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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1976

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 9        VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1976
>48    228-2301
Women get
office offer
CHECKER SENGA FULLAM .. . processes library books, slowly
—matt king photo
ByBILLTIELEMAN
Despite a setback at the student
representative assembly meeting
Wednesday night a group of
women still hope to set up a
women's office to co-ordinate the
activities of women's groups on
campus.
The group is considering an offer
by the dean of women of an office
in Brock Hall, after the SRA voted
13-9 Wednesday against setting up
a women's committee as a part of
the Alma Mater Society.
"On the basis of the incredibly
poor support shown at the SRA
meeting, i.e. animal show, we are
no longer depending on the SRA in
establishing a women's office,"
women's group member Millie
Nickason said Thursday.
UBC's previous women's office
was dissolved during the summer
after the AMS ruled June 29 the
group could not occupy a room in
SUB because it was not a student
club. The women's office had used
the room since 1971.
After the SRA voted against the
women's committee proposal SRA
president Dave Van Blarcom and
arts representative Pam Willis
resigned from the SRA.
Van Blarcom said the SRA's
decision against the women's
group was a contributing factor to
his resignation.
Willis' resignation was apparently brought on by the SRA's
decision alone.
The women's group is an ad-hoc
committee formed two weeks ago
to re-establish a women's office at
UBC, Nickason said.
Nickason said she was upset at
the lack of support the group got
from the SRA at Wednesday's
meeting.
"I was really disappointed and
surprised at the results of the
vote," she said.
Nickason denied the women's
group is a clique, as charged by
student senator Keith Gagne at
Wednesday's meeting.
She said the group has contacted
several UBC women's groups to
solicit support for the proposal to
set up a new women's office.
"We impressed the fact upon
him that we had only been
organized in two weeks."
Nickason said the aims of the
New machines slow book checkout
Those new gadgets for checking
out books at UBC libraries are
slower than the old ones and they
refuse to accept most students'
library cards.
Suzanne _ Lester, Sedgewick
circulation head, said Thursday
the new electronic units choke on
most cards because the cards were
designed for the old IBM
machines.
The locally made units even
reject some new cards issued this
year for use with the new system.
And a student library assistant,
who declined to be identified, said
the new system is much slower
than the old one.
To check out books with the new
system, library workers insert the
borrower's card into the six by
eight inch black box and watch for
the borrower's student number to
appear on a small black screen.
The operator must then slide the
IBM cards found in each book
through the machine.
The new system also requires the
borrower's card to be reinserted
for every book checked out. With
the old IBM machines, the
borrower's card could be left in
while the operator slid the IBM
cards through the machine.
Delays created by the relative
slowness of the new system have
often forced Sedgewick Library
supervisors to open two turnstiles
at the entrance instead of one, she
said.
The libraries installed the new
system    during    the    summer
because   the   10-year-old   IBM
machines were worn out and
caused   mistakes   in   processing
overdue notices, Lester said.
"The printouts would contain
conglomerations of numbers that
made no sense at all," she said.
The old IBMs, originally
designed for lighter office work,
were obsolete and parts for them
were hard to find, Sedgewick head
Ture Erickson said.
The new units, built by Epic Data
Sales Ltd. of Richmond were
chosen from a number of designs
submitted after the libraries
decided to get rid of the old
machines.
The new units are the first of
their kind in Canada, head
librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said.
But Stubbs would not say what
the units cost.
The new system can be adapted
for use with Barcodes, the series of
short thin lines found on packaged
goods in supermarkets, Erickson
said.
The Barcodes would speed the
work computers at the library
must do but new library cards
would be necessary.
The libraries also have plans in
"the very distant future" for installing microfiche card
catalogues. The new cataloguing
system would save on both space
and paper costs, Erickson said.
AUCE talks underway
By DEB van der GRACHT
UBC library and clerical workers' contract expired
Thursday but their union and the university administration are still miles apart in negotiations.
Jean Lawrence, spokeswoman for the Association
of University and College Employees local one, said
the university has yet to give anything that could be
called an offer.
"Their position is basically that many items fall
under the AIB (anti-inflation board) guidelines and
simply cannot be discussed. Our position is that our
contract is to be negotiated, that there are two parties
involved, not three, and that the contract should be
subject to review by the board after signing and not
before."
Erik De Bruijn, a member of the administration's
negotiating committee, refused to comment Thursday.
"We are progressing, and we want to keep working
at it," he said. "But we agreed we wouldn't negotiate
through the press."
AUCE is seeking a $191 per month increase for all
its employees—which works out to a 25 per cent boost
for its lowest-paid members.
A $191 across-the-board increase would give AUCE
workers parity with lowest-paid members of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees. UBC local and
is one of AUCE's goals in these negotiations.
In addition, they are seeking the same average
increase CUPE members get when that union and the
administration sign a contract.
"Basically, we're after the same thing as last
year," Lawrence said. "We're asking for parity with
CUPE's base rate. We chose the base-rate workers as
an example because there the difference in pay is so
gross while the similarity in job skills, knowledge and
experience required is so clear."
Negotiations started Aug. 13 and the university
indicated then they would probably go on for seven or
eight weeks, Lawrence said.
"Our contract is expiring and we'd love to sign a
contract today but I don't see a quick settlement."
women's office would be to coordinate the activities of different
women's groups on campus,
provide a place for women to meet
and discuss various issues, lobby
for women's causes on and off the
campus, and organize special
women's events at UBC.
The office would be able to fill
the needs of women's groups not
covered by the dean of women, she
said.
"I don't think that the dean of
women's office has a co-ordinating
service for women's groups on
campus," Nickason said.
The women's group is sure it will
be opening a women's office on
campus soon, whether or not it will
accept the offer of a space in Brock
Hall, she said.
The question of obtaining a
budget from the dean of women to
operate the women's office is to be
discussed this week Nickason said.
SFU's PSA 7
forgiven but
not rehired
Simon Fraser University has
withdrawn charges against seven
faculty fired in a 1969 dispute
which rocked the campus—but it
has not given the seven their jobs
back.
SFU's board of governors
reached the decision secretly Sept.
21 and informed the seven fired
faculty, who belonged to the
political science-sociology-
anthropology department, in
letters this week,
"They're saying what we've
always said—there's no reason to
fire," Mordecai Briemberg, former PSA department head and
member of the so-called PSA
seven, said Thursday. "They
(SFU) were fairly stripped of
principle then, so they're completely nude now."
The seven were suspended
during a 1969 strike which followed
the removal of Briemberg as
department head. Despite a series
of administration-run investigations which cleared the
seven, they were fired for violating
their contract and violating the
trust of their students.
The department had been
previously run with a high degree
of student input and the removal of
Briemberg as department head
was strongly opposed by PSA
students.
The letter sent to the seven
concluded: "This letter is to inform you that all charges laid
against you have been withdrawn
by the university."
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers has placed a
boycott on SFU since the firings. It
was widely hoped when Pauline
Jewett became administration
president in 1974 that the seven
would get their jobs back and the
boycott would be lifted.
But a proposed compromise
between SFU and CAUT that was
to give one of the seven his job back
and four others research stipends,
was rejected by CAUT last
November.
"Why were we fired?" asked
Briemberg. "We should get our
jobs back. There was no' reason
and this decision confirms that."
SFU is "still trying to finagle
something with the CAUT," he
said.
Jewett said this week the board
will take no further action until the
reactions of the seven are known.
In addition to Briemberg, the
PSA seven are: David Potter,
Prudence Wheeldon, Nathan
Popkin, Kathleen Aberle, Louis
Feldhammer and John Leggett. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,  1976
Tween classes
TODAY
CANOE AND KAYAK CLUB
Meeting   for   weekend   trip,   noon,
SUB 213.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International      students      program
committee      executive      elections,
noon,    International    House    room
400.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Joggers  three   mile  run,  noon,  War
Memorial Gym field.
UBt INTRAMURALS
Men's       and       women's       hockey
registration,    all    day,    Intramurals
office.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Classical   Hindustani   vocal   recital,
noon, music building, recital hall.
PSYCHOLOGY
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General   meeting,   noon,   Angus 24.
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
Organizational  meeting, noon, SUB
211.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French practice, noon, International
House.
Exrita
A
little ribbing
can be
a lot of fun.
COMMITTEE   FOR   A
DEMOCRATIC   UNIVERSITY
Cy  Gonick,   publisher  of  Canadian
Dimension,        talks        on        wage
controls     and     the     new     statlsm,
noon,   Bu.   104.
