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The Ubyssey Nov 2, 1984

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Vol. LXVII, No. 16
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November2,1984       s ^ss'i^iei
228-2301
— rory a. photo
LATEST STUDENT FASHIONS seen on campus this week. Theme this year is chivalry. Note knight in shining
armor and stereotypic damsel. (Left of picture, dummy.) Fashion designer (second from right) did not live long
enough to see his creations become trend — he was howled to death by five rats. (See last issue's ghost story for
more details.)
Cyanide petition gains support
Despite opposition UBC's Students for Peace and Mutual Disarmament club is going ahead with
plans to hold a cyanide pill referendum.
SPMD spokesperson Jennifer
Kinloch said although some people
have strongly opposed the referendum the club has received mostly
support.
"I was talking to the University
of Victoria's peace club and they
said they were going to hold a similar referendum soon," Kinloch
said. She added support from off
campus individuals has been strong
and the referendum has been covered by both the Sun and the Province.
She said the purpose of the referendum is twofold, to make people
organize against nuclear war and to
assist SPMD's membership, and
both purposes are being fulfilled.
Kinloch added, "After Brown
University's successful referendum
the students did not get cyanide pills
in health services but Brown's peace
group grew twofold and threefold."
When people are faced with the
shocking suggestion of stocking cyanide pills in student health services
for suicide in the event of a ntfclear
war, she said, they originally act
negatively but when they think further they realize the nuclear situation affects them personally.
People might then start working
against nuclear war, she said, adding she thought there are not
enough people working for disarm
ament on UBC's campus now.
But she said the group is no
longer hoping to hold the referendum this November but is planning
for a January referendum coinciding with student council elections.
SPMD now has 100 petition signatures. If the Alma Mater Society
receives 500 student signatures asking for a referendum on any topic
the society must hold the referendum according to its bylaws.
SFU students slacking off
The average number of credit
hours taken by Simon Fraser
University students dropped this
year, maintaining the trend of the
past several years.
According to a study by SFU's
analytical studies department, the
average course load per
undergraduate this fall is 10.2 credit
hours. The average last year was
10.4 credit hours.
"Our study was purely statistical
and didn't even delve into this
economic reasons behind the
figures," said department
spokesperson Mary McGee.
"However," she added, "superficially the numbers would appear
sensitive to the economy."
This drop is in keeping with a
reduction trend that began in 1977,
when the average course load per
student was 11.4 credit hours, said
McGee.
The greatest year to year drop occurred between 1979 and 1980,
when the average fell from 11.1 to
10.5 credit hours. This drop
parallels the sharp downturn of the
B.C. economy during the same
period, McGee said.
Janet Laxton, Canadian Federa
tion of Students spokesperson, said
although CFS has not formally
studied the issue, she knows many
SFU students were unable to obtain
desired courses.
"Because of the cancellation of
certain courses, many students have
had part-time status forced upon
them. People are unwilling to spend
money and time on courses not
related to their degrees just to fill
out their time tables," Laxton said.
The UBC administration does
not have statistics on the situation
at UBC.
Gym hedged on
peace speaker
By GINNY AULIM
People in charge of booking War
Memorial gym would not allow a
peace speech to be held there Remembrance Day because it is inappropriate, the Alma Mater Society
program director said Wednesday.
'' We thought it would be very fitting to have Helen Caldicott speak
about stopping nuclear madness on
November 11," Bruce Paisley said.
He added he was shocked when he
was unable to book the gym for
Caldicott's speech on that day.
Paisley would not say who specifically denied his request. "I still
have a relationship to maintain with
these people. Let's just say it was
the people in charge of booking the
gym," he said.
Paisley said when he first requested the gym for Caldicott on Nov. 11
he was told the speech would have
to be interrupted for the Remembrance Day ceremonies always held
there that day. Bookings people
later told him this type of speaker is
not fitting for the gym on that day.
"I couldn't believe that this went
down," Paisley said. "Caldicott is
a very highly regarded speaker
about nuclear issues."
Caldicott is the speaker in the
academy award winning documentary If You Love This Planet, and
the founder of the U.S. chapter of
Physicians for Social Responsibility.
Holding the speech on the long
weekend would have been more
convenient for people attending
from outside Vancouver, he added.
Caldicott is now speaking at the
University of Alberta Nov. 11,
Paisley said, and will be at UBC
Nov. 26.
Gary Marchant, UBC Students
for Peace and Mutual Disarmament
member, said he thinks it is absurd
that a peace activist's speech was
not allowed in the gym.
"That's the whole point of Remembrance Day — to remember
how horrible war was and to prevent it in the future. Nothing that
we'd do in the gym on Remembrance Day would be disrespectful
to war veterans."
Joanne Hintzliffe, physical education department administrative
assistant, said any questions about
Helen Caldicott should be directed
at Paisley because he is booking the
event.
Justin Marples, whose job is preventing conflicts in bookings, said
the speech may have interfered with
intramural events scheduled for
that day. "Paisley may have been
unable to reschedule the events into
different times," he said.
Marples claimed he has no idea
why Paisley said someone told him
the booking date was unfitting,
adding the department takes no
stand on the issue.
Daycare passes
By ROBERT BEYNON
The Alma Mater Society voted
Wednesday to contribute $350,000
to a daycare project an AMS committee has organized.
Don Holubitsky, Capital Projects
and Acquisition Committee member, said the money will be used to
construct a new daycare project on
campus, using money from the
CPAC fund.
"This is one of the most important projects on campus right
now," Holubitsky said. He said if
new daycare is not constructed now
there might be no daycare facilities
available to the campus community
in five years. The UBC fire marshal
has given this long before the present daycare becomes completely unsafe and UBC must close it down.
The project, which will cost
$800,000, will be financed 50 per
cent by the AMS and 50 per cent by
other groups, Holubitsky said. He
added, "We have the support of
student council, support in principle from the board of governors,
and an understanding with the
alumni that they will help raise
funds for the project."
The project will be built in a
modular style, he said, with a simple wood frame and a concrete slab
base. He said in the past projects
failed to be completed because they
were too expensive but he believes
the present project is within student
council's expenses.
Daycare was the second priority
in a referendum two years ago
which set up the CPAC fund. Holubitsky said the first priority, housing, is beyond the financial means
of the student society.
*     *     *
AMS director of administration
Glenna Chestnutt presented a second Loto UBC tuition prize to a
lucky student Wednesday night.
She presented Joanne Sasuari, unclassified 5, with a prize of $560.
She said the AMS added just under $2,000 into its bursary fund
with the lottery's total returns. The
AMS began the fund this year.
Homophobia challenged
"Homophobia is not a disease
but an attitude," a Vancouver psychiatrist told 25 people in SUB 215
Thursday.
