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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1972

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 Council OK's
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Alma Mater Society council passed
a Ubyssey motion Wednesday night to
start publishing the paper twice
weekly.
The council instructed the
executive to lift its ban on twice-
weekly publication until the AMS
budget is passed.
The executive has budgeted $22,800
for a weekly publication of the paper,
while The Ubyssey is asking for
$37,000 and a thrice-weekly
publication.
The budget will come up for
discussion at next Wednesday's
council meeting in th AMS council
chambers in SUB.
At the meeting, external-affairs
officer Teri Ball introduced plans for
a B.C. Association of Student Councils.
bysseys until budget
"The  proji
volves no
bureaucrac
"In fact,
wordy    at
structured,
copies of the
at the next council
Ball also said the external-affairs
committee is "investigating the
creation" of a student tenants
association, under the wing of the
Vancouver Tenants Association.
"We want to look into
discrimination against students when
they're trying to look for a place to
live," she said.
"We'll be working with Speakeasy
and other student service
organizations to get referrals."
Former AMS president Grant
Burnyeat,   now   chairing   a   con
stitutional reform committee,
proposed several reforms to the
meeting.
He said the changes, based on the
Calgary student bill of rights, would
include changes in the present student
court structure, in an attempt to
update court procedures.
"We want to rationalize the present
court structure through a formal
reconsideration of the student court
and procedures," he said.
He said the court, designed to arbitrate disputes between students or
between students and professors,
would be able to impose small fines or
withdraw the AMS card of a guilty
party.
A proposal by special events
committee chairman John Wells to
sign a $2,000 contract with folk-singer
Shawn Phillips caused  controversy
when council members, including
grad rep M. J. Feser, objected to
signing a "commercialized, packaged
singer."
"It's not the fact that he's an
American that I'm objecting to, but
that he's being sold as a commercialized, packaged singer that
leaves me cold," Feser said.
But Wells said he thought Phillips,
travelling through Western Canadian
universities on a tour publicized by
Columbia Records, would be "enjoyable."
"We're anticipating selling out both
concerts in the SUB ballroom," he
said.
"And if we do this, we should break
even for the shows."
THS UBYSSEY Covered p°o1
Vol. LIV, No. 2
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1972
228-2301
',«__.'3£_____..__'r
.      ( In ..   _.  Ml     * - -""I      ■'    I-.
-kelly booth photo
OH MY ACHING hemorrhoids, says Joey Jumper as he lands on the SUB playing field after a fall of 35,000
feet. The display by five chutists was part of a membership drive by the UBC skydiving club. The club
offers a $40 instruction course which  includes free use of equipment for the first year. For further
information see them in SUB 216G in the clubs workroom.
to cost $3M
By SANDI SHREVE
Students will be asked in a referendum Oct. 6 to pay $5 each
per year for a long-term loanicovering one-third the cost of an indoor swimming pool.
The Alma Mater Society council Wednesday approved the
referendum after hearing a brief from Grant Burnyeat,
chairman of the ad hoc committee for an indoor swimming pool
at UBC.
Students' $925,000 contribution toward the $2.8 million pool
would be matched by private donations and a board of governors grant, said Burnyeat.
The $5 would pay the loan, plus interest over 22 years.
Council agreed to the referendum on the basis that four
conditions be met:
• "The pool be planned and managed by a committee on
which students shall have equal representation with the
remaining members of the committee;
• "The facility shall provide free recreational time
available to students;
o "The facility shall be constructed in the area of the
Student Union Building;
9 "The student contribution shall not exceed (a loan of)
$925,000."
The pool committee was given a $6,000 graduate class grant
last March to begin plans, promotion and development of the
scheme.
Burnyeat said the $2.8 million estimate is based on
assessments of physical education professor Jack Pomfret, who
has studied pool developments throughout Canada.
Pomfret says the estimate is valid "as long as the pool is
built within the next five years."
"We would like to begin designs for the pool in the spring
(1973)," said Burnyeat, adding there is no completion date for
the building but it will be "as soon as possible."
To date about 10,000 students have signed a petition begun
last spring, supporting the pool.
Pomfret, Burnyeat and AMS president Doug Aldridge are
confident private donations will yield more than the necessary
$925,000.
"I think the possibility is great, with indications of support
from people downtown, that we (students) will wind up paying
less than $925,000, including interest on a loan," said Aldridge.
He estimated at council the $925,000 loan with interest over 22
years would total $1.25 million.
But Pomfret, in charge of soliciting funds, admitted this
optimism is based only on the overwhelming verbal support of
everyone approached.
"Most are willing to support us but can't commit themselves to specific amounts" until students decide they want the
pool.
If private donations do fall short of the amount required,
"we will inform the students of the situation and not collect the
fee," said Aldridge.
Like private donations, the board of governors' grant
depends on the referendum vote.
AMS up 4,000 rags
Four thousand copies of Tuesday's Ubyssey are currently
sitting in an inner office of the Alma Mater Society executive
suite in SUB because AMS treasurer David Dick doesn't like
the paper's distribution system.
Neither, however, do the Ubyssey editors.
Dick said Thursday he picked up the papers between 7:30
and 9:30 p.m. Tuesday during a check of about 10 of the
paper's 28 drop-off points.
Terming the system "pretty awful", Dick said: "You must
See page 2: GLUT Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September  15,  1972
Dept. gets new name
Senate voted Wednesday to change the
name of the geology department to the
department of geological sciences.
The department's new head says the new
name is meant to keep time with the changing
nature and diversification of geology.
"Until about 15 years ago geology was concerned with the structure of the earth's continental crust," head W. R. Wynne-Edwards
said Thursday.
He said geologists are now working on moon
research, in the sea and in environmental
research.