CHINESE   VARSITY   CLUB
Disco dance, 8:30 p.m. to 12:30
a.m.,  SUB  party  room.
SATURDAY
UBC    KARATE   CLUB
Practice, new members welcome,
10 a.m. to noon, gym E, winters
sports  centre.
SUNDAY
UBC   SAILING   TEAM
Sailing      team      eliminations,      10
a.m.,   Jericho   Sailing   Association,
Jericho  Beach.
UBC   INTRAMURALS
Co-recreational    *_golf,       1       p.m.,
university golf course.
PAN   AFRICAN   UNION     .
General     meeting,     2     p.m.     SUB
211.
MONDAY
AGRICULTURAL   ECONOMICS
STUDENTS
Meeting to elect undergrad
department rep, organize
extracurricular field trips, noon,
room   203   Ponderosa  annex   p.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
' DECORA TE WITH PRINTS*
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Thoto Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes- Gifts,,etc.
{DECORATE WITH POSTERS}
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
JULIUS SCHMID OF CANADA LIMITED
Excita — the new ribbed prophylactic.
Also Fourex. Fiesta: Nu-Form, Ramses, Sheik.
Sold only in pharmacies.
APPLICATIONS FOR THE
POSITION OF COMMISSIONER
TO THE
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE
will be accepted at the A.M.S. Business Office, S.U.B.,
during business office hours.
No   applications  will   be  accepted   after  4:00  p.m.,
Friday, October 1, 1976.
Dick Byl,
Selection Committee Chairman
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
PROF.
HARRY HINSLEY
Cambridge University, England
A distinguished
commentator on
international affairs. Prof.
Hinsley is currently
visiting UBC as a Cecil H.
and Ida Green Visiting
Professor.
TOPIC:
THE  FUTURE
OF THE  EUROPEAN
COMMON MARKET
SATURDAY, OCT.  2
sctures take place on
aturdays at 8:15 p.m.
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional  resources
centre
idmission to the qenerai
Weti like
to talk to you about
your future
Gulf Oil Canada
is looking for graduate and undergraduate*
students of the Sciences, Engineering and those'
presently studying the financial disciplines of Business.^
It's not too early to begin thinking about
' what you're going to do when you graduate or even as a summerT
job for next year. In fact, right now is the best time.
WfeVe got a
lot to talk about
CANDIA
pizza factory
I 228-9512 |   or    | 228-95131
FAST FREE DELIVERY
4510 W. 10th Ave.
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.
TH€ CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Event*
Visit your local campus placement office today.
There you'll find the numerous job descriptions, recruitment
dates, information about us and application forms.
Closing date for applications
is October 7th.
RUMMAGE SALE. Saturday, Oct. 2,
University Hill United Church, University Boulevard and Toronto Road.
10:30  a.m.-1:00 p.m.
ROCK WITH KWAK, Friday, October
1. 8:30-1:00. Totem Park. $1.50 with
rea   card,   $2.90  without
11 — For Sale — Private
TOYOTA MARK II. 1870. Very good
condition, standard 2-door, eats little
gas. Asking $1,350. Janice 228-8541.
FOR SALE. 1975 Fiat 124 Spyder. Excellent condition, low mileage. Offers.
Phone  298-7174.
MARANTZ 2220 Receiver Dynaco A2S
XL speakers. Ph. 224-1851.
20 — Housing
ROOM AVAILABLE in three bedroom
house, Dunbar and 20th. Grad student preferred. Rent approx. $150.
Phone 228-1085 after six.
B.R. IN COMFORTABLE 3 B.R. suite,
car tranpsortation to UBC. Available
$90 plus utilities.  876-9148 evenings.
30 - Jobs
CREW MANAGERS WANTED. Organize student sales crews. Excellent
commission, over-ride on sales.
Phone 873-5126 days.
35 — Lost
GOLD WRISTWATCH near bookstore.
Reward — President's office, dark
228-2400.
65 — Scandals
RORY MAC plays at rock with Kwak.
Friday, Oct. 1, Totem Park Ballroom.
8:30-1:00.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
99 — Miscellaneous
MEDICAL SCHOOLS Interior Mexico
now accepting applicants for 1977
terms. Contact R. W. Cary, P.O. Box
214313, Sacramento, CA. 95821. Phone
(916)  483-4587.
GULF OIL CANADA LIMITED
Use Ubyssey Classified Friday, October 1, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students want vendors back
By JANET NICOL
Most students polled by The
Ubyssey Thursday want to see
vendors back in SUB.
Out of 20 students polled, 17 said
vendors should be allowed to
return to SUB; only three didn't
want them.
Students are being asked today
to decide in a referendum whether
to allow the vendors to return to
SUB, after a student council
decision last November to evict
them.
But the polled students do want
vendors to pay a fee for using SUB
space, and they want to allow only
craftspeople to set up booths;
people simply selling other
people's goods aren't welcome.
The Alma Mater Society made
the decision because they said:
•Vendors were blocking
pedestrian traffic in SUB and
creating a fire hazard;
•They took business away from
the AMS co-op bookstore,
•They were associated with the
AMS by customers who complained to the AMS when they were
dissatisfied;
• The vendors were not students
but represented outside commercial interests, and
•The vendors were not paying a
rental fee.
"They should pay a rental fee
unless they're students," a second-
year science student said, and a
second-year recreation student
said vendors should only b«
allowed back if they pay rent.
A second year English student
agreed they should be allowed
back "if the vendors are under
some arrangement" with the AMS.
A fifth year education student
said the AMS could overcome the
problem of having commercial
rather than craftspeople selling
goods in SUB by setting up certain
restrictions as to who can sell.
Most students didn't think that
vendors created a traffic problem.
"They don't seem to crowd the
halls" said a third year arts
student.
But a second year education
student said vendors should not be
allowed because they're in the
way.
Most students didn't feel that
vendors interfered with the co-op
bookstore in the SUB basement
and said that they would continue
to use the bookstore.
"The bookstore needs the competition," a third year education
student said, and a commerce grad
student said vendors "would encourage free enterprise".
But a second year education
student said he preferred the
bookstore because it was more
reliable.
Two     craftspeople,      Lacey
Freeman and Pauline Ouellette,
set up a table in SUB Thursday to
display crafts and publicize the
referendum.
"Most students are unaware of
the referendum," Freeman said.
SFU sets study of
Winegard report
The Simon Fraser University
senate has appointed a one-man
.jcoj^mittee,. to.,.»sto<Jy,.- tbe-; im-
pTrcatiohs f or SFtTofme Winegard
report's recommendation that a,
four-campus institution in the B.C.
interior be set up under the wings
of SFU.
The report, to be prepared by
Bryan Beirne, head of SFU's
pestology centre, will be an important factor in SFU's decision to
accept or reject the recommendation.
Education minister Pat McGeer
said he will not make any decision
on the Winegard report, which was
commissioned to map out the
future of post-secondary education
in B.C.'s non-metropolitan areas,
until SFU decides on the report.
The Winegard report called for a
decision from SFU by Dec. 31, and
said the institution should be set up
on its own if SFU rejects the idea.
SFU academic vice-president
Brian Wilson said Thursday
Beirne's report will be ready by
Nov. 5 and SFU's senate will vote
on the issue later in the month at a
special meeting.
"He's going to look at the implications for Simon Fraser but I
don't know if he will put in his
personal  feelings,"   said  Wilson.
Beirne's report will go to the
senate committee on academic
planning which will then recommend to senate whether to accept
or reject the report.
An advisory panel composed of
Wilson, three faculty members and
two students will help Beirne
prepare the report. There will be
no public hearings, but Beirne will
accept written submissions.
Wilson said the review is needed
because "this is a matter of great
concern at the university."
The Winegard report has come
under sharp attack from UBC
administration president Doug
Kenny, who this week called its
recommendations "simplistic and
unrealistic."
The SFU senate will consider at
its October meeting a motion
condemning the role spelled out for
SFU in the Winegard report.
"We didn't like very much the
role of Simon Fraser given in the
report," Wilson said. "I don't know
why those things were put in the
report.
"We don't like that role given us
because we have not confined
ourselves to that," said Wilson.
The Winegard report said SFU
"originated as an arts and science
institution with an emphasis on
tutorial teaching and in recent
years it has developed interdisciplinary programs at both
the undergraduate and graduate
levels.
"The university has little interest in further development of
professional schools and has or
should have ambitions for a
somewhat restricted role in
graduate work especially at the
doctorate level,'" the report said.
