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The Ubyssey Feb 29, 1968

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Array GEARS' PREZ KIDNAPPED  BY BEDPANNERS
By SUE GRANSBY AND MURRAY McMILLAN
Ubyssey  News  and  Managing Editors
For two hours Wednesday night, Nurses
ruled the world.
Twenty-five members of the third year nursing class captured engineering undergraduate
society president Lynn Spraggs and held him
captive in the bathroom of a West End apartment for two hours.
The bedpanners tricked Spraggs into coming
to the apartment by telling him they needed
his help with a skit they were planning for
Nursing Day celebrations, today, in the engineering building.
"We asked him to help us. At first he was
leery, but he finally agreed to come when we
told him he wouldn't be humiliated," said
Heather MacRae, an organizer of the plot.
"Brains won out over brawn this time.
"When he arrived we overpowered him and
locked him in the bathroom. We first removed
— thorry cohrarUy photo
the handle so there was no way he could get
out," Miss MacRag^settT   Tr^ip^55*5**^
However af^ejjtfSo V«iil5»fe^^hn^- weakened and allmjesTTSpraggs one phdnJ^caM —
to his wife. \s
He theji told them there WjergQtwenty engineers outside the ik*or, aria they were,ggoing
to break it do*wn. They checked, there-*$%$ no-
one there, but ,minutes later a red ho'rdte appeared. N^o/ty p     - J\^ v
"We only letirim-.go". because the manager
was complaining, we didn't want to get kicked
out of the apartment. The engineers had already
broken one window and we were afraid they'd
smash the door down,"  said one nurse.
Spraggs had only one comment: "Nobody
can hold an engineer for long, the nurses did
well by doing it for two hours."
The bedpanners do have one souvenir of
the attempt. Spraggs is minus his sacred red
sweater, and the nurses say he's not going
to get it back.
TO HELL with that Swahili 741 term paper. Photographer
Bill Loiselle was an outsider inside the Henry Angus Building Wednesday as students answered the call of the great
outdoors. Only 48 days to exams.
SFU council raps McFog,
unethical   conduct   charged
BURNABY (UNS) — Simon Fraser University's student
society has condemned what it called SFU's president Patrick
McTaggart-Cowans unethical conduct.
The action followed the president's rejection of recommendations made by a society committee on food services.
McTaggart-Cowan ignored the committee's choice of food
consultants and recommended several others for the job, said
student information  officer Gordon  Hardy.
The president called the recommendations unacceptable
because they would harm the university's relationship with other
businesses.
Student society members said it was unethical to strike a
committee and then ignore its recommendations.
Acting society president Lena Dominelli said a major turning point in the process of democratizing the university may be
reached Friday evening when she leads a delegation of society
members to a board of governors meeting.
She, acting first vice-president Bill Engleson, and second
vice-president Gini Shaw will forward briefs and petitions to
the board.
Miss Dominelli's appointment followed the resignation last
week of student president Arthur Weeks, who left council chambers saying student council as a vehicle for responsible student
government has broken down.
Vol.  XLIX,  No. 51      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 29,  1968   «^^>48        224-3916
Referendum fails;
Persky ineligible
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Stan Persky will not be Alma Mater Society
president next year.
A referendum held Tuesday to change eligibility requirements imposed on presidential candidates failed by 72 votes out of a 4,154 turnout.
The referendum, which needed two thirds
approval, gained 64.9 per cent support.
Had the referendum passed, a student would
need one rather than two years on campus before   running  for  president.    Persky  has  been
on campus only one full winter session.
2.698 IN FAVOR
A total of 2,698 students favored the change,
while 1,456 opposed it.
The referendum received at least 50 per
cent approval at all but three of the 20 polls.
Polls in the engineering building, the Woodward library, and the MacMillan building gained
little support for the revision.
A by-election will be held March 13 to decide
who will be the next president.
Persky beat Brian Abraham, law 1, in the
presidential election held Feb. 7. The election
was declared null and void when Persky was
found ineligible to run by student court Feb. 19.
SMOOTH PROCEDURE
Returning officer Chuck Campbell said Wednesday the referendum vote Tuesday was one
of the smoothest at UBC.
"All the ballots were double counted and
there wasn't one spoiled ballot," he said.
Campbell, however, criticized education student council representative Bob Gilchrist, ombudsman-elect, for not telling council over 1,000
education students would be off campus teaching
the day of the referendum.
'MOUSE  REP STUPID'
"The education rep was stupid not to point
it out," Campbell said. "But we found out too
late to change the date of the referendum."
Campbell said it was a relatively good turnout but criticized students for not acting to give
the referendum more publicity.
"I put up posters all over campus, but saw
only a few others urging students to vote," he
said.
Earlier Campbell said he would go ahead on
his own to publicize the vote because he knew
the AMS would not do so.
However,   AMS   president   Shaun   Sullivan
said Wednesday had Campbell not gone ahead
the AMS would have directed him to do so.
SHAUN DID NOTHING
Sullivan said he himself did nothing to promote the referendum.
"The executive was just sitting back to see
what the students would decide," he said. "It
was the decision of the students."
He said he was disappointed the referendum
was not clearly defeated or passed.
"And I'm surprised more people didn't vote
when it was obviously a question of whether
or not Persky would be able to run. Somewhere
in the last three weeks Persky's lost 1,100 votes."
NO  CANDIDATES  YET
Nominations opened Wednesday for the
March 13 election, but no candidates have declared themselves as yet.
Carey Linde, AMS vice-president-elect, said
after the referendum he felt obligated to consider running for president, but later said he
did not plan to run.
Students warn
McGill board
MONTREAL (CUP) — Student leaders
Monday warned McGill's board of governors against tampering with the .students
society's financial structure.
The board had announced Monday the
formation of a committee to review the
way the student society collects and distributes its funds.
McGill students now pay a compulsory
$24 student society fee at registration,
which the university hands over to student
government.
According to internal vice-president
Danny Trevick, McGill principal Rocke
Robertson had said at a private meeting
two weeks ago: "Some of your (student
society) activities are valuable but we will
have to look into the problem of differential distribution."
Trevick interpreted this statement and
others made at the time to indicate the administration intends to destroy the McGill
Daily in one way or another even if it
means destroying the student society as
well.
Trevick accused the administration of
intruding into a purely student concern.
Daily editor Peter Allnutt agreed the
move was designed to get at the Daily,
wh'ch has been a thorn in the administration's side for several years now.
