated faculty? Great!
Of the female engineers I've spoken
to not one has had any serious complaints. Within the faculty they met
with little or no discrimination.
They are respected as a fellow student and if anything encouraged to
become more involved. The
misconceptions seem to occur outside the faculty.
A survey on Women Engineers',
their careers, their workplace,
showed two general impressions to
be wrong. Women engineers do not
have to be "one of the boys" to
succeed and they do not have to
work "twice as hard as men" to be
accepted. The majority of the
women surveyed considered
themselves to have the same professional skills as their male colleagues. More important an even
greater majority of male engineers
feel there is no difference in this
area.
Fifty-two per cent of the women
engineers surveyed had not experienced any sexual discrimination. Even women who described
some instance of discrimination
remarked on the positive aspects of
their work.
Women engineers will have to
redefine their attitude and expectations with regard to their profession. In the coming years they will
have to make up for the disadvantages created by a socialization based on passivity, by learning to
develop greater self confidence, initiative, daring and decision making
ability.
Shades of shit, mountains of
manure: what has happened to the
colour of our back yard? Let me
assure the reader that discrimination against women in engineering
is not a myth or a misconception
but is alive, well, and flourishing.
Attention Studentsl!
For the best price and service
call
Dino Haute
Coiffures
224-7440
Complete hair and skin care
for ladies and gentlemen.
4532 W. 10th
Avenue
Open Thurs. & Fri. nights
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
One need only state, in addition,
that 48 per cent of the women
engineers surveyed had experienced
sexual discrimination. The figures
are appalling, not comforting. Here
we have a group of apparently intelligent women who seem bent on
ignoring all evidence of sexual
discrimination. And this in a faculty where sexual discrimination is
not only rampant, but part of a
grand tradition.
While some satisfaction could be
gained by censuring the women who
wrote this article, that is not the
purpose of this discussion. I believe
that they wrote their opinion unwittingly and without much thought.
What concerns me is that the
tendency among women to
overlook incidents of male
dominance and oppression is
widespread and prevalent not only
in engineering, but in almost every
facet of our society. The question to
be asked is how these attitudes can
be turned around.
If the women who are oppressed
won't stand up and complain, there
are damned few men who will do it
for them. Men today need to be
slapped in the face more, not less,
than yesterday. Women engineers
have the potential to develop a very
loud voice and to wield a very big
stick.
;-^T~wj_that  52.% et \
js  wwen'T 0e&n ;
cameras and publish pictures in the
student annual. How many more
examples need be given? Hang
around a group of the boys in red
sometime and listen to the conversations. Or hear the story about a
certain unnamed professor who
organized Summer field trips for
the boys only. "This is for the boys,
the boys like to go on these field
trips. We've never had girls
before." Examples of discrimination abound, dammit, and there
isn't room to carry on.
When women engineers are moved to ignore the negative and con-
perspectives
centrate only on the positive aspects
of being in a male dominated faculty they are really not much to be
blamed. Self-preservation and a decent self-image are important too.
Historically, men placed the notion
of male superiority on women and
women bought it. Men gave the
women shit jobs and the women
decided that maybe they deserved
shit jobs. The reason a lot of
women don't have any self respect
is they were taught from birth that
they were intrinsically inferior to
men. It may sound trite, but trite in
this case is true. Male chauvinism is
woven throughout the fabric of our
As a man in engineering it is
astonishing to me that most of my
female colleagues refuse to admit
that they are discriminated against.
Examples of discrimination fairly
scream at you every time you sit in a
class or amble through the grounds.
It is on every red jacket on campus.
It is written in every blasted E.U.S.
publication. The Lady Godiva ride
proclaims it and the Red Rag revels
in it. In Vancouver women
engineers are barred from the
Engineer's Club. Sexist jokes are
mailed to members of the Professional Association of Engineers by
the officers in charge. Engineering
firms refuse and restrict employ-
employment of women graduates.
Sexual discrimination is easy to see
if you open your eyes.
Ever heard of a Smoker? This is
where the engineers organize a party for the boys and hire a prostitute.
It doesn't take too much imagination to figure out what happens
there.    They   even   bring   their
society and sometimes you have to
dig a little to find it. You only need
a small shovel.