Jaime Smith said society must
eradicate homophobia, a negative
attitude toward gays and lesbians.
It is expressed externally and internally, he said.
Overt external homophobia is
comparable to racism and is witnessed in "fag beatings," police en-
Grad centre still open
The graduate student centre will stay open, at least for now, a
UBC administration representative said Thursday.
Charles Bourne, presidential legal advisor, said the decision on
whether or not to close the centre has been put "on hold" until Neil
Risebrough, associate vice president student affairs, assesses the matter. Risebrough has not been on campus this week due to personal
matters.
The administration had threatened to close the centre on Nov. 1
unless an agreement was reached with the Graduate Student Society
over employee hiring practices and other matters.
"There is no question of the centre being closed right now,"
Bourne said. "We have received letters from them (GSS) and now
it's up to Dr. Risebrough to consider their response."
trapment, and legal difficulties such
as the Armed Forces' banning of
homosexuals, Smith said.
Internal homophobia is faced by
individuals who discover they are
gay and wish they were not. The
consequences are serious — the resulting depression may lead to alcoholism, drug abuse and even suicide, Smith said. The problem,
Smith added, is "You can't change
what you are. Nature doesn't work'
that way."
The answer to external homophobia is the gradual education of
the public until homophobia like
racism is socially unacceptable.
Smith said he sees some good local
signs such as Vancouver's Gay
Pride Week.
He said internal homophobia can
only be positively resolved by the
individual coming to terms with his
or her sexuality and feeling good
about it. "It is not important how
you love but that you love," Smith
said.
The speech was sponsored by the
UBC Gay/Lesbian Club. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 2, 1984
Hopes
Hooray! The Alma Mater Society strongly endorsed
the daycare project an AMS committee organized.
Events like this make one believe students actually
can change the world, at least in some small way. If
students can organize the financing for an expensive
($800,000) and important project such as a new UBC
daycare facility, where do their limits start?
In the past students have tested their limits and triumphed. At UBC they built SUB, War Memorial gym, the
Aquatic centre, the Thunderbird Winter Sports centre.
More than this, students have affected political
change in the past. In 1922 students organized and trekked to the present UBC campus and influenced a former
provincial government into building the present campus.
Students should look back on these past events and
realize they do have collective power. And students
should not be afraid to work towards achieving the
goals they desire, whether this be increased funding for
universities or the protection of human rights in B.C.
Nursing image inaccurate
By KAREN JENSEN
With Nursing Week coming up
Nov. 5-9, it is appropriate liming to
discuss the image of nursing.
We are expending some effort to
put across the rightful image of
nurses which for so long has been
distorted. Nurses have come a long
way from Florence Nightingale's
days, with increased technology, increased nursing education, speciali-
zation, and increased responsibility
and yet we are still cast as the dedicated young women who mop the
fevered brow, as the doctor's willing helper. Nurses all know that image is no longer appropriate.
But we have a problem in that the
actual awareness of what nursing is
really about does not go much further. The public still tends to see
nurses in the traditional image or
may hold stereotypical views of the
nurse as a sexual plaything or battle
axe.
As soon to be B.Sc.N. graduates,
we are concerned about the image
of nurses and its effect on nursing.
It is important that people understand exactly what nurses are now
being expected to do, are having to
do, are wanting to do, and are capable of doing in delivering health
care.
In order for nurses to deliver the
type of health care we are capable
of, we must be seen and accepted as
the credible health professionals we
are.
However, negative public images
persist, affecting nursing in important ways. These images distort the
public's concept of nursing, reinforcing outmoded expectations. So,
it is consumers too, and not just
nurses who are affected as these
portrayals   deprive   the   public   of
knowledge of the many vital services that nurses provide.
As concerned nursing students,
we are working on ways to improve
the image of nursing. Our aim is to
supplant outdated or negative images of nurses with vital, positive,
accurate accounts of today's profession.
Making the public aware of the
necessary role that nurses play in
health care is essential to assuring
quality of nursing care to the consumer.
We will be presenting information to update the public's awareness of the nurse's role at our Image
of Nursing booth Monday in SUB
at the Health Fair. Drop by and
help up help you.	
Karen Jensen is a fourth year
nursing student who wrote this article for her graduating class. Perspectives is a column open to the
university community.
Letters
Kinahan 'divorced from social realities
99
During the Oct. 24 forum on the
plight of education in B.C., Don
Fisher of the Committee of Concerned Academics outlined three
aspects of the "historic mission of
public liberal education."
These were: providing people
with the grounds and methods for
seeing and making rational choices
as to personal and social goals,
priorities and values; providing a
route to equal opportunity in an as
yet unequal society; and providing a
basis for social cohesion, cooperation, and respect for diversity by bringing together people of many different backgrounds. If John
Kinahan is any indication ("Most
UBC students 'whiny' and 'wimpy',
Oct. 23) then UBC's sense of this
historic mission requires drastic improvement.
Any methods of rational, critical
judgement are conspicuously absent
from this letter. While I accept
Kinahan's belief that people should
take responsibility for their lives, he
has extended that belief beyond any
credible rational grounds, and been
lulled into the capitalist and Socred
daydream that anyone can "make
it" in society solely "by dint of
hard work", and that conversely
anyone who does not "make it" has
only himself or herself to blame.
This kind of wishful thinking,
divorced from social realities, leads
to his glib contention that anyone
can still finance his or her UBC
education from summer work at
minimum wage, as he did.
But this then excludes all people
who can't find work, have parents
who don't live within commuting
distance of the university and can't
afford to help them pay for living
or tuition expenses, must support a
family, or cannot see the likelihood
of repaying $20,000 debts after four
years education. So much for equal
opportunity.
How long will it take Kinahan to
see that his "stable, high quality
education" has already been
seriously undermined.
The funding cuts of 5 per cent for
1984-85, to which one can add 5 per
cent annual inflation on top of the
zero per certt increase last year,
amounts to a real reducation of
something like 15 per cent in funding over two years. Do you think
an organization the size of UBC can
take that sort of butchering without
sustaining deep, irrevocable human
and institutional damage? This isn't
a hardward store, it's a university.
Kinahan "will grant that funding
cutbacks have played havoc with
previously available educational
services." But later he claims that
"educational quality will suffer only as much as we students believe it
will ..." This last statement con
stitutes either a great leap of prophetic wisdom, which I am unable
to fathom, or a serious skew in
logic.
As far as Socred educational
policies go, no amount of believeing
everything will be okay is going to
make it okay. This government will
continue on its destructive course as
long as it feels it has enough public
support. And it receives this support because we as a province do
not presently possess any sense of
the "historic mission of public
liberal education."
Yet how can we expect the public
to have that sense restored if we
who are most immediately involved, don't openly show concern? Get
together with your friends, discuss
the problem, propose solutions.