"There were so many under one umbrella
called geology that something had to be done,"
he said.
Wynn-Edwards, 38, formerly headed the
geological science department at Queens
University, Kingston, Ont. for four years.
Wynn-Edwards was studying the petrology
and structure of the Pre-Cambrian Shield but
now says he is moving his research to B.C.
A MS seeks candidates
By ERIC HANSON
Nominations are now open for the upcoming
Alma Mater Society byelections and senate
elections.
Students interested in entering student
politics have a choice of being nominated for
AMS co-ordinating officer, internal affairs
officer, ombudsperson, graduate studies
senator, arts senator, or applied science
senator.
Nomination forms for these positions can be
picked up at AMS secretary Sally Clarke's
office and must be returned by Friday noon.
Any UBC student who has attended classes
for one year and who obtains 25 signatures is
eligible to run in the Oct. 5 and 6 elections.
If a prospective candidate has not been on
campus for one year, he can go before the
eligibility committee which makes the final
verdict on such matters.
The term of office for the internal affairs
officer, the co-ordinating officer, and the
ombudsperson lasts until February, 1973 while
the senate offices extend from one to two years.
The co-ordinating officer's duties include
assisting in the management of SUB's food
services, room renting, and booking
arrangements. Student housing and the
organization of a day care centre will be the
major concerns of the internal affairs officer.
The candidate who becomes ombudsperson
should be in the senior years so he or she can
understand and effectively handle the student
problems, Clarke said.
Those who become senators are expected to
act as an academic liaison between the
students and the board of governors, she said.
Glut on fish-wrap market
From page 1
have had 2,000 in Woodward
Library. They filled the trunk
of my car. The other place that
was really bad was Education
(Building). There weren't very
many around SUB."
Dick denied taking the
papers for political reasons,
i The Ubyssey, currently
negotiating with AMS council
for a larger slice of Dick's
budget, had its lead story in the
Tuesday paper headlined "Rag
wants three issues weekly".)
"It's political in the sense
that one issue with The
Ubyssey is readership," Dick
said. "I went around to see how
many people were actually
reading it. If it had been purely
political I would have dumped
the papers in council Wednesday night but obviously that
wouldn't have been valid."
Dick said he recognized that
the paper experienced the
common first-of-the-year
distribution problems and
would wait to see how well a
revised system works for
subsequent issues.
Ubyssey co-editor John
Andersen said Thursday he
regretted the distribution
problem but said Dick's action
is only one more of a series of
unilateral actions he has taken
with the paper without consulting the staff.
"One of the main reasons
relations between the paper
and the AMS are so bad is
because of Dick's attitude,"
Andersen said.
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Lower SUB
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For app. 226-4636
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
New Asian studies centre almost here
ByRYONGUEDES
Plans for the new Asian studies centre are well on
their way to being realized, E. G. Pulleyblank, head
of the Asian studies department, told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
The majority of the necessary $1.6 million has
been definitely pledged, Pulleyblank said.
The provincial government's promise of $400,000
has been matched by the federal government.
Combined with the $200,000 pledged by the Com
memorative Association for Japan's World Exposition, this brings the total to the million-mark, he
said.
It is hoped half of the remaining $600,000 will be
contributed by Japanese donors, and the remainder
through a local drive.
The centre, which will be a replica of the Sanyo
Corporation's pavilion at Expo '70, will be constructed near International House and the Nitobe
Gardens. It will be the largest Asian studies institute
in Canada when completed.
It will accommodate more than 1,500 students,
and the fields of study of more than fifteen separate
departments. It will also house a comprehensive
Asian-language library and a performing arts
centre.
The initial contribution was made toward the
centre on March 22, 1971, when the Sanyo Corporation donated the steel girders from the actual
Expo '70 pavilion to the university.
UBC FIREMEN are on the scene noon Thursday outside of SUB to douse potential oil fire in overturned wreck. It's engineering orientation week.       bruce west photo
Aldridge tastes caf business
By GARY KOSINSKY
There is an "excellent"
chance that the Alma Mater
Society will assume control of
SUB food service by
November said AMS
president Doug Aldridge
Thursday.
While the takeover will not
mean an increase in student
AMS fees, it may lead to the
firing of present food service
employees, said Aldridge.
Go vote!
Many students, freaks and
poor people are not on the
city's voters list although they
may be on the federal or
provincial lists.
To remedy this situation a
group of concerned people
have set up special
registration locations at UBC,
Vancouver City College and
Simon Fraser University.
Anyone who will be 19 by the
Dec. 19 election has the right to
vote. However, registration
ends Thursday, Sept. 21.
UBC registration will be
held in the SUB main foyer 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. today and
Monday.
The possibility of firing
present food service employees would have to be
ironed out in negotiations after
AMS takeover, he said.
"The creditors of the food
services facilities said they
would extend the repayment
period of the original $1.2
million loan which means
future students would pay the
same fees rather than putting
the repayment burden on
current   students'   shoulders.
"This method of repayment
is only fair since future
students would also be using
the AMS food service," said
Aldridge.
The food services would be
handled by an AMS appointed
manager, who would also be in
charge of the Pit.
"This method of repayment
is only fair since future
students would also be using
the AMS food service," said
Aldridge.
The food services would be
handled by an AMS appointed
manager, who would also be in
charge of the Pit.
The takeover all depends on
receiving permission from the
board of governors in
November, he said.
Until then students will have
to patronize UBC food services.
Unlike last year, there is no
alternate food service
available   for   students.   The
AMS   council   has   discussed   until   November  but   nothing
forming an alternate service    concrete has been worked out.
Lost and found opens
Lost and found will be open again this year from 12:30 to
2:30 Monday to Friday in SUB 105A.
