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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1975

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 Students stage invasions
By MARCUS GEE
About 75 Vancouver
Vocational Institute students invaded the downtown headquarters
of Vancouver Community College
Tuesday to protest community
college budget restrictions.
Chanting  slogans   and  waving
placards, the students marched to
the   Royal   Bank   building   at
Hastings and Granville to confront
the VCC administrators who
control WI.
Students from VCC, WI and
Capilano College were on strike
Tuesday to protest the drop in
educational quality they say will
result from the government's
college budget restrictions.
VCC administration president
Tom Gilligan and bursar Len Berg
defended administration spending
policies against criticism from the
angry students who crowded
Gilligan's luxurious Royal Tower
office.
Gilligan told the students the 15
per cent community college budget
ceiling announced Friday by
education minister Eileen Dailly
does not necessarily mean
programs will be cut back.
"I can't agree there will be
cutbacks," he said. "But I cannot
say there will not be."
—marcus gee photo
PROTESTING CUTBACKS, students from Vancouver Community College demonstrate Tuesday outside
sumptuous offices of VCC administrator Tom Gilligan. Students were demanding repeal of recent
community college budget increase freeze, imposed last week by education minister Eileen Dailly.
Act not for residences-report
By CHRIS GAINOR
A rent review commission task
force has recommended that
university residences be excluded
from the Landlord and Tenant Act,
the provincial rentalsman said
Tuesday.
Barrie Clark said a change in the
present act would be needed to
exclude university residences from
its provisions.
The task force report, released
last week, says student residences
should be exempt because they are
publicly supported and are part of
a university.
Clark told about 70 law students
"it is also my view that
(residences) should not be included under the act."
UBC residences are currently
subject to the same percentage
rent hike ceiling as other rental
accommodation, but no other part
of the act is applied to them.
The residences should not be
subject to rent controls, but all
money made in their operation
should be ploughed back, he said.
Clark slammed the UBC
residences, saying "the accommodation is not serving the
people it's designed to serve."
Most of the people currently in
UBC residences are people who
could stay with their families for
an extra year or two, he said.
He denied that rent controls are
the cause of B.C.'s housing shortage. "It's cost."
"Unless we change our social
values a lot, we'll have a low
vacancy rate for 10 years."
He said that new apartment
buildings cannot be built and pay
for themselves with rents below
$350 per month.
"It costs a lot to build an apartment building — more than people
can afford. What can government
do, now that private enterprise
capital can no longer produce low-
income rental units?"
Clark said there was a housing
shortage before rent controls were
introduced and that the current
housing situation would not be
much different without rent controls.
"I do not believe you can leave
the Landlord and Tenant Act
unamended because the housing
problem is not solved," Clark said.
He said that since rent controls
are now being introduced
throughout Canada, other
provinces have expressed interest
in B.C.'s landlord and tenant laws.
"We've been besieged with
delegations from Saskatchewan
and Ontario," he said.
He said the rentalsman's office
has prepared several proposed
amendments to the Landlord and
Tenant Act, which were ready for
government action "until (the
See page 2:  CLARK'S
Meanwhile 150 Capilano College
students marched from the North
Vancouver school board office to
the West Vancouver school board
office, also to protest Dailly's
budget restrictions.
Students at the VCC
headquarters — known as
Gilligan's island because of its
isolation from the campuses they
administrate — scathingly
criticized what they called grossly
inflated administrative spending
at the time of the budget restrictions.
Responding to a student's
question, Gilligan said his salary
this year is $45,000, an increase of
22 per cent over his 1974-75 salary.
This was greeted by loud boos
from the students.
One said: "You are taking a
large chunk of our money. There
are 5,000 students in this college
and only one of you."
Another said: "Why don't you
spend the money you spent to put
mahogany panelling in this place
to improve facilities (at WD?"
Students told Gilligan they want
the VCC administration to join
them in protesting Dailly's college
budget ceiling.
Steve Watson, an organizer of
the VCC anti-cutback committee
and spokesman for the students,
told Gilligan the VCC college
council should pressure Dailly to
life the budget ceiling.
"Our protest is focused on the
education department," he said.
"The college council should try and
make Dailly ease her budget
restrictions."
"Administrative costs should be
cut down," Watson said.
"You should spend money on
new instructors and classes even if
it means the adminstration should
go along on a shoestring."
Many students complained of
poor facilities at WI and called on
Gilligan to push the education
department for a new WI campus.
Outside the building they
chanted: "We need a new school,
we will fight. Education is a right."
Gilligan said he does not know
how the college will allocate its
provincial grant until: the
education department approves a
budget for VCC.
"The college council has done its
very best to provide information to
the education department," he
said. "The department responded
with cutbacks."
There is no way we can give you
further information. You know as
much about next year's budget as
we do," Gilligan said.
Watson responded that the
college council should actively
lobby the government for more
community college money instead
of simply submitting VCC's
budgetary needs to the education
department.
"You didn't want to make a
protest. You are standing in the
way of our protest. If we have to
push you aside we will."
After the students left the
building, Watson said the college
students' next step will be a trip to
Victoria to protest budget
restrictions there.
But he said no definite
arrangements have yet been made
for a protest at the parliament
buildings.
Watson said Tuesday's protest
showed the VCC administration "is
not<Qn our side."
The strike at Capilano College
was supported by 85 to 90 per cent
of the college's students, student
union vice-president Barbara
Smith said Tuesday
A six-mile protest march by
Capilano College students was also
'successful,' Smith said.
Smith said marchers carried
placards and leaflets explaining
Capilano student and faculty opposition to the budget restrictions
were distributed along the route.
Ten faculty joined in the march
and most of the rest cancelled
classes for the one day strike, she
said.
Smith said Capilano faculty
association head Ed Laval joined
student speakers in denouncing the
budget restrictions while speaking
GILLIGAN
. . .maybe yes, maybe no
at the North Vancouver school
board pffice, starting point for the
march.
"Capilano College comes under
the Public Schools Act so the
boards are important," Smith said.
She said the student society has
collected 4,000 signatures on a
petition to Eileen Dailly protesting
the budget restrictions and
demanding $60,000 to preserve the
"status quo" of educational quality
at Capilano.
Voter registration set up
in SUB foyer for students
UBC students eligible to cast
ballots in the Dec. 11 provincial
election can get their name on the
Students face two referenda
BySUEVOHANKA
Students will face two referenda in less than two
weeks — one asking for money and the other
proposing a new constitution for the Alma Mater
Society.
Both referenda will be held the week of Nov. 17-21.
AMS council decided Wednesday to ask students for
a $3.50 increase in the AMS general fee levy which, if
approved, would hike AMS fees to $12.50 from the
current $9 per student per year.
