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The Ubyssey Nov 23, 1982

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Array Vote passes, fees up $20
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Students voted overwhelmingly
in favor of a $20 increase in Alma
Mater Society student fees in last
week's referendum.
In a near record turnout, 8,838
students voted 75 per cent for the
increase — the second operating fee
increase since World War II.
Students also gave council control
over $15 per student for capital projects each year.
AMS president Dave Frank seemed pleased with the result but said
there is still work to be done.
Students placed eight projects in
order of priority during balloting.
Lower capital projects numbers indicate greater preference. The rankings for spending the $15 capital
portion are:
• On campus student housing —
31,044.
• Preventing the closure of
daycare — 34,655.
• Development of athletic
facilities — 34,919.
• Development of space under
SUB plaza — 35,170.
• Parkade by Gage towers —
35,286.
• Sprinkler system in SUB, if
needed — 39,178.
• Purchase of the land under the
Whistler cabin —45,121.
• Renovation of the B-lot barn
— 46,598.
Another $3 of the $20 increase
goes to the intramural program and
$2 goes to the AMS general
operating budget.
"We're looking at housing
first," said Frank. "We've got to
think about all of them but we're
starting at the top."
Frank said priorities two through
five would have to be looked at collectively because they got similar
levels of support.
"The whole thing is going to be
looked at to see what can be done
now and what can be done later,"
he said.
The last priorities on the list need
as much thought as the first ones
said Frank. "We have to work out
how not to spend money on them
and still keep our options open."
Housing director Mary Flores
said the result was "fantastic."
"I have some hope that the AMS
will look at the Gage lowrise pro-
UBC wooed
By SARAH COX
The TV cameras bore down
angrily on Michael Clark, the
organizer of a meeting Monday between B.C. business people, university representatives and Pentagon
officials. A reporter from CBC
demanded to know why the two-
day seminar on the defence industry, held at the Robson Square
Media Centre, could not be filmed
or recorded by the media.
Clark took an uncomfortable
step backwards. "All the military
speakers from the United States
have asked that they not be
filmed," said Clark, who works for
the B.C. ministry of industry and
small business development.
"I didn't pursue their exact
motives," he said later at a press
conference. "There is an internal
video taping that the U.S. army is
taking. We don't even get to see
that."
Organizers said the conference is
the first of its kind and will allow
delegates to meet with officials
from the U.S. army, navy and air
force on a one-to-one basis to
discuss research and development
contracts.
Although it is not a major focus
of the conference, the talks could
affect research at UBC.
"Canada is the only country
whose defense industry is considered part of the U.S. mobilization base," Tom Chell, Canadian
assistant undersecretary of state,
told 250 suit-clad delegates at the
beginning of the seminar.
"(The seminar) will provide an
opportunity for companies and
universities to compete for research
and development contracts." Chell
emphasized Canada's co-operation
with the U.S. in defence production, a 40-year-old relationship
sponsored by both federal governments.
Defence department official Marvin Steam addressed potential
customers with a friendly American
drawl. He urged delegates to not
fear the complicated bureaucracy of
the Pentagon.
"You've got to focus in on the
items that you think you are most
competitive in. The only way you
can market effectively is to touch
flesh with people who know who
you are. You must make us realize
that you have personal and financial commitment to the program."
Delegates were shaken at the first
coffee break when they were in
formed by the moderator that a
bomb threat had been phoned to
CBC and the Vancouver Sun.
Police had combed the media centre
and conference room earlier that
morning, he assured the worried
delegates.
"I'm not representing the university," UBC chemistry professor
Mel Comisarow said nervously as
he gulped his coffee and reached for
a cigarette. "I'm looking for information. My research interests
overlap with the U.S. department
of defence. I'm here just to find out
about programs for funding.
"Providing the work is of sound
academic quality, I see no reason
why UBC should not do research
for the U.S. department of defence.
There is no classified research at
UBC. Or, if there is, I don't know
about it."
UBC is currently researching at
least two Pentagon-sponsored
research projects. The chemistry
department is studying a layer of
the stratosphere which could affect
communications among satellites,
and the oceanography department
is researching ocean turbulence, an
important factor in submarine warfare.
Pat McGeer, minister of universities, science and technology, attended the morning session, but
wore no name tag and refused to
answer reporters' questions. "We
aren't, as politicians, actively participating in the seminar," he said
later.
"This (seminar) doesn't contribute to the arms race," he said.
"I'm a dove on these matters, but
I'd like to be a well-armed dove. We
are not here to build nuclear
weapons — that goes on in Russia.
posal that the university has
developed," she said.
The AMS could provide the seed
money for the housing," she said.
"I am certainly glad students
have given housing a priority," said
Flores. She added it is "nice"
students today are thinking about
students of tomorrow.
Daycare coordinator Mab
Oloman said "we're thrilled, we're
really happy, we're all running
around very happy."
"We're not sure what the AMS is
going to with daycare," said
Oloman. They might help to pay
back the $270,000 loan daycare has
from the administration, she said.
Oloman added, "we would like
to thank everyone for voting."
Robert Hindmarch, athletics and
sports services director was "very
excited" and "delighted" with the
result and congratulated council.
He said an all-weather field and
lighting is important. "In my mind
that would be No. 1," Hindmarch
said.
He also cited squash courts, better locker and changing facilities
and a multi-use field house as
priorities.
Intramurals director Nestor Korchinsky said "I am pleased the
referendum passed with the margin-
that it did."
He said that two-thirds of the approximately $75,000 extra for intramurals would go towards administration and the immense
volume of paperwork and
duplicating costs involved when 35
per cent of the student population
participates in the program.
Korchinsky said that all of the
athletic facilities named by the
athletic director are necessary —
especially   the   all-weather   field.
Parking committee chair Ken
Denike, said AMS money for parking would go into a sinking fund
already established by staff and
faculty. He said a parkade built on
the lot beside SUB would have a
capacity of about 1,100 cars.
Dave Frank said "nothing is happening until we have considered
every one of these things."
He said some decisions will be
made by the new year with housing
analyzed by then.
The increase will be added to
1983-84 AMS fees.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 21
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November23,1982
228-2301
CANADA'S   GESTAPO . . .
in great democratic tradition,
films people protesting Pentagon penetration of B.C.
universities and businesses.
— doug Schmidt photos
Defence seminar attacked
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Peaceniks, placards and police
swarmed Robson Square Monday
as demonstrators tried to disrupt
the opening of the Pentagon sponsored seminar on the defence industry.
While police filmed the noon-
hour rally, about 250 people
chanted anti-war slogans and carried placards such as "Normaloids
against the Pentagon" and "Omnicide is no way to make your mark
in life."
Throughout the day,
demonstrators wore radiation suits,
gas masks, black and white skull
makeup and buttons condemning
the cruise missile and promoting
peace.
At the rally, which was organized
about two days earlier on an ad-hoc
basis, one protestor wore a Trudeau
mask. He climbed on top of the old
courthouse steps and extended his
middle finger to police film crews
who hid in the bushes across the
street. A Ubyssey photographer
took pictures of the officers but was
warned: "We're gonna bust your
camera."