Talk to the Campus Community
Alliance, a coalition of various student, faculty, and support-staff
concerns in the Lutheran Campus
Centre.
Students for a Democratic
University has regular meetings and
information talks. Talk to Margaret
Copping, your Alma Mater Society
president. But put the onus where it
belongs, on provincial government
policies, and on students only so far
as we do nothing to oppose those
policies.
Trevor Hilton
arts 4
Letters
We need new desks
for left-handeds
Who is in the right, us or UBC?
UBC obviously, the four of us are
in the left.
The letter in the Oct. 26 Ubyssey
(Desks unfair to left-handeds) made
us all sit down and think (in a right-
handed desk of course). "Why
should we, though still a minority,
have to be subjected to twisting into
the most uncomfortable positions
just to write our lecture notes down,
not to mention two- to three-hour
exams!"
Statistically, about 10 per cent of
the population is left-handed and it
has been rising, most likely, over
the last 20 years as people start to
realize that it isn't right (Yuk!
Yuk!) to try to make children conform to "the right-hand rule."
Many of the older buildings have no
left-handed desks in their classrooms. The more modern ones have
just enough so we don't revolt,
maybe five per cent.
If 10 per cent of the students are
left-handed, then how about making 10 per cent of the desks left-
handed. The four of us feel, and
we're sure all the other 'sinister'
people on campus do as well, that
this is not too much to ask.
Andrew Arthur
geology 4
Tammea Archibald
arts 3
Leslie Lipsin
arts 4
Mark Fenwick
commerce 4
Slob speaks
In defence of all disgusting slobs,
I feel it is my duty to reply to
Graeme Silvera's mucous comments (Mucous globs litter walk,
Oct. 26).
Fortunately, I am now a reformed slob (somewhat debatable). As
such, I must say, that although I
sympathize with Mr. Silvera's
point of view, I also feel that either
he has an inferiority complex (why
else would he be looking on the
ground?) or a phobia of mucous
and phlegm.
Admittedly, not many people enjoy finding one of life's nasty little
surprises on the sidewalk. Then
again, even fewer people are paranoid of them. In any case, I find it
hard to believe that Mr. Silvera
finds all sorts of 'spit' on the
sidewalk outside of Buchanan and
everywhere else. Even harder to
believe is that the 'spit' is
strategically placed there.
Perhaps Silvera spends so much
time looking for spit and mucous
just so he can have an excuse to
write The Ubyssey.   Jeff Bourgeois
education 3
THE UBYSSEY
November 2, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
David Ferman began typing. Tap tap tap. 'It was a dark and stormy night.' This is going to be great he
said to himself. "This is garbage, you're fired!" yetled a despotic Robert Beynon. Tap tap tap. 'Suddenly a shot rang out.' Patti Flather puked, "You'll be a star." Peter MacDougall, Richard Foreman,
Ginny Aulin and Rory Allen all nodded in agreement. But Brendan Boyte begged to differ. "This is a
serious beacon of truth and there is no room for individual conceited braggadocio." "Shh, he's thinking," exclaimed Debbie Lo. Tap tap tap. 'The quick brown fox jumped over Stuart Cocteugh.' "How
do you spell that?" asked Gordon Clark. Tap tap tap. 'The pirate ship loomed ominously on the horizon.' Chris Wong was nowhere to be seen. Tap tap tap. 'Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of
people?' "I'm not sure. 8ut let's go to 7-11 and find out," said Charlie Fidelman. Erin Mullan yelled,
"Stop the presses!" Tap tap tap. 'Colonel Mustard in the drawing room with a copy of The Ubyssey!' Friday, November 2, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bradshaw recommends joining
By DEBBIE LO
The Alma Mater Society external
affairs coordinator will support the
Canadian Federation of Students in
its upcoming UBC referendum.
Nancy Bradshaw told a CFS
forum Thursday CFS is the only national student organization which
can lobby for student concerns effectively because students cannot
devote enough time to lobby for
themselves.
CFS's fee, $7.50 per student, is a
relatively small amount to pay to
join, she told 18 people at the Students for a Democratic University
sponsored forum.
"The lack of choice in national
student organizations is the main
reason for taking the pro stand,"
Bradshaw said.
She added she did not think the
fact colleges and universities have
an equal vote in CFS is a problem.
But Bradshaw said at an upcoming CFS meeting she will put forth a
motion to hold separate large and
small institution caucuses as well as
the caucus of the whole group at
future meetings because large institutions have different problems
than colleges. CFS policies are
formed at these meetings.
"The low (student) voter turnout
at UBC, 10 per cent of the student
population, could be discussed at
these special caucuses because other
institution's students might have
better methods of dealing with the
problem," Bradshaw said.
Frank Frigon, Graduate Student
Society executive member, said CFS
should be supported because it
"uses protest methods which are
much more sophisticated than those
used in the sixties."
He added, "There would be no
point in discussion if large institutions had more votes because
everything would be settled before
the caucuses."
Frigon   said   CFS   provides   a
Mayor digs Bill
Vancouver's mayor told a UBC
political science class Wednesday
Bill Vander Zalm as mayor would
make Vancouver the "laughing
stock of Canada."
Speaking to Paul Tennant's Vancouver Politics class Mike Harcourt
said he hopes the electorate will
closely examine the track record of
the two mayoralty candidates,
himself and Vander Zalm, before
heading to the ballot box for civic
elections this month.
Harcourt said Vander Zalm's
record as minister of municipal affairs, human resources, and education show a distinct anti-Vancouver
bias. Harcourt claimed he was surprised when Vander Zalm "threw
down the gardener's glove" and
entered the race.
While fielding questions from the
75 students Harcourt said his style
of negotiating with Victoria is not
confrontational and has the best interests of the city foremost in mind.
Expo 86 will not create the problems for Vancouver that Expo 67
did for Montreal, Harcourt claimed, because there is a post-1986 plan
for the site.
On the controversy over the planned Stanley Park aquarium expansion Harcourt said lie favoured the
move because the whales need the
room and the addition will not
dramatically alter the zoo's master
plan. He would prefer no killer
whales be caged.
There will be only 50 parking
spots added to the present parking
lot, he added, and this will not be
enough to alter the basic character
of the park.
Jobless face "yo-yo
m
By RICHARD FOREMAN
Emotions during unemployment
can be characterized as "an emotional yo-yo," two UBC researchers
say.
William Borgen and Norman
Amundson, both psychology professors, say in a new book: "A picture of a person who has experienced  prolonged  unemployment   (is)
Women earn
much less
TORONTO (CUP) — Women
staff at the University of Toronto
make less money than their male
counterparts, according to a report
by the U of T staff association.
The report released recently compares the salaries of male and female administrative staff in secretarial, clerical and administrative
positions.