It stocks different articles ranging from clothes to textbooks, turned in by students and physical plant staff.
Students who have lost something can pick up forms outside
the lost and found office, and complete them with a description
of the lost artical and their name and address.
The forms are filed and checked against lost articals
coming into the office.
They are kept until the end of each term, when a rummage
sale is held outside the SUB art gallery. Profits go to orphaned
children overseas.
Pit
awakes
drinkers
All beer-drinking students
will once again this year have
the opportunity to use the local
watering hole beginning today.
Bob Angus, Alma Mater
Society co-ordinator, said
Thursday the Pit will be open
for business from 3 p.m to 12:30
a.m. Monday to Friday.
For the sake of confusion the
clubs lounge in the southwest
corner of SUB's second floor
will be used Monday and
Friday and the party room will
be used for the rest of the week.
Beer tokens can be purchased at the door, three for $1.
Angus said a draft beer
outlet could be established in
the SUB basement by the end
of the school year. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September  15,  1972
Guvnors
The present members of the UBC board of
governors should be replaced with a group more
representative of the university. This has been Ubyssey
editorial policy for as long as we can remember.
So here are the latest changes on the board.
Leaving us are Walter Koerner, John Liersch and
Donovan Miller, bigwigs respectively with Rayonier
Canada, Canadian Forest Products and the Canadian
Fishing Company.
Joining us is Thomas Dohm, the president of the
Vancouver stock exchange. Back for extra terms are
Paul Plant, the vice-president of R. S. Plant Ltd. and
Beverley Lecky, our token woman on the board who's
chiefly interested in raising money for various charities.
We're rather disappointed and not just because it's
apparent that W. A. C. Bennett didn't take much notice
of Ubyssey editorials. The disappointment also results
from the knowledge that it will be three years before
the new members on the board can be replaced.
Now don't get us wrong. We've nothing against
these people personally. We're sure they're really very
nice people.
But why do so many of them have to be from the
business elite of this province?
The excuse is often given that the university is a
big business and needs big businessmen to run it.
But the university is not a business. Its purpose is
not to make a profit for someone. What its purpose is is
debatable but nevertheless the obvious end result of a
university controlled by a financial elite is a university
moulded to fit the desires of that elite.
But all this has been said before and should be
perfectly obvious to anyone who takes time to think
about it.
So we are going to use the rest of the editorial
space to offer a Constructive Alternative. We now
present our version of an ideal board of governors.
First we need a student representative. How about
senate veteran Stan Persky, the president of the
graduate student association. Or Ubyssey consumer
columnist Art Smolensky, also a veteran of the senate.
Or how about English grad student Anne Petrie, who
was coordinator of last year's highly successful
women's studies program?
Now we need some faculty members.
Anthropology prof Bill Willmott would be a good
choice. Or polisci prof Phil Resnick. Or how about
genetics prof David Suzuki?
Now we need some community representatives.
Local MP Grace Maclnnis would do an excellent job,
having had years of legislative experience. The same goes
for Harry Rankin. And then there's union leader Homer
Stevens and Jean Rands of the Working Women's
Association.
Nathan Nemetz, who through some oversight is
already on the board, could remain as a governor.
Add your favorite priest, minister or rabbi and a
token businessman and you've got a board which can
make some claim to represent the community.
If you don't like the people suggested in this
editorial, make up a list of your own. Anyone can do it.
We'd like to suggest the NDP government give it a
try.
J.A.
THE UmSCY
SEPTEMBER 15, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors:
John Andersen,       Jan O'Brien
Zero hour. Andersen and O'Brien at the controls. Gerry Scott at the radio
with Eric Hanson close beside, navigating, sweating. "It's hot," says Lorri
Rutland. We nod, understanding almost without thinking. Krueger and
Shreve, real women at last, turn vacantly to Madelein Charlamabous. But
she's looking at Petrie. John Rogers is pulling mindlessly at a lace onhis suit.
Sasges, Woodward and Booth step forward from the dark of the tail. As the
door opens, McDonald gives the order. We dive.
Letters
Booboo
Co-editor     Andersen,     The
Ubyssey:
Your rambling lead editorial
in Tuesday's edition, attacking
the general state of campus
guidebooks, contained a few
errors which I would like to
point out.
Much of your argument was
based on a connection between
Lifesaver '72 and the
university's office of information services. You refer
to "The administration alias
UBC PReports alias Lifesaver
'72 . . . etc." In fact, the information office had nothing to
do with Lifesaver '72. I was
responsible for producing the
copy for the booklet and it was
handled entirely by the office
of student services.
Certainly that's an arm of
the administration, but its
function is not public relations.
It's there to help students.
Period. And Lifesaver
provides 28 pages of useful
information to assist students
with the day-to-day problems
of existing on this campus.
Your editorial reprimands it
for not being critical of the
university's power structure.
That's not the point of the
damn thing. It's a guide book,
not a piece of political and
sociological analysis.
There's definitely a place
and a need for such analysis,
but the medium shouldn't be
Lifesaver. Students obviously
should be informed about the
university's power structure
and who pulls what strings.
That's a service The Ubyssey
or the AMS or some other
student organization could
perform.
Murray McMillan
Arts 3.
The editorial incorrectly
connects the Lifesaver '72
production    with    UBC    in
formation services. I apologize
to all concerned for this error.
I'd like to make a few
comments on the rest of your
letter.
You say that Lifesaver '72
was designed as a guide, "not a
piece of political or
sociological analysis." But
who decreed this? And why?
There is no natural law which
says student guides have to be
uncritical whitewashes.
We agree that students
should be informed about who
runs the university. This is why
we went to Alma Mater Society
treasurer David Dick and
asked for money to produce an
alternative to what the administration   was   publishing.
This request was refused.