So it isn't all that surprising that
many of the women who have the
"nerve" to go into engineering promptly rush out and buy a red
jacket, Lady Godiva decal on the
front and all. The red jacket is one
of the symbols of the engineering
tradition at UBC. To me it is a
tradition of male chauvinism, sexual depravation, social immorality
and the degradation of human
rights.
The women who wear red wear
the badge of their social inferiority
and the men in red approve. Big
surprise. The women in engineering
"get involved" in the activities of
the E.U.S. and take note of the
miracle, the men in red approve:
"aw come on — it's all in fun —
see, she likes it." But the most
frustrating manner in which women
engineers aid their oppressors is by
tacit approval. By saying nothing
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to
run for election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large
and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 9, 1983.
against the policies of sexual
discrimination in the E.U.S., these
women give them their vote of confidence and support.
Women now represent roughly 20
per cent of enrollment in first year
engineering and these statistics continue to improve. The time for a
women's group in engineering —
for active dissent — has arrived.
Enough of quietly accepting the
Lady Godiva ride as "the antics of
young boys and let them have their
fun". Enough of having prostitutes
brought in for the boys. Enough of
listening to sexist attitudes and sexist policy decisions drafted by
members of the E.U.S. It's time for
both men and women to start
demanding changes from the people
who represent them.
The Lady Godiva ride is a symbolic representation of women as
mere sex objects. It's time to dump
that symbol and reject the flimsy
arguments which support the tradition of Lady Godiva. How the hell
are changes in engineering going to
occur if we accept sexist symbols as
part of our figurehead? Raising a
voice against the silly assed crap
that goes down in the faculty of
engineering is not being "too militant." Getting involved could even
be fun. How about reinstating
another old tradition and start burning red engineering jackets? Much
more fun than burning bras.
Attitudes that degrade women
are part of the problem which lead
to appalling levels of rape and
violence against women. This is a
university setting and it is sick to
countenance sexual bigotry by saying nothing. The university is sup
posed to be an enlightened intellectual community. If we passively
allow sexist attitudes to prevail in a
setting of enlightenment then it's
pretty damned unlikely that there
will be any force for change outside
of that setting.
It is of course commendable if
women address their social disadvantages by developing their self-
confidence, initiative, daring and
other personal virtues. But it
doesn't matter a damn if you're virtuous and no one will recognize it or
if in the face of your virtues they
flaunt you as a sex object.
Chauvinistic attitudes may at times
seem subtle and of little consequence to a woman's ultimate success in life, but don't let yourself be
suckered by a thin veil over the corruption. The attitudes are there and
they are important.
In many ways I'm not very happy
about having written all of the
foregoing. A women writing the
same would have had more
credibility and no matter how hard
I try, I am a man raised in a
chauvinist environment and will
never see it like a woman. The last
word has to come from a woman,
not from me. I do hope, mind you,
that I've caught someone's attention out there and maybe pissed a
few people off enough to stir up
some active controversy. As for the
women in engineering, there are
other women's groups out there
that are willing to support you.
Why don't you give one of them a
call?	
Greg Harms is in bio-resource
engineering and has an aversion to
red jackets.
Hairstyling for men & women J|
The Hairline's team of experts wants
to give students a break!
10% OFF
our regular prices
Monday - Thursday
(Student A.M.S. card required)
2529 Alma
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Mon.-Fri. 9:00-7:00
Sat. - 9:00 - 5:30
THE UBC BOOKSTORE
IS
PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THAT
DENNIS LEE
will autograph
copies of his new book
for children
JELLY BELLY
5
ON THURSDAY, NOV. 24th
12:30 pm to 2:00 pm
TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
CALL 228-4741
E£ BOOKSTORE
6200 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
UBC CAMPUS. VAN.. B.C.  V6T  1Y5 Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1983
TODAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Showing of film on life in modern Japan, noon,
Asian Centre auditorium.