Allnutt claimed the chief cause of the
action was an article published Feb. 9 dealing with the association of members of the
board of governors with firms producing
materials for use by American forces in
Vietnam. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February 29,   1968
— Icurt hilger photo
THIS  FELLOW decided  to   get  serious when   his   girl   friend   told   him   to   go   get   stuffed.   He
filled   her  car  with   old   newspapers.  Anyone   got a  match ?
FILMSOC  PRESENTS
THE GREAT RACE
Today, Feb. 29
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30
AUDITORIUM-50c
a
African  apartheid policy static
By NORMAN  GIDNEY
Liberal South Africans have little hope of
changing their government's racist policies, a
former South African  senator said  Wednesday.
Dr. Edgar Brookes, who represented the
blacks of Natal and Zululand from 1937 until the
abolition of African representation in 1952, told a press
conference in International
House that only a long-range
education program would soften the ruling Nationalist
party's hardline apartheid policies.
He discounted the possibility
of Black Power type uprisings.
"South Africa is honeycombed with secret police. Vio- BROOKES
lence in South Africa, apart from external intervention, means the unleashing of millions of
blacks. There would be raps, arson and murder
on scattered farms throughout the country," he
said.
Brookes said the Afrikaaners (Dutch descendants) wouldn't give in easily. "They've learned
from the Sharpeville riots in  1960," he said.
In the riots, police fired on demonstrating
blacks, killing about 80.
"If freedom is won it'll be in a country
hardly worth  having".
As head of the Liberal party in South Africa,
which has no representation in the 159- seat
parliament, Brookes advocates one-man, one-
vote and complete abolition of the color bar.
"Nobody in the Liberal party anticipates
widespread revolution and bloodshed but the
present system can't last forever,"  he said.
Brookes said sanctions by the United Nations
have tended to harden the hearts of the ruling
group.
"But they have some effect, as toad as things
are. Without external criticism the situation
would be much worse."
Brookes said the English-speaking South
Africans, who compose 40 per cent of the four
million whites, play very little part in South
African government.
But he said the young, college-age English
speakers are promising. Their student organiza-
organization, the National Union of South African Students, is multi-racial.
"Even though the last three chairmen of the
organization have been banned, there are no
l:ss than 15 young people willing to put themselves up for the post," Brookes said.
He speaks again today in the Freddy Wood
theatre at noon as part of a lecture tour of Canadian and American universities. His subject
will be the white Anglo-Saxon Protestant in the
United States, South Africa and the world.
KEEP AN EYE ON THE
GUARANTEE
- As well as the price
ASIDE FROM THE ECONOMICAL PRICE
ONLY BAKER OPTICAL CERTIFIES TO
UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEE AND
REPLACE LENSES AND FRAMES AT
NO EXTRA COST IF BROKEN WITHIN
ONE YEAR OF PURCHASE.
SIMILAR SAVINGS FOR CONTACT
LENSES
XSOK01,
OPTICAL LTD.
888 GRANVILLE   Next to the Orpheum Theatre
2nd FLOOR — ELEVATOR SERVICE
688-4601
niccolini
suits, coats, car coats, rainwear,
at fashion stores everywhere. Thursday,  February 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
WARMING UP for tonight's 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. performance at International House are (left to right) classical guitarist Arthur Dolson, Spanish
prof "Twang" Volster and professional guitarist Chris Jordan. Guitar
recital, sponsored by El Circulo, will feature Spanish and Latin American
works.
Bed race set for noon today
Bedlam will reign today at noon.
This, at least, is the hope of the
Circle K club, sponsor of UBC's first
annual bed race.
The race, beginning and ending at
the bookstore, will include all faculties
which field a team and can put up an
entry fee of a case of suds.
The winner will be awarded half
the total entry fees with lesser prizes
going for second and third place.
One case goes to the most unusual
bed.
Entrants   must   supply   their   own
Dick lectures
Needham's back.
Richard Needham, the irreverent
Globe and Mail columnist, will visit
UBC today at 3:30 p.m. to talk with
staffers of Canada's best university
paper.
All interested students are welcome
to come down to the north Brock basement office of The Ubyssey and join
in a discussion on Canadian journalism.
beds and must have a team member
aboard at all times. The vehicles will
be propelled by six people.
Teams will be disqualified for im
peding the movement of other beds or
for throwing objects at opposing teams.
Their route will take them by the
library, physics building, Brock Hall,
Buchanan and the flag pole on the way
back to the bookstore.
SEATS  TO  SEE
UBC's fine arts gallery is aiming
its latest exhibition at the very seat
of learning.
Chairs, chairs of all kinds will be
on display from today until March 16.
High chairs, low chairs, folding
chairs, rocking chairs, revolving chairs
and wheel chairs are on display.
Highlights are Premier Bennett's
office chair, the UBC chancellor's chair,
and a barber's chair. All were acquired
by campus museology students.
From March 5-8, one free haircut a
day will be given in the barber's chair.
Student court
rules out Hoye
By   PAUL   KNOX
Student court Wednesday ruled
Alma Mater Society treasurer Dave
Hoye is ineligible to hold office this
year.
The court took four hours to reach
a 4-3 decision on the question, which
was referred to court by council at its
meeting Feb. 5.
Hoye said Wednesday night he will
offer his resignation to AMS president
Shaun Sullivan immediately.
Sullivan said council will have no
alternative but to accept Hoye's resignation, and will probably do so at
its  next meeting.
REASONS  TODAY
Chief justice Allan Stewart told
The Ubyssey the court's assenting and
dissenting judgements would be made
public today
Hoye, who argued in his own defence, based his case on the failure of
the constitution to say AMS executives
must remain students while holding
office.
"AMS   counsel   Andy   Sandilands
himself has conceded that, and I think
he has conceded the case right there,"
Hoye said.
DEFINITE INTENT
"The AMS code also says student
senators cannot hold office after withdrawing from university.
"Therefore the fact that this has
been left out of the requirements for
officers implies a definite intent that
it not be a requirement."
Hoye also referred to the B.C.
Societies Act, which states that directors of a society must be members
when they are elected, but doesn't say
they must remain members.
Hoye attempted to introduce opinions of student council on the question
of his own eligibility, but Stewart
ruled this argument inadmissible.
Sandilands, law 3, had argued that
the   intent  of  the  constitution  barred
non-students from holding office.
MUST PASS EXAMS
He quoted by-law 23 of the AMS
constitution, which says AMS executives must pass the exams immediately
following their election or appointment.
Sandilands submitted the treasurer
does not take office until May and
therefore would have to pass the following Christmas exams. This would
make  Hoye  ineligible.