To put it in simple terms, we
find it rather difficult to
publish a guide or anything
else when so-called student
leaders refuse to provide the
funds necessary.
J.A.
Sic
Dear people:
Well, here we is once again
beginning once again the
brain-masher exercises many
of us encountered last year.
And to greet us with its rather
purported nudity in opinion is
that "fish-wrap" which has
been rumoured to be called
The Ubyssey. Ah, but did we
with our bloodshot eyes savour
the scmuckismo of its pages of
yesteryear. It was a guide in
times when we didn't need it; it
was schizophrenically
megalomanical with its perverted sense of humour in its
so-called editorials. Whether
'tis nobler to suffer its
platitudal curses of doom upon
our most gracious administration (or anything
connected thereto) this year be
encore or be sequestered from
it is perhaps only met with the
equally  pernicious  idea  of
"heads I win, tails you lose."
Nay, It will not lack in its
fifty-fourth year that tenacious
quality of cyncism in its
approach to reporting the
events of this campus;
however, be not dismayed,
those of you who wouldst be
informed (or rather throat-
stuffed) by The Ubyssey need
not be disconcerted. Its
existence will continue to
desecrate this campus as
snobbish pseudo-
intellectualism in its rawest
form.
For the most part, I will sit
on my fat ass rather than do
something. Any attempt to
breach the precipitous walls of
The Ubyssey "establishment"
is a fallacious hope at best and
an exacting impossibility at
worst.
Gary Dickson
Science 3
Are you serious? If so, I
suggest you get your thumb out
of your thesaurus and learn
how to use the English
language.
J.A.
PF
Dear Ubyssey.
In the Page Friday article
Racism in Sociology, Mar. 24,
it was not the intention of the
union of radicals in social
sciences to accuse Werner
Cohn of racism. The headline
in The Ubyssey of Mar. 28, 1972
in which The Ubyssey stated in
part that the URSS "accused
Dr. Cohn of racism" was
printed with neither our
knowledge nor our consent.
However, we do take
responsibility for having
presented Dr. Cohn as a
follower of Jensen. This was an
error on our part and we
apologize for this misrepresentation.
URSS Friday, September  15,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Page Friday
'Crime1 lacks bang
By ANNE PETRIE
The Performance Group expects a lot from
an audience but doesn't seem to feel obligated
to give much in return.
Sam Shepard's Tooth of Crime, the Group's
second production since taking up residence on
Campus and the first of the Freddy Wood offerings for '72, opened this week with
something less than a bang — more like a self-
indulgent whimper.
Director Richard Schechner insists that we
are not to criticize the play as a finished
product but to 'relate' to it as a Work in
Progress; which means (for all you Theatre 120
students) that "the play is at a stage before
crystallization, with restructuring occurring
daily. A complete run-through of the play may
not occur every night but segments of the play
may be worked intensively with the audience
directly involved in contributing possible
solutions to the problems of a given scene".
Well, that's fine, I suppose, and it's all very
comfy and homey when somebody forgets their
lines or sings out of tune or starts a number
over again to get it right (though with the
emphasis on being "natural" one wonders why
that is necessary), and it's fun to watch
Schechner tripping around on stage with the
script and winking at the actors and giving us
all the once-over to make sure we're having a
wonderful time. But beyond that, it's hard to
figure out why the audience is supposed to be
there at all.
There was no attempt (that I could see) to
encourage anyone besides the actors to participate in the process of the play; far from
being involved, the audience was simply
ignored. Though we were seated right in the
acting area on stage, the promise of that kind of
actor/audience proximity was never fulfilled.
Obviously a lot was happening between the
actors themselves (they, as we are reminded in
the program notes, are a "very together"
collective) but there was nothing happening
between the actors and the audience, between
the actors and the people. It was like being a
fifth wheel at a gestalt therapy group. What
was supposed to be confrontation came off a lot
more like alienation.
The play itself is Sam Shepard's latest effort
to tell us where it's at in America. But if you
know Hemingway, you've heard it all before.
Hoss (Spalding Gray) is anyone — biker, rock
star, gangster, capitalist, king — who lives in
a highly structured world where values are
clear and action is determined by a rigid set of
social rules. But as with Hemingway's
bullfighters and great white hunters, Hoss's
code begins to break down, partly from his own
insecurity, but more because of a threat from
the outside. The threat is Crow (Timothy
Shelton), the "gypsy killer" — the force of
pure power, new energy which ignores the code
and attacks at will.
The first half of the play, the preparation for
Crow's coming, works quite well and a strong
tension is built up. But things fall apart after
that. Neither Sam Shepard or the Performance
Group seem to know who or what Crow is. At
one moment he seems to be just sheer violence;
at another he is only one more shrewd
manipulator; but there is also the suggestion
that he might be some kind of revolutionary
teacher. It's all too vague and soft. There's
nothing to hold on to in the character, no personality, no idea, no concept. The uneasiness
that Schechner would like to create is there
alright, but it's not the uneasiness of
realization; it's just pointless confusion.
A few other notes: Jerry Rojo's set, a kind of
Meccano castle, is visually effective and the
movement of the actors within the spaces
creates some sharp compositions, but often it
also blocks off sound and though I'm hip enough
to know you're not supposed to complain, it's
just a drag when your vision is cut off by the
"environment" and you can't see what's going
on.
In his program notes, Schechner says that
The Performance Group has "introduced
certain themes of women's consciousness and
politics that were suggested but not strong in
Shepard's script." All I can say is I don't think
they know much about politics or women. One
mention of the "class war", a couple of
costume changes and a few patronizing efforts
at Canadian content and that's supposed to be
politics. As for women, it's the same old story
— they're just there to prop up battered male
egos. You ought to watch for one particularly
"liberated" scene where the three women
characters crawl all over Hoss and give him
what I assume is supposed to be a blow job so
that the poor baby will feel better and be able to
light the nasty Crow who wants to take his balls
away.
