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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jul 10, 1984

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Array ^UBYSSEY
^   Vol. Ill, No. 2
July 4-10,1984
228-2301
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od^e      seepa^1' July 4-10,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 2
tTTT
;■"  .\>'it.■■■.■ u '. „> .       ■ ., ■ .
«.   ..'*.■>■■'   .■■■■
Issues on graduate centre obscured
to offer an explanation for its actions     nn.«rtpnt\ nffi
Letters are welcome, especially if
they praise The Summer Ubyssey.
Letters should be typed triple-space
on a 70 space line. Letters may be
edited for style or brevity. No sexist
or racist ads, please. Letters deadline
is noon Monday.
Recent events at the Graduate
Student Center sound complicated,
but in fact, the stirred-up muck obscures a Tather striking event — the
center has been occupied by UBC
administrators. '
What a howl of protest would arise
if one morning Alma Mater Society
staff went to SUB and found that all
the exterior locks had been changed,
making it impossible for them to get
into their offices and committee
rooms!
This is exactly the situation that
graduate students must deal with.
Their building — including an extension their student fees are still
paying for — has been "taken over"
by an administration which has yet
to the Graduate Student Society and
which prefer instead to make its views
known through the press.
Are they really concerned about
a deficit? Then why have they ignored
GSS proposals to deal with that deficit?
Now, as we look into the depths
of a conservative revolution students
must learn how to deal with wild-
eyed reactionaries hiding out in the
president's office who have masterminded the "take-over" of a student
building. _ ,        _    ,
Rebecca Raglon
Arts 4
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except Sunday (6:00 p.m.)
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228-8255
Phone about our $8.00
Movie Rental Special
by self-employed
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- experienced all-round
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Stephen 263-6748 \
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SUMMER 5EENE
'    '   °*1     Hello and welcome to Summer Session '84
SUMMER SESSION
ASSOCIATION
The Summer Session Association is the student .organization of Summer
Session; if you have any problems, concerns or suggestions, please drop by
our office — main floor of SUB, opposite the candy counter. We are there
Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228-4846
SUMMER SOUNDS
Thursday, July 5
Friday, July 6
Monday, July 9
Tuesday, July 10
Free, noon-hour concerts. Bring your lunch
and a friend.
Pheonix Jazzers - SUB
The Gary Keenan Jazz Quartet
-SUB
Tuba Quartet - SUB
Stephen Nikleva Quartet - SUB
Wednesday, July 11 Dixieland Jazz - Music Bldg.
(In the event of rain, concerts will be held in the
conversation-pit area, main floor of SUB.)
SUMMER SCREEN
Free films presented at 7:30 p.m. in IRC
Lecture Hall #2.
Wednesday, July 4:
MR. MOM, featuring Michael Keaton; a
comedy of domestic turnarounds.
Friday, July 6:
SILKWOOD, featuring Meryl Streep, Cher
and others; a true story based on the life of
Karen Silkwood.
Monday, July 9:
CITIZEN KANE, Orson Wells' classic film
based on the life of William Randolph
Hearst; often called the greatest film of all
time.
Wednesday, July 11:
THE ROSE, Bette Midler stars as a wild
rock and roll singer of the Sixties; loosely
based on the life of Janis Joplin.
MUSIC FOR A
SUMMER'SEVENING
Tuesday, July 10:
An evening of Chamber Music featuring
Ravel, Kuhlau, Rossini, and Sydeman.
Thursday, July 12:
Camille Churchfield, Flute; Jane Gormley,
Piano and Harpsichord; music of Bach,
Handel, Barber, Honegger, Ravel,
Morawetz and Casella.
These concerts are held in the Music Building Recital Hall, and are free to
the public. All concerts are co-sponsored by the S.S.A., Musicians Union
Trust Funds, Extra-Sessional Office, and the Department of Music.