But court held that he need only
have passed the final exams after his
election to satisfy this requirement.
The  prosecution  counsel  also  said
the sub-section title of bylaw 23, Eligibility for Holding Office, was proof of
intent that officers be students.
ARGUMENT REFUTED
Court refuted this argument, saying
that sub-headings of bylaws cannot be
used to interpret the wording of the
constitution.
Sandilands said the name "students'
council" was further proof that the
constiution  was  intended to limit eli
gibility for holding office to students.
However, he admitted directors of
companies do not have to be members
of those companies.
He also quoted by-law 7 (2) of the
constitution, which says "no student
shall hold more than one office on the
Students' Council during any one session."
Sandilands  said  this   bylaw   could
imply  officers   of  the   AMS   must  be
students.
LUDICROUS INTERPRETATION
"It could ' also mean non-students
can hold more than one office," he
said. "I think this is a ludicrous interpretation."
"No more ludicrous than your argument," said a justice.
Observers said the tone of the
court session was considerably lighter
than the last, in which the court ruled
AMS presidential candidate Stan Persky was   ineligible  for  office.
At one point, Hoye said a decision
that non-students were ineligible to
hold office would mean all AMS executive members would have to be
made honorary AMS members.
"Why?" asked a justice. "To avoid
referring cases like this one to student
court," replied Hoye.
OUT OF BUSINESS
"You'll put us out of business," said
chief justice Allan Stewart.
"Hear, hear," interjected one of the
10 observers.
Sandilands also raised the question
of how many units a student must take
before he can be considered a student.
"But I think it's beneath the dignity of this court to nit-pick over
units," he said.
"We're willing," said a member of
the  bench.
HOYE BEFORE HOYE AFTER
Bid now to
edit Ubyssey
Applications are now being accepted for the position of Ubyssey
editor-in-chief for 1968-69. A letter of application stating name,
age, journalistic experience and
plans for the paper must be sent
to The Editorial Board, The
Ubyssey, before 12:30 p.m., Monday, March 4. Applicants must
be prepared to appear before the
board Tuesday, March 5.
r£
ALBERT AND P0LESDEN LACEV ARE
IN[JAIL BECAUSE « UNNATURAL
sL i=(5rTreAR! m afraid leu
(VE OBtfOUSLYCAjn'lTAVU^
AaRoUND HERE TOO LONfi! TLL    PV^^N        ~7r^     VM. BUT UE',
AROUND HERE TOO LON<j! TLL
CALL flV FRIENDS, D'AACV AHdl
GROSS FMFEREllA!* THEU9YSW
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex   04-5224.
FEBRUARY 29,  1968
Hoye ploy
An Alma Mater Society treasurer's job is never
done. More specifically, an outgoing AMS treasurer's
job is not done until the end of May. That's how long
it takes to play the book-keeping games that have to be
played with the AMS budget.
Meanwhile, student court has decided treasurer
Dave Hoye is ineligible to hold office. The court says
the AMS constitution bars from office persons who are
not full-time registered students — as Hoye this year
is not. A revision of the constitution to change this situation will be put to the AMS general meeting — but the
general meeting is three weeks away.
Clearly, some kind of expedient is needed. It is important that Hoye, the world's foremost expert on the
AMS budget, finish the job.
Student council has proved itself fairly adept at
finding expedients. We hope they come up with one
next Monday night.
Thumbs up
Hitch-hiking, an 'editorial in a downtown paper claims,
is thumbing trouble. It is a practice which can lead to
danger for both driver and hitch-hiker. Moreover, it's
not even legal. And, although the writer doesn't come
out and say it, it's not very good for General Motors, so
it couldn't be good for the country.
Meanwhile, UBC still exists at the remotest tip of
Point Grey — miles away from where most students
live. Many of these students don't have cars. And many
of them have cars but must leave them far from the
campus because of UBC's parking shortage. To add
grief to the situation, bus service is slow and undepend-
able. Hence, dangerous or not, many students must hitch.
They will continue to do so. Campus-bound drivers
should not believe everything they read — especially
in editorials in downtown papers.
Separatists
Separatism is bursting out all over.
The new engineering undergraduate president is
talking about a technical faculty breakaway from the
Alma Mater Society. And the men's athletic committee
says it wants student athletic fees collected separately
from AMS fees.
Thus, the AMS seems faced with a miniature version of the separatist problem facing the Canadian government. The engineers are Quebec: they have a different culture which needs autonomy in order to flourish.
"Engineers think in entirely different lines than some
other faculties," says the new EUS president.
The MAC, on the other hand is B.C.: it merely
wants more control over the power to tax.
We think both of them are wrong. B.C.'s school of
engineering was not established at the university so that
engineering students should cut themselves off from
students in other fields. And as a recent Ubyssey interview with UBC's top engineer — Dean William Armstrong — indicates, the gulf between engineers and the
rest of humanity is not as great as engineering student
politicians claim it to be.
The MAC proposal, in which $5 for athletics would
be collected from students by the university and sent
directly to the men's and women's athletic committees,
would remove control over $70,000 of student money
from the student government. While the engineering
students' desire for more autonomy requires serious consideration — and perhaps a compromise solution — the
MAC proposal does not. Student fees must continue to
be controlled by students.
EDITOR:
Danny   Stoffman
City
Stuart   Gray
News
Susan   Gransby
Managing
Murray   McMillan
Photo
Kurt   Hilger
Senior
Pat   Hrushowy
Sports
Mike   Jessen
Wire
Norman  Gidney
Page   Friday
Judy   Bing
Ass't.  City
Boni   Lee
All staffers with over five-inch foreheads, except Irving Fetish/ are quite
urged to come down today to hear
Dick "Establishment" Needham, of
the Grope and Flail at 3:30 p.m.
About four hours later, a truck crammed with pubsters will lurch in the
general direction of Calgary, via Usk,
B.C.   In   the   interim,   it   is   hoped   a
paper   will  be   produced.
Alexandra Volkoff rolled dried
onions and smoked tears. "Onion
soup," she called. Soon there was a
long line of destitute staffers clutching their ladles. "More please,"
squealed Mike Finlay as he clouted
vying minor ogres Mike Fitzgerald
and Sidney Winteringham. Paul Knox
hove to in his 5.4 litre milk can. Fred
Cawsey showed and roundly insulted
All Concerned. Linda Gransby typed
letters with a hot dog in her ear but
relished every moment. Sportingly
sprinting and sorting seven solid
silver supermen were Jim Maddin and
John Twigg. It should be remembered that while the truck is in motion
absolutely no hanky-panky will be
tolerated. Bottles to be neatly stacked
for disposal at the Hell's Gate fish
ladder.