But Wilson said SFU has plans to
expand graduate and professional
programs, and said the description
was a "rationalization" for the
report's recommendation.
The role description was outside
the report's jurisdiction, he added.
UBC is given the role as the
province's major professional and
graduate institution in the report.
But most students polled were
aware of the referendum and
familiar with the vendor situation.
The referendum needs a 15 per
cent voter turnout to be valid.
AMS  finance   director   Herb
—matt king photo
GOLL-LEE, HOW AM I EVER gonna get this finished by 9:30 when I
keep making mistakes? — oh shit, where's that eraser?
Profs differ over fee hikes
A Ubyssey mini-survey of nine
UBC professors indicates that yes,
they feel much the same way
students do about next year's
tuition fee increase.
Six profs didn't seem too upset
about tuition fee increases, three
said there should be no tuition fees
at all—but all of them agreed that
for next year at least, tuition fee
increases are inevitable.
Political science professor Philip
Resnick said "I'm against tuition
fees in general. The fees for
education should come from the
general tax system. In France
they've adopted this system; the
student can pay anything from
zero to $20 a year to attend
university."
He predicted a decrease in
enrolment next year of up to 10 per
cent, as students in a borderline
financial situation drop out.
English professor Peter Quartermain said no to tuition fee in
creases. "Education should be
free. It makes sense to subsidize
education from general taxes."
Education professor Robert
Rubeck said "This doesn't affect
me personally. I really can't say."
He added that if higher tuition fees
resulted in more materials and less
crowded classrooms, he is in
favour of an increase,
Librarianship director Roy
Stokes said an increase in tuition
fees is inevitable.
"The money needed by „ the
university has to come from
somewhere," hesaid. "It makes no
difference whether it conies from
taxes or fee increases. It's all the
same thing.".
Education professor Kenneth
Slade agreed mat a fee increase is
inevitable. "Students will keep on
working, keep on borrowing,"
added Slade. "I'm still paying off
student debts myself. If a student
is determined to get through
university he'll do it somehow."
Acting economics head John
Cragg said the university is
definitely short of funds and money
is needed from any source.
"It's the government or the
students," hesaid. "The provincial
government should vote on tuition
fee issues; I believe this is the
government's responsibility."
English professor Jonathan
Wisenthal said there should be no
tuition fees at all, let alone any
increases. He said university
entrance should be based only on
academic standing, not on the
student's ability to pay.
"As it is the university is
teaching the rich, not the poor. It's
not a fair system."
Erich Vogt, administration vice-
president of faculty and student
affairs, said "I don't think fees
should be abolished altogether, but
neither should they inhibit
students."
Dhaliwal said if the referendum
result favors the vendors the AMS
would place certain restrictions on
them so that the previous problems
won't recur.
If the referendum fails, Dhaliwal
said, "we will stay with our old
policy of no vendors in the
building."
Polls are situated throughout
campus and are open from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
TAs meet to
form wage
committee
A UBC teaching assistants'
committee was established
Thursday to examine TA work
loads and wages.
Details of the formation of the
grad committee on teaching
assistants were not disclosed and
The Ubyssey was refused entry to
the grad-only meeting of about 60
TAs.
Dave Chapman, the meeting
organizer, refused to comment on
the meeting because, he said, a
resolution was passed by a
majority of TAs to keep publicity of
their decisions to a minimum.
"Silence is in our own best interests," Chapman said.
Several TAs said they were
opposed to Chapman's ideas of the
TAs interests and said the meeting
was anything but a success.
"There were about 17 departments being represented," said a
second year chemistry TA, "and so
many various opinions and
problems were being battled out
that it was thoroughly confusing to
us."
A first year geography TA said it
was foolish to hold a meeting exclusively for grad students behind
closed doors. He said the problem
was one of communication with the
faculties and departments.
The department should have
been put in the hot seat from the
very beginning, he added.
Chapman said the me%|ng was
only supposed to be Vari .information-gathering venture.
The meeting, which lasted about
an hour, was chaired by former
graduate student association
president Dave Fuller, now a math
grad.
Newly-elected GSA president
^Norman Lewis, a chemistry grad,
was;approached to participate in
the meeting but refused on the
grounds he knew little about the TA
situation.
Chapman said Lewis' refusal to
appear was disappointing because
it meant there was no official GSA
support of the TA meeting.
A second year arts TA said the
meeting got organizing off to a
shaky start.
"This committee will beworking
in the shadows, afraid of their
departments," he said. "How can
they accomplish anything when
they can't come out in the open?
Not even this meeting was in the
open."
A third year education TA said
he was satisfied with the first
meeting. He said it was the first
real opportunity to get oriented
and the best was yet to come.
UBC's TAs say they were
prompted to organize after learning of inequalities of pay scales,
workloads and TA-supervisor
disparities between departments.
They said they began taking
serious interest in their positions
when they learned of an eight per
cent stipend increase allotted to
them by the board of governors
across the board.
Some TAs said they never
received the full increase and some
said they had not even been
notified of the proposed increase. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,  1976
Council
right-wing
If -you didn't think this year's student
representative assembly consists of a bunch of brainless,
knee-jerk, right-wing assholes, consider what they did
Wednesday night.
They voted against establishing an Alma Mater
Society women's committee which would co-ordinate
women's activities on campus and give women a drop-in
centre where they could go for anything from lunch to
psychiatric help.
This committee was to operate like any other
committee, of the SRA: it would draw up a program
for the coming year, figure out how much money it
would cost, and ask council for the money. The SRA
would study its budget and, if it figured the program is
good, give the committee the necessary money.
In addition to being a co-ordinating organization
and setting up a women's office, the ad-hoc committee
was to initiate speakers and - programs designed
specifically for women, and serve as a lobbying group for
women's issues. •
The reasoning behind setting up a women's committee is
that women, as one of the larger oppressed groups in
society, needed an organization to look out for their
interests — something that is impossible to do on an
individual  basis.
And, even in these regressive 1970s, there's no
question that women are discriminated against, both
overtly and subtly. The discrimination ranges from rape
and divorce laws to the kind Of things girls and young
women are urged to do with their lives (namely, to
serve others).
And yet 13 of 22 councillors who voted on the
issue Wednesday night decided that "the group wouldn't
be offering a service" and should not exist.
Why? The view*that the group would not offer a
service was mouthed by science rep Anne Katrichak,
engineering senator Keith Gagne and apparently shared
by  11  others.
"Other SRA committees such as the housing
committee and the teaching and academic standards
committee are set up with specific problems and goals,"
Katrichak said. "But they (the committee) haven't
presented specific problems and goals they would like
this body as its founder to see through."
Yup, yup, Anne. Well: why, not try to eliminate
discrimination against women on campus, for a starter?
That should keep the- committee busy for the next two
or three decades.
While half the people in the room were picking
their jaws up from where they'd failed to the floor,
Katrichak continued:
"Why don't they set up as a club and come to
the student administrative council (the red tape arm of
the AMS)  for money and support?"
Nobody thought of saying it last night, but the
best answer for that is the line by Nicola Sumner, an
organizer of the now-defunct women's office: "Women's
liberation  isn't a club."
The Ubyssey would hate to think that the AMS
voted against establishing the women's committee
because it didn't think sexual discrimination is a
problem or that it doesn't exist. But council didn't give
any other reasons than those put forward by Katrichak
and mentioned above; what other conclusion can we
reach?
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 1, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
Sue Vohanka was sauntering down the road one day when suddenly
. . . nothing happened. There was no dismembered Steve Howard lying by
the road. Doug McMullin, Heather Walker, Ralph Maurer and Marcus Gee
were not scattered in bloody pieces on the ground. In fact there was
absolutely nothing abnormal going on. Vicky Booth, Chris Gainor, Ted
Davis, Deb van der Gracht and Matt King were not running away into the
woods, their clothes spattered with gore. Jon Stuart, Jan Nicol, Amanda
King, Perry Keller, Bill TIeleman, Paul Wilson and David Morton were
doing the exact same things they did every other day, month after month.
There were no police sirens wailing in the background as Geof
Wheelwright, Bruce Baugh, Ted Collins, Les Wiseman and Shane McCune
were not standing staring at the non-existent death scene. Doug Rushton,
Deryl Mogg and Don Chang did nothing unusual.
"Coach,   at  three  and  one,  your  team   is   in first  place  in the Western Conference.  To what do you
attribute your success?" "Well, to begin with, it's discipline, a dedication to practice . .."