AMS vice-president Dave Van Blarcom said the
last general fee hike was in 1949.
Students already pay a $15 SUB fee, $5 extramural
athletic fee and a $5 pool fee in addition to the basic $9
AMS fee.
Council voted to allocate 50 cents of the proposed
$3.50 hike to clubs. The remaining $3 would go to
cover administrative and other costs.
Council also gave final approval to the proposed
new constitution,  subject to its approval in the
referendum.
Purpose of the new constitution is the decentralization of control over money to undergraduate
societies and a splitting of the housekeeping and
pojitical functions of the AMS.
"Under the proposed set-up, a committee of 10 would
be selected to manage the. society's assets and a
larger body would discuss more political matters.
Council members would be elected by the undergraduate societies or win their positions by being
elected to the board of governors or senate: There
would be no direct elections at large for AMS
positions.
AMS treasurer Dave Coulson told councillors the
fee hike is necessary because the society "is facing a
deficit in the neighborhood of $45,000 this year.
"And it doesn't look like it's going to get any
smaller," Coulson added.
See page 7:  AMS
voter's list at a voter registration
booth in SUB's main foyer.
And out-of-town students have a
choice of either voting in the lower
mainland riding where they
currently live, or in their home
riding — without going there.
Stew Savard said Wednesday the voter registration booth
was set up by the B.C. Students'
Federation in conjunction with the
Alma Mater Society.
"I was authorized to set up the
booth by the provincial returning
officer, Ken Morton," booth
organizer Savard said.
"It's just a registration booth,'
not a polling station."
Eligible     voters     must     be'
registered by Wednesday to vote
Dec. 11.
Anybody who is 19 years of age
or older, is a Canadian citizen and
has lived in B.C. for the last six
months is eligible to vote.
Gladys Schoor, a clerk in the
office of the provincial registrar of
voters Wednesday explained what
out-of-town  students  wishing  to
See page 2:  VOTERS ruyc
Clark's future in doubt
From page 1
election call) yesterday (Monday)."
He said a number of amendments are proposed by the task
force report, including a proposal
that tenants pay their municipal
taxes directly, instead of through
landlords. The report recommends
"a very sophisticated system of
rent controls," Clark said.
Clark said he hopes to increase
staff to provide more service in
outlying parts of B.C. and because
he has been forced to "soft-pedal"
landlord-tenant disputes involving
non-essential maintenance and
similar problems.
But he said the  future of the
rentalsman'soffice and of landlord .
and tenant laws  depend  on  the
result of the Dec.  11  provincial
election.
"I might not even be in office in
Voters have many choices
From page 1
vote in their home riding must do.
"If you are attending UBC but
consider yourself a permanent
resident of another riding, you
must phone back to the
registration office in your home
riding," she said.
"If you aren't on the voter's list,
you must go to the nearest
registration office (in SUB) and fill
out the forms there."
Schoor said people wishing to
vote for a candidate in another
riding other than the one the voter
is living in, must go to an advance
poll and fill out a special form.
"After you mark in the name of
the candidate in your riding, your
ballot is counted and tallied for the
specific district your candidate
represents."
She said this was not the same as
a proxy vote, where a voter gives
someone else permission to cast
his or her vote.
_ "There   is   no   proxy   vote   in
provincial elections," she said.
Students have another choice
open to them.
Joyce Nash, former secretary of
the B.C. NDP party, said Wednesday students may vote for the
candidate in the riding in which
they are currently living, if they
were living there Monday.
"If you live in residence at UBC
(for example) and were residing
there Monday, an election writ was
filed enabling you to vote in the
Point Grey riding," she said.
She said all students need to do to
take advantage of this feature is
register as voters of the riding they
are currently living in.
Savard said people were "lining
up" to register at the SUB booth
Wednesday.
"Hopefully by the deadline next
week we'll have registered between 5,000 and 15,000 people," he
said.
"We've already done about four
hundred people (by Wednesday
evening) and nobody knows we're
here yet."
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731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
U.B.C. AWARDS OFFICE NOTICES
B.C. Student Assistance Programme
(Canada Student Loans & B.C. Grant-in-Aid)
1. B.C. Grants-in-Aid — Students who are receiving
grants under the above programme and who have
not previously submitted the "notification of
award/enrolment confirmation" to the Registrar's
Office should do so immediately. Cheques in
payment of the grants will be distributed by the
U.B.C. Finance Department and will be available
after January 12, 1976.
2. Award Recommendations — Students who applied
for assistance through B.CS.A.P. prior to October
6th and have not received their recommendation
forms may pick them up at the Awards Office,
Buchanan 207. Applications submitted after
October 6th will not be processed prior to
November 15th. 	
six months — depending on the
statements of the (party) leaders."
Acting housing director Michael
Davis declined comment
specifically on the report's
recommendations but said "our
position is that the residences
except Acadia Park and Camp
should not be covered under the
act."
When told of Clark's comment
that most students in residences
need not stay there, he said most of
the residence students are from
outside the Lower Mainland.
He said Clark's statement implied that most first- and second-
year students should attend local
community colleges.
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp reacted
angrily to Clark's remarks.
"Barrie Clark is the wishiest-
washiest liberal I've come
across," said van der Kamp. "He's
such a chameleon he's liable to
change his mind tomorrow if he's
pushed the wrong way."
He said the residences should be
under the act because "students
had no rights at all" before they
were covered under the act.
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HAGEN'S TRAVEL SERVICE
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Offices around the town —
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VANCOUVER:
932 King Edward—732-8868 /  4841 Victoria Dr.—879-4575
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WEST VANCOUVER: 1425 Marine Drive—926-4304
BURNABY 4685 Kingsway—435-6674
NEW WESTMINSTER: 624 Columbia Street—526-1611
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SUF
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DR. JESSIE BERNARD
.   distinguished sociologist, Visiting Scholar at the
National Institute of Education, Washington, D.C,
in a panel-discussion
THE CHANGING FUNCTION OF WOMEN
IN MODERN SOCIETY
with
Dr. Jean Lipman-Bluman *Gene Errington * Freda Paltiel
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7
at 8:00 p.m.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BALLROOM
For further information call
Lois Crawley, UBC Information Services,  228-3131. Thursday, November 6, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Williams sees more housing
Resources minister Bob
Williams said Tuesday he envisages a large-scale housing
development on the UBC campus
for students, faculty and people not
associated with the university.
, He emphasized in a talk Tuesday
with University Endowment Lands
residents that he is not proposing
the community development for
the UEL but rather to be on 1,000
acres apportioned to UBC campus.
"I'm talking about the campus,"
he said. "The possibility of other
»     people living on campus who are
not full-time students or faculty
people is an interesting idea."