T-BIRD NIGHT
Meet the Thunderbird athletes in the Pit. Try our
new Thunderbird drink and keep the glass, happy hour 8:30 p.m., the Pit.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Varsity vs. Western Washington University Vikings, 7:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
WEDNESDAY
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Meeting with Manning Glicksohn — "The way
things really work," noon, Buchanan 8220.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem 150.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Film:  Minds Behind  Bars, all welcome,  noon,
SUB 212.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Fraser Valley Reps, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Bronze clinic featuring the jive and the chacha,
noon, SUB Partyroom,
THURSDAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film on life in modern Japan, noon, Asian
Centre-Auditorium
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Speaker: Dr. Eat Fattah of SFU Criminology
Dept. on the death penalty, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.,
SUB 215
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN ST.
AND THE SPANISH EMBASSY
Spanish feature film (dialogue in Spanish) entitled "cerca de las Estellas". 12:30, Buchanan
A202
TREES . . .
endless contributors
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Speaker Or. Bruce Walker of Regent College: "A
Historical Perspective of the 0. T. Canon.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,    1:30   p.m.,    International
House, Upper lounge.
FRIDAY
UBC JOURNALISM SCHOOL
Free bzzr before Mr. Bill's seminar, noon, 241K
SUB.
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 50% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
with your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
Choose ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
-EYE LAB
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym nite, 7:30-10:30 p.m., gym A, Osbourne.
THUNDERBIRD WRESTLING
Men's    Varsity    vs.    University    of    Calgary
Dinosaurs, 5:00 p.m., Osbourne Centre.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House, upper lounge.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Latin American Fiesta and Bzzr Garden Viva Le
Revolucton, 7-12 p.m., SUB 212.
{id-ffafrs
The Universities Model
Parliament Society of BC is a nonpartisan organization dedicated to
the furthering of the understanding
of the parliamentary system.
Membership is open to all,
regardless of party affiliation or lack
thereof.
The NDP caucus of Model Parliament is looking for interested people. This year's session will be in
Victoria on Jan. 3, 4, 5, and 6.
The caucus will be holding its
first meeting this Saturday at 4 p.m.
at 517 East Broadway. For more information, contact one of the
numbers below. Duncan 921-7273,
Lawrence 736-5141, Carolyn
291-0716.
CORKY SAYS:
BALD PEOPLE ARE
MORE REFLECTIVE.
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Ski for the month of
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• On sale now nt rne A fvl.S. Box Office.
• Ski 7 days a week, day or night.
• Open weekdays 9 am - 11 pm and weekends
& holidays 8 am - 10 pm.
Pass Sale ends December 3, 1983.
SEEK
PROFESSIONAL
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kinko's copies
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a complete copy,
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Help, 1 am trapped In thie box with virions of HaHe Sedate*, the mighty ieh, and
other a reat rote models. The only remedy I can eea le consumption of meaetve quan-
tltlee of beer. beer. boar. Coma to 2*1K and participate In thla drunken orgy on Friday after a thrHIIng temlnar from tha greatest role model: Bill Tieleman. Times to be
announced. : v
l^abooclles
Think Christmas — think early — think and hop to
Kaboodles
We have stocking stuffers for everybody.
• wind-up vegetables • skiing bears • cookie coin purses •
grey flannel bibs • inflatable atlases • hot water bottle bears •
stuffed names • calligraphy pens • pandas, honey bears &
baby bears • helium balloons • scented wrapping paper &
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Open Thurs. & Friday evenings - Sundays 1-5
4462 W. 10th Ave. (near the Gates)
fTHE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional I
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; addi- I
tional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c. I
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the    I
day before publication. I
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5        I
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
BB|
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body needs T.L.C. $400 obo. 254-5598.
25 - INSTRUCTION
TUTORING. Experienced English Tutor with
extensive academic background available to
assist with all aspects of written or oral expression. Brian 682-1043.
LSAT. GMAT. CAT preparation. Call National Testing 738-4618. Please leave message
on tape. Manager is counselling.
33 — Business Opportunities
STATE OF THE ART, New era personal
care products, new era thinking. Great personal growth potential. No Ceiling on
return for Services. Jim 437-0089.
40 - MESSAGES	
SMOKERS   -  WE NEED YOUI We are
studying the effects of smoking on the ability of the lungs to protect against inhaled
substances. We need smoking volunteers
(one pack a day or more) for a painless
study which involves breathing a non-
irritating tracer and sitting in front of a
machine for 15 minutes. This study involves
radiation at a dose about equal to half a
chest x-ray. A $20 honorarium will be paid.