We  also  have  a  steady  defence.   But  when   it  counts,  we  kill  them with our deadly precision
passing.
Thanks,
Bas
I'd like to know how the students
on this campus expect the administration, senate, board, and
the department of education to
take their elected representatives
seriously.
In most faculties you can get
elected as a student representative
if you have about six friends. Very
often people get in by acclamation.
This lets people know that
students don't really care who
represents them. It also means
that often the situation arises
where elected representatives
have philosophies and ideas which
are radically different from the
majority of the students they
represent.
Even more damaging to the
cause of student representation is
the fact that many elected
representatives are not responsible enough to serve their full
terms.
Last year a board representative
resigned. Right now there are
three empty seats on senate. And
last night the president of the
student representative assembly
quit.
This kind of thing makes it extremely difficult for anyone to do
an effective job representing
students at UBC.
Next time there is an election use
your vote intelligently.
Basil Peters
engineering 4
student representative on the
board of governors
Rounder
I know it's early in the year, but
that's still no excuse for sloppy
criticism.
Ian Morton's review of Tom
Grainger's Roundabout (Sept. 17)
contains the following description
of a theatrical characterization:
"Roger Rowley, in a much
cleverer,more empathetic Malcolm
Letters
MacDowell-type role, excels as
Charlie Flower..."
Now, I admit that this is taken
out of context, but even within the
review as a whole, one would be
hard pressed to discern just what
or whom is much cleverer and/or
more empathetic that what or
whom.
Malcolm MacDowell is an actor.
He has played several roles, some
sympathetic, some apathetic,
some, yes, even empathetic. He is
not, however, the part he plays; a
distinction that should be made
before one pretends to criticize
theatre.
This ambiguity continues into
the final paragraph. Morton
rightly admits that the play was
'too intelligent" for him. He then
goes on to "doubt" something,
which from his rather convoluted
statement could be any of the
following:
1. The "point" of the play;
2. Whether he was awake or
asleep (while watching the play or
writing the review?) or
3. Some vague "it" which he just
missed experiencing.
Rather than carry on love affairs
with their own words, perhaps
reviewers at The Ubyssey could
try for some brevity and clarity. It
would be appreciated.
Paddy McCallum
arts 4
Logo 3
Your "new" logo is really no go.
The Red Rag had better art. And
the engineers aren't even in arts.
Your logo sucks worse than Red
Rag photos.
Your logo has forced me to accept a date with a member of the
more cultured engineer crowd. I'm
happy to be a gear-girl. I now see
thetruth. Your "new, progressive"
logo has taught me that revolution
is regression. I now see that the
engineers are the radical ones.
They are in favor of progressive
tradition.
I liked your old logo, but I find
that since you've opted for an "in
with the new, out with the old"
approach, I'm now in with the old
and out with the new. Novelty is the
essence of creativity, and art.
But your logo is new, not novel. It
is a graphic illustration of
regression in its most redundant
form. It is a disgrace in the eyes of
creativity and a demonstration of
the Ubyssey's perverted sense of
art.
I'm going to stick with the
engineers from now on. Tradition
has shown that the engineers have
a working knowledge of aesthetics.
They've been around for a long
time, but they are still a novelty.
When they change something, it is
always for the better—not just
change for change's sake.
Toilet paper draped on trees is
far and away more stimulating
than your new logo.
The Ubyssey is back in the dark
ages; the gears are here and now.
And don't let me hear you say that
if engineer mentality is where
1970s art is at you'd rather stay
where you are. You don't have any
idea how significant one little act
can be.
If you were to reverse your
reversive action (bring back the
old logo) you would propel yourself
far and away ahead of the times,
ahead of the gears and their art.
You would be as far out as you used
to be.
But until that day comes, I will
drown my sorrows in forty beers,
for lack of anything better to do.
Priscilla Goodbody
Portland, Ore.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Klaek Oak Arkansas Ittlt*^
. OrV* •  • • •  •
•   •   •   w w M_m   •   •   •   •
v^ *d**«* * *"0OOC
•y-
Page Friday
— geof wheelwright photo J&Uv —
*<&* SMk^i
indians
Canadians committing genocide
By TED COLLINS
Page Friday staffer, Ted Collins
was involved this summer in a
research project with the National
Parole Service in the area of Indians in the parole system.
His article last week went
partially into the findings of his
work as well as the effects of white
culture on the Indian society.
This week Collins writes of the
potential danger of the construction of the Mackenzie River
■Pipeline.
Last week I spoke about
Canada's Indians and the consequences of their treatment by
Canadian white culture. A large
number of them are dying violent
deaths, both from suicide and from
being killed by other Indians. This
matches trends among other
minorities in similar situations,
such as the American urban
blacks. Interracial murders —
black-white or white-black — are
relatively rare. A black murder
victim is most likely to have been
murdered by another black. The
conclusion seems fairly obvious.
When a culture is subordinated and
subjected to indignities by another
more dominant culture, it becomes
self-destructive.
What are the forces that can turn
a culture in on itself? One is the
breakdown of personal and
cultural pride. I could go on for
volumes telling about how an Indian's pride is broken, but that is
not my purpose here. Suffice it to
say that a man without pride is
dangerous, because he has nothing
to live up to, nothing to protect and
nothing to lose. Shortage of pride is
at the root of much native crime.
Last week I touched upon the
problem of native unemployment.
One of the factors that will cause a
culture to self-destruct is a
separation from the means of
production. Witness the following
example.
Grassy Narrows is a reserve in
northern   Ontario   near   Dryden.
With the discovery of mercury
pollution in the waters of that area,
commercial fishing was banned,
with the result that the Grassy
Narrows Reserve moved from
approximately 95 per cent employment to about five per cent.
The consequence of this was that
there was a rise of drinking among
these Indians and a rise of
violence, with brother killing
brother, nephew killing uncle, and
so on.
It is sad to say that ultimately,
Minimata disease caused by
mercury pollution will probably do
less damage to these Indians than
the loss of employment. Horrible
though the disease is, murder is
more final, and it claims two
victims at a time: he who dies and
he who loses his freedom. A-culture
is also more likely to survive
disease than social disorder.
Grassy   Narrows   is   not   an
isolated example. Time and again sequences if this pipeline is built,
it has been shown that the advent First a metaphor,
of white culture and technology If you introduce a foreign sub-
into areas formerly the territory of stance into an organism, several
Experience
our
Ambiance
7 p.m. — 2 a.m.
Everyday
3357 West Broadway
Telephone 732-6113
DANCERS ... preserving
Indians has resulted in the
destruction of the Native economic
structure and the undermining of
Native culture. Another such invasion is being planned now in the
form of the Mackenzie Valley
pipeline, and the purpose of this
article is to warn  of  the con-
self-destructive culture
things might happen. The substance might actually be useful,
fulfilling a need and causing the
organism to flourish, or on the
other hand, it might have no effect
at all. Another result might be that
it would induce an allergic reaction, or it could be toxic, bringing
about damage or death. The moral
is that it is not wise to introduce
such a substance into an organism,
with all its parts complementing
each other for maximum
production and maximum survival
value. Changing even one element
of a balanced ecology could bring
about far-reaching consequences.
Lake Erie is now a haven for eels
and little else.
In Australia, they are still having
trouble with excessive numbers of
rabbits. In the Soviet Union, they
are now trying to synthesize a
palatable caviar because the
widespread pollution of the Black
Sea has caused a shortage of
sturgeon.
A society functions in much the
same way as an organism. It can
only accept so much before it
begins to sicken and die. When
something happens to upset a
cultural ecology, the results can
often be disastrous. To show just
how disastrous, I would like to
contrast the situation I have been
See PF 5: CULTURAL
PETER   FONDA
Restricted    —   Violence   and|
coarse    language   throughout.
— R. McDonald, B.C. Director.
FIGHTING MAD
ii
Vogue
Shows at:    12:20,   1:50,   3:45,   5:40,   7:35,9:30      •'J***"*1"*
s Sunday 2:10  615-5414
THE TRAMS-AMERICAN OUTLAW ROAD RACE-
A DEMOLITION DERBY WITHOUT RULES!
12:15, 2:10,4:05, 6, 8, 10 MATURE:-R. McDonald
i Violence and coarse language. B.C. Director
Odeon
181   GRANVILLE
682-7468
ANDRE PELLETIER
MIGUEL FERNANDEZ
"EAST END HUSTLE1
RESTRICTED -  Nude sex,
and Brutal Violence.