But "Williams also emphasized
his government will support only a
limited amount of development in
the UEL in the near future and
residents cannot expect municipal
government status for a long time.
He said local residents will be
represented through "federated
associations" of tenants, students
and ratepayers, who will be able to
meet with UEL administrator Bob
Murdoch. who is directly
responsible to Williams' office.
He also said tenants and
ratepayers will be guaranteed
public hearings before new
developments take place.
He also announced his cabinet
has passed an order in council
requiring   developers   to   obtain
*    demolition ^permits   before   they
tear down existing buildings.
Several members of the UEL
tenants society which organized
the meeting with Williams in the
Lutheran Campus Centre, cheered
when he announced the Oct. 9
order-in-council.
The decision apparently thwarts
plans of LRS Development Enterprises Ltd., to demolish several
small apartments and row houses
in the Kings Road area for a
proposed $35 million luxury condominium development.
Williams said the developer
faces a downzoning of the land to
single family dwelling status if he
defies the Land Use Code. He also
said the government will consider
raising the current $500 fine
' against defying lawbreakers.
Williams admitted the government has given little consideration
to UEL development since it took
office in 1972.
He said architects drew some
"very preliminary" concepts
shortly after the NDP took office,
but these were discarded.
(Housing minister Lome
Nicolson announced in 1972 the
government was planning a large-
scale housing development for the
lands, but apparently backed off
the idea when public pressure
against it mounted.)
Williams said he has "some
broad general ideas" for UEL
development but currently has no
firm plans.
And in an interview after the
meeting, he said UEL development
is a "low priority" in the NDP's
next term of office, if the government is re-elected.
But he said the UEL problem- is
"an exciting question" and
proposed the integrated
development on the campus.
Williams ruled out the possibility
of municipal representation for
UEL residents, noting "the area is
pretty small and the campus is
relatively so much bigger.
"I think there's a provincial
interest here beyond what a
municipality might have," he said.
Williams went on to say the
campus "is sterile in some ways.
"It could be a community," he
said.
"The possibility of a university
becoming a more genuine community is exciting."
In an interview, Williams said he
has "talked to some of (UBC's)
administration on campus in a
general way" about the on-campus
development proposal.
But administration vice-
president Chuck Connaghan, who
attended the Tuesday meeting,
said Wednesday nobody at UBC
has officially talked with him or
members of his department about
the idea.
Connaghan said such a
development would be "a public
policy   decision"   beyond   the
university administration's direct
scope. "I think it's an interesting
concept," he said.
Meanwhile, Williams said lease
rate increases announced recently
for government-owned land on the
UEL would hit commercial enterprises hardest. He said rates for
commercial enterprises would rise
by as much as 400 per cent.
He said the Lutheran Campus
Centre and churches will pay much
smaller rate increases, but would
not reveal how large these increases would be.
Williams said the rate increases
for several fraternities would have
not yet been set. He said the increases would depend on "who
owns them."
Spokesmen for several fraternities said Wednesday student
rents would not be affected by the
hike in lease rents.
—matt king photo
WHEN THE  FLACK HITS, change the subject, says resources minister Bob Williams. Minister spoke to
University  Endowment Lands residents Tuesday and told them they have little cause to worry about
proposed luxury development on UEL. Williams shifted development worries to UBC campus.
Board meet opens, closes
By GARY COULL
The question ,of public and in
camera meetings of UBC's board
of governors is not an open and
closed matter.
At the board's regular monthly
meeting Tuesday, student member
Svend Robinson objected to a
series of motions he had introduced
at an earlier meeting being placed
on the closed portion of the agenda.
Under the revised Universities
Act, the board of governors is
required to meet at least partly in
open, public session with an in
camera meeting to follow.
Corporate heavies study themselves
OTTAWA (CUP) — The members in direction of the royal
commission on corporate concentration were challenged as
being hopelessly prejudiced at
their first public appearance here
Monday.
The commissioners were asked
to resign at the first of a planned
series of public hearings because
of their personal and professional
interests in big business — the
subject of the inquiry.
They were also accused of
narrowing the scope of the inquiry
before the hearings began so as to
avoid dealing with the power of
banks, the impact of foreign
ownership and competition policy.
Chairman Robert Bryce announced he thought matters were
satisfactory except that he personally felt reluctant to deal with
matters concerning energy interests because of past involvement in determining
government energy policy.
He   also   acknowledged   that
another   member   of   the   com-,
mission,   Pierre   Nadeau,   might
also have reservations because of
his own corporate background.
But Bryce rejected the challenge
to resign from political activists
James Lorimer and James Laxer,
acting on behalf of the corporate
research group.
Bryce, a former deputy finance
minister and Canada's representative to the International Monetary
Fund, was named chairman when
the royal commission was  first
—matt king photo
FELAFFEL FOLKS? Students flogging Israel  during week of same
name at UBC offer Wednesday Middle East version of hamburger.
announced last April.
The setting up of the royal
commisston followed an attempt
last spring by the Montreal-based
Power Corporation to take control
of the Toronto-based Argus Corporation.
Nadeau, whose appointment to
the royal commission was announced later by prime minister
Pierre Trudeau, is a board
member of the Royal Bank of
Canada, which has links with
Power Corporation and other
conglomerates.
The final member of the three-
person commission is Robert
Dickerson, a lawyer with long
Liberal traditions and a clientele of
conglomerates.
The three were mandated to
"investigate the economic and
social implications for the public
interest of major concentration of
corporate power" and to recommend as to any safeguards "that
may be required to protect the
public interests."
Bryce denied the commission
was too narrow in its scope and
said they were not interested in the
already studied area of foreign
ownership, or in making detailed
amendments to the Bank Act.
He had previously announced a
decision not to get involved in
competition policy due to existing
legislation in that area.
Bryce also rejected the idea of
paying non-corporate witnesses
who might wish to appear in order
to give testimony, saying he did not
know what the commission could
gain by such an appearance.
Previously, however, he
described the hearings as more "a
public airing of views" than an
outright government inquiry.
The six motions Robinson introduced were placed on the in
camera part of the meeting by the
board's table officers who prepare
the agenda.
. Among the six motions were
some calling for an investigation
into the university's dealings with
the Bank of Montreal On campus,
The Ubyssey has learned.
Robinson told the board he saw
no reason why the motions should
be debated privately.
"Just because something might
be controversial doesn't mean it
should be put in closed session," he
said". "It might be more in the
public interest to debate it openly."
"I can't understand how the
public would be harmed if we
debated these motions in public."
Board chairman Thomas Dohm
said it wasn't up to either him or
Robinson but the board as a whole
to decide on whether something
should be debated in open or closed
session.