Impromptu speakers criticized
Canada's compliance with the Pentagon and chastised the seminar's
Why did the vote pan?
By CRAIG BROOKS
After three years of trying, the Alma Mater Society
has finally succeeded in passing a fee increase
referendum.
Past referendums have either failed to reach a
Analysis
quorum, or have been narrowly defeated. A fee
decrease vote passed two years ago.
So what made this time different?
AMS president Dave Frank, who labelled this vote
"do or die," and his cohorts must take credit for a
much improved information and lobbying campaign
this time around.
AMS executives and student council members talked to numerous classes, clubs, undergraduate
societies and special interest groups.
And here lay their secret for success — there was
simply something for everyone in this year's vote.
Previous votes in 1980 and 1981 were for specific
capital building projects on campus. However, as
voting results showed, the northern end of campus
voted against anything they wouldn't use at the
southern end and vice versa. Coupled with the
general anti-AMS vote, and apathy on the part of
clubs, these votes went down to defeat.
See page 2: EVERYONE
organizers   for   not   allowing   the
public into the media centre.
UBC graduate Gene Long said
seminar delegates had the perception that the demonstrators were on
the fringe of society. "The real terrorists are across the street and
downstairs," he said.
Bill Ethell, a participant in the
blockade which tried to stop the
USS Ohio from entering its Trident
base in Bangor, Wash., stressed the
importance of grassroots involvement. "It's the bricklayers and
candlestick makers of this world
who are going to bring about
peace."
During the rally, about 15 protestors staged a die-in outside an entrance to the centre. They lay on the
cement, forcing delegates to wade
through the bodies as they made
their way in and out of the centre.
Afterward a group of youths infiltrated the building and clung to
the screen which blocked entrance
to the seminar. They howled and
wailed at the delegates and called
them "murderers." An undercover
security guard wearing a trenchcoat
darted up to the screen and snapped
pictures of the moaning
demonstrators, who in return gave
him the finger. Startled food fair
patrons stared at the scene with less
than amusement. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1982
Everyone gets involved
From page 1
This time, lobbying paid off as
clubs mobilized their vote to record
the second highest voter turnout in
AMS history.
The ski club was bent on saving
the $400,000 Whistler cabin, the
dance club wanted more space to
practise, the agriculture
undergraduate society wanted to
save the B-lot barn, photo soc
wanted enlarged facilities, an evergrowing intramurals program
urgently needed cash, and daycare
faced closing down.
Another secret to passing the vote
was intramurals. With thousands of
UBC students involved, the referendum was guaranteed a large "yes"
vote, despite the program being only $3 of the $20 vote.
And snuck through, was a
general AMS fee increase. Since
1949, the AMS fee has only gone up
once, by $1.50 in 1979. Very little
explanation was given of this increase, other than "it is needed to
counter inflation." Obviously
voters felt $2 to an unknown was
negligible when compared to the
overall $20 fee.
But the vote outcome was never
really in doubt — the AMS had seen
to that.
With   a  procedure  that  allows
Come See
The
WallsCome
Tumbling
Down at
The Lethe
REMEMBER:
There is no problem,
however complicated,
which, when you look
at it in the right
way, does not become
still more complicated.
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
REGGAE
Comes To UBC
WUSC
Presents
I&I
This Friday
NOVEMBER 26th
8:30-12:30
SUB
PARTY ROOM
Tickets On Sale
At The
AMS TICKET
CENTER
Min. Age 19
elections committee members to
know how the vote is progressing in
terms of Yes/No during the polling
week, it became common
knowledge the vote was passing.
Elections committee members,
some of whom were actively involved in the Yes campaign, also intentionally tried to snuffle the campus
media regarding election progress.
A Nov. 9 memo to The Ubyssey
and CITR radio outlined a regulation from the AMS code of procedure which prohibited the
publication or airing of "letters or
articles regarding the referendum"
during polling week.
The rule does not exist.
Elections committee chair Donna
Chow and interim administration
director Alexis Cherkezoff told
Ubyssey staff members this included any articles regarding the vote.
They later changed their position to
allow "Information articles."
Cherkezoff said this would include articles about voting and campaign irregularities, and more.
Tham are just some things no sett-respecting grey box would do. Grey boxes offw biting
wit, astute, relevant analysis and take up space. Grey bones don't-take pictures. Grey boxes
don't wear uniforms. Grey boxes" don't guard doers to public bu!o»>gs. Grey boxes don't
sneak around with television cameras, taking pictures of concerned citizens exercising their
right to free speech. . .Police people do. We love grey boxes. We don't love cops. You'll
never takes us aflve!
SWAMPED?
Save some time.
Let me help you find the information your
essays require.
BEVERLEY SCOTT, librarian
733-3657
HARGDUftN
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Oj3fx3u4 **«•** ftecessayy  (CxpiViVvg B|s+l>€c. Wg&)
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57?4 WfcWe/si+yT S/d* Vo-mcouv-s/*&c.
B 224-9116     224-1922 K Tuesday, November 23, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
McMaster union adopts controls
HAMILTON (CUP) — Charges of
racism and sexism against
McMaster University student
publications have prompted the student union to develop formal
guidelines on advertising and
publishing.
But the guidelines are not meant
to bring in censorship, said Kathi
Popaleni, a member of the
Students' Representative Assembly,
that governs the McMaster Student
Union. Popaleni said the guidelines
are meant to clear up any uncertainties that currently surround the sensitive areas of advertising and
publishing.
The guidelines stem from an incident last spring when a McMaster
ethnic student group accused the
MSU of distributing a racist poster.
The SRA did not respond to the
charge so the group lodged a formal
complaint with the Ontario Human
Rights Commission.
Although the commission ruled
in favour of the MSU, the union
decided it should develop criteria
for judging the acceptability of
material it publishes.
"If a club or an organization of
the MSU has printed up material
such as posters or an ad in The
FOLLOWING CONTINUED STUNNING losses this weekend, women's basketball acquired startling sky-hook
Bonny, pictured above. Bonny, slam dunk champ, started benumbed players and team coach, dunking
basketballs behind her head. "Golly gee," Bonny replied when asked. Bonny is expected to be a tower of power
at center position: she has 3.5m vertical leap and pinpoint passing. She finds ball large, but "look out
Dr. J.," she said when asked.
West loves Canada, won't separate
elect strong provincial governments to represent their
interests," he said. Meekison added that strong provincial governments have now become the regional
representatives of the West, since there are only two
federal Liberal MPs from the West.
Meekison said the 1981 constitutional debate
brought Western alienation to a point.
The veto right that Quebec and Ontario would have
had was totally unacceptable to the Western provinces,
he said. The new amending formula treats provinces
equally based on population, with no veto right, he
said.
Meekison was a participant in the federal-provincial
constitutional talks.
The federal senate needs to be restructured, since it
is currently heavily Eastern dominated, he said. The
new structure might be similar to the U.S. senate, or it
might be elected at-large, he said.
The Western Canada Concept party learned its
separatist learning won't catch on. Meekison said.