—R. McDonald, B.C.  Director I
Coronet fej
Shows at 12,1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30
.    Sunday 2, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 esi granville   eas-682e
Shows at  12:20, 1:30, 3:00, 4:45,|
6:30, 8, 10
"If You Don't Stop It    Sundav 3- 4:45< 6:3°- 8-10'
You'll Go Blind"
Coronet tmwi
RESTRICTED - Crude sex comedy
-   R.  McDonald, B.C. Director «< granville   eas-esze
THE
FUNNIEST FILM
OF 1985
Shows: 7:30, 9:30
Coarse and suggestive ^.
Hn?.u-a2ii,]!'2uSn£uJ;1.     staring CHEVY CHASE  «*J,,Bit,«,,;»»
Park
R. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
8762747
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
THE MAGIC FLUTE'
GENERAL
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
SHOWS 7:30-9:30
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR il 30th
r
PALIMO PICASSO
"IMMORAL TALES"
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
SHOWS
7:30-9:30
Varsity
324-3710V
NUDITY AND SEX THROUGHOUT      224-3730*
-R. McDONALD, B.C. Director 4375 w. 10th
■INTRAMURALS IN OCTOBER1
Women's Intramural Program
EVENT
*
Volleyball
Ice Hockey
League
Broomball
Tennis Tournament
(Singles)
Turkey Trot
Flag Football
Squash
Curling
DEADLINE
COMPETITION
^
DATE
DATE
TIME
FACILITY
Friday
Sept. 24
Monday
Sept. 27-Nov. 8
Except Mon.Oct.
Leagues
11
7:30 -
9:30
Memorial
Gym
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursdays
Oct.7-Nov. 25
Leagues
7:30-
9:30
Winter Sports
Centre
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursday
Oct.7-Oct.21
Double
Elimination
7:30-
9:30
Winter Sports
Centre
Friday
Oct. 8
Saturday
Oct. 9
Double
Elimination
10:00 a.m
4:00 p.m.
Armouries
Friday
Oct. 8
Timed
12:35
Noon
Memorial
Field
Friday
Oct. 8
Thursday
Oct. 14,21
Double
Elimination
12:35
Noon
Memorial
Field
Friday
Oct. 15
Mon-Thurs.
Oct.18-Oct.21
Double
Elimination
Weekdays
P.M.
Winter Sports
Centre
Friday
Oct. 15
Saturday
Oct. 23
Double
Elimination
All
Day
Winter Sports
Centre
Men's Intramural Program
Hockey
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursday
Oct. 7
Weekday
Evenings
TWSC
3 on 3
Basketball
Friday
Oct. 8
Sunday
Oct. 17
10:30
4:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Basketball
Friday
Oct. 8
Monday
Oct. 18
Weekday, Noon
& Evenings
Memorial Gym
Turkey Trot
Friday
Oct. 8
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Arts 20 Race
Friday
Oct. 8
Thursday
Oct. 14
12:35
Noon
VGH to UBC (Start
at 12th & Heather)
Curling
Bonspiel
Friday
Oct. 22
Sat., Sun.
Oct. 30, 31
All Day
TWSC
Great Pumpkin
X-Country Cycle Race
Thursday
Oct. 28
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Co-Recreation Intramural Program
Golf 4
Sunday
Oct. 3
1:00 p.m.
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & return via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 1
12:35
Noon
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 7
7:30-
9:30 p.m
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 14
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & back via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 15
12:35
Noon
Badminton
(Doubles)
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 21
7:30-
9:30 p.m
Joggers 4 Mile Run
(University Blvd.-Blanca-
Chancellor Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 22
12:35
Noon
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 28
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Racquetball
(Doubles)
Friday
Oct. 29
Sunday
Oct. 31
1:00-
5:00 p.m.
Joggers 5 Mile Run
Cross Country
Friday
Oct. 29
12:35
Noon
University Golf
Course
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
Memorial Gym
Memorial Gym
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Memorial Gym
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Memorial Gym
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Page Friday, 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1976 PF   INTERV>
BLACK OAK ARKANSAS ... you can take the boys out of the country, but.
Page Friday staffers Bruce Baugh and Geof Wheelwright
talked this week with members of raunch and roll hand
Black Oak Arkansas in their Bayshore Inn suite.
Later that evening they went to their concert
at the Gardens.
Black Oak Arkanasas are billed by their
record company as "American's x-rated
rock group". Yet, when PF talked with
Black Oak band members on Tuesday,
group spokesman Jim Dandy tried to
convince us that in reality Black Oak are
just a bunch of "down home country boys"
who share the same wholesome values as
any other hillbilly.
PF: You say you are a people oriented
group. What do you mean?
Dandy: We have not only the sexual
controversy, which has been sensationalized
over a lot of your medias and which I think is
almost a bad thing, almost a diversion from
what is truly the better essence of Black Oak
Arkansas. We have become a brotherhood
together, our lives in the mountains
together. It's a family type oriented group.
We were discovered by the people and we
were a people's group. This made us invulnerable to a lot of the boycotting of
medias, from radio stations and magazines,
back in the beginning of our careers.
PF: You complained about the emphasis
placed on the sexual aspect of your act by
the media, but haven't you done a lot to play
up that aspect yourselves?
Dandy: We've always been a symbol of
virility and we'll never hide it. Actually you
know, on T.V., or where they're selling cars
or selling magazines, it's what they want on
iithe front page. We haven't picked out the
, subjects. We talk about a lot of things. You
know how many songs we have on each
album that are actually sexually orientated? There's maybe one or two songs per
album.
If you're talking about the (skintight)
pants, Rudolf Nureyev wears them pants
and that's where I got the idea from. I like to
dance.
PF: How about the way you hold the
microphone?
Dandy: I didn't pick that picture neither!
I got all kinds of things I have on stage but I
ain't, you know, the rolling, hunching fool
they try to make me out to be. We are and
always will be be the sign of virility.
People will sensationalize it into being a
lustful thing. Lust is not part of our whole
thing. In our family we have kids of our own.
Our example is not that, it never has been.
The way we live never has been. It's love,
not lust.
PF: Given the sexually aggressive nature
of your act, what is your attitude toward
women?
Dandy: I love 'em. I don't see a lot of
sexually aggressive things, other than there
being passion in a lot of different ways. We
have no grudge against women. When we
make love to 'em, we make love to 'em.
Now I have a wife of my own that I love
very much. I like the way she makes love,
and she likes the way I make love. To really
love you gotta love many things. But to love
is not to lust. To love is not to use. Love
doesn't come forcefully.
PF: You have a retreat in the Ozarks.
What is the aim of setting up that lifestyle?
Dandy: Independence. Knowing how not
to need so much. Thomas Jefferson said the
best kind of government governs the least.
We're trying to show them that we don't
need so many people to protect and to serve
dressed up in blue, comin' an hour late and
fillin' out a report. We want to take care of
our own. We wanna have the backbone to
raise our own. We try to get with nature's
way..
PF: Is that why you isolate yourselves?
Dandy: Isolate? We went back to where
we came from. A lot of famous people have
fences around their place. You know why we
do that? People used to go through there all
the time just like at Disneyland. When the
fence is there they know it's a private thing.
When you deal with the public all the time
you have to have a certain amount of
solitude. The whole fifteen thousand acres
— geof wheelwright photo
isn't fenced in; it's just fenced in around
where we live.
In Arkansas there aren't any rock groups.
We're the only one. When you're around
where you play all the time and controversy
is raised up, to us it's not seclusion. We were
brought up in country livin', brother.
There's plenty of people out there, it's just
not all concrete. There's people all through
them woods.
PF: You were involved in a lawsuit
recently.
Dandy: We just got back from a tour of
Europe, and we had a few weeks off.
We were confronted by a delegation of
reputable citizens and the county judge of
the county we live in. They all asked us to
donate fifteen thousand dollars for a
people's medical wing on a medical building
for the poor people, so they could have the
technical advantages people with money do.
We said, "Far out, we'll do it."
We like to get involved, but also a lot of
kids up there had never seen a rock concert.
They've never had a rock concert in the
Ozarks. Never. The most they've had is
Midnight Special. We decided we'd do a
concert and donate all the money to this
thing. We found a place to do it in a place
called Harrison, Arkansas in the rodeo
grounds. The people were sympathetic to
the cause. They had people who were gonna
benefit by this building.
Five days before we came, this preacher
J.D. Tatter came, who was with the "Open
Door Baptist Church". That's something he
put his own name on. Before that he'd been
in four different police departments and was
fired from everyone for overreacting.