BLOOD DONOR
CLINIC
The annual UBC Summer Session Blood
Donor Clinic will be held July 18 & 19 in the
Scarfe Building. Please give to this cause in
your usual terrific manner. They need our
help.
Summer Session Association information is provided
cooperatively by the S.SA. and The Summer Ubyssey.
HELP WANTED!
If you are a registered
Summer student, can be
available 2 hours per day, and
would like to make some
money to offset course
expenses, please see Michael
Grice as soon as possible in
the Ombudsoffice, main floor
of SUB. Phone 2284846. July 4-10,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 3
New VP to find more funds for UBC
Starting July 1 UBC will have a
vice president of development and
community relations to garner public
support and private sector money.
David McMillan, currently executive vice-president of the Canadian
Direct Marketing Association of
Toronto, will be responsible for attracting funds from corporations and
businesses to financially pressed
UBC, said Bruce Gellatly, vice president administration and finance.
"The reality of the fact is that public (provincial government) funds
cannot be relied upon as in the past,"
Gellatly said.
Provincial operating funds to the
university decreased by five per cent
this fiscal year, and the university
received no increase in 1981 nr I PR?
despite inflation, Gellatly said adding
Victoria approved no capital funding
for the coming year.
Alma . Mater Society president
Margaret Copping said hiring the
new vice president is a viable way to
gain funding for UBC. But she also
said whether UBC or B.C.'s post secondary system wants to become like
a U.S. post-secondary system is a
serious question that is not being
addressed.
"Dependence on any one funding
source puts you under the thumb of
that source. If you have more than
one source you have latitude," said
Copping.
UBC chancellor Robert Wyman
said the university's creation of the
position is not "a knee-jerk reaction
to government cutbacks."
He said universities have been
critized for not actively seeking private sector funding, particularly from
industry and corporations. The appointment is a sign of a long term
change in the university's funding
Cm.—*. m   u   j    j.l.    ■     _i n   i « -Charlie Fidelman photo
Some watched ethnic dancers at Robson Square Canada Day. Others spent day drinking, eating, sleeping and birdwatching Ubyssey
editors spent day editing and whining.
Hunger striker protests new spying agency
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Carl Rising^Meje was arrested at
the Vancouver Liberal headquarters
June 29 for protesting bill C-9.
The bill to create a new-civilian
security agency passed in the Htmse -
of Commons the same day the political activist announced  a  hunger
strike in protest.
He telegrammed the senate, where
bill C-9 was sent for final approval.
The telegram read, "As a Canadian
citizen, civil and human rights activist, father of two, I feel a statement
must be made." The telegram affirms
his respect in the rule of law in his
many activities as a reformer and
begs senate not to pass the bill.
Since the bill passed the senate,
Rising-More said he will continue
.working to reverse the decision. But
he "said he gave up the fast. "It takes
too much energy to run after my
children," said the father of two.
The Independent Canadian Security Intelligence Service which will
replace the RCMP security wing will
be able to abuse civil rights, Rising-
More charges.
"It seems ironic that the MacDonald commission set up to review the
RCMP wrongdoings has now legalized such actions," he said. He criticized Canadians for being too aquies-
cent.
"I want to let people know that
there is a debate going on. Where is
the public?"
Rising-More said the new agency
will particularly affect peace activists
because Canada is aligned through
NATO'to the U.S. and its military
policies. "The CSIS' relationship
with the CIA will make it difficult
for those in the peace movement,'
said.
he
Trying to reverse bill C-9 is not a
left or right struggle but one for democracy, said Rising-More. He
added he would be satisfied with a
trend towards changing the decision.
The thirty-nine year old community organizer said he considers civil
disobedience a last resort against the
agency. "By fasting I get rid of the
anger in a non-violent way."
Rising-More is going to court to
fight his arrest. He said he will plead
not guilty on grounds of necessity.
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Status of Women survive tough year for funding
By PATTI FLATHER
The vase of roses and the bulgy green garbage bag were mere
curiosities when the 30 women mingled in NDP Hall previous to
the annual general meeting Thursday night.