"If anything, they tried to rid themselves of the image of being a separatist party. Campaign literature
stressed they were working for effective representation
and equality for all Canadians," Meekison said.
By CRAIG BROOKS
Western Canadians will never accept Western
separation as a political alternative, an Alberta civil
servant said Saturday.
"The separatist alternative is not one that Western
Canadians will embrace," Peter Meekison, Alberta's
deputy minister for intergovernment affairs, told 300
people in IRC 2.
Meekison, a UBC mechanical engineering graduate,
said Western alienation has been building up over the
twentieth century.
The original attitude of Eastern Canada was to
treat the West as a "hinterland" to provide raw
materials and a captive market for Eastern products.
Battles for control over resources, tariff and trade
policies, energy, and, more recently, the constitutional
debate and national energy program helped lead to the
alienation, he said.
"Western Canadians want to be part of the
mainstream of the decision-making process in Canada,
both economically and politically. Far from wanting to
get out of Canada, they want to get into Canada,"
Meekison said.
"The people of Western Canada will continue to
Silhouette (the student newspaper)
that is seen as sexist or racist by
another MSU member, the MSU
should have a policy to condone it
or not," Popaleni said.
The issue currently focuses on a
series of advertisements run in The
Silhouette for Han.-ahan's, a
Hamilton burlesque-style pub. The
question is not so much whether the
advertisement is sexist, said
Popaleni, but whether there is an
MSU policy that would determine
it.
"I am not advocating censorship
and I am well aware that this issue
involves problems," she said.
"After all, what I find offensive
won't be seen in the same light by
someone else."
A major difficulty with this
policy is defining racism and sexism
to suit everyone, said Bob Jarecki,
student ombudsperson. Jarecki said
he has not had many complaints
about racist or sexist publications
on campus, although this does not
mean he finds no need for a policy
on the issue.
MSU vice-president Walter
Mykytyshyn said an SRA committee reviewing the issue "is talking
about the possibility of a public inquiry."
Mykytyshyn said he recognizes
the danger of infringing on the
freedom of the press, but the MSU
"stands to lose credibility" if it
does not actively stand behind its
convictions.
UBC faculty and
students all lose
UBC students and faculty did not
fare well in Saturday's Vancouver
civic election.
Brian Barber, education 3, failed
to win a place on the Vancouver
school board. Barber received
22,383 votes and came second last
in polling.
Tim Louis, law 3, came within
8,000 votes of winning a park board
seat. Louis got 34,986 votes to come
eleventh in a field of 17. There were
seven park board seats up for grabs.
Math professor and city council
incumbent Nathan Divinsky, who
barely got on council in 198C, came
in at number 13. Divinsky had
previously been school board chair.
Physics professor Karl Erdman
received 41,644 votes but came in
eleventh for the nine person school
board.
Geography professor Ken
Denike received 39,974 votes and
placed thirteenth for school board.
Divinsky, Erdman, and Denike
were all running for the civic Non-
Partisan Association.
Louis ran for the Committee of
Progressive Electors, while Barber
was an independant.
The UBC poll saw a turnout of
only 150. University endowment
lands residents could only vote for
school board.
COPE'S Pauline Weinstein topped the UBC poll with 124 votes.
COPE running-mates Gary Onstad,
Wes Knapp, Philip Rankin, Mike
O'Neill and Frank Fuller topped the
poll, in that order.
Barber got 30 votes at the UBC
poll.
Litton cruises on
MONTREAL (CUP) — Seventy-
two people, including several
students, were arrested in a Remembrance Day attempt to halt production of the Cruise missile guidance
system at Litton Industries' Toronto plant.
A coalition of anti-nuclear
groups organized the action to protest the Canadian government-
subsidized manufacture of the
cruise guidance system at Litton.
The government is using public
money to build the Cruise missile,
which is "not a defensive weapon,
but an offensive weapon," said
Janet Mrenica, a Concordia
University student who was arrested. "I don't believe in that."
About 500 protesters were
prevented by 200 to 300 police officers from closing the plant by
blocking access to the building.
About 150 protesters risked arrest
as they set up human blockades at
two intersections near the plant.
Police moved in at one intersection as soon as the blockade was
established. Concordia University
student John Kinlock was pushed
by police and challenged on his first
attempt to block the road. Kinlock
and two of the protests' coordinators were the first to be arrested.
Police  re-routed  traffic  at  the
other intersection. One motorist
said "they have a point, but I've got
to get to work. My boss is right
behind me."
Many protesters were dragged by
the arms, legs or hair. Some were
shoved to the ground. Others were
angry that police horses came
perilously close to protesters sitting
on the road.
"After the first movement, the
cops got a little rough," said
McGill University student Julien
Haddoch. "They threw some people on top of others and then they
got heavy with the horses. 1 think
they realized that they weren't going to scare us with one rough tactic."
"It's the police who are the
obstructors, they set up the barricades," said another protester.
"It's surprising to see how protected Litton is, and how vulnerable
and unprotected we are, except in
our numbers."
The Nov. 11 demonstration was
the largest ever held at Litton and
the first since a bomb was
detonated in front of the plant Oct.
14, allegedly by a group calling
itself Direct Action. The group
stated in a communique released
after the blast that they are
unrelated to any peace group.
Bonzo goes to campus
(RNR/CUP) — The Pentagon, which cut back on military contracts
to American colleges during the Vietnam war years, is now spending
money on campuses in record amounts.
The American Friends Service Committee says some 250 schools
are now receiving over SI billion per year for military-related work.
Nearly half of that money goes to just two universities: Johns
Hopkins and the Massachussetts Institute of Technology.
The Quaker research group says the Pentagon is trying to "buy its
way back onto college campuses," a charge denied by the Pentagon,
which says "the purpose of the program is to contribute to a strong
national technological base." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23, 1982
Police state? Here?
If this is an example of how they "defend freedom," then we are all in
big trouble.
The two-day defence seminar that concludes today at Robson Square is
a simple and blatant lesson on how the military and everything it stands for
deprive people of liberty while claiming to protect it.
Robson Square was so covered with blue uniforms Monday that it looked like the taping of a Hollywood cop show. But those boys in blue were
the real thing, and they taught more than a few people about democracy.
Pentagon-style.
While demonstrators exercised their democratic right to dissent, Vancouver's finest were lurking in the bushes across the street, taking
photographs and filming the rally.
Is the State so afraid of the people that it must make such an effort to
find out who isn't going to be supportive when the next war breaks out?
What is the Pentagon so afraid of? Ideas? Free thinkers? Placards?
And what of the policemen-turned-photographers? Do they think that
by such actions they are enhancing much touted "democratic traditions"?
They certainly provided answers to those questions. When a Ubyssey
photographer dared to take pictures of the police in action, they threatened
to break his camera. Caught in the act, like adolescents masturbating.
When our same intrepid reporter began taking notes while the police
discussed their activities with city council member Bruce Yorke (no doubt
one of the commies the fuzz wanted to get goods on — and why not, he is
a commie after all), the police told him to "fuck off." Not that it is surprising that the officers know how to swear — they learn that well enough
when they beat up hippies.