Contact Susan Kennedy, St. Paul's
Hospital: 682-2344 local 2700 or 2709.
50 - RENTALS
TELEVISION RENTALS $23.00 monthly.
Answering Machines rentals $23.00 mon-
thlyl Dekka Sales Ltd. 732-7021.
66 - SCANDALS
ANOTHER GREAT IDEA FROM California!
Say ANYTHING you want with a PERSONALIZED bumper stickerl Same day
service-available at the Thunderbird Shop
in SUB. A UNIQUE and PERSONAL GIFT
or JOKE — temporary or permanent
adhesive.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
TYPING: experienced typist; reasonable
rates; all jobs, will pick up and deliver. Tel.
421-0818, Mary Lou.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. IBM Selectric.
by experienced secretary. $1.25/pg. Bing,
224-1567.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, essays, thesis,
manuscripts, etc. Choice of type engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6756.
FAST. ACCURATE typing at reasonable
rates. 732-0834 after 6 p.m.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose. 7 3 1-9857.
FAST, ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS: U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, Er masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD PROCESSING: & typing: term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl.
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
INK DRAWING for theses and papers. Professional quality, reasonable rate, by hour
or estimate. 266-8771.
80 - TUTORING
CRITIQUE AND EDIT term papers, theses
in preparation. 7 yrs. exp. as university
educator, Ph.D. Quality assured.
Reasonable rates. Will travel. 669-1284.
WORD PROCESSING
SERVICES
Days, nights, weekends
MAR POLE AREA
Spelling and grammar expertise.
Cai! Nancy - 266-1768
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from
legible work, essays, theses. 738-6829 10
a.m. -9pm. On King Edward bus route.
ARE  YOU   HAVING   PROBLEMS  writing
correctly? Are you losing marks because of
your english? Get your papers checked and
corrected. Phone Evenings: 6-9 p.m.
531-8157.
86 - TYPING	
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional result call Audrey. 228-0378.
WORD PROCESSING Papers, theses, let
ters. Resumes, etc. Fast turnaround. Student rate $15/hr. no minimum rsq. Call
Ellen, 271-6924.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS	
IMAGE DESIGN, 2331 Main St., 876-5586.
15% discount for students on all reg. priced
items. Full line of drafting, engineering Et
art supplies. SPECIAL Drafting Table
$139.00 Tuesday, November 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC rugby team lost Cup
The UBC rugby team lost its second McKechnie Cup game against
Vancouver by a score of 9-6 in monsoon conditions Saturday.
The loss leaves UBC 0-2 in the six
game qualifying tournament.
All the points came from penalty
kicks in the first half. Although
SPORTS
Volleyballers menace
While two of UBC's incumbent
national champions were finishing
off their seasons two weekends ago,
in repeated success for the field
hockey team, in honorable failure
for the football team, a third, the
men's volleyball team, was just starting its defence of a Canadian intervarsity Athletic Union Crown.
The Volleyballers began their
season in menacing style in a tournament in Calgary, beating all five
of their Western rivals in the process. And followed up this weekend
with a pair of convincing wins
against the University of Lethbridge
on Friday, and the University of
Calgary on Saturday. Both games
were at the War Memorial Gym.
The 'Birds defeated the
Lethbridge Pronghorns 15-7, 15-9
and 16-4 and then crushed Calgary,
who'd given them a hard game the
previous week, 15-7, 15-5, 15-2.
This year the Western tourna
ment has a new format. There is only one tournament and then each
team plays each other team home
and home.
The wins in the tournament were
worth one point each, a win in the
other games gains two points. UBC
has won all seven of their games so
far and has nine points, to lead the
league.
V
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Fridays till 6:00 p.m.
hi   6
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20% off on
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Nov. 30th
Elio of Rome is now open at 7a.m.
UBC had good field position on
numerous occasions they could not
turn possession into points. The rain
made the ball greasy and the ground
slippery so that UBC's strength,
which is moving the ball about was
taken away.