"You can't set up one policy to
cover all situations," he said.
Some board members said they
couldn't decide publicly whether
something should remain in
camera or not because they would
have to refer to the subject matter.
Ken Andrews, the non-academic
staff representative on the board,
charged that some board members
are "discriminated against
because of where they come from"
and have no say in what items are
placed on the agenda.
He said there are "grey areas"
which come up from time to time.
"This board should actually sit
down in closed session and
determine what policy is."
Referring to one of Robinson's
motions, board member George
Morfitt said it would be difficult to
debate the financial matters involved without more information.
"For all we know taking money
from one place and putting it into
another might cause a drastic fall
in bank stocks or the stock
market," he said in an apparent
reference to one of the Bank of
Montreal motions.
Board member Sadie Boyles
moved that the discussion continue
behind closed doors and it was
passed after one of the "controversial" items was placed on
the public agenda for immediate
discussion.
The item was a Robinson motion
calling for the board to endorse
administration president Doug
Kenny's expression of concern
over a proposed development on
the University Endowment Lands.
A development company had
announced plans earlier this year
to build a luxury housing complex
on the UEL by exercising options
on land where low to middle income people are currently living.
Kenny wrote a letter to the
provincial government expressing
his concern about any such
development.
But Kenny told the board
Tuesday he would rather the board
itself express its concern about the
project instead of simply endorsing
his letter.
The motion passed unanimously
and will result in a letter being sent
to the provincial government.
mmmmmmmm^mmm
No standards nullify
Nobody will ever know if tests
made of SUB food last week indicate whether the stuff is good or
not, according to the man who
interpreted test results.
"We don't have any standards,
really," said Dr. Bill Meekison of
the Boundary Health Unit, which
controls food services' licence.
Meekison said Wednesday the
tests, performed by microbiology
grad student Mark Muller, were
really a "pilot project," the results
of which will be used to educate
food handlers.
"We have standards for dairy
products," Meekison said. "But
there is no yardstick to measure
food by. All the results we received
from Muller were for food."
However, Meekison said, "there
is nothing to indicate that UBC has
anything to worry about."
"Handling and storage of food at
UBC are very good indeed," he
said.
But the lack of standards for
deciding on the quality of the food
that arrives on the plate makes the
tests little more than an academic
exercise.
"Everyone seems to have different opinions on what standards
should be," he said.
Meekison stressed that the
health unit has not recently
received any complaints about the
quality of food services' products. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 6, 1975
BoG farce
Open board of governors' meetings at UBC?
Ha! Open is too strong a word. The open session is more
like a rubber stamp, a ceremonial meeting or (dare we say it?)
a farce,
exciting, action-packed meeting.
For a brief, flickering moment (as an accidental side issue
of course) there was actually some discussion about how the
university's highest decision-making body should operate.
But the fact it was only a brief sidelight and had to be
continued in closed session backs up the definitions of the
board's "open" meetings cited above.
The issue was a series of motions introduced by student
member Svend Robinson. The motions had been placed on
the in-camera section of the agenda.
Why? Robinson wanted to know.
He argued that if open board meetings are to mean
anything then, with the exception of sensitive areas such as
personnel or contracts, everything should presumably be for
open discussion.
Non-academic staff representative Ken Andrews added
that these "grey areas" of what should be debated in the
open come up from time to time. The board should set a firm
policy, he said.
But in order to decide whether Robinson's motions
should be part of the open agenda, the board had to go into
closed session.
We'll have to wait until the next meeting to find out what
it decided — officially anyway.
It seems the mysterious tabling officers are the ones who
decide what is debated where. What was one of the things
they wanted kept secret?
It was a board policy on a proposed UEL development.
Sure it's controversial, but why shouldn't it be discussed in
public. (Public by the way means one member of the press, a
Ubyssey reporter, three flacks from UBC information
services, two members in the public gallery and a couple of
administrators.)
After administration president Doug Kenny sends a letter
expressing concern about the project why should the board
debate be covered up?
There is no end to guessing what else should be out in the
open.
It seems to be secrecy first, then throw a few crumbs to
the public to keep it happy and satisfy the Universities Act.
Just look what's left over for the public eye: agreement
on a committee report to disburse money from a fund, a
tabled report on daycare facilities at UBC, a tabled motion to
increase car mileage allowance, discussion about the aquatic
centre and the library processing centre . . . and so on.
But on almost every item, there was no debate. In the
public session board members sort of sat around looking at
the mound of paper in front of them.
Nothing controversial.
Unless Tuesday was an exceptionally dull meeting, UBC's
open board concept is nothing more than a tokenistic farce.
Ubyssey perfect?
Where have all the letters gone?
Usually in the world of journalism letters to the editor are
criticisms about a particular newspaper or opinions of what is
not being covered.
Since we haven't received any letters lately, The Ubyssey
can only conclude that it is perfect. You know — flawless,
all-encompassing, thoughtful, intelligent and erudite.
It warms all Ubyssey staffers' hearts to know we're loved.
Thank you, everyone.
WHADDYAH /AEAN   "DEADWOOD IN
THUH DEPAKTME NT*... HUH BUD.1?
me wvsscY
NOVEMBER 6, 1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"Gloriosky, Batman, you mean I get my name on the fuse box?"
burbled young Gary Coull Incredulously. "S'right, tad," quoth uncle Doug
Rushton laconically. "You mean, along with the Arlene Franco snaps?"
leered Ralph Maurer. "Hush, you're not supposed to know about that,"
said Heather Walker. "I'LII only go along with my name going on the fuse
box if it doesn't fall on a crack and half get cut in half," retorted Mark
Buckshon to no one in particular. The latter, aka Sue Vohanka, blushed
furiously. "Why did Sue Vohanka blush furiously in the last line?"
inquired Len MacKave. "Because underneath those clothes, she's
absolutely naked," drooled Chris Gainor. "All right, hold it right there,"
shouted Matt King. So Marcus Gee did, much to the disgust and distaste of
all right-thinking people on the staff.
We taped an interview with Douglas Kenny, and
were encouraged because we found him ready to
embark on a mission of a startling scope.
During his tenure as president of UBC we will
finally see an examination and delineation of
society's valued traditions; there will be a thorough
examination of departmental curricula to ensure that
they are matched up with social needs; attempts will
be made to facilitate equal access to education and
health services; an examination of societal and
governmental priorities will be conducted.
President Kenny affirms the university's obligation
to hear proposals for reform from all sectors of
society. He will endeavor to lead the university
community to help remove social inequalities from
North America.
PRESIDENT KENNY GOES ON RECORD
F.O. How will you lead us?