But Pat Feinde's voice cracked when she handed a rose and a
loaf of bread from the bag to each of Vancouver Status of Women's
outgoing board of directors.
"What they did is in the tradition of women who struggle for
both bread and roses," she said. She said the board guided the
VS W through a difficult year, described at the meeting as "the year
we survived the cut."
The provincial government told the VSW on April 16 they
would no longer receive a yearly $83,500 grant from human resources. The ministry gave no explanation why they cut funding to
the feminist resource group they had funded since 1972.
But Thursday night the meeting's mood was happy, emotional.
VSW treasurer Janet Berry said the federal Secretary of State
approved a $63,050 ten-month grant effective June 1. She also said
Vancouver's city hall will continue to provide $22,000 a year for
one worker's wage.
"We're not out of economic difficulty yet though," Berry said.
She said the VSW had asked the federal government for $111,000
to cover their expenses. The VSW will have to reduce staff and
services this year, she said.
In her staff report, Patty Moore said the group had a difficult
year, and spent most of it criticizing the July 1983 provincial
budget and coping with the grant's end.
Moore said despite all, their activities — which include research
on prostitution, pornography, and pension reform, day workshops
for older women and assertiveness training workshops — were
effective.
"It would be impossible to list all the marcnes and rallies we've
attended. We've been working all year and that's felt good," she
said.
Jan de Grass, a staff person for Kinesis, a monthly women's
newspaper the VSW publishes, said many people expecting the
paper to fold surprised her.
De Grass said, "We're quite determined to keep going."
Lesbians Against the Budget spokesperson Betty Baxter told the
meeting her group is increasingly trying to fight homophobia and
make lesbians visible. "LAB is probably the most visible of a new
wave of lesbian organizations," Baxter said.
Following tributes to two women, and the election by acclamation
of seven new board members the meeting ended with music by a
four women acapello (voice only) group.
lllllllllllIllllllllllllIIIUHIIIItllllllllllllllUIIHIISIIIIIItlllllllllltlllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllHHIIfflllllllltlllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllll
lllllllllllllllllllllltMHfllllllllllllllllinillUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllUIIHIIIIlllllIlllllfllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
iiiiiiiiiiiiifiiffiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiin
policy, said Wyman.
Simon Fraser University and the
British Columbia Institute of Technology have also recently created
positions similar to the new vice
president at UBC.
Higher education professor John
Dennison said the new vice president
would attract little money in the short
term. "It will be a slow process because attitudes must be changed,"
Dennison said.
He said the present system in which
universities are reliant on public
funding is undesirable. "The public
has no direct control over tax money.
The government allocates money as
they perceive the priorities of the
electorate," said Dennison.
He said relying exclusively on the
government for university funding
was like putting all your eggs in one
basket.
Senate
talks cuts
By ROBERT BEYNON
Cutting academic programs selectively is unavoidable if the provincial
government implements a threatened
five per cent cut in university funding
for 1985-86.
A senate budget committee report
released in late May says the university cannot maintain its quality if it
cuts its budget across the board next
year.
Acting president Robert Smith
said the senate budget report will
strongly influence the administration
when it plans next year's budget and
that UBC will likely end programs.
"For a long time people have said
that we shouldn't have across the
board cuts," said Smith, adding that
selective cuts preserve the quality of
surviving, programs while cutting
across the board undermines the
quality of all programs.
Provincial authorities have told the
administration to plan for a five per
cent budget cut in 1985-86.
If the university budgets for cuts
in 1985-86, programs will be cut according to senate guidelines, Smith
said.'
The guidelines, senate's 1983 academic planning and priorities statement delineates programs into core,
core-related and non-core academic
activities.
Senate budget committee chair
Geoffrey Scudder said non-core activities would be the first cut but
could not say which programs are
non-core or who would decide which
programs are non-core. The guidelines define non-core activities as
those not core or core-related.