But the fact is that our society allows people such as this to "protect" us
and to provide us with "security." The mentality of the police was also the
mentality of the people inside the seminar — if people oppose you shut
them out, or better yet intimidate them.
The doors between different areas of the media center were either locked or guarded — by up to five policemen. Movement for the media wasn't
necessarily restricted though, just slower and more selective. But it still
typifies the military mentality of limiting information available to the public.
As for the Pentagon officials, they carried themselves with the snuff arrogance of absolute rulers, as they no doubt see themselves.
During one of the seminar's coffee breaks a CKVU reporter asked a U.S.
Pentagoid what he thought about the bomb scare earlier that morning.
No comment.
Later, at a press conference which was hastily called after protest
rumors grew and bomb scares passed without notice, the Canadian external affairs ministry gave the official U.S. line.
"They don't want to comment on what is essentially a Canadian
domestic problem." Well. Sorry we asked.
If all this surveillance brings up visions of an English-speaking SS, don't
panic. We're still a democracy and the politicians will protect us.
That is why our own beloved universities minister Pat McGeer announced to the demonstrators that Tuesday the seminar would be closed to the
media. As befits our great democracy, the source of the decision was not
revealed.
Thanks Pat. And all you others. You're a credit to your government. As
for our American, Pentagon friends — take a running leap off the USS
Ohio.
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Letters
Herpes scare tasteless and irresponsible
The phony Herpes scare article
published in The Ubyssey on Nov.
16, is the most tasteless and irresponsible piece of journalism I
have ever seen.
Last years' phony article, which
purported that the computer had
destroyed all academic records, was
witty, plausible and in the end, funny. This year's effort, a poor
sophomoric imitation of National
Lampoon, was obviously the effort
of some repressed puerile mind.
The humour in it depends heavily
on the perception of Herpes as a
sexually transmitted disease,
therefore supposedly immoral, dirty and something to snicker at.
In light of the current hysteria
about Herpes, publishing it was ex
tremely irresponsible. When I
challenged Ubyssey staffers about
it, they snickered, said there were
"lots of clues that it was fake" and
one asked me if I had Herpes (I
don't). Even with the clues that the
article was false, the perception was
spread that Herpes is some kind of
plague that should be reacted to
with hysteria, along with the
perception that a pool epidemic was
plausible, which is completely false.
Even with a retraction, this kind
of story contributes to the uninformed Herpes hysteria that is
sweeping the country. This hysteria
is a direct result of sensational journalism by publications like Time
and Reader's Digest. Meanwhile,
the efforts of clinics and research
facilities, like the excellent one here
at UBC, go un-noted. Fortunately
this week there has been some
responsible journalism in Vancouver on Herpes.
The Province magazine, Sunday
Nov. 14 had an excellent article
which destroyed much of the
popular superstition about Herpes.
The people at the UBC Herpes
clinic are trying very hard to beat
through fear and superstition only
to have some ignorant person like
Lori Banham spread more fear and
misinformation.
For Herpes sufferers too, this is
cruel and irresponsible. The Province article relates how many of
them already feel like lepers.
Ridiculing their condition cannot
help.
The staff of The Ubyssey should
smarten up, and examine their journalistic ethics. Articles like this
reveal the hollowness of the pompous and moralistic little statements
that emanate from Canadian
University Press conventions about
the sensationalism of the capitalist
press. At least when Thomson and
Southam get ridiculous and offensive, I can withhold my quarter.
Joke obviously joke
r~
THE UBYSSEY
November 23, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not nscessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/05. Advertising 228-3977/78.
"Defence, defence, defence!" chanted Sarah Cox and Muriel Draaisma in unison as Peter
Berlin pondered philosophically whether they were referring to football or Pentagon contracts. "Nuke jocks," they hollered with reckless abandon, and Pete had his answer. Lisa
Morry angrily denounced American militarism while Gen Sanford and Keith Baldrey did
pushups in preparation for the day revolution would arrive. Craig Brooks complained he had
herpes, but could not be heard above the din created by Alison Hdens and Rick Katz as they
verbosely praised Doug Schmidt for his hitherto unknown shutterbug abilities. Stephen
wisenthal and Phil Kueber, two devoted admirers of the democratic process, sat trying to
remember how they had voted in the previous week's referendum. "Don't worry, football is
all that matters," chipped in Harry Hertscheg and Monte Stewart in some profound advice
from sports desk. Just then Kevin Finnegan and Scott McDonald phoned from Toronto,
home of libertarian impulses. "Toronto, Toronto!" bellowed Arnold Hestrom, "I don't want
to hear anymore bullshit about direct action or anarchy." Brian Jones seemed not to hear, as
he sat quietly in„the corner talking with Emma.
Last year it was the Great Computer Screw-Up Scare. This year,
Herpes Aqueous I in the swimming
pool (and in the Pope's holy
water!).
Come off it, guys, sometimes a
joke is just too obviously a joke,
but still as funny as hell!
Of course, I'd be willing to take
such a ridiculous story a bit more
seriously if I knew that BOTH
Reagan and Falwell were in town at
the same time (watch out for that,
Vancouver!). But then, some of us
are too pressed for time to fully
read an article which could "create
unjustifiable confusion and anxiety."
If you can't be bothered to read
the whole thing, then why do you
bother to pick up a paper at all?
Were you also too busy to vote on
the referendum last week? Both of
these subjects should concern any
UBC student, so not being "patient
enough" to read the rest of the article is no excuse for falling for such a
laugher.
In the meantime, to Scott
Mendelson and Farzin Mokhtarain
(and others), if you are so willing to
be suckered by that ridiculous concoction, I'll let you in on a deal. I
happen to own a particular suspension bridge which traverses Burrard
Inlet at First Narrows. I'm willing
to sell it any my own personal loss
to a particularly discriminating type
of buyer . . .
And to you mutants at The
Ubyssey, if you ever print such an
obvious load of horse gonads again,
I'll be forced to cancel my subscription. Come to think of it, your vile
rag is free. Oh well, carry on, then.
Chris Richardson
computer science 2
Students at UBC are forced to
pay for this sort of trash whether
they like it or not. The Ubyssey is
blessed with editorial freedom and a
guaranteed source of cash. Students
expect something enlightening, intelligent and witty in return. We expect controversy and divergent
viewpoint, but socially irresponsible
trash like the Herpes article cannot
be supported.
If The Ubyssey wishes to continue publishing this crap, it should
allow students to opt out of paying.
John Harris
history 3
Letters should be as brief as
possible, and typed on a 70 space
line. If your letter isn't printed, it
could be because it wasn't typed, or
it didn't have proper identification,
or it was the fiftieth letter that week
on creationism, fundamentalism,
abortion or boring political platforms of an extremist nature.
Letters must contain your name,
student number, phone number,
faculty and year, and affiliation if
appropriate. The Ubyssey reserves
the right to edit for brevity, taste,
libel, grammar and spelling. Sexist
or racist letters will not run.
Please address letters to the
newspaper staff because there is no
Editor, and if there was one,
chances are 51-49 that "Sir" might
be a woman.