'Is something  bothering you this morning, dear? Why don't you just go
out and legislate  against it?'
Memo to African Nationalist,
Crossly Protesting Englishman
and many others: In no circumstances will The Ubyssey
publish unsigned letters, Pseu-
donymns will be used if re-
quested but correspondents
must sign their names and include addresses. For reasons
of space The Ubyssey can only
publish 30 per cent of letters
to the editor. For this reason,
brief letters recsive first preference. Typewritten letters
also   receive   preference.
Symposium
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Recently a number of us,
students and professors, attended a week-end symposium
originated by some of the students. Why did we not get
beyond the superficial? Perhaps it was the questions we
asked: "What is literature?
Why study literature?"
This could be compared to
Columbus' asking: "Why explore the world ?" or "What is
the world like ?" If those had
been his questions he might
have spent his time circling the
Atlantic. But he didn't. He
knew what to ask: "Is the
world round ? If so, what is on
the other side ?"
We could have asked: What
is the difference between Coleridge's idea of time and space,
and that of a scientist today ?
If we had done so we would
have required an authority
from the sciences to help us
explore our question. But the
exploration would have been
worthwhile.
We need to cross lines at the
university. It was this type of
exploration which set Coleridge ahead of his time, and
gave him reason to write.
We could have asked: What
is the relation between 'doing'
and 'learning' in literature ?
With this type of question we
could have drawn on the experience of those present. We
need symposia: we need them
now, while there is still time
for us to learn how to 'do it
nurselvps.' As thn univ*r«itv
gets larger we need symposia
more. I appreciate the efforts
of those who got this first one
on the road. I hope we do not
stop there.
JEAN GRAHAM
education 3
No  dance
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We wish to express our sincere regret for not being able
to play for the mid-term dance
on Feb. 21. Due to the childishness of a certain undergraduate society's president, as we
understand, the scheduled
dance was cancelled at the last
minute. We, hereby, apologize
to those who came out to hear
us, only to find that the dance
had been cancelled.
THE  SOUND   TUNNEL
VOICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Burpsky ponders
his prospects
By STAN PERSKY
AMS presidenl-elect-in-exile
Ubie-Doobie: Even though
4,200 people voted in the referendum and 65 per cent voted yes, I'm sure you're disappointed that you aren't eligible. What are your plans?
Burpsky: Well, I think I have
three  choices:
1) I could ask the academic
senate to grant me an honorary doctor of divinity degree
and apply for the job Jim
McKibbon just vacated. If allowed to be a priest I would
promise to lecture weekly
against the dread evil of marijuana and to support the U.S.
war  in  Vietnam.
2) I could commit suicide in
a bizarre way. For example,
I could throw myself under a
toppling government and be
crushed to death.
3) Sinco I've talked about the
erotic nature of government, I
could try to suppress my political needs by going into sex.
I  could establish  a list which
people could sign up for to
help me repress my political
urges.
All of these solutions would
be very helpful to me, but I
don't know that it would solve
the present campus mess.
Arts-hippie-front-pinko sheet:
Is the rumor true that you are
attending Bob Rowan's political philosophy class?
Blapsky: Alas, yes. He says
we've fought the good, honest,
clean fight, etc. It's very refreshing to be a student again.
Slime journalist: Do you
have any feelings of ill-will
a g a i n is t Shim Shaunsham,
Drone Mutton, Dove Ahem-
ahoye or Jim Leadass?
Plushky: No. Absolutely not.
They lie. Students should not
believe them.
Sensationalist rag: What kind
of a person would you like to
see   become  president?
Glurskee: I hope that he or
she will have long hair, beads,
beauty and be someone I
would like  to sleep  with. Thursday,  February 29,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 5
Commercemen
'Students   must  dismiss   obsolete   business   maxims'
By  MANUEL  F.  NEIRA
During the commerce workshop on education,
professors and students met at Cecil Green Park
to talk about educational systems, attitudes,
values, society, the business establishment,
teaching and Vietnam. The purpose was to build
firm grounds for further understanding and
questioning. But more important, the experience developed self-awareness of our limitations.
Does the present educational system provide
opportunities for "discovering" as well as "remembering"? Is there provision in the commerce
curriculum for playing with facts and ideas as
well as repeating them? Can students be taught
to be more sensitive to the nature of problems?
What is the student's ability to deal simultaneously with relationships between two aspects of a
problem? Do they do some thinking in other
areas of knowledge?
Does the business establishment demand college graduates to be selfish, narrow, short-sighted
men, unable to grasp the vision of the future,
imprisoned by a book-keeping attitude to life,
silent and blind about the great issues of our
age?
INTELLECTUAL  CLIMATE OF
COMMERCEMEN
Opinions and facts were considered during
three hours of continuous and stimulating conversation. Oliver W. Holmes would have clapped
—we acted as civilized men. The common denominator was the willingness to re-examine our
most cherished beliefs. And for some of us, it
was an opportunity to reaffirm our skepticism
toward any explanatory system as a final and
ultimate truth.
The participants committed themselves to
change the entire intellectual climate in which
commerce students as well as faculty function.
The immediate steps to be taken are oriented
towards promoting curiosity among students. By
using panel discussions, outside speakers, workshops, and publications they expect to confront
students with events and opinions to make them
curious.
Early in the meeting, I remembered the findings of a research study which reported that
students with a high degree of curiosity move
out from a familiar position and attempt to make
contact with aspects of the environment that
are novel. By the same token, low curiosity
students are characterized by his or her acceptance of the balanced and familiar. Curiosity is
an inherent human factor and therefore, it should
be manifest in varying degrees at all levels of
intellectual ability. If this is so, we necessarily
have to conclude that either commerce students
are not as intelligent as we think we are or the
educational structure provides a climate hostile
to inquiry,  or both.
COMMERCE STUDENTS WANT JOBS
The preceding reasoning must have unconsciously motivated us to examine the extent
inhibition and external domination have crippled
thinking, creativity and imagination with the
subsequent effect of producing apathetic students. Our concern is relevant since the new
teaching methods have all involved the more or
less inductive approach in which new understandings come to light through a form of discovery by the individual learner. Somebody
suggested that the real problem is the attitude
of commerce students: they are more concerned
with getting a job than with knowledge. The
degree is seen only as a means to impress prospective employers, and, in so doing, they hope
to secure any job that makes them the conquerors of the business world. This is a classical
example of distortion between conceptual systems
and reality. Personally, I do not think the suggestion can be generalized.