"Yes, it really is true that women
are discriminated against at the U
of T. We finally have hard, cold
facts," said Dominique Burs, editor
of the UTSA newsletter.
"This is the first time we've actually had statistics. Before we did
not have anything to back up our
arguments."
The report, based on information
obtained from U of T's personnel
office, says the majority of women
on staff earn between $15,000 and
$19,000 while the majority of men
earn between $25,000 and $29,000.
There are twice as many female
staff as there are male at the U of T.
Statistics showed women made
up 100 per cent of secretarial staff,
the lowest income bracket and tra-
See page 4: DETAIL
characterized by periods of apathy
alternated with anger, sadness and
sporadic optimism, few habits of
regular structured activities, few
meaningful personal contacts, and
dominant feelings of victimization,
lack of personal power and low self
worth."
Borgen and Amundson said their
book, The Experience of
Unemployment, shows the pattern
of the "yo-yo" varied widely between groups and as the period of
unemployment progressed.
This has important implications
for those involved in counselling
them have to listen and take account of their specific emotional experiences," Amundson said.
They said this study, which
describes the results of over 90 in-
depth interviews with unemployed
women, men and youth, is the first
study of such scope that attempts to
identify the similarities and differences of emotional reaction between groups of unemployed people
in different stages of unemployment.
Borgen said the study is "foundational. It is an attempt to describe a
territory so that we can map out a
strategy for dealing with the problems of the unemployed."
The report has important implications for career counselling in
schools, he said.
They said a study on recent
university graduates is presently being conducted as a result of this initial work. Preliminary results indicate the reactions of this group
are very similar to the reaction of
career-committed people who have
lost their jobs.
country-wide and international network for students.
Tami Roberts, CFS pacific region
chair, said there are problems
within the structure of the organization, but she said the problems will
be worked out within the organization as it receives more student support.
Roberts said previous CFS lobbying of government groups has
prevented government budget cuts
to post secondary institutions. She
said, for example, CFS and student
lobbying caused the B.C. government to transfer more money into
its grants program two years ago.
Provincial   government   abolished
the grant program this February.
The AMS is paying for four
pages in The Ubyssey to give both
the pros and the cons of joining
CFS.
CFS needs at least 2,800 votes to
reach quorum and more yes votes
than no votes to win the upcoming
referendum Nov. 21 to 23.
CHUBBY BELUGA WHALE asks for ocean freedom to no avail. Stanley Park whales will only travel to a different pool. Mayor Mike Harcourt spoke to political science students Wednesday on whales and other matters.
UBC pursues energy conservation
By PATTI FLATHER
UBC may be able to save millions
of dollars through energy conservation, UBC's vice president finance
told the board of governors Thursday.
Bruce Gellatly told the monthly
board meeting in the long term
UBC should save $1 million per
year on energy, based on a study by
Neptune Dynamics. The Vancouver
company has done energy conservation for Simon Fraser University
since 1972, he added.
"Our energy consumption is
about double that of the University
of Victoria. We're higher than
Simon Fraser and the all-Canadian
average," said Gellatly.
And UBC "charge-up rates"
such as those for steam sold to the
university hospital are not up to
market rates, he said.
Gellatly said Physical Plant director Neville Smith will do a special
year-long study on what Physical
Plant needs updated and Smith will
"provide an ongoing program of
preventative maintenance."
UBC will also have to use existing
space more efficiently because new
buildings financed by governments
are unlikely in the future, Gellatly
said.
David McMillan, vice president
development and community relations, said he is having trouble
tracking down major donors who
have promised money to UBC in
the future. McMillan is trying to
raise private funds for financially
strapped UBC.
"I think this is a very important
point badly in need of being sorted
out,"   said   board   chair   David
MacLean.
UBC can no longer provide funds
as originally planned for the
Shaughnessy research centre and
the Acadia housing development
are under budget, Richard Stewart
said.
Stewart said a request by Regent
College on Wesbrook Mall for support in their bid to gain the lot next
door be investigated. The lot is
owned by UBC.
Joy McCusker said the lot is
valuable, and added "maybe
Regent College should find
something else."
ye Exams Arranged
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 2,1984
Investigator asks beliefs
WINNIPEG (CUP) — An attorney-general department investigator approached the University of
Manitoba faculty association Oct.
11 looking for information about
the political allegiances of some
professors, according to the association president.
Del Hanson, Manitoba police
commission investigator, asked
faculty association executive director Denise Beley if she knew anything about a man in a photograph
taken at a demonstration outside
the U.S. consulate last November.
The   demonstration,   a   protest
Detail needed
From page 3
ditional female job ghetto.
Lois Reimer, the newly appointed
officer of the status of women at
the U of T, said she was not surprised by the report but said more
information on the data used on job
classifications and a profile of the
staff were needed.
"1 want to look carefully at the
situation and see what can be done
to improve representation of
women at U of T," she said.
against the U.S. invasion of Grenada, turned ugly after a group of
young militia men forced their way
into the crowd and started shoving
protesters. Seven protesters were arrested.
Hanson spoke to Beley for half
an hour and wanted to know what
type of people would participate in
that kind of demonstration.
Hanson, a former RCMP officer,
is collecting evidence for a police
commission investigation into
charges of police brutality at the
demonstration.
"I've spoken with the attorney-
general and he was concerned if
they were in fact inquiring about
the political persuasion of professors, and did he think that was going beyond their mandate," said
faculty association president Vic
Froese.
Attorney-general Roland Penner,
who is a past president of the faculty association, refused to comment about the propriety of Hanson's questions on faculty political
beliefs.
Froese said the Canadian Association of University teachers has a
policy established in the '60s urging
faculty members not to answer
questions from the RCMP concerning the beliefs or activities of their
colleagues or students to protect
academic freedom.
The police inquiry continues.
Vote
HOWARD FAULKNER
Alderman
"Common sense for a change'
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Davis braves critics
Heron
flies
By GORDON CLARK
With his latest book of poems, In
the House of the Great Blue Heron,
Scott Lawrence has achieved a level
of intimacy with his audience that
many writers with wider recognition
can only begin to imagine.
Lawrence has in his fourth published collection combined wonderfully simple descriptions of everyday events with an impassioned call
for the protection of the earth.
In The House of the Great Heron
By Scott Lawrence
Harbour Publishing, 1984
The 40 pieces cover a number of
subjects in which Lawrence has an
obvious interest. His poetry is
refreshingly clear, especially his
writing concerned with his children,
which is both enchanting and
humorous in an off-beat way. One
poem, I'm Trying to Work on a
Poem, describes an afternoon,
perhaps a Sunday, when Lawrence
is attempting to write. His son Kai
breaks into the room with a child's
natural spontineity and the interup-
tion inspires Scott's work; "...
now Kai,/ is working away at my
left shoulder,/trying to screw a
hook into my shirt." The image is
only an instant, but one which we
can all appreciate.