Coach Don Spence said he was
nevertheless very pleased with the
way the team played. "We played
better than for a couple of weeks,"
he said, "even Vancouver players
said that they stole it from us."
Spence said the first McKechnie
Cup game against the Island team
was the first really physical game
that his team had played this year.
Some of the new players had not
realized how psychologically tough
the game could be. But, said
Spence, the team had come on in
the second half of that game and
finished off with the prettiest try
when they carried the ball the length
of the field making fourteen passes
en route.
If UBC are to make the
McKechnie Cup final they must win
all four of their remaining games,
said Spence.
The next game they have in that
competition is on Wednesday next
week against Fraser Valley. On
Wednesday of this week they play
the University of Victoria in the annual Wightman Boot competition.
HOLLYWOOD
3123 West Broadway
738-3211
Nov. 21-28 incl.
One of the best movies about growing up . . . since "Small Change".
N.Y. Times
GREGORY'S GIRL
9:15
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WILD
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ADMISSION
Whan accompanied by one
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EXPIRES NOV. 24 (Not valid Friday or Sat.)
'NEW METRO' RUNNEI
'NIKE' SALE
BROADWAY PLAZA - Phone 873-2723
601 W. BROADWAY (near London Drugs)
Friday, Nov. 25 Et Saturday, Nov. 26 or until quantities last
We must get rid of '83 stock for new '84 stock!
All Merchandise on Sale from 10% to 40% off
INCLUDING THESE NIKE RUNNERS:
Reg.
Alcourt (M/L)               25 99
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50.99
68.99
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Bruin Leather                      51 99
Racquette Leather               43 99
Killshot                   40 99
Yankee (M/L)               47 99
WE CAN GET YOU ANY NIKE PRODUCT A T INCREDIBLE SA VII
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THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
chSSST
pcrioNS
DECOR
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R\BBON
CRACKERS
NAPKINS
TEDDY BEARS
MUGS
BATH
GOODIES
Wine
RACKS
UBC SWEATSHIRTS
NOW OPEN AT 8:00 A.M.
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
HOURS:
MON. TO FRI. 8 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22,1983
T-birds beat hockey Dinosaurs
By MONTE STEWART
Well, the Thunderbirds finally
managed to defeat the Calgary
Dinosaurs. The only problem was
that it was the hockey 'Birds — and
not the football version — who did
the winning.
The 'Birds a la glace swept a
weekend series with the Dinos' at
the Thunderbird Winter Sports
Center. Friday, the 'Birds escaped
with a 5-4 victory. Saturday, the
margin was greater as the 'Birds
skated off with a 4-1 decision.
The two wins were the first of the
1983 Canada West season for UBC.
The Thunderbirds lost to Alberta at
home last weekend after opening
the season with a pair of losses in
Saskatchewan against the Saskatchewan Huskies. Calgary is still
winless this season.
This year's version of the hockey
'Birds is almost a replica of last
year's edition. Goaltender, Wade
Jensen and forwards Mark
McLeary, Renzo Berra, and John
Brunoro are the only new members.
The veterans provided the offensive
output for UBC in both games.
Friday, Mike Reid, Daryl Col-
dwell, Graham Kerr, Renzo Berra,
and Mike Coflin scored for the
'Birds. Out of the five goal scorers,
Berra is the only newcomer. Ken
Vinge, Paul Geddes, Damian
Steiert, and Dave Sverzek replied
for the Dinosaurs.
The first encounter was the best
game of the series. The outcome
was not final until Daryl Coldwell
tipped the puck over the UBC
blueline with six seconds remaining.
Defenceman Rick Amann gave
Calgary a powerplay with just 20
seconds left after he received an obvious roughing penalty. Calgary
goaltender Mike Frank was out for
a sixth attacker, creating a two man
advantage, when Coldwell poked
the puck away from Calgary
defenceman. Grant Mac Kay.
Calgary opened the scoring at
3:39 when Geddes took a pass from
Mac Kay and beat Jensen. Then,
just six seconds later, Reid evened
the score with a 40 foot blooper
which eluded Frank. The score was
tied 2-2 at the end of the second
period with Kerr and Berra scoring
for UBC while Vinge accounted for
Calgary.