But, if this were actually the case how can
we expect the next generation of business leaders
to add wisdom, values and commitment to the
foundation of competence, effectiveness and professionalism of today's young executives? Society
no longer can afford an elite concerned mainly
with means. As Walter Guzzardi saw it, the
next generation of executives will have to bother
their heads about ends. I feel that the university
environment is where values will be learned by
future executives. Faculty and students should
engage in an honest attempt to reexamine their
beliefs and eventually dismiss the obsolete or
near-obsolete puritan maxims that still are being
presented as realities by the business establishment.  To think of the business world as a more
appropriate  environment for such tasks   is unrealistic and naive.
Students are resourceful and intelligent. The
answer to apathy may be that the system is
preventing inquiry by utilizing ego and social
needs to make students conform rather than
inquire, to store facts rather than search and
discover for themselves. This possibility should
be explored. In fact, it has been considered in
the open lately. Congratulations to those faculty
members who are already trying to create the
proper conditions for commerce students to develop the skills of inquiry and the attitudes that
lead to its use.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FASCINATING
Busines administration is a fascinating professional field that offers unlimited possibilities
for inquiry. For instance, economists have traditionally viewed the firm as an organization that
is guided by the criterion of profit maximization.
Do firms actually operate on such a narrow
criterion?  Or do other goals figure prominently.
Another illustration relevant to our time is
the study of bureaucracy. Discussing bureaucracy, Max Weber emphasized its formal aspects.
These include clearly defined and functionally
specific roles, each guided by definite rules;
organization of these roles into an unambiguous
hierarchy of authority and status; authority by
rule rather than by person; positions filled by
trained and salaried career bureaucrats. These
traits of bureauacracy are viewed as an imposing threat to freedom, individualism, and spontaneity.
Bureaucracy's features mark more and more
areas of modern life. So, North American society
has developed in a hierarchical system based on,
and ruled by, status. A system in which everybody relates to people through his relationship
to a strictly impersonal, strictly objective, strictly abstract thing—-"the organization," "the corporation," "the government agency,'' "the multiversity."
Groups of intellectuals question whether the
values of a liberal society can be realized under
such a system. The masses are unconcerned
about it. Indeed, people are not aware of the
negative functional inter-relations between bureaucracy and democracy, and those who actually
are aware find themselves powerless in dealing
with the pacesetters—big business and industry,
big labor, big universities.
EFFICIENCY   OF BUREAUCRACY
Bureaucracy, Weber argued, makes for maximum efficiency because action is rendered calculable and is perpetuated without regard for
personal considerations. However, recent research has come to center on features of bureaucracy that may in fact impede efficiency. Specialization of roles itself presumably reaches a point
of diminishing economic returns; equally valid
criticism is on Veblen's concept of "trained incapacity": It refers to that state of affairs in
which one's abilities function as inadequacies;
actions based on training or education which
have been successful in the past result in inappropriate responses under changed conditions.
Robert Merton and others have shown ritualism,
red tape, and ossification of roles may clog
bureaucratic channels of action. Alvin Gouldner
and Philip Selznick have shown how inadequate
individual leadership may lead to conflict and
ineffectiveness in organizations. Herbert Simon,
Harold Guetzkov, Kenneth D. Mackenzie and
others have shown that the adequacy of communication—up and down the line, between
staff and line—affect the productivity of the
organization. Peter Blau has shown how certain
patterns of competition in bureaucracies may
reduce outputs. Finally, Chris Orgyris has shown
how the individual's needs and the formal organization's demands  are basically incompatible.
Weber pointed out the efficiency of bureaucracy, contrasting it with council of elders, household staffs, and other forms of social organization. A few years from now, a researcher somewhere will point out the efficiency of other
forms of organization or the lack of it, contrasting it with bureaucracy. The prognosis is realistic. Indeed, the effect of technology is steadily
raising the average level of well-being, thereby
gradually bringing to an end the condition of
material need as an effective stimulus for human
behavior. As a consequence, occupations will
become valued for their intrinsic pleasures rather
than for their extrinsic rewards with an inestimable gain in human dignity—provided trends
towards bureaucracy, authoritarianism, and regimentation do not prevail.
PAULS
TRY OUR SPECIALS
PAUL'S    SPECIAL
salami,   olive,    green   pepper,
mushroom
FREE DELIVERY over $2.50    THE   F|REBAU
EAT-IN, PICK-UP
3623 W.
BROADWAY
Phone 733-1617
pepperoni,    onion    capocollo,
hoi    peppers
THE   SUPER
salami,   pepperoni,   onion,
green   pepper,   olive,   mushroom
SHRIMP   PIZZA
THE WHO and
TOM NORTHCOTT
At The Agrodome
FRIDAY, MAR. 1,8 p.m.
Tickets $2.50, $3.50 & $4.50
ON SALE VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE
& OUTLETS
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS  — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   — 12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to  9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission:  Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information  call 228-3197 or  224-3205
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
MARCH 5 AT 8:30 P.M.
"UPROARIOUSLY FUNNY!"-Newsweek
r>. HLJKOK puesercts
GrnLyn tx^iLLiams
THE CREAT BRITISH ACTOR AND AUTHOR
OF THE CURRENT BEST-SELLER
"BEYOND   BELIEF"
OS
GUOLJOiriG
An entcofcijnmenf loom the slomes of DYLAN THOMAS
4.00, 3.50, 2.50
All events to be held in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.    Tickets   available   in   the   Bay   Box
Office, Main Floor at the Bay—Daily 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Phone 681-3351. Page 6
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday,  February 29,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Americas fall  probed
LSM
Dr. James Hendricksen discusses the fall of the American
empire — moral decline and
moral ambiguity, today, noon,
Bu.  104.
HOUSING  SURVEY
Join the 3,375 students who
have returned their question-
aires. Your answers are important regardless of your
situation.
DR. JOHN PORTER, author of
the Vertical Mosaic, speaks
on Canada's class structure,
Friday at 8 p.m. in Hebb
Theatre. He will conduct a
seminar for educators on social values, change and education, Saturday 9:30 a.m. to
4  p.m., Angus  building.
CULTURAL  OPPRESSION
CONFERENCE
James Bevel, veteran of
civil rights and anti-war movements, speaks on North American myths on the nature of
man, today, noon, Freddy
Wood theatre.
CIRCLE  K
Watch  the first  annual bed
race,   today,   starting at   12:30
p.m.   at   the  bus   stop.   Winds
through the campus.