Another special poem relating to
Lawrence's life is "We are Surrounded by Water''. The poem captures that feeling people have every
once in a while when they ponder
the grandeur of life, and their individual relationship to it. The
magnitude and wonder of the earth
can create feelings of loneliness at
times in all of us. From these emotions we derive the need to be with
others, to comfort each other when
that need exists.
"If Dianne would come to our
room now,/ I would hug her and
hold her/long dark river running/
valley in which the streams/would
flow together."
Another theme present in many
pieces is Lawrence's personal commitment to preserving the planet.
The passion of his fear of atomic
weapons is most elegantly expressed
in Nuclear Family Flashes. This
work is concerned with the author's
dreams about the future of his
children, and how they will
remember the present if they survive the next few years.
The poem expresses Lawrence's
great love for his children and is filled with wonderful images of the
future. "Been thinking/visualizing
their/beards grey, thin white
hair/lying dying old in their
beds./Me long gone/as they
peruse/from that plateau of
peace/such long lives,/filled with
the usual poisons/and grace-full
flashes."
The collection contains a number
of short interesting poems capturing tiny moments and events most
people ignore. Lawrence has a
perspective on these moments that
gives them a special glow. The best
example of these poems is Gift, "as
i am/unaccustomed/to receiving/water unasked for/ i smelled
the clear liquid/in the white
cup/with Chinese blue/ expecting
stronger brew/but found no
odor/tasted no taste/just your
gesture/clear from the lake."
Without need for more words,
Lawrence lets our imagination fill in
the mountaintops, clouds and
alpine meadows.
By CHRIS WONG
Question: What do Cyndi Lauper
and Tina Turner have in common
besides four syllable names and a
penchant for warbling soppy tunes
concerning that crazy little thing
called love?
Answer: Miles Davis, the ultra
cool jazz trumpeter. Davis perform-
Answer: Only that bearded dude
— the swinging jazz God in the sky
— knows what Davis is up to. Davis
has always been an enigmatic individual undaunted by criticism about
his forays outside the jazz world.
Even now he must surely have an
explanation for his attempts to
make pop palatable.
Only that bearded dude —
the swinging jazz God in the sky —
knows what Davis is up to.
ed Lauper's hit single Time After
Time and Turner's Second Hand
Emotion Tuesday at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre.
(Yet another) question: Why did
Davis do renditions of their songs,
other than to confound the already
confounded critics who have been
trying to analyze his music for close
to 40 years?
Regardless of his reasoning, Davis did not inject any notable adaptations or inflections to suddenly
transform these songs into momentous jazz classics. Thank that same
God he only devoted a small portion of his concert to these decidedly non-inspiring selections.
While he was unable to muster
significant energy with pop, Davis
Queen still belle
By ERIN MULLAN
Bon Temps is French for good
times, and that is what Queen Ida
and the Bon Temps band showed
the packed house at the Commodore Wednesday night.
The fanciful costumes sported by
most of the crowd gave the place a
Mardi Gras, carnival atmosphere. It*
was only appropriate. Queen Ida
hails  from   Louisiana,   where  the
folks dress up and party-hardy
every February for Mardi Gras
before the sombre time of Lent.
During Hallowe'en at the Commodore, Vancouverites feted in the
face of bleak early winter weather.
Queen Ida and company played
zydeco music — born in the bayous
of Louisiana. When the Acadians
were expelled from the Maritimes
by the British in the eighteenth century, they were transported to La
Louisiane.
Zydeco is a spicey blend of Acadian, Black and Western music. Ca-
jun slang for string bean, zydeco is
also a sound. Electric guitars, bass,
drums, rub board and accordion —
but the traditional accordion nevej
sounded like this.
Queen Ida rules the stage with her
daichonic accordion, wailing out
the tunes while her brother Chilly
Willy's singers are a blur on the
boards.
The result is not quite country,
folk or R 'n B, but pure dance media with a fiery Cajun twist.
The sister-brother team are the
flash of the act, the four white musicians pale in comparison. The
queen looked simply regal in a glittery royal gown and head band
while Willy was cool and smart in
white duds and black tie.
Texas fiddle player Gatemouth
Brown, who is in Vancouver for a
stint at the Town Pump, joined the
Bon Temps band for a few numbers. His frenetic fiddling was the
perfect compliment to the hot Cajun sounds.
The costumed crowd got in on
the fun with foot-flingin' country
dancin', a polka at lightning speed.
was in top form when he and his
band launched into that unique
brand of electric jazz that he shaped
and refined in the early '70s.
The music produced Tuesday at
the Queen E. was reminiscent of the
acid-rock flavored, improvisational
heavy sounds Davis experimented
with on his first Fusion recordings.
The time for experimentation and
exploration is over. Davis is now
more than comfortable in this
genre, and audiences are for the
most part over their jazz-rock inhibitions.
What the Queen E. crowd heard
was fast moving, harmonically
complex music — full of the drastic
dynamic contrast, asymetrical lines
and odd rhythmic patterns Davis always manages to bring together in a
provocative assemblage.
Davis only played during selective
parts of the songs, leaving plenty of
room for his able colleagues to toot
their horns. When he wasn't looking very much the spacey jazz cat,
standing with his back to the audience, and when he wasn't playfully
pounding out crisp chords on his
synthesizer, he was blowing with
spirit. His chops — the jazz term referring to a musician's storehouse
of musical prowess — are still plentiful.
Davis still possesses a knack for
interjecting space throughout the
fiery jazz inferno he creates — and
he does it at moments you least expect.
Miles is also continuing his knack
for goading the best out of his cohorts. He brings out resources in
them that may have previously gone
untapped with less inspirational
leaders on the bandstand.
Guitarist John Scofield and saxophonist Bob Berg got by without a
road map and managed to stay together on the unison melody lines
that jutted out of the complex,
maze-like arrangements. Individually their solos were intriguing and
free of cliched trappings. They also
swing with more ease than their talented predecessors in Davis' band,
Mike Stern and Bill Evans.
New bassist Daryl Jones looks
like he's still hovering in his pubescent teenage years. But he sounds
like a seasoned veteran, well schooled in the thumb slapping, rollicking
funk style of playing. Yet another
talented Davis find.
Vancouver's Bob Bell band opened the show with a short set of electric ramblings that would have
made Hendrix proud. Bell on
guitar, with Paul Blaney on bass
and Al Wiertz on drums occasionally meshed their musical thoughts
into a cohesive whole, but their
music suffered from a tendency toward overkill and a lack of creative
space.
The Razor has surprising edge
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
The Razor's Edge is both a love
story and the story of a man searching for self-awareness and self-
knowledge.