If you have any questions or
gripes, drop by the office, SUB
241k, or call us at 228-2301. Tuesday, November 23, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Seminar on methods of death and destruction
One of the significant business
opportunities for British Columbia
is with the U.S. department of
defense. In addition to representing
an enormous market for the supply
of goods and services, contract
research and development, there is
an initiative to extend the historical
U.S./Canada defence — industrial
relationship.
Originating from the
U.S.-Canadian Defence Production
and Development Sharing
Agreements formulated in the
1950s, the relationship has evolved
into a North American defence base
concept, where Canada is recognized as part of the U.S. mobilization
base.
Further, the NATO allies have
agreed to share more equitably the
financial burdens and economic
benefits of NATO defence. Since
the U.S. is the major producer of
such equipment, there is a genuine
interest to contract out both
defence procurement and research
and development.
Recognizing the difficulties small
and medium sized organizations experience in accessing U.S. defence
opportunities, the U.S. department
of defense has agreed to sponsor
with the ministry (ministry of industry and small business development —ed.) a seminar on Defence
Industry Opportunities, and how to
access them. The program has been
developed in close cooperation with
the department of external affairs
and department of industry, trade
and commerce.
The seminar is directed to a select
group of industry, research and
academic organizations. It will
focus specifically on marine, communications, electronics, advanced
materials, transportation and
fabrication technologies. There will
Herpes harrowing hex
I was extremely incensed to read
your hoax article regarding Herpes
in the UBC Aquatic centre.
Herpes is not a laughing matter
but a serious and dehabilitating
virus affecting millions throughout
North America and no doubt a
number of individuals here within
the university community. A
number of my friends have come in
contact with Herpes and believe me
the physical effects are secondary to
the mental trauma that they have
suffered.
I, and a number of fellow commerce students, feel that you owe
them and the numerous students
who use the aquatic centre facilities
an apology. Such irresponsible
journalism has no place in the
university newspaper.
In the future perhaps you could
limit your infantile diatribes to
more meaningful articles
englightening people of sexual
developments and dangers rather
than ridiculing them.
Neil Colquhoin
commerce 2
EARN
512,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELLINI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
CHARLIE'S
GIRL
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women.
STUDENTS ONLY
Cut, wash, blow dry
Gents $10
Ladies. $15
JOICO JOI-GEL
AVAILABLE
3615 W. 4th Ave.
        734-3841
WARREN MILLER PRESENTS
SihMOikIci'
A FEATURE LENGTH SKI FILM
featuring:
COLORADO
SWITZERLAND
CHILE
CALIFORNIA
IDAHO
UTAH
AUSTRIA
OREGON
MEXICO
BACK BY POP ULA R DEM A ND
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 8:00 P.M.
WIN A DESTINATION APEX SKI WEEK FOR TWO
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Reserved tickets at VTC/CBO
outlets and Can-Ski Sportshop
Presented by Can-Ski Sportshop
be opportunities for one-on-one interviews.
This letter is intended to alert you
to this event, taking place at the
Robson Square Media centre, and
to reserve the dates of Nov. 22 and
23, 1982. A program brochure and
registration forms are being
prepared which will be mailed to
you early in November. The
registration fee will be nominal.
A great deal of effort is being expended to ensure the program is
focussed and specific. I hope you
will be able to attend. If you would
like to discuss any aspect in greater
detail, please give me a call at
689-4411, extension 243.
If you are currently pursuing
business with the department of
defense, please let me know so I can
ensure the DOD representatives are
prepared to discuss your specific
situation.
Michael    G.    Clark,    P.    Eng.
defence seminar organizer
This letter is from the industry
and small business ministry to some
UBC faculty members. The seminar
mentioned in the letter started Monday and ends today at Robson
Square.
Society perpetuating rape myths
We are writing in response to
Gord Crawford's letter concerning
the Nov. 12 freestyle Grey Morning
Rape Not A Love Story.
The point of this article was not
to blame men for all the injustices
that women have suffered, but
rather to question a society that
feels that some women "ask" for
rape. Society is comprised of men
and women, indeed the author of
this article mentions that it was a
woman who remarked that the
author was "kind of asking for it."
Who is to be the judge of what constitutes rape? What is rape?
We all tend to think of rapists as
being strange men who lurk in dark
alleys, but in fact rape is usually
committed by men that women
know and trust. It has only been
recently recognized that a woman
can be raped by her husband. Mr.
Crawford is assuming that the
woman who wrote the article was
not raped but simply "did not have
the personal strength to say no."
Unfortunately we are ail socialized
to believe that when a woman says
"no" she actually means "persuade
me."
Whether this woman was a
passive participant in sex or
forcefully raped is not explicit. If in
fact this woman did not assert
herself sufficiently to effectively reject the advances of a man she did
not wish to sleep with, what conclu
sions can we draw about our
culture? Are we not all socialized to
believe that men are supposed to be
sexually aggressive and that women
are supposed to be passive?
This article succinctly points out
the consequences of the aggressive-
male, passive-female relationship
which our society romanticizes.
Women are as guilty as men in
perpetuating this myth. If we are
ever to improve the relationship
between men and women, both
sexes must address the problem and
cease to lay blame or feel defensive
about their respective positions.
Fran Rooyakkers
Lorna Stefanick
arts 3
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Jaffe & Hilbert. 6 practice tests,
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GRE - GRADUATE RECORD
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Brownstein & Weiner. Includes
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math review, strategies, 5 model
exams. 640pp., $7.95 (2506-7)
LSAT - LAW SCHOOL
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Bobrow. Revised to reflect the
new LSAT. Analysis of question
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MCAT - MEDICAL COLLEGE
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Seibel & Guyer. MCAT science
review, 4 complete 6V2 hour
exams. 304pp., $9.95 (2190 8)
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SAT - SCHOLASTIC
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Brownstein & Weiner. Over 2.5
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Weiner & Green. Review for
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ENGLISH PROFICIENCY
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Sharpe. Includes 6 exams,
6 listening comprehension records. 328pp., $10.95 (2115-0)
Cassette 1  (Tests 1-3) $9.95
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Cassette 2 (Tests 4-6) $9.95
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TOEFL - PRACTICE
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Sharpe. 1000 practice questions
for extra preparation. 6 records.
320 pp., $11.75 (2164-9)
Cassette 1 (Exercises 1-12)
$9.95(2489-3)
Cassette 2 (Exercises 13-19)
$9.95 (2490 7)
MICHIGAN TEST BATTERY
Sharpe. Review for English proficiency test used by many col
leges. 3 complete test batteries.
208pp., $9.95 (2419-2)
Cassette $9.95 (2564-4)
HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY
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Rockowitz et al. In-depth review,
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order direct from Barron's adding S2.00
for postage and handling.
U.B.C. Bookstore
Also available from Classics, Coles, selected
W. H. Smith stores, and other good bookstores everywhere. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23, 1982
TODAY
TWEEN CLASSES
Only one form per event please! Unlike last
year's system, this year it is only necessary to fill
out a 'Tweens form once for each event. Your
event automatically appears in any Ubyssey edition up to six days before the event.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner followed by speaker, 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus centre. Yaren Verod on Jewish
Perspectives on the Mid-East today.