COLLEGE LIFE
Teach-in today, noon, ed.
1006.
UCC
General meeting and election today, noon, Bu. 202.
FACULTY-STUDENT
HISTORY COMMITTEE
Any one interested in working on history curriculum,
meet Friday,  noon, Bu.  212.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Last minute tickets available for all performances of
Three Rituals for the Theatre,
QE Playhouse.
DEMOLAY  CLUB
Meeting to discuss car rally,
Friday, noon, Bu. 223.
HILLEL
Discussion of the future of
man: today, Dr. David Suzuki,
noon, Bu. 102; Friday, Edward
Levy, noon, Bu. 100.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
General meeting Friday
noon, Bu. penthouse.
NOISN31X3 xDoaa
dOHS 393T10D
SI^IHS 1V3MS
1SVJ    9NIOE)
NEWMAN   BALL
B.C. Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver
RECEPTION  . .  .  BANQUET .  .  .  DANCE
FRIDAY, MARCH 1st
7:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
$7.00 Couple, Black Tie Optional
Music by Claude Logan
and His Orchestra
- FULL  FACILITIES -
ALL WOMEN ARE INVITED
TO HEAR ABOUT
THE CHANGING ROLE OF MEN
At the  Leap Year  Coffee  Party
at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
THURSDAY, NOON, FEB. 29
Sponsored by the Phratares and I.H.
WUS
Regional  Workshop
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
MARCH     9-10
INQUIRE   BROCK   EXT.  257
FOREST  CLUB
Dr. Jan Solecki discusses the
forest economy of Russia, with
slides, today, noon, for-ag 166.
TFVS
Third annual general meet
Friday night after gymnasts,
at the Cece. Remember conditions of eligibility: Innocent
until proven guilty. Bring any
incriminating evidence.
VCF
David Adeny, former overseas missionary with IFES,
speaks Friday, noon, Ang. 110.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Hear Pianist Robert Griffiths play Chopin, Friday,
noon, IH.
French film, Elena et les
Hommes, today, noon, Bu. 100,
also 7:30 p.m., Bu. 102. Admission: 35 cents for members,
50 cents for non-members.
COLLEGE LIFE
CATGIF Friday, 9 p.m., 1619
East  Sixtieth.
LIBERAL CLUB
General meeting today,
noon, Bu. 104.
CLASSICS CLUB
P. Merivale discusses the
classical tradition in modern
literature, Friday, 8 p.m., 4049
West  Eleventh.
TTloM pizza VnoJi&
Dine In — Take Out —  Delivery
Across  the street from the
Fraser   Arms
1381   S.W.   Marine  Drive 263-4440
Overseas
Forwarding
of
Household
Goods & Effects
Call  531-2931
HOW YOU CAN FEEL FIT
AT ANY AGE
• Learn what your physical condition is
— right now
• New discoveries show you how to
improve your condition and stay in
good shape
• See how you can be more vital, alert
and efficient
The March issue of Reader's Digest
features a revolutionary new program
which enables you to assess your present
physical condition, shows you how to
improve it and to stay in fit condition.
By following this simple plan, you will
become more vital, alert and efficient.
Get your copy of March Reader's Digest
today while copies are still available —
the same issue features the timely
article, "The Miracle of Transplants".
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
'TWO BAND SMASH" — INTEN-
sions and Shockers, Totem Park,
March   2.   8   p.m.   -   2   a.m.
COMING SATURDAY MARCH 9—
Kentish Steele, Strange Brew —
Armouries — Light Show! — 8:30 -
1:00.   —  Only   $1.00 - $1.50.
'3'S A CROWD" AT THE CIRCUS
this weekend. Seeds of Time & The
Crowd" at Retinal Circus, Pri. &
Sat.   9-2.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
WRONG GIRL'S CAMEL COAT
taken from Zete House during Valentines  Party, Feb.   17,  ph.  266-8009.
IP POUND PLEASE RETURN MY
brown briefcase with initials CMS.
Lost Feb. 19, reward, urgent, 435-
4985.
LOST TUES. AM, PENCIL AND
mapping pen in blue plastic case,
please   phone   Terry   at   224-9835.
POUND—CHANCE FOR INVOLVE-
merit. WUS Regional Workshop,
claim    Brock   Ext.    257   immediately.
Rides & Car Pools
14
CAR POOL DRIVERS NEEDED UR-
gentlv. Central Park area, 9:30
classes,   433-5327.
Special Notices
15
GET INVOLVED WITH CAMPUS
activities! Work on the Homecoming Committee. Applications in
A.M.S.   Office.
DON'T MISS KENTISH STEELE
and Strange Brew, March 9. Saturday, Armouries. 8:30-1:00. Only
$1.50 - $1.00.    Added    Light-Show!
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
UBC BARBER SHOP, OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m., Sat. until 5:30
p.m.,  5736 University  Boulevard.
Travel  Opportunities
 16
FREE    TRIP    TO    EUROPE    —   FOR
further details contact  tel.  738-4721.
RACE YOU TO THE AUD. THURS.
12:30, 3:30. 6:00, 8:30. For the great
race.   Admission   50c.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
COINS WANTED, PAYING: CA-
nadian $5-35.00; $10-70.00; Dollars:
38-8.00: 45-20.00; 46-6.00; 47-
18.00; 47ML-45.00: 48-160.00; 49-
5.00. 54, 55, 5'6 - 2.25. Sovreigns 10.00.
Also proof-like sets prior to 62. Ron
321-1487.
I WILL PAY CASH FOR GOOD
used AM-FM transistor radio—preferably  SW.  Phone 278-0853 anytime.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
ai
'61   MG.    MAGNETTE.   $780.   EXCEL-
!er:t   Condition.   Phone   731-8450.
FOR SALE — 57 FORD FAIRLANE
sedan, automatic. P.S. radio, $200.
Bill   255-8026.
1958 PONTIAC 4-DOOR SEDAN
(automatic) excellent cond., $325.
Phone   224-4001.
VANGUARD SEDAN, GOOD POWER,
radio, six good tires on wheels,
excl. paint job, good transportation.
See it at Parkdale Shell, 41st and
Larch.   What   offers?
'64 CHEV 2-DR. STD. 6-CYL. RADIO
snow tires, 43,000, top condition, 1-
owner,    $1,100,    263-6300   or   684-3044.
'63 VOLKSWAGEN 1500 SEDAN —
New valve job, good engine, clutch,
rubber and radio. Call 684-4011 from
10 a.m.  to 6 p.m. ask for Mr. Yacht.