Larry Darrell (Bill Murray) returns to normal life after participating in the bloody horror of World
War I. Normal life consists of a
beautiful wife, a ready made high-
paying job in a brokerage house, a
nice house, kids, and money. It is a
life already planned for him.
The Razor's Edge
Based on the novel by
W. Somerset Maugham
Directed by John By rum
At the Coronet
Rejecting comfort and materialism, Darrell leaves behind the economic prosperity of post-war America, his fiancee, friends and family, and begins an epic search. He
seeks spiritual enlightenment first in
Paris and later in a Tibetan monastery. Years later, his mission accomplished, he returns to Paris only to
encounter the people of his past.
The Razor's Edge is based on the
novel by W. Somerset Maugham
and it is a timeless story, but the
film's rendition of the search for
higher meaning is not convincing.
Most annoying is the music by Jack
Nitzsche (An Officer and a Gentleman), which rose in volume and
Muzak-like content along with the
findings of higher meaning. In
parts, this film is like an elevator
ride, safe and predictable.
The love story theme of the film
is much more convincing. Maugham's women characters are two very
good roles for actresses; however
they are traditional roles. Darrel is
the hero and the women function to
give him focus. They are shadow to
his foreground even though they are
at the heart of the drama.
Isabel (Catherine Hicks) the fiancee chooses the preplanned life of
luxury over the grassroots lifestyle
full of cockroaches and smelly
French toilets which Larry offers
her. She marries Larry's best friend
but never stops loving Larry.
Sophie (Theresa Russell), one of
Larry's closest childhood friends,
becomes even closer in Paris. Sophie ties in with the Paris low-lifes,
acquiring alcoholism and a pimp to
confirm her own sense of her destructive nature. But her salvation is
swift through the loving ministrations of Larry Darrell. This is not
the end of the story.
The final twist in the plot is one
of the major salvations of The Razor's Edge, the other is Bill
Murray's acting. If not for his sensitive portrayal of Larry, the man
who loved to make others laugh
while still maintaining an epic
search, the film would have been
only a pleasant elevator ride.
As for the surprise ending, I
won't spoil it for those who plan to
see the film-. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 2, 1984
w&
wea/i
TODAY
UBC THEATRE DEPARTMENT
Student film screening, 8 p.m., Robson Square
Cinema.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Mambo lessons (2 of 3), noon, SUB ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
CIAU women's national championship tournament Location changed to B.C. Place. Admission free.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Reading: Canadian novelist and short story
writer, Audrey Thomas, reads from her recent
work, Buch B322, noon,
CFS YES COMMITTEE
Meeting, SUB 213, noon.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC AA and A invitational tournament, all day
War Memorial gym
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
General organizational meeting for Helen Caldicott event, all welcome, SUB 205, noon.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Taking orders (and payments) for Psych club
shirts, outside Buch A205. 11 30 a.m   1:30 p.m.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, International House,
noon.
BAHA'I STUDIES AT UBC
General meeting. International House, 3:30 p.m.
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Basic newswriting seminar with hard nosed Erin
Mullan, SUB 241K, noon; be there.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Selling Canada Savings Bonds, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., SUB concourse.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Women's pub night, 5 p.m.,
office, SUB 237A.
UBC AUTO SPORT CLUB
A navigational car rally, 7 p.rr
loop near bookstore.
neet at the club's
, at the former bus
UBC DANCE CLUB
rock 'n roll party, SUB partyroom, 8 p.m.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Youth conference. Images theatre, Simon Fraser
University, all day.
ROCKERS
First members only social night, bring your own
axe   and   amplifier,   no   minors,   7   p.m.,   SUB
207/209.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
CIAU   women's   national   championship,   B.C.
Place. Admission free.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Non-conference   game   versus   Montana   Tech
Orediggers,   last  game of the season,   1   p m.,
Thunderbird stadium.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
AA and A invitational tournament, all day, War
Memorial gym.
SUNDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bowling meet,  2-4 p.m.,  Commodore bowling
lanes.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise worship and teaching, 10 a.m., SUB 212.
MONDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
NURSING
Lecture on nursing image by "Nursing is. . ."
group, noon, ACU G279.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
Seminar by professor Peter Sloterdijk, philosophy and German literature, University of Munich, 3:30 p.m., Buch penthouse.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
Lecture by Peter Sloterdijk, philosophy and German literature, noon, Buch 316.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film. The Streets of Saigon, noon, Buch B214.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration of dancers for new dance work by
Jennifer Mascall, noon, SUB 216E. Call 228-6668
for information.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Taking orders for Psych club shirts (and payments for), noon, Kenny 2007.
c/e
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Nightly Specials for $6.95
5 pm-9pm
monday    QUICHE or chili
tues. and wed.
EGG PLANT MOUSSAKA or chili
thurs.   TUNA VEGETABLE CASSEROLE or chili
friday    HEARTY WINTER RAGOUT or chili
with choice of soup or salad, slice of cheesecake,
coffee, tea or cappucino.
STUDENT         FAR
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VANCOUVER
T O
Victoria $20
Comox $27
Campbell River $27
Port Hardy $39
Quesnel $46
Williams Lake $39
Nanaimo $13
Bella Bella $58
Bella Coola $57
Powell River $21
* Certain conditions apply.
Contact your Travel CUTS office.
Going   r* TRAVEL
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TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
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1516 Duranleau St
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UBC. Student Union Building
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AirBCJ®
DASH 7 SERVING BRITISH COLUMBIA
One and all are welcome to The Ubyssey School of Journalism's noon lecture.
"Newswriting made simple" in SUB 241K. B.C. bureau chief Erin Mullan will
preside.
ANOTHER INTRAMURAL EVENT. . .
UBC SKI FAIR
NOVEMBER 7,8,9 - 10 a.m.-3 p.m., SUB Concourse
DAILY ACTIVITIES IN j ;
THE SUB CONCOURSE |
- Hot Waxing & Filing - $3.00 ;
(While U wait) j
* Ski Packages at Special Student Rates, [
Available to individuals and groups \
* Exhibits: Including Grouse Mtn., Whister, I
Blackcomb, 108 Hills, Big White, Benno's '\
X-Country Shop & "Universki". If        j
Wednesday: j *          ff
* Fitness Show (12:30, Concourse) i f
* Bzzr Garden (4:30-7:00, SUB Room 207) \ A     Jl'-v&^A
* Ski Films (7:00 SUB Audirotium-Prizes) L *mk :'' '
Thursday:
* Fashion Show (12:30, Concourse)
Friday: j "
* Auction (1:00, Concourse) i
— Ski Clothing, Equipment, Ski Packages
and Ski Passes
Developed in Co-operation with the Intramural Sports Ski      " ""
Services Department and the UBC Ski Team ^ a&
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
6x
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional lines, .60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
vnA
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
PROF. ZENON PYLYSHYN
Centre for Cognitive Science
University of Western Ontario
ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE AND
THE HUMAN MIND
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, Saturday, Nov. 3
at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
CHRISTMAS GIFT idea orders are being
taken for poinsettias. Low price of $8.99 includes free delivery. Part of proceeds to
Christmas Seal Fund. Ph. Anita 224-6582
after 5 p.m. weekdays, all day weekends.