In the third period, Damian
Steiert tied the score on a play that
occurs once every thousand goals.
Roger Wolfe passed the puck from
the corner into the goalmouth area;
Jensen kicked the ensuing pass right
into the back of Reid and the puck
rebounded into the net. Coldwell
and Coflin scored at 6:31 and 9:54
respectively to give UBC a two goal
lead before Sverzek set the stage for
the dramatic finish with 5:23 remaining.
Saturday, the 'Birds showed their
superiority. Kevin Argue scored
twice with Amann and Coldwell adding singles. Darren Halasz scored
the lone Calgary goal. Both
Amann's and Halasz's goals were
powerplay efforts.
Neither of the games was very
lame, severely damaging the non-
aggressive image of college hockey.
Friday, there were 43 minutes of
minor penalties. Mark McLeary led
UBC with six minutes while Terry
Paskaruk also received six minutes.
Saturday, a total of 70 minutes was
called. There were 40 minutes in
minor infractions.
Jensen played both games in the
nets for UBC while Mike Frank and
Mike Craig split the duties for
Calgary.
— brlan grooa photo
SHOWING CHAMPIONSHIP PLAY, Women's field hockey team has captured Canadian university championship for second year in a row.
Water polo team wins tournament
By PETER BERLIN
For a team to improve from last
place in their conference to first in a
year is a remarkable achievement.
All the more remarkable when the
feat is accomplished by the same
players. But that is exactly what the
UBC men's water polo team did
when they won the final tournament of the American collegiate
Northwest region in Corvallis,
Oregon.
The weekend started out on a bad
note. Many of the second-string
players dropped out and even with
two members of the women's team,
UBC only took down 10 players to
contest five games in two days.
They made things easier for
themselves by leaping out to big
leads in the first quarters of their
first   two   games   allowing   coach
Michael Roy to use the three subs
and rest the starters.
They were ahead 5-0 after seven
minutes against Portland State and
won 9-5. They out-scored
Washington 9-0 in the first period
and ended up with a 17-9 victory in ,
another game. That win guaranteed
them a place in the semi-finals. But
a win against traditional nemesis
Simon Fraser would give them the
easier game.
SFU, seeing only eight men in the
UBC team decided to take it easy.
They rested their star forward Mark
Lawrence for the first quarter in
which UBC grabbed a 3-1 lead.
Even after Lawrence was thrown into the game UBC held onto the lead
and won a tight game 9-7.
In   the   semi-final   gainst   the
University of Washington on Sunday morning, UBC went with their
seven starters all the way and after a
well played game won again by 9-7.
That set up a final against previous
year's champions Oregon State, who
squeaked past SFU by one goal in
the othe semi-final.
UBC handed OSU their first conference defeat in three years in Vancouver last month but the final was
in OSU's home pool before a large
partisan crowd with the Oregon
team at full strength.
UBC rose to the occasion. They
trailed 2-1 after one period and 5-3
at the half. The game was very hard
played and during the second
period starter John Riley was fouled out of the game.
But UBC fought back in the third
period and moved into a 7-6 lead.
The two teams exchanged goals at
the start of the final quarter and
then John Montgomery, UBC's
leading scorer and lone representative on the tournament all-star
team, committed his third major offense and was fouled out. UBC
brought in Angie Haveman. Immediately after the substitution
OSU equalized and seemed to be in
control. They were unable to
capitalize on their momentum and
with just over a minute remaining
UBC grabbed the winner.
On their next attack, OSU was
stopped by goalie Chris Kellman
and UBC were able to play out the
clock.
THE
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for men and women
THE PROS
is All fully qualified,
professional stylists
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Monday-Friday 8:30-7:30
Saturday 8:30-5:00
95 basic cut
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3621 W. 4th Ave. 733-3831
we're doing it again!
book
event
the.
year!
fiction, non-fiction, best sellers, classics, art, cookbooks,
childrens    books,    textbooks   and    reference    books
all at tremendous savings!
shop early — a great opportunity to buy Christmas presents!
RD
nov21STdec3
monday - friday 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
BOOKSTORE
at our new location
6200 university blvd.
ubc campus
228-4741

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