Kenny: By trying to articulate very clearly, certain
goals; then by trying to build off the concensus within
the academic community to achieve those goals. A
president better have some very clear-cut goals
which he wishes to achieve in the very short time he is
in office.
There are some traditional goals. One of them, and
it may not be a delightful task,' is securing the
necessary resources to make sure that the academic
enterprise doesn't falter, so you don't prejudice
education for future generations.
One primary task facing this university is to sort
out our valued traditions, and match them up with the
real needs of society today.
F.O.' How?
K: You forceably draw to the attention of senate
and faculty: are you really looking at your curricula
in light of societal needs?
F.O.' What are the needs of society?
K: I think that you watch very closely what the
national and provincial governments are stressing in
terms of their spending priorities. You can infer,
from those, some of the priorities of the nation.
One of the primary needs is the remarkable
inequality in our society. There is a consensus, within
North America, that those inequalities should be
removed.
We hear a great deal of talk of insuring equal opportunity toward education: that inequality is
something the university should face squarely. We've
got to ensure that every individual has equal access,
if they have the ability, without due regard to their
fiscal background.
There are inadequecies in health delivery systems.
We believe, in our society today, that people should
have ready access to the most excellent health ser
vice that society can afford. We do have pressing
problems in B.C. Too many deserving students have
to be turned away from the health sciences in
general.
There are problems in our society in terms of
energy. It's one of the most pivotal problems facing
society. That is an interdisciplinary problem from the
university viewpoint. The university should make
sure it is turning out people who can come to grips
with that problem.
The university is always obligated to listen very
closely to what society is saying its needs are.
F.O'. How does society communicate its needs to
the university?
K: The university authorities have always had to
infer those by listening with the third ear to what
political leaders and community leaders are saying;
you watch the debates in Ottawa and Victoria, you
watch the world arena.
The university can be more responsive by being
very sure that all sectors of the university are in tune
with society's real, basic, long-term needs. You
really focus in on those, then, within the university
itself, you try and order your own priorities to see
whether you can come to grips with societal
priorities.
The university ultimately should set its own
priorities, but it must be responsive to society.
The university should listen to Mr. Barrett, to other
political leaders, and to^the community at large. We
should examine what they are saying. Then, turn
around and see whether some of those things are
compatable with the nature of the university.
When the current government (NDP) revised the
Universities Act, they did insure that the university
was autonomous. I want to emphasize: we must be
sensitive and not oblivious to the needs of society.
This past year, arts and science and other faculties
did try to expand credit offerings into the evening. We
look forward to more of that. That's one clear-cut
example of where this university did listen to
Premier Barrett.
Next: Tolerance for Ambiguity
Return of the old ones to campus
Humanities protected from the social sciences
Kenny pays debt to society
The critical crunch.
Holocaust Blues #4
Yesterday ole Hayzoos
croaked or rose or both athose
But the stores were closed
so I couldn't drink no beer.
I stood out in front at church
just to hear the cheer
*
he had: two marks on his hands
where the vampires bit.
two marks on his feet
that's where his mama licked,
but no body in his grave cuz
that's where the angels sit.
F.O', Thursday, November 6, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Poo.5
Do colleges mask Dailly sores?
This is the second of a two-part
interview with education minister
Eileen Dailly as the NDP takes its
"good government campaign" to
the people in a provincial election.
By GARY COULL
One of the brighter spots in
education that Eileen Dailly will
likely be pointing to during the
upcoming provincial election is the
community colleges program.
Although she is busy defending
the 15 per cent budget increase
ceiling imposed last week, the
NDP government nonetheless has
committed itself to developing the
community college concept.
Since the NDP came to power,
five new colleges have been built in
B.C.
In an interview this week with
The Ubyssey, on the education
department and how it fits into the
NDP's "good government"
election theme, Dailly outlined a
"three-pronged" role the colleges
fill.
The colleges are more than a
gradual step between secondary
schools and the universities," she
said.
Colleges new
She said the colleges provide
students with a place to get the
first two years of their post-
secondary education without going
to universities.
In addition they offer vocational
training and "a response to what
the local community wants —
programs for the need in that
area."
Dailly added that the community
colleges also offer the chance for
many people to complete their high
school education in a way that
encourages people to return to
school.
The minister said students in
ROBINSON . . . hits mistakes
most areas of the province now
have the opportunity to attend
community colleges near their
homes. One of the steps which
made this possible, she continued,
was the NDP's removal of a taxpayer referendum to okay construction of new colleges.
Of all the education areas left in
a mess by the former Socred
government, the public school
sector was probably the worst.
"In the public schools, there was
more to be done at first," Dailly
said in response to a question about
what government education
priorities were in August 1972.
Socreds froze
She said the Socreds placed a
freeze on all school construction
"and they weren't building
libraries and gyms, for example."
Not only did the NDP lift the
freeze, Dailly said, but the
government has spent lots of
money (this year, $100 million) on
classroom construction.
The NDP government has also
removed the referendums formerly required in B.C. school
districts before more money could
be spent on capital and operating
costs   of   the   particular   school
system, she added.
This move, together with more
local input into curriculum, gives
greater autonomy to the school
boards, a longstanding wish of
many B.C. teachers.
Other improved areas of public
schools cited by Dailly during the
interview were:
• abandonment of a ceiling on
teacher's salaries imposed by the
Socreds. "We don't believe in
selecting controls which only affect
one sector."
• removal of the strap from the
public schools, which evoked a
widespread response from parents,
teachers and administrators. The
loudest reaction was the outcry
against the decision but Dailly and
the government stood by their 0flf||y talks
"philosophical" guns. '
system as a means of developing
students into "good citizens,"
equipping them with basic reading
and literary skills and developing
the cultural aspects of the individual.
In attempting to put across how
her ideas on the system can best
meet these ends, she has come up
against numerous critics.
However, she agrees with the
suggestion that if there is one thing
nearly everyone has an opinion on,
it's education.
• reduction of class sizes in B.C.
"from what was one of the highest
in Canada" to one of the lowest,
according to Dailly. She said when
the NDP took over the pupil-
teacher ratio stood at 22.7; it is now
19.82.
On her over-all philosophy
behind education in the public
schools, Dailly said she "has tried
to encourage the notion that every
child is unique ... a unique person."
Removal of the strap ("one of
the most difficult decisions") was
just one of the ways she believes
the government has improved the
atmosphere in which children
learn.
"If you want them to live
humanely, you must bring them up
humanely," she said.
Dailly said during her
discussions with parents and
teachers she has tried to encourage
more flexibility. This has meant
giving school boards the power to
implement flexible programs and
make the traditional system "a
more open structure."
Hires variety
She said she likes the idea of a
variety of programs, both
traditional and innovative, in each
school district to allow some
degree of choice by students and
parents.