Tooth of Crime runs until Sept. 27th. If you
go, I'd advise you to take up Schechner's offer
of audience participation in the solution of the
play's problems. Maybe somebody can make it
better.
I
Shine on
Students will again be
shining shoes to earn money in
the fight against cystic
fibrosis.
Volunteer "shiners" may
register today from 8:30 a.m.
on at the SUB arts gallery
alcove.
Shoes will be shined all over
campus and in different parts
of Vancouver. Mobile units are
available to take new groups of
shiners throughout the city all
day.
"It's going to be lots of fun
and I hope there will be many
volunteers," said Shinerama
chairman Gary Koss.
A Shinerama Raffle is also
being held at 25 cents a ticket.
First prize is a Seagram Texas
Mickey and second prize is a
Juliet AM-FM Shortwave,
cordless radio.
Last year UBC made $3,525
while BCIT contributed
$11,500. A free dance will be
held for all volunteers at 9 p.m.
Friday at BCIT with entertainment provided by
frorthwest Company and
Spain.
ROYAL BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Dave Stewart, Manager
Terry Cotton, Loans
10th at Sasamat — 224-4348
B C stands for
BONUS COUPONS
$75 for 75c
Watch
for
Details
NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
HOW DOES THIS SOUND
TO YOU . . .
15% OFF
THE MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED LIST
ON ALL OUR STEREO
COMPONENTS & ACCESSORIES
Bring in your I.D. card and receive our opportunities for
youth  grant.
COME IN AND SEE OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF STEREO EQUIPMENT
MILLERS
4 STORES TO SERVE YOU
1123 DAVIE ST.
683-1326
Open 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon. to Fri.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
622 COLUMBIA ET
524-2016
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
782 GRANVILLE ST.
683-1395
9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Mon. to Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
726 YATES ST.
388-6295
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Fri. 9 - 9
Thurs. & Fri. 9 ■ 9
CHARGEX • EASY TERMS • LAYAWAY Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
■ ;*» T^T^ ^;^WlW8$W™&/V*!3'*lVlf'W%'$
Friday, September  15,   1972
Tween classes
SUNDAY
Lutheran Campus Centre
Worship with the Eucharist, 10:30
a.m., and communal lunch, 11:30
a.m. at Lutheran centre.
TUESDAY
Canoe and Kayak Club
General meeting,  noon, SUB 125.
Speakers
annoumed
C.B. Mcpherson, professor of
political science at the University
of Toronto and Harold 0. Seigel,
president of Scintrex Ltd. are the
first speakers in the Cecil Green
Lecture Series, lecture committee
head George Volkoff said Thursday.
The series is funded by a
$600,000 grant from former UBC
student and Texas industrialist
Cecil Green.
Mcpherson will be here in early
November on a speaking tour of
the West, but the topic for his
speech has not been announced.
While he is in the Vancouver area
he will be giving an address at the
Vancouver Institute entitled "Can
Democracy Survive?"
Seigel Will be speaking in late
November on "Canadian Geophysics as an Exportable Commodity."
Volkoff wouldn't say who else
has been asked to speak, saying
that it would be "discourteous"
to announce their names without
giving them a chance to reply.
WEDNESDAY
Hillel Society
Executive    election,    noon,    Hillel
house.
THURSDAY
Charismatic Campus Ministry
Harry    Barker,    noon,    Lutheran
centre.
Judo Club
General  meeting,  noon,  apparatus
gym in the War Memorial Gym.
Chaplains
H uston
SUB 205.
Ghetto    Lawyer,    noon,
SEPT. 22
Slavonic Studies
losif    Brodsky,   exiled   from   the
Soviet Union, will read his poetry at
noon in the old auditorium.
Lutheran Campus Ministry
A  weekend   retreat  on the theme
of community and tasks.
Hot flashes
even discouraged into entering^
them," Waechtler said.
Waechtler said she will help
any woman student who feels her
counsellor or advisor is not as cooperative as he could be. She said
she will direct the woman to a
female graduate student or a professor in her particular field for
persona) advice.
"We know of women in several
departments who would be willing
to help," Waechtler said.
The Woman's Action Group
Counselling can be reached by
calling Waechtler at 733-7514.
The group's first meeting will
be held at noon, Sept. 22 in the
graduate student centre boardroom.
JMusic stops
The listening room is now
closed because of the SUB expansion program which will begin in
two weeks.
The equipment and a large
number of records used for the
past two years were damaged
beyond repair, said Bob Angus,
Alma Mater Society coordinator.
He said the damaged equipment will probably be replaced
with a tape system.
Angus said tape equipment
wouldn't be damaged as easily and
more supervision would also help
to limit damage.
Copy, please!
The Ubyssey desperately needs
a copy runner.
It's like this — Berton Woodward and Al Vince cannot keep
up the pace.
The copy runner must have a
car to travel from campus to the
printers at 12th and Maple.
Twice — on each press day.
At this time, press days are
Monday and Thursday. However,
this could change after the executive has presented its budget to
council.
The first copyrun is at 4:30
p.m. and the second is at 6 p.m.
Last year the copy runners
were paid for each run and a
miserly sum it was. However,
we're open for negotiations.
See either co-editor or Vince,
the ad manager.
Women help
By STEPHEN MORRIS
Are you being discriminated
against?
If the answer is yes, and you
are a woman, the Woman's Action
Group is prepared to help you,
group member Sue Waechtler said
Thursday.
The group, composed of staff,
faculty and student women on
campus, started meeting last year
to investigate and to improve the
status of women at UBC.