He got five other preachers to come up
with him to the city council meeting to
protest the concert, saying, "I've seen rock
concerts, I've come from Kansas city, and
they bring sin and they bring drugs and sex.
You might as well put up a whore house on
main street if you need money that bad. Do
we need these kind of heathen, mongrel dogs
before we can get the kind of money we need
for these type of causes?"
After they let him blow his stack for a
while, they said, "Frankly, yes we do. We
cannot deny these people to come in and
play no more than we can Pete Fountain or
Billy Graham."
They wouldn't stop it, so J.D. said, "Well,
we're gonna pray for rain, and there isn't
gonna be any concert." Blue sky
everywhere the day of the concert. We made
a point of saying to everybody, "This is the
Good Lord's day for you. There's nothing
you're doing here that's wrong, so feel free
to have a good time." Great concert.
But the guy kept on attacking us. He didn't
realize untiljie gqt into court that we have a
very spiritual foandation of our own. Our
beliefs are very strong also.
But this guy had to be stopped. Our loved
ones were endangered. We have wives and
kids, and they go shopping like everybody
else, and he was saying we were devil-
worshipping, heathen mongrels. How would
you like it when your woman, when she goes
out shopping, some redneck thinking, "Ah,
devil-worshipping, immoral type"? Would
youstopit? Do you think it's right for a man
of the cloth to be able to lie? I don't either,
and we thought that was a bigger hypocrisy
than anything we'd ever come across.
We showed we had respect for their
system. We said, "Put up or shut up. We're
gonna use your court, we're gonna come
here and we're gonna use your laws" and
say, "Put our names back right", 'cause he
did it in all kindsa papers, all kindsa radios.
He was out there marching against us,
standing on street corners and court
squares, and I mean it gets to a point where
you don't want it no more. We stood on it.
And we won. We didn't want no money
from him though.
A lot of good people came out of the
woodwork, and were backing us up, 'cause a
lot of them had asked us to do the benefit.
Also, a lot pf good Christians came out of the
woodwork, and in that court they found out
that we do believein God, and we do believe
in Jesus Christ and in a lot of things that
nobody had ever asked us before.
There's a lot of older people now who are
turned on by the whole ideal of us, and
realize that we ain't breaking tradition so
much as keeping it sound. A lot of the ways
of the family, a lot of the ways of respect
we've gained up there in a lot of different,
just human experience with fellow man,
right there in the locale.
But one of the reasons we kept our sign of
virility out there, and let people know that
we get hot and nasty just like everybody
else, is that we didn't want people thinkin'
we was preachin' to 'em. There's a lotta
people out there who know us to be regular
people: regular good old Arkansas boys,
whatever that means, we are.
So there you have it. They may look
rebellious on stage, or even dementedly
lascivious in true Bo Diddley fashion as they
were on Tuesday night, but deep inside they
believe in the down-home American values:
God and a family where the wife does the
shopping and stays with the kids while the
menfolk go, put to hunt up a livin'; and where
seximay be fun, but whatever it is, it's not
lust. X-rated my ass. I'd rate them PG.
The only thing that keeps Sunday school
classes away from these guys is the fact that
they really can't play music at all (Jim
Dandy, as has been said, moans like a
bullfrog in heat) and they are so loud! But
like most pre-sixties rock and roll, as far as
establishment values go, Black Oak
Arkansas arcsafe. Woolly bully. Give your
mother some ear-plugs and take her along
the next time these boys are back in town.
ArAFAT/^
traditional
Qitco-Roman Cuisine
Whole Wheat Pizzas
Whole Wheat
Spaghetti
Souvlaki
Mousaka
Kalamari
Game Hens
"LUNCH
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
DINNER
5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
733-6824
2222 W. 4th Van. B.C.
Friday, October 1, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Poets miss mark
By ALLAN FORSBERG
It seems to me that the Canada
Council is so keen on having us
believe that literary art is alive
and well and living in Canada that
they are willing to publish
anything, desperately hoping that
it is genuis. More often than not it
is mediocre and generally not as
good as we are led to believe.
Lizard on the Scalding Stone by
Michael E. Latter
Valley Editions, 30 Pages.
Michael E. Latter's Lizard on the
Scalding Stone, despite its intriguing title, is distinctively
mediocre with an occasional spark
of brilliance. He dedicates this slim
volume to his grandfather, whose
ragtime piano "first made me
aware of rhythm." So spurred, we
read on to find twenty-one poems
which are nothing if not arhyth-
mical. e. e. cummings is rhythm.
Michael E. Latter tries hard, but
never quite achieves his objective,
if one is to take his dedication
seriously.
The most disappointing feature
in this work is that the man has a
great deal of potential. Every once
in a while one sees a spark of
genius, only to be disappointed
when you are left with that while
the author continues along in a
different direction. Frustrating to
say the least!
The Mind  of Genesis   by  David\
Slobotsky
Valley Editions, 44 Pages.
The Mind of Genesis by David
Slobotsky follows in vaguely the
same vein. Publicized as "a
collection of fictions, fables,
parables and prose poems
. . beautifully textured and simply
phrased stories with Eastern as
well as Hebraic influences," one
feels that one may well expect not
your average book of .poetry. In
this respect we are not disappointed.
The book is composed of two
collections of short stories,
parables etc. Part One is called
The Medallion and has a distinctly
Eastern flavour with the
characters, places, and events
described in an exotic dreamlike
fashion.
The Second Part, entitled The
Mind of  Genesis,   is classically
TbeOLB.
THE OLD ROLLER RINK
Theatre Restaurant
135 West 1st St., North Van.
986-1331
In Concert: Oct. 1st and 2nd
Eddie Harris
Admission: $4.50
Oct. 5th thru 9th
Ken Tobias
and
OFFENBACH
Admission:
$3.50 Tues. to Thurs.
$4.00 Fri. and Sat.
Hebraic with most of the
characters actual Rabbis of
historic and literary fame.
Slobotsky explains that the stories
about these men are his own invention, and it is just as well since
many of the stories seem to be
fantasies, with some pretty
unlikely situations.
As one might expect, this type of
format gives the writer a whole
range of opportunities to borrow
from both the Hebrew and Eastern
cultures and develop his stories
from there. Slobotsky does this, but
as often as not the stories are
steeped with terms, references
and logic so totally foreign to the
average Canadian reader that any
meaning there may be, is obscured. In a few of the shorter and
simpler stories, however, one is
able to appreciate Slobotsky as a
good story teller with a wry sense
of humor, and a feeling for a really
good story.
Again, here is a young poet that,
given time and exposure, may
develop into a really fine artist.
Meanwhile, I suppose, we can
expect to be continually bombarded by Canada Council. (One
can only grit one's teeth and carry
on.)
poetry
Now that's Southern Comfort.
Straight, on the rocks or
mixed. That's what puts
Southern Comfort
in a class by itself.
fls rich in heritage
as a bluegrass banjo picker.
The unique taste of Southern Comfort,
enjoyed for over 125 years.
-!*A>'.fff
Earn some high credits this
i lintel id
COMMERCE STUDENT SERVICES
Available at the Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce on or near most college and
university campuses throughout Canada.
Commerce Student Services are designed to help the student
successfully manage the financial aspects of his or her education.
OPEN TO FIRST-,SECOND-.THIRD-, FOURTH
FIFTH-, SIXTH. SEVENTH-. EIGHTH- AND
HIGHER-YEAR STUDENTS.
COMM 101     Introduction to General Banking.
Supervisor of Service: The Commerce.
A service that emphasizes .saving money. It covers such necessary information as setting up a bank account, making deposits.
making withdrawals, bringing your passbook up to date, cashing
cheques, etc. Unlimited enrolment.
Prerequisite: Money to open an account.
Offered K Summer Si Fall ^Winter ZlSpring
COMM 102    How to Manage your Money.
Supervisor of Service: The Commerce.
Different ways to earn higher interest on your money. Making
ends meet: budgeting and money handling (paying bills and
meeting financial commitments, balancing your cheque book,
affording a night out, etc.) Unlimitedenrolment.
Prerequisite: Money to manage.
OfTered 53 Summer K! Fall KI Winter MSpring
COMM 103    Principles of Student Loans.
Supervisor of Service: The Commerce.
Check with the Supervisor of Service for full description and
prerequisites for enrolment.
OfTered ^Summer Ki Fall £3 Winter (SSpring.