ONE OWNER, WHITE '59 ALPA
Romeo Spyder 2000. Hard and soft
tops. Guaranteed top speed 127
mph, maintained by top mechanic.
Price only $1800. After 5 p.m. AM.
1-4992.
Motorcycles
26
SUZUKI 120, EXCELLENT CONDI-
tion, 1966. Asking $235. Phone Colin
224-9662.
BUSINESS* SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BEAUTY SALON EXPERT
styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates 5736 University Blvd.  228-8942.
FRANKENSTEIN,    COUNT   DRACU-
la,   Yul   Brynner   and   Herman   Schwartz     get    their     hair    styled     at
Corky's.   Why   don't   you?
Gorky's  4th Avenue Barber Shop
4th   and   Alma   Road
Phone 731-4717 for your appointment
Orchestras
33
FOR MUSIC WITH A SPARKLE —
Hire the Lamplighters trio, banquets, receptions, cabaret, phone
684-8858   or   732-5895   after   6.
Scandals 37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.
TWO BAND SMASH—INTENSIONS
and Shockers, Totem Park, March 2.
8   p.m. - 2  a.m.
HAVE FUN WITH THE "CROWD"
at Retinal Circus Pri. & Sat. Also
Seeds   of   Time.   Wow!
Scandals (Cont.)
37
PTLMSOC STRIKES AGAIN — NOT
another dirty flick but a movie approved by the forces for good.
Come and feel clean. Thurs. Aud.
IS WUS HOLDING ITS REGIONAL
workshop March 9th, 10, just for
the party Sat.   night?
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -   ELECTRIC
224-6129   -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesia   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253	
TYPING.   PHONE   731-7551   —  9:00   to
5:00.   266-6662   after   6   o'clock.	
"GOOD    EXPERIENCED    TYPIST
available   for   home    typing.    Phone
277-5640".
EXP. TYPIST, WORK GUARAN-
teed, Phone 684-5783 — 8 a.m. - 9
p.m.   any   day.   	
TYPING   —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
VERY RESPONSIBLE UNIVERSITY
girl to assist and take charge periodically for summer in groovy
house. Three interesting school age
kids. MUST like children and
cooking and be able to drive and
swim. Other help kept. Start at
$175 plus room and board. Live in.
Phone    266-8641.
Help W'ted—Male or Female
53
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
•4
ARTICULATE YOUNG WRITER.
B.A. (Eng. Lat.) will tutor 1st, 2nd
yr. Latin, all Undergrad Eng. 522-
0974,   ask   for   Conrad.	
EXPERIENCED TUTORING IN 1ST
& 2nd year English, History, Math,
Chemistry, French, and other languages. For appointment phone Mr.
Huberman—B.A.-LLB.— Huberman
Educational Inst. 2158 West 12th.
Phone   732-5535—263-4808.
SEE HOW THE WHITE KNIGHT
lives in The Great Race, Thurs., 29,
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30, Aud. 50c admission.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
1963,   1965  & 1966 issues  50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
.375 S&W MAGNUM REVOLVER—
New with manv extras. Phone Phil
433-7668   after   6:30   p.m.
CLASS   71 	
SISEL CARPETING. CHEST OF
drawers, table, chairs, lamps,
washer, fish tank, chesterfield like
new, TV, table saw, Housewares,
'56 Plymouth and many other articles, 2073 Dundas, Van., AL 5-
3789.
MUST SELL! 1965 TROOP-LIKE
coin sets from Royal Mint. Also
silver dollars.   Call  263-9679,  after  6.
SCUBA TANK %" K VALVE CAM
Pack. Healthways Regulator. Phone
224-0250   after  six.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
■1
2 ROOMS, SHOWER, SOME COOK-
ing, vie, W. 41st & Marine, phone
261-4978   eve.
WALKING DISTANCE TO CAMPUS
near Village & meal services, 224-
9662,   $40  month,   2250  Wesbrook.
FOR RENT CLEAN BRIGHT ROOM
upstairs, kitchen priv. $40.00. 3869
W.   19th   Avenue,   228-834S.
LARGE BATCHELOR AND ONE-
bedroom suite, immediate occupancy. 12th and Granville, 736-5344
after   4:00.   Girls   only.
Room & Board
n
L U X U R I OUS ACCOMMODATION,
superlative cuisine at Phi Kappa Pi.
Vacancies now and for this summer.   Phone   224-9667.
THERE ARE A NUMBER OP BEDS
available in residence for both male
and female students. For further
information please contact the
Housing   Administration    Office.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
33
SKI WHISTLER MT. SELF-CON-
tained "A-Frames", foot of mountain, stove, fridge, open fire, bath
& shower, electric stove, phone
921-9356.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday,  February 29,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 7
Mackie and  UBC win
Canadian title easily
UBC's top gymnast, Bill Mackie is having
trouble deciding where his allegiance lies, with
Canada or with UBC.
Admittedly it is a tough decision but Mackie
found the best solution: represent them both.
And to date he is doing an excellent job.
For example, Mackie compiled 52.5 of UBC's
Swim Birds Host WCIAA
This weekend UBC is hosting the WCIAA
swimming and diving championships at Percy
Norman Pool.
Teams will be coming from the University
of Alberta at Edmonton, the University of Calgary, the University of Saskatchewan at Regina
and the University of Manitoba.
There will be two days of competitions, Friday and Saturday, with the heats going at 1:30
p.m. each day and the finals starting at 7 p.m.
UBC will get strong performances from
veterans Jim Maddin, Phil Winch, Rick Mansell,
Frank Dorchester, Dave Goodman, Mark Le-
mieux  and  Bob MacKay.
Giving the veterans a good run for their
money will be the freshman team including Ted
Dorchester, Terry Lyons and led by frosh Phil
Dockerill.
The team members will be trying for victories, naturally, but there is added incentive.
A first or second place finish in this meet will
earn a trip to Hamilton next weekend for the
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union Cham-
poinships in swimming and diving.
134.45 points in last weekend's Canadian
intercollegiate championships
in Antigonish, Nova Scotia.
He accomplished the tremendous feat of winning every
men's event, including free
exercise, side horse, rings,
vaulting box, horizontal bars
and parallel bars. Naturally he
won the all round award.
While    his    performance
boosted   UBC  to   an easy  win
MACKIE over the University of Alberta
in  the  men's  division,  Mackie  wasn't the only
star.