"One of the most difficult things
to do as minister is to know how the
majority thinks . . . what the
average parent wants to see."
Dailly said repeatedly during the
interview that the education
minister must not be controlled by
"vocal minorities" and "interest
groups" which attempt to shape
B.C. education policy.
"You cannot allow vested interests to control the minister,"
she said, adding that the minister,
school boards, the cabinet and the
-provincial legislature are the
people elected to seek out public
opinion and make the final
decisions.
The minister said she has noticed
today's high school students are no
longer' as concerned with the
politics of education as much as the
quality of education they are
receiving.
"I've discovered over the last
three years there has been a
change in the high schools. When I
go out and talk to students they
aren't talking about participation
in decision-making as much any
more.
"They are worrying about
getting some of their basic skills
and being able to go on to
universities."
Dailly said she views the school
"I've talked with other education
ministers in Canada and no matter
what their political stripe there is
always controversy ... it's a
controversial portfolio."
Dailly said she has attempted to
give leadership on educational
issues and points to the strap
removal as one concrete example.
"I have attempted to make our
stands clear and have gone out to
speak to the people about them."
She said at another point,
"education is an area with so many
opinions and often one or two
controversial things obscure other
things."
One controversial area which
Dailly did not want to discuss was
the costly fiasco behind the hiring,
employment and eventual firing of
education commissioner John
Bremer.
Bremer was hired by the
government shortly after its accession to power to investigate
education in B.C., promote and
stimulate ideas on the subject and
come to the government with
recommendations.
Bremer set up a number of
commissions covering various
levels of education and started out
on his study. During his tenure,
Bremer did lots of talking, some of
which scared many of the more
traditional members of the
teaching establishment.
Bremer loses
At the same time, he (and not
Dailly) seemed to be the voice of
the education department and
there was some fear within NDP
circles that the minister was losing
her grip to an eloquent outsider.
One day Premier Barrett made
some comments on a TV talk show
about Bremer's performance and a
few days later the commissioner
was sent packing. As time and due
process would have it, Bremer
launched a law suit against Dailly
and Barrett, part of which is still
before the courts.
That, conveniently, is why the
minister can't discuss it right now.
It's lucky for Dailly and the NDP,
because the Bremer incident is one
of the blemishes on the education
department's face.
What followed the Bremer incident in the area of investigation
into education was even more
distressing. Stanley Knight was
hired to head a research and
development department in Victoria and a number of researchers
were hired to assist him.
It wasn't long before Knight was
also sent packing. The research
department people openly spoke
out against the structure of
Dailly's department after Knight
was fired and claimed that there
was resistance to any real change.
Amid all of this, Dailly seemed to
be faltering. There was no over-all
leadership in education, no long-
term plan for education in this
province.
In the interview Dailly said you
can't make educational changes
without taking the public along
with you.
"The general message about
research and development is to
move rather slowly and
cautiously. ..."
After Knight and his staff were
out, another study was done into
what research should be doing and
. . . well, what they decided doesn't
really matter at this point.
Has there been a lack of over-all
policy and philosophy, about
education in B.C. since the NDP
took over or has Dailly been
responding more to the issues as
they come up?
The minister said there is an
over-all policy.
"All I can repeat is that a record
of all our moves will show we have
a policy which we have followed."
She said the government has
fulfilled almost all their campaign
promises about education made in
1972. As major examples she cited
greater accessibility to higher
education and more local
autonomy and involvement in the
running of public schools.
But referring generally to some
of the areas for which she received
so much criticism, Dailly said:
"any minister, when you take over
any job you learn."
Biggest error
One of Dailly's biggest mistakes,
says Svend Robinson, an NDP
member active in education affairs
and a member of the UBC board of
governors, is that she didn't get rid
of trie Socred civil servants who
are "rife in the department."
•Robinson said in an interview the
Socred leftovers are the ones who
"carry out policy, yet they're
working against us."
"She hasn't had the guts to chop
them off."
Because the minister is busy in a
department that's probably too big
for one person to head, Robinson
says Dailly has to rely on them.
"She's definitely weak in not
removing them."
• Robinson says the NDP has
"significantly advanced important
steps in a number of educational
areas" such as granting more
autonomy to school boards,
reducing the pupil-teacher ratio
and increasing student aid.
But he said Dailly and her
department have been "weaker in
taking a broad look at some more
fundamental changes" in
education.
"She (Dailly) has an issue by
issue response rather than an overall view which is illustrated by her
handling of the research and
development section," he says.
Robinson, who denies rumors
that hevwill run in the provincial
election, said he would like to see a
"greater emphasis put on an overall view of education."
He added that the idea of a public
commission is not bad but when
Dailly picked Bremer "she picked
the wrong person."
"He was all talk and no action."
Dailly has been an MLA since
1966 and was the NDP's opposition
education critic at the height of the
Socred tyranny. There are some
rumors that Jean-Pierre Daem
will challenge Dailly for the
Burnaby-North NDP nomination.
Daem ran and lost as the NDP
candidate in the last federal
election in Burnaby-Richmond-
Delta.
Should Dailly win the
nomination, and at this point there
is little doubt she will, the voting in
Burnaby North might well be the
public's decision on whether
Barrett's "good government"
campaign theme also includes the
education department.
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APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA
731-4191 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 6, 1975
Hot flashes
Automated
creativity
The man behind the automatic
dog-walking machine, the elephant weighing device and other
implements essential to the future
of society will speak here at 8
p.m. Friday.
Edward de Bono, also known
for his books on creativity and
problem-solving, will speak on
lateral and creative thinking in
Instructional Resources Centre,
lecture hall 2.
Ah, England
Attention     all     you     history
freaks and political hacks following the fortunes of your counterparts in England.
Max Beloff, from Oxford
University, will ask the question Is
England Breaking Up?
The answers will be provided at
8:15 p.m. Saturday in Instructional Resources Centre
lecture hall 2.
Economically
American economist Sam
Bowles will present his own radical view of economics noon Friday in Brock 303.
Bowles, a subscriber to the
theory that traditional methods of
studying economics are trivial and
miss  the   point,   is  giving   a talk
entitled The Invisible Hand and
the Iron Fist: Economics as Ideology.
Women
A panel of four prominent
women will discuss the changing
function of women in modern
society, 8 p.m., Friday in SUB
ballroom.
The panel consists of sociologist Jessie Bernard, Jean Lipman-
Blumen of the Stanford Research
Institute, Gene Errington, B.C.
provincial co-ordinator of Status
of Women, and Freda Paltiel,
special advisor on status of
women in the federal department
of health and welfare.