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
Page Friday, 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October  T,  1976 i  •***"!&?
indians
Cultural ecology
From PF 2
describing with that of certain
natives in the far north of Quebec
who have been virtually untouched
by the mainstream of white
culture.
The group I wish to talk about is
that surveyed in the book, The
Administration of Justice Beyond
the 50th Parallel, by Jerome
Choquette, Minister of Justice for
Quebec in 1972. The sample is of
approximately ten thousand
people, five hundred of which were
white — five per cent — and the
NORTHERN INDIAN
. . .an endangered species?
remainder of which were Indians
and Inuit, equally divided. The
duration of the survey was three
years and ten months, from 1968 to
near the end of 1971.
To my mind, the most significant
fact the survey revealed was that
among these ten thousand people
for the entire forty-six months of
the study, not one murder, attempted murder, manslaughter,
rape, armed robbery or robbery
with violence was committed.
The report states, "In brief,
major crime does not exist, and,
consequently, there are no hardened criminals among these
people. They remain respectful of
authority if not always of those who
represent it.
"Whether it be at the stage of
preliminary inquiry or at the time
of trial, the same fact is
established: the majority of cases
against Indians and Eskimos have
to do with minor offenses against
persons or property."
In case somebody wishes to ease
his conscience by claiming that the
above is an isolated incident, I
would like to quote a passage from
the preface to Indians and the Law,
a survey prepared by the Canadian
Corrections Association in 1967.
The author of the preface was
Gilbert Monture, a Canadian Indian. I would like to compare the
following quotation with those
above.
"I had been born and raised on
an Indian reserve prior to the turn
of the century and had lived there
until the beginning of World Wax I.
I was quite aware of the type of
misdemeanor and "trouble" . . .
that our people were experiencing
with the law, such as drunk and
disorderly or assault and battery
arising out of occasional drinking
sprees, but rarely any crimes of
deliberate violence or forcible
burglary or theft. Now it seemed
the whole picture had
changed ..."
The author of the above quote
describes a situation startlingly
similar to that prevailing in northern Quebec, as shown in the
previously quoted survey. I
suggest that what had entered the
picture and altered it so drastically
was the development of the north.
Between the time when he left the
reserve and when he was writing in
1967, Indian life had been more and
more infringed upon by white
culture. In my belief, it was this,
and the resulting culture shock
that caused not only the increase in
crime, but even the change in the
very nature of the crimes committed. A foreign element had been
introduced into the culture, and the
culture proceeded to sicken.
Somebody once told me with
some amusement that one of the
reasons that the natives of the
Yukon did not want the Mackenzie
Valley pipeline to be built was that
they feared their children would be
corrupted by white culture. I hope
that I have demonstrated that this
fear is a justified one, and not one
to be greeted with laughter.
There have been numerous
reasons put forward against the
building of the pipeline, one of
which is that it might upset the
delicate ecology of the tundra. I
think I have found a better reason.
It is that not only will the ecology of
a tundra be upset, but the ecology
of a culture.
I would like to issue the warning
that if this pipeline is built, then
natives, both Indians and Inuit,
will die. The blood of these natives
will be on the hands of the builders
and on those who allowed them to
build. If this pipeline is built, it will
demonstrate finally that this
society is more interested in
money than in people. It will
confirm to the native peoples of
Canada what they have been given
to suspect that they are tolerated
merely in the name of conscience,
but that if they get in the way of
what this society wants, then both
they and their culture are expendable. Conscience will have at
last given way to greed, and yet
another act of genocide will have
been committed.
MUSSOC
presents
Auditions    Oct. 2 & 3
12-6 p.m. UBC Old Aud.
for more info
come by the
MUSSOC office
SUB 218
r#*Slfl
fa*?
A wine for all reasons. Mateus Rose\
Product of Portugal.
M.irk~tei'  iciosi Cunuda
b» Cnnnclian Sclvnlt-y Distiller iei Lid
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5:'?'•'//.../|.^-' :y-l'm^-:fW
Urn
B.C.S great tasting beer,
...because it's slow brewed with the pure
spring water from Shannon Falls Park.
Friday, October 1, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 va,y
movies
Classic cartoons screened
By SHANE McCUNE
This week's treat from the flic pickers is a
short film quiz. Of the following films,
idenity those that are animated cartoons:
(a) Accatone
(b) East of Eden
(c) Resistance
(d) Duck Dogers in the 24 1/2 Century
(e) Robert Having His Nipple Pierced
(f) All of the above
The correct answer, of course, is (d), a
1952 Warner Brothers cartoon by Chuck
Jones, in which Daffy Duck's mission is to
replenish earth's supply of aludium
phosdex, the shaving cream atom.
The others — all of which are dramatic
films of one sort or another — were not
thrown in just to confuse you. They are all
among the flics on view during the next
week or so of Pacific Cinematheque
Pacifique showings at the National Film
Board theatre, 1155 West Georgia.
The current array of five separate film
series includes Hollywood Cartoons,
Postwar Italian film, Elia Kazan, and New
British Cinema.
The first series to get underway consists
of five features by Elia Kazan, beginning
tonight with East of Eden, and continuing on
successive Fridays with Gentleman's
Agreement, Splendour in the Grass, The
Arrangement and Wild River.
East of Eden, made in 1954, is now mainly
remembered as James Dean's first major
dramatic role. It is unfortunate that the cult
following of Dean has overshadowed not
only the film's story (based on Steinbeck's
novel of the same name) but also the superb
performances of Jo Van Fleet (who won a
best supporting actress oscar for her role),
Julie Harris, Raymond Massey and Burl
Ives.
"Set in 1917, East of Eden evokes an age of
innocence'filled with romantic myths about
war and patriotism which were soon
shattered by World War I," says my handout from Pacific Cinematheque Pacifique.
"The dramatic subject of the film is Cal's
(James Dean) increasingly intense confrontation with the harsh realities behind
.personal myths about his family."
The Gay Film series begins Saturday with
the 1970 release, Robert Having His Nipple
Pierced, by Sandy Daley, and Arthur
Bressen's 1974 feature, Passing Strangers.
Of Robert, etc., the PCP notes say:
"Bizarre as the title sounds, Ms. Daley's
film is pleasurable, full of beautiful
imagery: white enamel, green leaves, silver
pillows, rose petals, Robert in black leather,
anesthetized and wounded, swooning into
the arms of his sultry lover as a doctor
^performs the decorative operation."
Poet and rock singer Patti Smith delivers
an "hilarious" soundtrack monologue in
"the English-speaking world's most extravagant New Jersey accent."
Passing Strangers is a full-length (77
minutes) feature about the relationship
between an 18-year-old student and a 28-
year-old white collar worker.
The first half of the film is black-and-
white; the remainder is in color, to accentuate the story's romanticism.
"Nothing is more embarrassing than
romanticism that misses," admits Bressen.
"But if it succeeds, then you can reach a
gentleness, a tenderness in people that they
may have forgotten in themselves."
A warning: the films in this series,
although supposedly not exploitive, are
frequently explicit.
New British Cinema is explored Monday
and Tuesday at 8 p.m. with British director
Ken McMullec speaking in person at the
showing of his 1976 film Resistance, on
Monday, and also at the screening of five
short films Tuesday.
Resistance (90 min., color and b&w)
concerns five people active in the French
resistance who are brought together in a
mental hospital near Paris, where they
undergo experimental treatment. The film
utilizes a great deal of archive and newsreel
footage to lend a historicaj perspective.
For less serious film students (or for
student of less serious films), Wednesday is
the first of three nights dedicated to the
Hollywood Cartoon.
The program (showings at 7, 9 and 11
p.m.) is an excellent survey course in
American animation, from the first Mickey
Mouse talkie, Steamboat Willie (1929),
through Betty Boop singing, "Please don't
take my boop-boop-a-doop away" in Boop
Boop a Doop (1932) by Max and Dave'
Fleischer, the creators of Popeye, to Elmer
Fudd as  Siegfried and Bugs  Bunny  as
JAMES DEAN .. .East of Eden, before the fall
  ■   - . ■ i_
Brunhilde in my favorite Wagnerian epic,
What's Opera Doc?, made in 1957.
Incidentally, those early Mickey Mouse
cartoons featured a far gutsier Mickey than
the club leader of later days. Many of them
have been banned in Sweden as too violent.
Betty Boop suffered a similar fate in the
U.S. during the late 1930s, although
violence was not the issue. The slick little
Art Deco vamp was rated "X" after the
Hays Act, and although she was kept alive
briefly in diluted form, her fans weren't
buying it. The voice of Betty Boop (whose
name I cannot recall) is now plugging paper
towels on television. ("Weigh it fer yerself,
honey!")