The investigation was directed
towards women at the graduate
and faculty level, and their findings will be published this fall.
"In some departments women
have a  lot of difficulty, and are
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Fri. - Sat.
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DINING
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TAKE OUT ORDERS _-0  »e*»_A
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738-11131
"S m
RECORDS
Rock, folk and blues.
New and Used.
Trade in your unwanted
LP's for new records or
cash.
GUITARS
Acoustic and electric,
parts, amps, all at VERY
low prices — check for
yourself. Most other musical instruments (brass, percussion) can be ordered.
Complete set of PREMIER
drums and cymbals for only
$700.
JOY MUSIC SANCTUM
6610 Main St. (at 50th)
Phone 327-6139
Open 11 a.m.- 7 p.m.
(except Sunday)
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
Nominations are now
open for the following    **%
Executive and Senate positions
CO-ORDINATOR
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
OFFICER
OMBUDSMAN
GRAD STUDIES
SENATOR
ARTS SENATOR
APPLIED SCIENCE
SENATOR
Deadline for nominations is 12:30 p.m. Friday, September 22, 1972.
For eligibility forms and/or information, come to the
AMS Secretary's office SUB 250.
£35
5885
University Blvd.
Lutheran
Campus Centre
Sunday, Sept. 17
Group Discussion    9:30
Worship       10:30
Lunch    11:30
DON JOHNSON - Campus Pastor
The   Campus   Centre   is   open   each  day  —
8:30 a.m.-11:00 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
, 35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
VAN. EAST FEDERAL CONSERV-
ative Social and Dance, Thurs.,
Sept. 21, 8 p.m. All welcome.
Special guest celebrities. For in-
formation   call  Herb  at   874-4139.
MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT UK-
dercut 72. Sat., Sept. 30, 8:30-1:00
SUB Cafeteria. Hardtimes, full
facilities.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED COQUITLAM TO
UBC. Will pay gas and or share
driving.   Phone Sandy 93G-3843.
Special Notices
15
COMPUTER   MATES
J'oin thousands across Canada.
Let our Computer System find
your special guy or gal, only $10.
All replies are confidential. Send
no money now. Write to Computer
Mates, P.O. Box 1012, Calgary,
Alta. for your free application.
MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATE
Student Centre can obtain pamphlets describing the Centre and
its functions from the office of
the  Centre.	
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October   .	
DISCOUNT STEREOT EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith   TVs.   Call   732-6769.
FOR YOUR HAIR NEEDS. GIVE
the UBC Barber Shop, or Beauty
Salon a visit.. 5736 University
Blvd.   in   the   Village.	
THE COMMUNITY IN THE Lutheran Campus Centre invites
students to join us in worship
each Sunday at 10:30. 5885 Uni-
versity   Boulevard.
I >R. RTTNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
Medicine Show. What is it? Who
cares?
Travel Opportunities
IS
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED IMMEDIATELY — 10-
speed bike in good condition. Ph.
224-9684 ask i'or or leave message:
Blake
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1969 MGB IMMAC. MUST SELL
immed. New motor. Tape deck &
tapes. Ski rack, skis, boots. Studded snows. New top. Fantastic
buy. $2300. worth $2700 (new
motor alone $600). Won't last at
this   price.   738-7862.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
Motorcycles
24
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
DR.    BUNDOLO:    SOON !    !    WHY
did   he  defect ? ? .
PATRIOT    OR    PERVERT???
Bundolo?   SOON!!!
DR.
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
Rates.   263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TY-
pist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist.   Mrs.   Ellis — 321-3838.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PUBLIC   SERVICE   OF   CANADA
GRADUATES
Administrative Trainee and Foreign
Service   Officer   Competition.
Written Exam
Thursday,   October   19.   1972
Buchanan   10.6  at   7:00   p.m.
This  exam   is  a   prerequisite  to  the
interview    stage.     Pre-register    by
October   10,    1972   and   obtain   more
information  at  your   Office   of   Student    Services    or    at    the    Public
Service     Commission,     No.     203    —
535   Thurlow   Street,    Vancouver   5,
B.C.
This   competition   is   open    to   both
men   and   women.	
PART-TIME WORK. c.a. 10 HRS.
biweekly. Ecological field work.
Daphne Tapp. Leave phone num-
ber  at   Zoology   office.	
ROOM, BOARD, REMUNERATION
to woman student for part-time
assistance, including driving, for
paraplegic working woman. Dunbar area.   733-2819  eves.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY OF-
fers fast, accurate typing service
on own electric typewriter. Reasonable rates. Helen Ashvorth,
683-1161 (days) or 681-8921 (evenings).
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
61
Music Instruction
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of .Music. All
grade levels welcome. 2 studio
locations.    291-0237.
Special Classes
62
POT    AT
POTTER'S   CENTRE
12   Week  Fall   Session
Starts   Sept.   IS
Phone G.  Alfred,
261-4764
"ANGEL MONZON, DIRECTOR
of the Monzon School of Flamenco & Folk Dance and 'Los
Cavales' Flamenco Troupe will be
teaching Spanish dance at International House this session —
for    information    call    681-1716."
WILL JACK FELL JANE AT UN-
dercut 72? Cum and see! Sat.
Sept.   30   SUB  Cafe.
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
FRAMES        12-STRLVG.     GUITAR
Excellent       shape       $80.00       John
'.143-5244.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SPACIOUS      ROOMS
campus     with     pri\
private entrance foi
$40   each.    224-6389.