'„»i,|
■JJ-'i
'Tween classes
TODAY
INTEGRITY
General meeting, guest speaker,
noon, Bu.    232.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Talk, the cries of a lion, noon, SUB
125.
FILMSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 247.
PRE-VET CLUB
Dr. Krishnamurti speaks on animal
disease, noon, Macmillan 158.
SIMS
Transcendental meditation introductory lecture by Denise Denni-
ston, author of The TM Book, 8
p.m., IRC 3.
CO-ED INTRAMURALS
Beer and chicken available for competitors after games, 7:30 p.m., War
Memorial Gym.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Terry Anderson talks on vision and
responsibility, noon, SUB 212.
SKI CLUB
General meeting, ski film, membership cards avaHable, noon, biology
2000.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Discussion group, what socialists
stand for, 7:30 p.m., SUB 213.
DECORATE WITH PRJNTS
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Practice, new members welcome,
5-7 p.m., Place Vanier ballroom.
AQUA SOC
General meeting, diving film, discussion of upcoming events, noon,
SUB 205.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Michael Griffiths, author of Cinderella with Amnesia, speaks, noon,
Bu. 100.
MUSIC.DEPARTMENT
Concert by university concert band,
Loren Marsteller conducts, noon,
Old auditorium.
CHARISTMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Larry Hurtado of Regent college
speaks on the body of Christ, 7:30
p.m., Lutheran campus centre
lounge.
FRIDAY
UBC DISCO
Free   disco   dancing   for  all   people
with two feet, 2:30-5:30 p.m., SUB
207.
SCI-FI CLUB
General  meeting,  repeat  on Barbar-
ella, possible election of scapegoats,
noon, SUB 216E.
CREATIVE WRITING
Poetry    performance,   noon,   Brock
206.
SPANISH CLUB
Party plans, noon, Brock 351A.
PSYCH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Park   Davidson   speaks   on   clinical
and  community  psych at  UBC, discussion, noon, Bu. 205.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Fight Bill 146, Ron Johnson, B.C.
Federation of Labor research director speaks,  8  p.m.,  1208 Granville.
SKYDIVING
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Concert by university concert band,
Loren Marsteller conducts, 8 p.m.,
Old Auditorium.
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Storeand Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs& Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
THE CENTRE
A Creative Alternative
Opens Friday, Nov. 7
with
FRED BOOKER
(Writer and Singer, of Chat Noir Fame)
AND
Cathy Webster
8:00-12:30   (Eve.) $1.00-Cover Charge
UNIV. BLVD. & WESTBROOK CRES.
ALL GRADUATING
COMMERCE & M.B.A. STUDENTS
Interested in an
employment interview with:
OLIVETTI CANADA LTD.
PLEASE CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE
Due to mail strike the pre-screening
program has been cancelled.
INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED NOV. 24 & 25.
HELENE
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4429 W. 10th Ave,,    224-6331
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 tines, 1 day $1.80; additional fines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
«MMi
5 — Coming Events
Photo/Darkroom   Courses
ir Color or B & W darkroom
techniques
+ Cibachrome prints from slides
if Basic camera techniques
10% OFF WITH AMS CARD
Classes start November 10-13
AMPRO  PHOTO WORKSHOPS
117 West  Broadway 876-5501
35 — Lost
COIN CLUB MEETING, Thurs., Nov. 6.
Kerrisdale Community Center, 42nd
Ave.  &  West Boulevard ■■— 8:00 p.m.
"THE   WORLD  IS  ONE  COUNTRY  and
Mankind Its Citizens." Baha'u'lah informal discussions on the Baha'i Faith
every Tues. night at 5606 President's
Row. Phone 224-7257.
11 — For Sale — Private
NATURAL B.C. FRESH HONEY. $10 per
gallon.  (Approx.  14 lb.) Ph.  733-7850.
1964 RAMBLER V8. Excellent condition,
snow tires, winterized, 65,000 miles.
$700.00 or best offer. 738-1593.
CALCULATOR TEXAS INSTRUMENT
SR-51. Still on warranty. $125.00 —
224-9933, Bar Evans.
STEREO-DYNACO SCA-80Q, 40 watts
rms./channel, white BD1000 turntable,
Shure M91-ED cartridge, Dynaco A-25
speakers. $400.00. 224-9933, Bar Evans.
FOR SALE: ONE PAIR K-2 Winter Heat
skis. 200-CM, one year old, excellent
shape. $65.00. Phont 736-0797 after
5 p.m.
ONE TICKET, HALIFAX - VAN. with
optional stop Toronto. Original price
$146, sell for $125. Toronto • Van.
portion $115.  Susan Yee, 876-9397.
LOST GOLD ID BRACELET. Sentimental
value. Reward. Contact Pam, 435-9272.
ORANGE PACK taken from Main. Return contents to Angus 302-C. No
questions asked. Glasses needed.
WOULD PERSON WHO borrowed Indian
sweater from Commerce Reno Night,
please return to SUB lost and found.
I need it.
50 — Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
70 — Services
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
80 — Tutoring
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basic. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
85-Typing
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING near 41st &
Marine Dr. 266-5053.
1-5 — Found
20 — Housing
SLEEPING ROOM $80-mo. Private home,
43rd & Dunbar. Tel. days: 228-5858 —
evenings: 263-0387.
LIVE    IN   A   FRATERNITY   HOUSE   —
single $95. double $60. Available now!
2280 Wesbrook, 224-9679, Ron.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
EFFICIENT  ELECTRIC  TYPING  — my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat, accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90-Wanted
RIDE TO CASTLEGAR or nearby —
wanted Friday after 10:30. Share, gas,
driving.   Phone   Will,   263-0272.
99 — Miscellaneous
20 PERSON CABIN on HoUyburn Mountain on the North Shore. Mid-week
$40 per night, weekend $50 per night.
926-2224.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM lauuy,   i-><uv<7lMuer   o,    |7/g
IHt       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Double daycare spaces, c'tee says
A president's ad hoc committee
on daycare facilities at UBC has
called for almost a 100 per cent
increase in the number of spaces
available for children.
The report from the 10-member
committee set up* by former administration president Walter
Gage was tabled by UBC's board of
governors at its meeting Tuesday.
The committee concluded from
the current daycare waiting list
and a questionnaire that there is "a
distinct need for expansion of
daycare facilities. At the present
time there appears to be a need for
daycare places for 125 children."
The UBC campus currently has
eight   daycare  centres   with   ac
commodation for 144 children
between the ages of 18 months and
five years.
It was recommended that
daycare facilities be expanded
initially through conversion of huts
in Acadia Camp which are not
currently being used for daycare
or student housing.
U of M students continue strike
MONTREAL (CUP) — University of Montreal students are continuing their strike despite any injunction granted to the administration Tuesday.