DEBATING SOCIETY
~ Supermouth debate vs. NDP, noon, SUB 213.
That capitalism does not serve the needs of
society.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
MUSSOC
Guys and dolls rehearsal, dolls only, 7 p.m. on,
SUB 207/209.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist led by Rev. G. Hermanson,' noon,
Lutheran Campus centre.
THE PENTAGON
Seminar on methods of death and destruction,
or "There's no business like war business," all
day, Robson Square. Al) suits welcome.
STUDENT PUGWASH ASSOCIATION
Lecture by Peter von Stackelberg on setting
standards and the media, noon, IRC 3.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, noon. Bio Sci. 5458.
UKRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 207.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 209.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Meeting, noon, SUB 209.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series, 8 p.m., International house.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Community   dinner   followed   by   "Attitudtnal
Healing"  with  Joy  Hebert,  6  p.m.,   Lutheran
Campus centre.
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
Film and panel discussion with federal fisheries
and environmentalist, 7 p.m., 2150 Maple St.
Topic is Are Natural Resource Management Programs Viable? 92.
RECREATION UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bake sale, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., SUB foyer.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance  languages,   7:30  p.m.,   International
house.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Information table, noon, SUB concourse.
THURSDAY
PHOTO SOCIETY
Social evening, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Bible study:  Christian lifestyle,  noon.  Lutheran
Campus centre.
AMNESTY UBC
Free film,  noon,   Buch. A102.  Your Neighbor's
Son.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ismailts of the East, a series of three slide show
presentations,    7   p.m.,    International    house.
Tickets    $1    includes    refreshments   and    are
available at the door.
See London
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(with AMS card)
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JOHNART
UNISEX
HAIRSTYLING
2691 W. Broadway
738-8011
Expires June, 1983
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate vs. Campus Pro Life, noon, SUB 211.
"Thet a 'pre-born infant' has the right to life."
FILM SOCIETY
General meeting,  all members please attend,
noon, SUB 247.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 212.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
MUSSOC
Guys and dolls rehearsal, guys only, 7 p.m., SUB
207/209.
Executive meeting, planning for Guys and Dolls
1:30 p.m., old auditorium club room.
Costume   committee   meeting,    noon,   old
auditorium club room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Roller-skating party, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Richmond
Stardust.
CYCLING CLUB
No meeting this week, no time, no place.
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Guest speaker Walter Laming, artistic director of
the Playhouse, on Recession and the Arts, noon,
Dorothy Somerset studio, behind Freddy Wood
theatre.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films The Doctor and the Soul, and Enemy
Alien, noon, Asian Centre auditorium.
CREATIVE WRITING
writing non-fiction by Elinor Wachtel, noon,
Buch. penthouse. Free, everyone welcome.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Crew members of the Pacific Peacemaker will
give a slide presentation on anti-Trident action
and   a   nuclear  free   Pacific,   noon.   Computer
Science 200.
CHESS CLUB
Speed chess tournament, free to members, $2
non-members, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 215. Prizes.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Film, noon, Buch. A102. Free.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Worship!  Turn  your eyes  upon  Jesus,   noon,
Chem 250.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m.. International house.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Debate on "A pre-born human infant has the
right to life," noon, SUB 211.
OUTDOOR SPORT POETRY
Reading by George Graphite, renouned lyrical
poet and big game hunter, from his work Blood
and  feathers,   a  Great   Lake  Experience,  2:47
p.m., Buch. penthouse.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christianity and Psychology, noon, Scarfe 206.
FRIDAY
JAPAN CLUB
Sake garden, 4:30-12 p.m., SUB 205.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Potluck dinner with international quisine, bring a
main dish or dessert, 6v30 p.m.. International
house lower lounge. Phone I.H. at 228-5021 or
Mary Gerry 263-9236 for reservations.
LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Legal Aspects of Martial Law in Poland, noon.
Law 169. Prof. Karol W. Wronecki, formerly of U
of Wroclaw speaks.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Pre-Christmas dance with The Coffee Dregs — a
steel band from the Caribbean, bar service,
everyone welcome, $3 cover charge, 8 p.m.-l
a.m., Graduate student centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy hour: Happy refreshments and happy
conversation, 4:30 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Folk night, 8 p.m.. International house.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting for members, noon, SUB 207.
Dance and social for all those interested, 7:30
p.m., SUB 212.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bzzr and bull bash, all welcome, 4-6 p.m., Buch.
penthouse.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Talk  by  Andrew  Milne  on  local  effects  of  a
nuclear war,  noon,  SUB 205. Followed by a
general meeting.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate against gears: that scientists succeed
and engineers fail, noon, SUB auditorium.
ORAL ROBARTS OF THE
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Informal meeting, read prose, poem or work on a
monologue, all welcome, noon. Brock hall 302.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Men's fall invitational tournament featuring top
club teams from  B.C., all day. War Memorial
gym.
SATURDAY
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB party room.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Men's fall invitational tournament featuring top
club teams from B.C., all day, War Memorial
gym.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Vancouver first division match vs. Meralomas,
2:30 p.m., UBC playing fields. Preliminaries in
the morning.
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   10   p.m.,   Aquatic   centre.   All   new
recruits welcome.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Quick ride to Trolls (Horseshoe bay) for brunch,
back  in lots of time to study,   10 a.m.,  SUB
cafeteria.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, everybody welcome, 9a.m., between SUB
and Aquatic centre.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
No meetings until Jan. 13.
SAILING CLUB
Iceburg regatta, open to all skill levels, 9 a.m.,
Jericho.
MONDAY
SOUTH ASIA COLLOQUIUM
Seminar on Agricultural research in Sri Lanka: Its
assumptions, structure and impact, 3:30 p.m.,
Asian centre 615. Led by Adam Pain.
ROCKERS CO-OP
General meeting to discuss permanent
workshop, all members please come, 5:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
SHRUM BOWL
UBC vs. So Fucked Up
Tickets for the non-
contest contest Saturday
night at Empire stadium at 8
p.m. are now on sale for $4
from undergraduate
societies, the AMS box office, and the War Memorial
gym.
Get  some   rum   and  get
ready for Shrum.
) Bank of British Columbia
supports |
THE
SHRUM BOWL
For The United Way Q
SFU vs
1982 Canadian Champion
UBC THUNDERBIRDS
8 pm November 27th
Empire Stadium
Tickets: s400
\m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
calculators and
personal computers
Discount Sales
437-6114
GRAD'S
Phone   now   for   complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
flmograph*
Shidios lid.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to
run for election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large
and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 22, 1982:
SUBFILMS presents
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CHARIOTS OF FIRE
1
a LADD COMPANY
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YAHNfR CUMMijSlCA-iONS COMMllI   ^J
Thurs.- Sun. 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00 SUB AUDITORIUM
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days. $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
11 — For Sale - Private
TORONTO CHARTER ticket for sale, Dec.
21-Dec. 29, $339 +tax. 228-1661. Leave
message if not in.