Dennis Fridulin placed fifth in the all round
and John Salmela was third in the long horse
and sixth in the all round.
But Canada also benefits from Mackie's talents. He will represent the nation in the upcoming North American championships in Vancouver this weekend.
The teams will perform in War Memorial
Gym Friday starting at 12:30 p.m. Special student rate tickets are available in the P.E. office.
Wrestlers weigh-in
The weigh-in for those wishing to compete
in intramural wrestling will be held in the
memorial gym men's locker room today, not
Friday as previously announced, from 12:30
p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Weight classes will be listed
in the locker room as will the bout draws.
Cultural   Oppression   Conference
presents
JRMES BEVEL
" North   American   Myths   on
the   Nature   of   Man"
Born in Mississippi 31 years ago,
James Bevel has been involved
with the civil rights movement
since it began with the Nashville
sit-ins in 1960. He was an organizer of the Freedom rides, the
Mississippi Freedom Democratic
Party and various southern action
projects. In 1963 he became Director of Direct Action of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and led the mass demonstrations in Birmingham. The next
year he led the voter registration
and education drive in Alabama.
An ordained Baptist minister. Bevel
was Director of the National Mobilization Committee to End the
War in Vietnam and organized the
massive nationwide demonstrations of April  15th,  1967.
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE
NOON TODAY - FREE
FILMSOC   PRESENTS
"THE GREAT RACE"
with
TONY CURTIS JACK  LEMMON
Today, Feb. 29
12:30, 3:30,  6:00,  8:30
Color & Panavision Auditorium  50c
Your New Student Union Building
FACTS  You Should Know
The NEW SUB...
• IS   THE   LARGEST   BUILDING   EVER   BUILT   ON   THE
CAMPUS IN ONE STAGE.
• HAS A GREATER SQUARE FOOT FLOOR AREA THAN
THE B.C. HYDRO BUILDING AND HAS 265 ROOMS.
• WILL COST $5 MILLION, SPLIT BETWEEN AMS AND
UBC.
• IS 25O'x300' (APPROX. 190,000 SQ. FT.) WITH 6,000
SQ.  FT. FOR FURTHER EXPANSION.
WILL BE OPEN NEXT SEPTEMBER
For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South.
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come in at your convenience for a private no-obligation
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AVAILABLE ONLY AT
KLEAR VISION CONTACT 1ENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg.     UBC 2/29
1030 W. Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
CALL
MU 3-7207
FOR
FULL
DETAILS
A
BIFOCALS, TOO!
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Bliss"?'
Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
and the cost of invisible lenses.
Mr.
Mrs.
Miss-
Address-
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0FFICES THROUfiHOUT U.S.*. AND CANADA Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February 29,  1968
SPOR TS
Hornets sting
puck Braves
The Junior Varsity ice
hockey Braves suffered a complete loss of form and were
therefore upset by the Vancouver Hornets 6-4.
In what coach Andy Bako-
george described as a poor
game, a total of 18 penalties
were called. Perhaps the action tired the Braves as they
faded in the third period.
UBC took a 3-2 lead into the
last period but succumbed to
the Hornet's pressure. Scoring
UBC's four goals were Ernie
Lawson with two and Dwayne
Biagioni and Larry Watts one
each. Mickey Hamm notched a
hat trick for the Hornets despite the many penalties which
usually keep scoring down.
Tonight at 6 p.m. the Braves
play SFU in the Winter Sports
Centre.
The second game of the best
of three series for the Richmond Intermediate League
championship against the Hornets is in Richmond Arena
Wednesday at 9:30 p.m.
I
I
I
I
Armando Valles of Mexico is here for the North American Gymnastic Championships.
Gymnastic event biggest yet
Teams from Mexico, Cuba, the United States
and Canada are all coming to Vancouver to
determine a gymnastics champion.
The event is the North American Gymnastic
Championships which runs from Thursday
through to Saturday. Friday the teams will perform in War Memorial Gym at special student
prices while on the other days the events will be
in the new Pacific Coliseum.
The championships will be the biggest gymnastics show ever held in Canada.   Canada has
25 judges and competitors while the USA has
21 competitors, Cuba has 14 and Mexico has 18.
As well, two Japanese stars, Takeshi Kato
and Miss Chieko Oda, will be giving demonstrations.
The championships have enough importance
to attract ABC film crews of the show Wide
World of Sport. The show will be seen in Vancouver on delayed broadcast, if at all. Meanwhile, the first event is at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
and finishes late Saturday night.
Gymnast injured
at UBC practice
One of the female Cuban
gymnasts was injured Wednesday while practising at UBC
for the upcoming North American Gymnastic Championships.
Miriam Villasian was performing on the uneven parallel
bars when she slipped and fell
to the floor.
It was first suspected that
she broke her elbow but her
injury was later disclosed as a
bad elbow bruise.
She will be unable to compete in tonight's opening event
of the gymnastic tournament at
the Pacific Coliseum but she
should bs ready for Friday's
demonstrations in UBC's War
Memorial Gym.
Gymnasts from Cuba, Mexico, the U.S. and Canada are
using memorial gym as practice headquarters, priming for
the big event.
| THE VILLAGE CAFE |
Where Friends Meet & Dine
DISCOUNT ON
PIZZA TO GO
V4 Block East
of Memorial Gym
at 5778 University Blvd.
Phone 224-0640
I
I
I
I
IL CAFFE
International House
DANCE
Friday, March 1
I.H. 9-1
Live Band - Free refreshments
Tickets $1.00 at door
The Miracle of
Surgical Transplants
. . . and the Mystery of
Body Rejections.
Heart-transplant operations are
making today's headlines. Only
a few years ago, the successful
transfer of a living organ from
one human being to another
was still an age-old dream.
March Reader's Digest brings
you a progress report right
from the earliest experiments
in transplants of living organs
.. . tells you all about the phenomenon called "rejection" and
why it's still a serious difficulty.
Get the facts in March Digest,
now on sale. The same issue
contains another not-to-be-missed article — "How You Can
Feel Fit at Any Age".
SPECIAL EVENTS AND CULTURAL OPPRESSION CONFERENCE
presents
JOHN   PORTER
speaking on
ff
Canadian fecial Structure and Change: Quebec
tt
DR. PORTER, A SOCIOLOGIST AT CARLETON UNIVERSITY, OTTAWA, IS THE AUTHOR OF THE DEFINI
TIVE WORK ON CANADA'S SOCIAL CLASS AND POWER STRUCTURE THE VERTICAL MOSAIC
Friday Noon
FREE     ADMISSION
Auditorium

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