"Forces of circumstance" is the title
given to the second part of the series on
Postwar Italian Cinema, beginning Thursday with Accatone, Pier Paolo Pasolini's
1961 story of a working class outcast,
spearated from hs wife and son, who pimps
for a living. When his sole prostitute is
arrested, so is he, and once set free he tries
to entice another girl into hooking, but falls
for her instead.
Pasolini's assistant director for this film
was Bernardo Bertolucci, who would later
take Pasolini's realism a step further in
Last Tango in Paris.
WIN
ONE OF THREE
HONDA CIVICS
Full details are     t~4*-
in your free
personal telephone directory
available at your
campus bookstore
IN THE
LONGDISTANCE
SWEEPSTAKES.
Trans-Canada Telephone System
Page Friday, 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,  1976 Friday, October 1, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 11
Aid amounts unchanged
HALIFAX (CUP)—Canada's
provincial education ministers will
make recommendations on student
aid changes to the federal
government soon, but they won't
include a proposal to increase that
aid.
At the close of the Council of
Ministers of Education of Canada
meeting here recently, Manitoba
education minister Ben Hanuschak
said: "The federal government has
not been approached to increase its
funding of the student aid
program," expected to be
overhauled sometime soon.
Nova Scotia education minister
Maynard MacAskill said the issue
was discussed, but the ministers
had nothing to report about an
expected new national student aid
program.
The   meeting  was   called   to
discuss the federal government's
plans for increased involvement in
post:secondary education policy,
according to Bennett Campbell,
council chairman and PEI
education minister.
The ministers told secretary of
state John Roberts that the
provinces will set terms for federal
plans to increase second-language
programs and would not give up
their jurisdiction granted under
the British North America Act.
The ministers had nothing to say
on effects that changes in federal-
provincial cost sharing are expected to have on post-secondary
education, despite a report from
informed sources that the Fiscal
Arrangements Act was to be on the
agenda.
Under the act, due to expire in
April 1977, the federal government
matches dollar for dollar what
provinces spend on their respective post-secondary education
systems.
Recent negotiations, however,
reveal the federal government will
abolish this system and replace it
with a transfer of tax points to the
provinces.
The smaller and poorer
provinces have said their small tax
bases will mean decreased
financing for education when the
new system comes into effect next
year.
FORMER PRISONER TO SPEAK
RICHARD
WURMBRAND
Tues., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
PARTY ROOM, S.U.B.
ANNIVERSARY
SALE      .,*
^Featuring
TIOTI
Bi   W&SBt     BffiMS        ^a9B&&^ Brans     BBSs
Canoiirlir^E
<*,*
Canon
Canon
Canon \c^-
A great way to get started in the
Canon system of photography
• Full aperture metering
• 50mm f 1.8 lens +, m aW*.a»\ -.
• Hot shoe $ 1 QQ.95
• Complete with case I   #  #
A superb new automatic exposure
camera from Canon. Smaller, lighter,
more feature packed than any previous Canon SLR. Hurry, these cameras
are scarce! Chrome model c/w new
f 1.8 lens.
$299»s
SEE THE CANON RACE CAR!
Centrepiece for our Anniversary Sale is this extensively modified Oatsun 240Z
face car. Well known throughout the Pacific Northwest as a top competition car.
Meet driver Larry Nerada
and his team — at the
same time check out the
fine line of Canon cameras.
Canon
!.■■    !
-JJ
*IJ
New updated model of Canon's professional system camera. Check its many
features including — multiple exposure, brighter viewfinder, combination
split image/microprism focusing, extended A.S.A. range and more.
SPECIALLY FLOWN IN!
$11495
INEWI
Canonet
This little Canon Range-
finder Camera taxes
great pictures under all
kinds of lighting conditions. Automatic daylight
and flash exposures. Accurate rangefinder focusing. Kit includes camera, flash and camera
case.
Lens&Miuneruu
2912 W. BROADWAY
CHARGEX
DEMO
STEREO
SALE
This week we are "house cleaning" at the Sound Room.
Our demo and trade-in equipment will be sold at super
low sale prices. Now is the time to pick up some real
stereo bargains. All units sold are fully warrantied. Some
with manufacturers' warranties of up to five years parts
and labor. Come early to avoid disappointment.
LOUDSPEAKERS (priced each)
AR 7, our best buy .    $69
AR 3a improved super bass $299
ARMST, mini studio monitor . .$169
AR LST/2,7 driver studio monitor $419
AR LST, 9 driver studio monitor $599
EPI 350, tower $349
Yamaha NS 645,10" 2 way  $109
Leak 2020, 8" 2 way        $69
Leak 2030, 8" 3 way   $99
OHM D Damaged finish . . $99
OHMC+    $179
OHMB $199
OHM B + v $249
Dyna A25XL    $79
AM/FM STEREO RECEIVERS
Pioneer SX434 $199
Pioneer SX535 $239
Sherwood S-7010     $199
Sherwood S-7110A     $249
Sherwood S-7210     $299
Sherwood S-7310  $349
Sherwood S-7900A     $449
Concord CR-110    $89
Concord CR-210 $129
Sansui 310 $139
Pioneer HR2000 with 8 track player $149
MISC. AMPS, PREAMPS, ETC
Pioneer SA-6500 Amplifier     $159
Pioneer SA-7500Amplifier   $299
Pioneer SA-8500 Amplifier  $399
Pioneer SA-9500 Amplifier   $499
Yamaha CA-lOOOAmplifier $379
Lux CL350 Preamp $359
Marantz 3200 Preamp, new model $259
SAE Mk IXB Preamp with 7 band eq $499
TURNTABLES/TAPE DECKS
Pioneer PL-112 complete $129
Pioneer PL-115 complete $159
Dual 1225complete   $149
Dual 1228 complete   $139
Dual 1218complete $109
Dual 1215    $39
Tandberg 6000Xreel deck $299
Pioneer CTF 2121 cassette deck $239
CAR STEREO CLEARANCE
CAR STEREO CLEARANCE - All Pioneer auto stereos in stock
must be cleared out. Save on car radios, tape players and
speakers. No reasonable offers refused.
Hurry! Most items are one-of-a-kind only.
Sorry—no phone orders please.
)•
THE SOUND  ROOM - MORE SOUND  FOR YOUR MONEY
2803 W.  Broadway  (at MacDonald)  736-7771 Page 12
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1976
u
m
1
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YAMAHA AUDIO
yp-450
Modern styling Goes Hand-
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All this For a greatly reduced
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1.95
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Sophisticated Tonearm Suspension System. Hinged
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BEST
OF THE
BAND
UMCSTVMlOtXJEBS
FLY LIKE AN EAGLE
Steve Miller Band
BEST OF THE BAND
THIS ONE'S FOR YOU
Barry Manilow
DEDICATION
Bay City Rollers
A Capital Industries Company
DARK SIDE OF THE MOON — Pink Floyd
HELEN REDDY'S GREATEST HITS
DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH — Jessi Colter
MUSIC, MUSIC — Helen Reddy
BAY CITY ROLLERS
ERIC CARMEN
TRYIN' TO GET THE FEELING — Barry Manilow
ROCK 'N' ROLL LOVE LETTER — Bay City Rollers
FACE THE MUSIC — Electric Light Orchestro
LEE OSKAR
OLE ELO — Electric Light Orchestra
AMERICAN FLYER
BARRY   MANILOW   II
POUSETTE—DART   BAND
INTERVIEW—Gentle  Giant
Capitol,
* Capital Intfustiies Company
NATALIE — Natalie Cole
BAPTISM — Ann Mortifee
MELISSA — Melissa Manchester
AMERICAN PIE — Don McLean
BETTER DAYS AND HAPPY ENDINGS — Melissa
Manchester
HEART UKE A WHEEL — Linda Ronstadt
CHEWING PINE — Leo Kottke
MEDDLE — Pink Floyd
DESOLATION BOULEVARD — Sweet
GREENHOUSE — Leo Kottke
WHY CANT WE BE FRIENDS — War
THE WORLD IS A GHETTO — War
Two-Record Set:
ENDLESS SUMMER
— Beach Boys
$4-99
Three-Record Set:
Will THE CIRCLE BE UNBROKEN — Nitty Gritty
'9
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Two Record Set:
STEAL YOUR FAQ — Grateful Dead
$7.99

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