1.2 MEGABYTE COMPUTER. 2 floppy
8-inch drives. Intelligent terminal. Sacrifice
$2700. John 438-3342.
SKI SUIT — 2 pc (jacket zips to overall
pantsl. Mens s/m, navy blue, worn 5 times.
$75 obo. 228-2779 days.
20 - HOUSING
ON CAMPUS HOUSING, avail, reasonably
priced, rent incl. Great meals prepared by
our full-time cook. Contact David Kelly,
224-9930 or drop by Deke House, 5736
Agronomy Rd.
ROOMS FOR RENT: on campus, shared
rooms, $150 per month. Contact Brian or
Cam at 224-9119.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
35 - LOST
LOST: GLASSES, light blue frame, in a
grey corduroy case. Lost somewhere between B-Lot and Math building Oct. 22, 9
a.m. Reward. Please phone Kim 879-5973.
LOST ONE PAIR GLASSES, near SW
Marine. If found phone Erika 224-2489.
LADIES PINK WALLET, Mon., Oct. 29, in
Scarfe Building. Please call 274-7367.
40 - MESSAGES
DO YOU HAVE an alcohol problem? A.A.
meeting on campus. 873-8466.
IF THERE ARE any witnesses to the car
accident on Sept. 25 (at the Registration
Building) who like to see justice done,
please call Mike at 435-8560.
HAVE YOU kidnapped your pledges this
week?
Sprout.
50 - RENTALS
OUTDOOR   EQUIPMENT   RENTALS   on
campus. You can rent tents and other
backpacking equipment, mountain bikes
and kayaks, all at great daily, weekly and
weekend rates from REC UBC. Call
228-4244 for info, or drop by the cage in
Osborne, Unit 2 at lunch time or from
3:30-5:00 p.m., Mon.-Fri.
70 - SERVICES
BOOKEEPING Er TAX SERVICE. Expert &
personal attention — individual, sole proprietor and corp. Reasonable. We service
your account at your location or at our office. 434-9185.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST     U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING IMicom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641.
EXCELLENT TYPING. English, French,
German, Italian; editing English. Verses for
special occasions/cards. UBC references.
Good rates. 734-1081.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
WORD PROCESSING by Adina. Discount
for all student work. 10th & Discovery.
Phone 222-2122.
EXPERT TYPING from legible work. Essays,
theses. Spelling, grammar corrected.
738-6829 10 am-9 pm King Ed. Rte.
TYPING-ESSAYS, term papers, resumes.
$1.25/pg double-spaced. Professional
results. Call Gerry, 271-7142.
TYPING. Professional. 25 years experience.
Electronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
271-6755.
85 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
WEEKEND    WORK    available    in    alarm
answering service. $4/hr. 731-8204.
TEMPORARY  SECRETARIAL  JOBS  are
available through your Alma Mater Society.
If you have a year or more
clerical/secretarial experience, register with
AMS Temporary Personnel Services, Rm.
238, Student Union Building. Open to UBC
students and their spouses.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG IDS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
WORD PROCESSING
SERVICES
DAYS!   NIGHTS!   WEEKENDS!
Spelling & Grammar
Expertise
Marpole Area
Reasonable Rates.
NANCY
266-1768 Friday, November 2, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
QiuaZ
Jim Chivers and Friends: hot, whooh really
hot jazz, Nov. 4, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall,
689-0667.
Anner Bylsma: performing Bach's complete
cello suites, Nov. 2-3, UBC Recital Hall.
Kronos Quartet: Sounds Sensational Vancouver New Music, Nov. 18 one performance
only, 8 p.m. at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre.
Ethno-Fusion: a dynamic 20-piece International Orchestra at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre Nov. 2, 8:30 p.m.
The Villains: a benefit dance, Nov. 2, Commodore Ballroom, 8 p.m.
The Warehouse Show: that's right, a warehouse filled with art stuff, an event that is cur-
ated and juried. More than 200 local visual artists, scheduled concerts, performance art,
video tapes and films, panel discussion and
lectures, Nov. 3-30, 12-8 p.m./Wed.-Sun..
522 Beatty St., 732-6783
Juggernaut Tableau: new paintings from
Vancouver, Calgary and Halifax, by Jack
Niven, David Janzen, Derek Dennett, The
Phoenix Gallery, 2066 W. 4th, 732-7135,
Nov.2-25.
John O'Brien: Canada's foremost marine
painter in oil. J. C. Heywood: Fourteen Recent Prints of ideas layered with ink,
silkscreen, lithography and intaglio techniques, Oct. 24-Nov. 25, Burnaby Art Gallery,
6344 Gilpin St. 291-9441.
Whoop-de-do-a: Gary Young, Vancouver
based artist, graphic designs, screen prints,
originals, designer of the Carnegie logo, until
Nov. 2, Carnegie Centre, 401 Main.
Ann Nelson: paintings, Nov. 9-Dec. 11, Theatre Gallery of the Surrey Arts Centre.
Drawing and Sculpture: Linday Gammon,
Greg   Murdock,   and   Colette  Urban,   Nov.
2-Dec. 2, 13750-88th Ave., Surrey, 595-1515.
Photoperspectives  '84:  a  national,  juried
photography exhibition, 106 works by 22 photographers,    Nov.   9-Dec.   2,   Presentation
House, 333 Chesterfield Ave., 986-1351.
New  Paintings:  by  L.J.  Neville,  Carnegie
Centre, Main and Hastings.
Jack Shadbolt: act of painting, multi-panel
works, opens Nov. 9, at the Vancouver Art
Gallery.
The Place Where The Mammals Die: Kits
House Hall, until Nov. 3, Wed.-Sun. 8:30
p.m., 736-3588.
Da: a sugary Irish comedy written by Hugh
Leanard, best play of 1978, until Nov. 3, 8:30
p.m., 980-5552.
Suspect: a you-dun-it game of murder, by
the people who bring us Theatresports, 8:30
p.m., 688-1436.
Ain't Misbehaving: another great musical at
the Arts Club Revue Theatre, until Nov. 3,
8:30 p.m. until Nov. 10.
Overnight Exposure: Vancouver's late night
live talk show, Friday nights at 11:00 p.m..
Arts Club Revue Theatre, Granville Island,
687-5313.
Passion: Peter Nicholas Canadian premiere.
Arts Club Granville Island, 8:30 p.m.