CLOSE     TO
ate    bath    &
two to share
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR RES-
ponsible female student in exchange for evening babysitting
services. Experience with children necessary. Private room and^,
bathroom. Laundry facilities
available. Close to campus. Phone
263-4764. Friday, September  15,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Weekend Action Box
Date Sport Opponent
Sept. 16 Rugby Trojans
Sept. 16 Football U. of Alberta
Sept. 16 Field Hockey Jokers "A"
UBC FOOTBALL BIRDS hope the Alberta
Golden Bears get no closer than No. 59 Karl
Ruban of Manitoba does on this kick. 'Birds travel
to Edmonton this weekend to find out.
Championship 'Birds
need more members
The UBC Thunderbird field hockey team will begin defence
of its Lower Mainland hockey championship Saturday.
Last year's team compiled an impressive record of 14 wins,
three ties and one loss scoring 54 goals and letting in only nine in
18 games. The Thunderbirds won the Vancouver Indoor League
title and Thunderbird Invitational Tournament as well.
Due to graduation, only five of last year's first 11 will be
returning.
As a result, coach Eric Broome has initiated an ambitious
recruiting program which aims to rebuild men's field hockey as
a major sport on campus.
Over the past years, UBC has consistently had strong
competion on Canadian teams competing in international
competition. This year being no exception, no less than six team
members have been invited to train with the Canadian national
team.
The UBC field hockey program includes one evening and
one afternoon session at Thursday noon each week, utilizing
both indoor and outdoor facilities. This year two teams are
entered in the Vancouver league.
Anyone interested in playing field hockey, regardless of
experience, is encouraged to contact either Eric Broome, coach
at 228-2517 or Kelvin Wood, captain 224-6394.
Place Time
Stadium 2:30 p.m.
Edmonton 2:30 p.m.
WinskillPark 2:30 p.m.
intramurals
THE MENS INTRAMURALS program
swings into action this year with a big push for
an indoor pool on campus and almost 30 different sports to compete in.
Signing up is simple. About 35 different units
compete so just join one. Most faculties,
residences, fraternities and various other clubs
have unit managers. If you cannot find a unit
enquire at War Memorial Gym 308 to get his
phone number.
If you do not like any of the existing units
just form your own [even if for only one sport]
but don't forget to tell men's intramurals about
it in room 308 of the gym or you will not get any
games scheduled. The entry deadline for touch
football, softball and tennis is today.
For smaller but skilful units intramurals
has altered the point system this year so that
the units will be in closer contention for the top
annual point standings.
Referees are also needed for softball,
football and tennis. Referees will be given
pointers and will be paid.
For further information on intramurals see
the noticeboard in SUB, go to gym 308 or phone
228-4648.
THE FIRST WOMEN'S intramurals meeting of
the year will be held today at 12:30 in room 213
War Memorial Gym.
All managers must come to this meeting to
pick up their 1972-73 schedules.
Orientation for managers will be Sept. 17 at
11:30 a.m. in Lumberman's Arch, Stanley
Park. Those with transportation problems
should contact Heather Mitton at 224-9076, room
310 Mackenzie House.
PAYMENT OF FEES
The Department of Finance, General Services Administration Bldg., wishes to remind students that the first
instalment is due on or before
Friday, September 22, 1972
UBC BOWLING CLUB
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Wed. Sept. 20, 12:30 Buch. 104
Bowling will be on Mon. evenings starting Sept. 25 and
possibly a Wed. league will be formed if the Mon. league
is full.
For further information call Walter
(the Secretary) at 228-8225
NEW    BOWLERS   WELCOME   IN   SUB    LANES
MAJOR REPAIR WORK
®
CvoiiVQ)
We can save you money and give you the highest quality workmanship on
your VW, Mercedes, Porsche or Volvo. The larger the repair problem the
better off you are to come to us. If you have read this ad and don't own
any of the above, we can still be of service if you drive a B.M.W Let us
quote on your next repair jobs.
SALES and SERVICE
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)    Phone 263-8121
UBC DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
will present a lecture by
Dr. Richard Schechner
Professor at New York University
and Co-Director of The Performance Group
Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL THEATRE
FREE
Today at 12:30 (noon)
Frederic Wood Theatre
FREE
t
CINEMA-16
presents four series:
1 INTERNATIONAL:
—eight films, starting Sept. 25
featuring KWAIDAN
—membership fee $5.00 for students and
staff, others $6.00.
2 THREE DIRECTORS:
—nine films, three by each of PASOLINI,
RAY, & MIZOGUCHI, starting Sept. 18.
-fees: $5.00/$6.00.
3 SWASHBUCKLERS:
—seven films, starring such memorable
adventurers as FAIRBANKS Sr., ERROL
FLYNN, VALENTINO, & BELMONDO.
-starts Sept. 26; fees: $4.00/$5.00.
4 RITUALS:
—five films, depicting the life styles of
Spain, Japan, South Africa ...
-starts Oct. 2; fees: $3.00/$4.00.
—fees for all four series: students & staff: $15.00
others: $17.00
t
t Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15,  1972
The big two want you
CANADIAN UMVKKSITY
PRKSS
OTTAWA — Both the Liberal
party and the Progressive
Conservative party appear to
be making a concerted effort to
win Canada's youth vote in the
Oct. 30 federal election.
The director of the Tories
youth committee says his
party must convince young
people that the Conservatives
arc not synonymous with the
status quo and that the party
has policies for change.
One aspect of the campaign
will be the transformation of
Conservative leader Robert
Stanfield's image to portray
"the human aspects of the
man." -.says director Len
Domino.
Domino says he is worried
that Canadians associate his
party with American conservatives such as Barry
Ooldwator of Arizona or
(Jeorgo Wallace because of the
influence of American media.
They're as faraway from the
PCs as Mao is from Hitler,"
he said.
Besides the usual campaign
literature,   a   scries    of   six
posters will be used portraying
such issues as nationalism,
poverty, inflation and the
environment, says Domino, a
recent graduate of the
University of Manitoba.