VANCOUVER - Amsterdam, Dec. 19, 2 tickets, one way, $275 each. 926-1639.
20 — Housing
GAY WILL SHARE apt. near Alma.
$140/mo. for quiet, clean, n.s. Box 46364,
Stn. G V6R 4G6.
FREE ROOM & BREAKFAST near UBC
gates in exchange for ACTIVE care of 7 yr.
old boy, 3-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Must be non-
smoker & enjoy kids. 228-9494.
80 — Tutoring
85 - Typing
30 — Jobs
MECHANIC NEEDED for electrical and
mech. work on 72 Capri. Reasonable rates
and no rush. Brian, 731-3341.
35 - Lost
LOST: 7 foot patched Boa Constrictor,
answers to name Snavely. Contact Robin,
224-9494. Also, Robin wants to get lucky.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208. Word Processing Specialists for Theses, Term
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FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING. Fast & accurate. $1.10 per page.
Please call Katey at 224-4264 or 929-6790.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Socreds' letter sets record crooked — Learey
I was very interested to read the
letter from the UBC Social Credit
club, "setting the record straight."
What they have done however, is
misrepresent all the student
assistance issues.
The Socred government never increased funding for individual
students, they merely met the increased demand which bad been
forecast. It seems strange that the
federal government never held a
press conference to announce its
portion of the student aid program
considering that last year they outs-
pent the provincial government in
B.C. two to one.
This year the Socred government
changed the loan/grant allocation,
hoping that they would not have to
increase funding. The initial loan
allocation was raised from $800 to
$1,200, and only after this loan is a
student eligible for grant. So in fact
the federal government's contribution to students increased proportionally within the allocation from
last year's amount.
On the issue of the health bursaries, perhaps the Socred club
should get their facts straight. The
reason that a student has gone to
the ombudsoffice is because there is
no money  forthcoming from the
provincial government. If as you
say, not all the money has been requested then what is the hold-up?
The fact is, the ministry of health
suddenly phoned the financial
awards offices in August and said
"we are not accepting any more applications." This has left 41 of the
91 students eligible at UBC out of
luck. These students are the most
needy because they have already
qualified for maximum student aid,
and do not have the opportunity to
work during the summer because,
with their summer practicums, their
school year lasts 11 months.
In 1979 the health bursaries could
be received by anyone who applied,
and the amount of money
distributed was approximately $2
million. This year there is approximately $250,000 available.
The UBC Socred club said that
their government is "committed to
accessibility."
Instead of defending this
government, the UBC Socred club
should make sure that their government is fulfilling their promises.
Stephen Learey
deputy chair, CFS-Pacific region
Rape critic insensitive and harsh
The ignorant response of Gord
Crawford to the poignant tale of
rape printed in the Nov. 12 Ubyssey
fills me with anger and disappointment.
Anger because he is so harsh and
insensitive toward the woman's
plight. Disappointment because ignorance as to the nature of rape
even extends into the allegedly well-
educated echelons of university.
Yes, Gord, the feminist movement does have "a lot of valid beefs
against men" including attitudes
like yours. First of all, complaints
of rape and male brutality do not
have anything to do with women attempting to hide their "personal
failings." Plenty of women with
strong characters have undergone
the experience of rape. Rape happens not because women have personality flaws but because they
sometimes find themselves in a
position where they are physically
powerless to prevent the violation.
To accuse the woman raped of
not being of sufficient personal
strength to say "no" is to do her
and all rape victims a great disser
vice. Perhaps during the rape she
did not say "no" repeatedly but
this is irrelevant as statistics show
that a continuous stream of verbal
protests, begging, and pleading has
no effect whatsoever on rapists.
The letter clearly indicates a lack
of consent on her part; just because
she found herself in a position to be
raped does not give any man the
right to touch her without her permission.
CORKY'S
If your sister of girlfriend were
raped, Gord, would you say of
them that they had "the opportunity and not the personal strength to
say no?"
Cheryl Mitchel
grad studies
Recycle recycling at UBC
On a recent trip to Bellingham, members of UBC's environmental
interest group visited the recycling centre at Western Washington
University.
This centre, now in its tenth year of operation, accepts paper,
glass, tin, aluminum, and old motor oil from both the university and
the surrounding community. It is student run, employing 12 people,
at all levels of its operation. It has been subsidized by as much
as $1,500 per year by the equivalent of our Alma Mater Society but is
now operating at a small profit.
UBC, on the other hand, recycles some computer paper. Period.
The recycling committee of the EIG believes UBC can do better.
The recycling committee meets every Tuesday at noon in SUB 206.
Interested people are welcome. For more information call Helene
Guay 224-6338.
Helene Guay
environmental interest group
'*vi,»^
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
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Plus Karate and Kung Fu.
Thursday, Nov. 25th
12:30-1:30 SUB Auditorium
>Mi/
'?WS
THE 1982-83 DIRECTORY
IS HERE!
THE STUDENT
PHONE BOOK IS
HERE
Available at:
AMS TICKET CENTRE
Your undergraduate
Society UBC Bookstore
STILL ONL Y $1
Hovvza 'bouta Sauza?
Numero uno
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THE BOTTLED ROMANCE OF MEXICO Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23, 1982
UBC easy champions
— kevin finnegan photo
"NUTS HE'S GOT ME" says 'Birds running back Glen Steele as he is grabbed unceremoniously by Ontario
jock. Steele is reported not to have suffered any permanent damage, although the possibility of severe
psychological trauma is very real. UBC trashed Mustangs 39-14.
SPORTS
Bring on wet horses; Calgary,
UBC win water polo prizes
By PETER BERLIN
There were only two seconds left
on the clock at the UBC aquatic
centre Sunday night, when UBC
water polo captain Larry Ellenwood tried a lob shot from far out
on the left wing.
The ball made a high arc ovr the
University of Calgary goalie and
ended its flight by plopping against
the inside of the far goalpost. As
the ball bounced back into the
grateful goalkeeper's arms the
buzzer sounded, sending the tied
game into sudden death overtime.
Thirty seconds later UBC suffered their seventh kickout of the
game and a minute later, after sterling goaline shotblocking by Dave
Zayonc and goalie Chris Kellman,
Calgary scored their sixth
powerplay goal to win the Western
Canada universities water polo
crown.
Superb defense had been the
hallmark of UBC's play for most of
the final against Calgary. The
Thunderbirds did not concede a
single goal in regular play. The only
goal which Calgary did not score on
a power play came from a four
metre penalty shot.
If UBC slipped up anywhere it
was in offense. They only managed
to have two Calgary players kicked
out during the game which may indicate they weren't swimming at
their checkers enough to draw the
defensive fouls.
The other failing of the offense,
if it can be called a failing, was their
inability to capitalize on the scoring
opportunities they had in the first
and second quarters before Calgary
figured out how to check 17-goal-
scorer John Montgomery without
leaving someone else free.
Montgomery still managed three
goals in the final, with Dave Zayonc
grabbing the other three to end up
as UBC's second highest scorer with
six.
UBC had also lost to Calgary,
4-3, in their opening group game on
Saturday morning. That afternoon
they beat the B.C. provincial junior
team, who stood in for Alberta at
short notice, with Ellenwood scoring three spectacular long range
goals.