Cloud 9: a play of multiple genitals and other
comical parts, at the Waterfront on Granville
Island, 8:30 p.m., 873-3311.
Blithe Spirit: an occult discovery by Vagabond Players, 433-4308.
Faust: Theatre Space production of Goethe's
Faust opens Oct. 25, The New York Theatre,
681-0872.
Bruhanski   Theatre   Studio:    ongoing
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
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AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
with your prescription and
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Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
As a follow-up to Billy Graham's visit to
our campus, the UBC Christian Community presents a lecture series on:
Foundations of the
Christian Faith
a lecture series by Dr. Bruce Milne
• senior pastor of First Baptist Church, Vancouver
• for 10 years Professor of Theology at Spurgeon College,
London, England
• author of several books on the Christian faith
• frequent speaker to student audiences at Cambridge and
other leading universities in the U.K.
Place: Regent College, Main Classroom
Time: 7 p.m.
Dates: Oct 26, Knowing God
Nov. 2, Who is God?
Nov. 9, What is Man?
Nov. 16, Who is Jesus
Nov. 23, Why Christ Died?
Nov. 30, The Christian Way
This series of lectures is designed to engage both those individuals
who may be enquiring into the Christian faith, as well as those individuals who may wish to enrich their knowledge and understanding of the foundational Christian doctrines.
weekend performance space, presents Sweet
Eros by Terence McNally and Home Free by
Lanford Wilson until Nov. 4, 879-2080.
Suicide in B b: a new wave/film noir comedy
abut a crime that may not have happened,
SFU Theatre Oct. 30, 12:30, free, Oct.
31-Nov. 3 and Nov. 7-10 at 8:00 p.m. $2,
students $1.
The Pied Piper, Carousel Theatre: 10th anniversary production, a musical morality adventure. From Nov. 10 to Dec. 29, 689-5306.
Terra Nova Playhouse: starting Nov. 2. Antarctic explorer despairs while freezing to
death. Understandable.
The Peal Talking People Show: begins
Nov 2 at Tamahnous Theatre. Found theatre
from Vancouver's streets, set to music,
254-1911.
Billy Bee, King of the Hive: musical political
satire at the North Van Centennial Theatre,
Nov. 2, 3, 4. Call Vancouver Ticket Centre.
Twelfth Night: Shakespeare's most festive
comedy, at Freddie Wood, Nov. 7 through 17.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri   11 30 9 00 p m
CLOSEO SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00pm   9 0C p m
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
The Place Where The Mammals Die: Kits
House Hall, until Nov. 3, Wed.-Sun. 8:30
p.m., 736-3588.
The   second   Annual   Vancouver   Dance
Week is taking place Oct. 28-Nov. 4: dance
lovers celebrating Vancouver's diverse dance
community. Live performances at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre, The Firehall Theatre and Main Dance Place will be staggered
through the week, as well as a film series at
the National Film Board, dance photography
at the Firehall Theatre Gallery and the VECC
Gallery.
Coppelia: The classical coppelia with new
Thomas, performed by the Pennsylvania Ballet Nov. 8-10 at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
Extremities: a play about rape, Nov. 9 at the
Firehall Theatre.
El Cimarron: autobiography of the runaway
Cuban slave Esteban Nontejo, Nov. 11,8 p.m.
Arts Club Revue Theatre Granville Isle.
The Real Talking People Show: opens
Tamahnous Theatre's '84-'85 season on Friday, Nov. 2, at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. Every line is guaranteed overheard —
as meaningful and obscure as the unknown
people who daily pass by.
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD presents ....
THEATRE
TWELFTH NIGHT
By Wm. Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
NOVEMBER 9-17
(Previews - November 7 & 8)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Matinees/ 13th & 15th at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets - $4.50
Previews/ 2 for the price of 1 Regular admission
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    *    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS
SING & DANCE
AUDITIONS
for
HAPPY END
by Kurt Weill
Gangsters and Salvation Army Lasses in Al Capone's Chicago of the Thirties'
Directed by Arne Zaslove
(to be presented March 6-16, 1985)
30 Singer-Actors needed —Dance Skills Not Required
TIMES: MONDAY, November 5]
TUESDAY, November 6        >   5:00-9:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, November 7   J
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
[OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF]
{Arrange audition appointments in Room 207,
;!   Frederic Wood Theatre, or Phone 228-2678
Note: Please bring a song with you
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
kfjtofu
"THE PLACE
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682-2211
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• Casual Dress Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 2,1984
CFS lobby meets
OTTAWA (CUP) — Some 100
student politicians will converge on
the nation's capital next week to
discuss the future of Canada's national student lobby.
They will attend the seventh semiannual general meeting of the Canadian Federation of Students, at a
time when the three-year-old organization is strapped with a $65,000
deficit.
At the general meeting, national
chair Beth Olley says delegates will
discuss CFS's financial plan as well
as the federation's lobby strategy on
the issue of post-secondary education underfunding. They will tabulate the results of a telephone survey of public opinion on post-secondary education and gather signatures on a petition calling for a national dialogue on universities and
colleges.
The delegates' efforts will culminate in a national lobby day,
Nov. 8, when they will present the
three federal parties with the petitions and survey results. They want
the federal government to offer financial incentives to provinces that
give institutions enough money,
penalize those that fail to live up to
stated financial commitments and
come up with national goals for
education.
Delegates will also finalize plans
lo simplify the organization's bureaucratic structure. Central committee members and the CFS board
of directors for its services — both
of which ensure CFS staff follow
mandates set at the general meetings — will be integrated into one
executive. Olley must be ratified as
the chair of CFS-Services and delegates must decide if they need the
position of deputy chair to help
Olley coordinate executive meetings.
Other student issues such as the
quality of university and college education, the plight of international
students and access to post-secondary education will be discussed.
The general meeting, scheduled
for Nov. 4 to 11, follows a series of
blows to the federation. The University of Calgary graduate students
recently pulled out of the organization meaning a loss of $6,000 in
membership fees next year, and the
University of Alberta student council has voted to hold a pull-out referendum in February.
The University of Waterloo student council is also giving the organization headaches. At a recent
council meeting, the council vowed
to sue the National Union of Students, CFS's predecessor, for
$17,500 in membership fees. CFS is
now responsible for all of NUS's finances.
IN A HURRY?
See us for fast
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(604) 222-1688
Once more, let us discourse on the colour grey. It is a neutral color, easily combined with other colors
without any clash at all. A red sweater, for example, looks very good with a grey sports jacket. And
likewise, an engineering student's grey skin goes very well with a red jacket. The same goes for science
blue. Artsy purple is a bit harder to reconcile with grey, but it can be managed. But the best grey accessory
to any student wardrove is the grey box, or to be more specific, the grey-like pages of your latest edition of
The Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey. The best grey student accessory money can't buy.
^dkm
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