The campaign will be directed
mainly through campus Tory
clubs although the clubs are
under no pressure to work for
the candidates in its riding,
Domino claims.
Domino says he believes
young people have a place with
the PCs. This means not only
doing the usual campaign work
of stuffing envelopes but involving qualified young people
in important campaign
positions.
Domino says he expects
most candidates will bring
young people into the camr
paign if only because they
realize they need the support of
young people.
STANFIELD
the man, the image
TRUDEAU
. . . renewal
The Liberals intend to use
prime minister Trudeau's once
youthful image to gain the 2.8-
million youth vote.
The prime minister's first
time voter committee, with
members ranging in age from
20 to 26, has a budget of $10,000
to persuade young people that
Trudeau and the Just Society
can solve Canada's problems.
The first press release from
the 11-person committee announced the election of Kathy
Robinson as "chairperson" to
head the select committee. The
attempt to remove sexist
phrases young female voters
may object to was negated
when Robinson and other
women were referred to as
"Miss" so-and-so.
According to the press
release, the "committee grew
out of a series of meetings with
young activists dedicated to
assisting the re-election of
Prime Minister Trudeau and
the Liberal party."
Robinson and her co-workers
have set themselves three
main objectives. They are:
first time voter education of
the 21 per cent of the electorate
the committee is aimed at;
contacting youth groups in and
out of the Liberal party across
the country; and regular
reports to Trudeau "on the
attitudes and concerns of the
first time voter."
All committee members,
except one, have been heavily
involved in Liberal pary activities before.
Home is where you vote
OTTAWA (CUP) — University-
students may vote where they live
while at school, if they consider that
dwelling their "ordinary residence",
says Canada's chief electoral officer.
The statement by J. M. Hamel
appeared to contradict earlier indications that enumerators would
hinder students attempting to register
to vote in their university constituencies in the Oct. 30 federal
election.
"If a student tells the enumerator
his ordinary residence is room 105 in a
certain university residence, well
that's it," he said. ".We cannot ask
any more from a student that we can
from any other citizen. We don't ask
other people for proof of age or of
citizenship. No more so can we ask for
proof that a student is really on his
own. If a student says he's on his own,
then we'll have to accept that."
Under the new Elections Act of 1970
students lost the right to be
enumerated in both their parents'
home constituencies and in their
university ridings. Instead,
parliament gave them the right to
vote by proxy in their parents' constituency if they couldn't be there on
election day.
Regulations from Hamel's office
directed enumerators to determine
whether students living "away from
home" were "on their own". If they
were, they could vote in their
university riding, but if they were not
they could be enumerated only at
their parents' home.
"All we are asking enumerators to
do if they are in doubt is to ask
students if they would be willing to
take an oath about the location of
their ordinary residence if challenged
on election day," Hamel said in an
interview.
"It's a personal decision a student
must make by his own conscience."
he added.
In directives sent to local returning
officers last January Hamel said
"enumerators should be  instructed
that whenever an occupant of a
dwelling describes his occupancy as
'student' they should determine which
of the four basic situations applies to
that person by determining the
relationship of that person to the other,
occupants of the dwelling and the
nature and frequency of that person's
occupancy."
tThe four situations were married,
single living at home, single living
away from home, and single on their
own.)
The tone of Hamel's instructions
indicated enumerators would be
scrupulous in ensuring that only
students, who were financially independent of their parents would be
enumerated in university ridings.
But Hamel now says students could
vote in university ridings if they
wanted to.
"I want to emphasize that we're not
going to submit students to a means
test," he said.
But local returning officers have
contacted university residence officials to determine "which students,
if any, should be enumerated", according to Hamel's earlier
regulations.
Hamel says that the move was
designed to save time, and that any
student who was not included on the
list provided by residence officials
could meet an enumerator in a
residence common room and get
placed on the voters list.
"In Edmonton this morning we got
a report that authorities in a
university residence said that 150
students might claim the building as
their ordinary residence, but now
there will be as many as 700 on the
list," he said.
"So residence authorities have
nothing to do with the result. They're
just saving us the time needed to
knock on every residence door and
allowing us to allocate the appropriate nu'mer of enumerators,"
the chief electoral officer added.
The Election Act itself only men
tions students in its section on
proxies. All other rulings for student
voting are interpretations from
Hamel's office.
National New Democratic Party
secretary Clifford Scotton says he is
certain students can choose where
they want to vote, and is unaware of
Hamel's memos indicating anything
to the contrary.
"I have a daughter at York and I
provide support for her but I consider
her on her own. I expect she will vote
there." he said. "The unquestionable
right to vote where the student
pleases must be established."
Hamel claimed such a principle
violates the spirit of the Election Act
but that students could not be
prevented from considering their
unversity dwelling their ordinary
residence if they were willing to
swear it on election day.
Liberals extend LIP
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Local
Initiatives Program will be extended
for two months past the Sept. 30 expiry date for about 750 projects.
Federal manpower minister Bryce
Mackasey says LIP would function
this winter beginning Dec. 1 and
applications will not be accepted until
that date.
He says more emphasis on job
creation and on-the-job training will
be stressed.
Last year about 23 per cent of the
LIP project workers were drawing
unemployment insurance and another
25 per cent were from welfare. The
renewed program will try to increase
these percentages.
Mackasey denies that the Dec. 1
date was chosen to affect voters.
The date was selected so "nobody
can accuse me of being a political
tool," the minister said.
His statement came after more
than 1,400 Toronto LIP workers said
they would work against the Liberals
in the election if the program was not
extended. The Liberals held 14 of the
23 federal seats in Toronto when
Parliament dissolved.
The workers have since backed
down from their threat.

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