In the semi-final UBC beat the
University of Victoria 14-2. It was a
fine display distinguished by
defender Grame Black's three
goals, who each time swam round
the outside of a defender to score
from close in on the left. Meanwhile, in the other semi-final
Calgary went by a naughty Simon
Fraser University team to set up the
final.
Alongside the men's tournament
there was a three team women's
tournament. Two teams from URC
both beat the University of Victoria
team heavily on Saturday and then
beat them again, even more heavily,
on Sunday. The two UBC teams
played each other in the final which
was won by UBC gold by nine goals
to three.
REAL WOMEN
— rick katz photo
play water
polo too
Darwin's theory disproved,
Dinosaurs survive 'Birds
The Thunderbirds ice hockey
team have the same problem the
Vancouver Canucks have had this
year — losing a lot of games by one
goal.
The 'Birds lost a pair of games to
Calgary Dinosaurs at the Thunderbird arena this past weekend and
are now in sole possession of last
place in the Canada West conference.
On Friday, Calgary scored five
straight goals after falling behind
4-1 to UBC in the first period and
held on to win 6-5. Jim Allison led
the Birds with two goals.
The next evening, UBC had a 1-0
lead going into the third period
before the Dinosaurs erupted for
three goals in 75 seconds early in the
final frame enroute to a 3-2 victory.
Daryl Coldwell and Greg Cockrill
scored for UBC.
The 'Birds travel to Calgary next
weekend for two games with the
Dinosaurs there. The next home
games will be the following
weekend against Saskatchewan
Huskies, who split their pair of
games with Alberta Golden Bears
this past weekend.
By SCOTT McDONALD
Ubyssey Toronto Bureau
TORONTO — Maybe if Western
had used police forces?
At the Vanier Cup Saturday in
Toronto's Varsity stadium the only
way the University of Western Ontario football team could have hope
to match the UBC Thunderbirds
would have been if they had followed the horse that Toronto police used to clear fans off the field at the
end of the game.
Not that the Western fans should
have been trying to pull down the
goal posts. You normally do that
when your team wins and Western
was nowhere near winning as UBC
scored touchdowns on each of its
first three possesions en route to a
39-14 romp over the Mustangs.
Leading UBC to its first-ever
Canadian championship running
back Glen Steele, who rambled for
236 yards and two touchdowns on
21 carries.
Both of Steele's majors were in
the first quarter and were sandwich- .
ed around a 23 yard Jay Gard
touchdown pass to Rob Ros which
gave UBC a 21-4 lead at the end of
the first quarter.
The score grew to 29-4 at the
half, after Kent Bowling punched in
a five yard strike and Ken Munro
kicked a single on the subsequent
kick-off.
For his efforts, Steele was named
most valuable player of the game.
UBC coach Frank Smith and
Western coach Darwim Semotiuk
both praised Steele and agreed that
the key to his success was the play
of UBC's offensive line. "Their line
play was a very significant factor,"
Semotiuk said. He added "as much
as Steele is a great running back,
their offensive line was outstanding." Smith agreed when he said
"Mother McCree could have run
through some of those holes."
The offensive line was a tribute to
the coaching ability of Smith and
his offensive line coach Jack
Schriber.
How well they did the job will
become known when the CFL conducts its annual draft. Three UBC
offensive linemen will be up for
grabs.
The only time Western looked
like a threat was early in the second
half when it capped a 62-yard drive
with a one yard touchdown run by
Chris Byrne.
UBC responded with a 27-yard
Ken Munro field goal and a
touchdown by Pierre Deslaurier.
The Deslaurier touchdown came
off a second seven yard toss from
Garr.
There were several new Vanier
cup records set. Steele's 236 yards
broke the old record of 172 (he did
it early in the second quarter). His
57 yard run for his second
touchdown was also a record. The
other record was the 570 yards total
offense UBC ground out.
Defensively, UBC was led by
Mike Emery and Steve Harrison.
Emery was voted defensive player
of the game, while Harrison was
runner up. Both, along with defensive end Jason Riley, will be drafted
this year.
Six Thunderbirds were named all-
Canadian team Friday. On offense
it was running back Glen Steele,
and two of his front line, Jerry
Dobrovolny, and Peter Vanden
Bos.
Named to the defensive team
were linebacker Mike Emery,
defensive line player Jason Riley
and defensive back Dave Singh.
Emery was also named the top
defensive player in the country for
the second straight year.
Steele rushed in 276 yards, scored
four touchdowns and then sat out
most of the second half in that
game. He was also the MVP in the
final championship game, getting
the Ted Morris trophy, as well as
the offensive player of the game.
The University of Western Ontario is a bit of football factory like
the big, huge U.S. schools. There
are 11 coaches and 76 players.
UBC, by comparison, has six
coaches and 53 players. Rules only
allow 34 players to dress for the
final game.
Western also had a marching
band, and cheerleaders that included male performers.
This emphasis has also paid of
for Western. In the 16 year history
of the national final, Western has
won four times, and placed second
once.
This is the first year the championship has been called the Vanier
cup. Previously it had been called
the College Bowl and was run by
the College Bowl committee. This
year, the Canadian Inter-university
Athletic Union took over and
renamed the game after the trophy
that is presented to the winner.
The trophy is named after George
Vanier, who was governor-general
of Canada from 1959-67. There was
14,792 fans on hand.
Varsity stadium is located in the
University of Toronto campus in
downtown Toronto.
It was built in 1911 and renovated
in 1924 and 1930 to seat 21,000. The
stadium has also been the sight of
29 Grey cups games and was home
field of the Toronto Argonauts until 1969.
The Vanier cup was a typical
Toronto sporting event. There was
one street vendor selling popcorn
and chestnuts for every two fans,
scalpers hawking tickets even
though the game was not sold out,
and squirrels in the stands 30
minutes after the final whistle.
r
'Bird Droppings   J
W
L PTS
Alberta Golden Bears
5
1    10
Saskatchewan Huskies
3
3     6
Calgary Dinosaurs
3
3     6
UBC Thunderbirds
1
5     2
The UBC volleyball teams had a
very successful weekend.
The men's volleyball team won
four of their five games in their
Canada West tournament. Their
only defeat was against Alberta and
their wins included a 3-1 triumph
over the Univesity of Victoria. This
makes them 8-2 for the season.
The women's team also finished
their tournament with a 4-1 won
lost record. They're only defeat in
sunny Saskatoon was against Victoria. They are now 7-3 for the
season.
• • *
UBC   women's   soccer   team
scored a second round League Cup
playoff victory when they defeated
Lynn Valley Orange Crush 5-3 on
Sunday.
UBC scored twice in the first halt
through Lia Soroniv and Kelly
Robinson. Then Mai Le, who was
brought on at half time, scored a
hat trick in just twenty minutes to
put UBC into a winning lead.
Me Lai was rewarded by coach
Dave Fales who pulled her immediately after the third goal so
that he could put on another
defender and prevent a more high
scoring game in which Lynn Valley
might have come back.

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