The injunction prohibits any
occupation, picket lines, general
meetings or other action which
would impede free access to
classes.
Last week 8,000 U of M students
walked out in support of sociology
students at that university who had
been occupying the department
offices to protest the course content offered.
Students want course changes to
allow more study of relevant
material and want more student
participation in curriculum
decisions.
Students won a partial victory
Monday when the administration
granted the department $6,000 to
begin a pilot program for upper
year students.
This would satisfy current
demands by most students for the
time being, according to the
student assembly.
The issue, however, now seems
to have shifted from the sociology
AMS dips into fund
From page 1
He said this year's deficit will be
covered by dipping into half the
society's reserve funds of $88,000.
But he said the reserves would be
depleted by next year if students
don't approve the proposed fee
increase.
"If this doesn't pass we're
literally up the old creek. This
($3.50) is the minimum amount."
He warned that even if the fee
hike is approved, it would only
keep the AMS going for another
three or four years. "After that,
we're faced with the same deficit
situation again unless something is
done about the deficit."
Coulson said $3 of the proposed
hike would be . eaten up by
mushrooming administrative
costs, mostly due to inflation.
Councillors voted to add the
additional 50 cents after coordinator    Nadine    McDonnell
pointed out that otherwise "clubs
won't have enough money to expand or buy new equipment."
The special club allocation was
supported • after AMS president
Jake van der Kamp told council
"you'd get every  club  member
voting for it (the referendum)."
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
BOOK EVENT
OF THE
YEAR
WED. NOV. 12
AT
BROCK HALL
i in
unlimited
9IO RODSOn
666-9136
If mother
nature didn't
give you curly
hair . . .
WE CAN
SPECIAL DISCOUNT
10%
U.B.C. STUDENTS
(with A.M.S. Card)
WHITE TOWER PIZZA & SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
' Steaks - Pizza - Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli - Rigatoni - Chicken
Lobster • Ribs
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs
4:00 p.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sun.
4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
738-9520
or 738-1113
3618 W. Broadway
W. VANCOUVER   -
1552 Marine Drive
926-8521
DOWNTOWN - WEST END
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11:00 a.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sunday
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
688-5491
1 359 Robson
CHARGEX —
MASTER CHARGE
Dining Lounge- Full Facilities - Take Out or Home Delivery
"Late delivery call V2 hour before closing time."
department's course content to
student rights and their objection
to the injunction.
Other student organizations and
the Quebec student union have
indicated that if the injunction is
enforced there could be a call for a
general walkout by all Quebec
students.
Already students at the
University of Quebec at Montreal
have called a three-day strike in
support of U of M students.
At a meeting of the Universities
Assembly, which regroups all the
high-ranking university administrators, a formal motion of
blame was passed against
university rector Paul Lacoste.
The administrators blamed
Lacoste for not sufficiently consulting with the sociology department and the rest of the administration before calling for an
injunction.
Most student associations will
meet this week to decide what
action to take.
"... the committee was aware
of the fact that the report of the
Universities' Council effectively
curtailed the option of large scale
expansion from the university's
capital budget."
The report says expansion
through conversion of the huts "is
the most promising direction" at
the moment but that eventually
"the daycare centres will be forced
to relocate as the present structures reach the stage where the
cost of maintenance far exceeds
their worth."
To finance construction of new
daycare facilities in the future, the
committee recommends the
university investigate the
possibilities of major financing
through such agencies as Central
Mortgage and Housing.
Noting that the UBC administration recently allocated
$20,000 for upgrading the conditions in daycare huts, "the
committee urged that these units
be maintained in good repair, not
merely minimal repair."
Day-to-day operation costs of
existing   facilities   come   from
parent's fees. "These centres run
effectively as independent
organizations and the committee
feels they should continue to
operate in this manner."
In addition, some minimal
maintenance and servicing costs
are picked up by the university,
says the report.
The report also points out that
since the daycare centres operate
on a partially co-operative basis,
the needs of staff, faculty and
single parents are often not met.
"While staff and faculty can find
evening and weekend time for
most of the (necessary) tasks,
their day schedules are usually not
flexible enough to allow them to
put in the required time.
"For this reason alone, more
than any other, they are unable to
meet most of the basic
requirements for admission and
have to forego the benefits of
daycare for their children."
The board tabled the report until
its December meeting to give
administration vice-president
Erich Vogt a chance to review the
recommendations.
Henneken Auto
Your German Car Specialist
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine)
263-8121
C & C SPORTS
RACQUET SALE
10% OFF
ALL RACQUETS
With a copy
of this ad
Open 4 - 9 Thurs. & Fri.
9-4Sat.; 12-6 Sun.
3616 W. 4th
OFFER EXPIRES NOV. 30, 1975
YUEH YANG PALACE
NORTHERN & SOUTHERN CUISINE
HMSUM" LUNCH EVERY DAY FROM 11:30 A.M.
2142 Western Parkway, University Village
FREE DELIVERY (Min. $4.00) - 224-3144
HOURS:
Mon. -Thur. - 11:30 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Fri. - Sat. - 11:30 a.m. -1:00 a.m.
Sun. — 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.
GRAND OPENING - SATURDAY, NOV. 8
if******************************
Got A Function?
Need Entertainment?
CALL US!
GARY — KEN — PAUL
669-3634
Some of our groups
STEEL • • • •  KARROLL BROTHERS * * * *  BOUNTY
• • • •  COOKE • * * *   BRUCE MILLER BAND  • • * *
PRIVILEGE * * * * MOSHOW * • • • TACOY RIDE
* * * * ANDROMEDA * • * *  BIG SHOT * * • •
GREAT CANADIAN RIVER RACE * * * *  FREEWAY
* * * *  HICKORY * • * * JAYSON HOOVER • • • *
* MOSES * * * •   SPUNK • • • • CLOUD * * * *   STORM   *
* STUDIO CITY MUSICAL LTD. *
* IMo. 323 - 811 Beach Ave., Vancouver "*
** Vancouver - Edmonton — Calgary — Spokane — Los Angeles — Winnipeg "T*
j^-                                           Members of Canadian National Booking Association ^c
*•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••* Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 6, 1975
^^P^^^^^^^^^^^S
W&'w Aoinqit
at
BROCK HALL
from   Nov. 12th to 29th
-fiction, non-fiction, best sellers, classics.art & cookbooks,
text books,children's books - hard covers & paperbacks
ALL AT TREMENDOUS SAVINGS
shop early - a great opportunity to buy Christmas presents
&¥:
\hd\d
BROCK HALL, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Monday thru Friday 9 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.-5p.m.
S&S&&&
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^^^^^^^^^^^^

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