"What we're saying is that the
university should stress the core,"
Scudder said.
The committee that drew up the
1984-85 budget, the retrenchment
committee, considered senate advice
seriously when they drew up that
budget. But he added, "This year's
budget committee didn't operate by
senate guidelines as its only principles."
TheuniversitiesactbarsUBCfrom
running a deficit to avoid cutting
programs, Scudder said. "The government could give permission for
UBC to run a deficit, but I highly
doubt they will," he said.
Faculty association president
Elmer Ogryzlo said the faculty had
no official position on the report.
But he added, "I can't say it's clear to
us that ending programs is the best
way to resolve the problem."
Jane Burnes, universities minister
Pat McGeer's policy coordinator,
said she did not know if the provincial
government would cut university
funding next year.
Committee of Concerned Academics representatives contacted said
they could not comment on the report. July 4-10,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 4
'How many times do I have to explain, Henderson? There are good guys
and there are bad guys and no matter how It looks, we're still the good guys!'
AMS not proved
This year's Alma Mater Society council has not yet proved it is a
competent and responsible body. The council's failure to reach
quorum at its last meeting and the inability of its budget and
selections committees to meet show this.
Some people may argue these facts are irrelevant because
council is only a service group for students. However even if this
is what they currently are they should be more — they should be
student representatives to other levels of government and to the
community at large.
When the university and society is in a crisis like it is, it is
students who must demand support for the university, themselves
and society.
This cannot be done if council fails to meet, even during the
summer. We need strong council representation. Vice president
Doug Low is right, the situation is deplorable.
Democracy?
-i
News Item: Senate passed the spy bill many civil groups question
Bus-loss stricken need many friendly rides
A number of people have approached me, or left messages, asking
for rides to UBC during the bus
strike. In response, a ride board was
set up in the main concourse of SUB,
but the usual problem of such boards
is that it fills up with people needing
rides, and no-one offers any — and
this board is no exception.
Below is a list of desperate people.
If you have an empty space in your
car, please look it over and consider
offering a ride to one of these folks.
The notation "will share expenses"
was universal; I have not included it
below.
- from North Van.-Deep Cove, off
Mt. Seymour Parkway. For evening class M & W. Willing to come
to UBC any time during day or
evening. Catherine 929-6445.
- from North Van.-Lynn Valley area.
For 8 a.m. Norma Jean 987-8001
eve./682-0611 days
■ from Richmond: No. 1 Rd. For
Eve. class T & Th. Jackie 274-5427
• from Surrey: can meet driver anywhere. For morning class. Bev
Fitzgerald 591-6303
• from E. Hastings & Nanaimo. Daily M-F. Paul McDowell 253-7698
eve./228-2878 day
from E. 5th and Kerr. Daily M-F.
Henry 430-4849 after 6:30/ 228-4741
loc. 232 days
from Boundary & Hastings: Daily
M-F. Student & baby daughter.
Janet 299-3803.
from Main and 12th. Mornings
M-F. 873-4951
from 49th & Victoria. Daily M-F.
321-3413
from West End. Mornings M-F
Robyn 687-3893
- from West End. For summer school
689-0807
- from West End. Daily M-F.
681-9674
- from West End. Daily 9 am - 7 pm.
Ramesh 922-5736
- from West End or Broadway/ Granville. Michelle 921-7956 after 6:30
pm/228-2936 days
- from Broadway/ Granville, False
Creek, or Burrard/4th. Evenings M
& W. Richelle 733-9483
- from Broadway/Granville. M-F
days. 736-9300 home/ 228-2165
leave message for Martell.
-from Fraser/49th to Downtown
around 8 am; from Downtown to
UBC around 5 pm; from UBC to
Fraser/49th around 10 pm; Helen-
324-3254 home/665-7553 work.
Margaret Copping
Alma Mater Society president
John Turner, John Turner. Our
new prime minister as of Saturday
June 30,1984. What a lucky guy.
- But we cannot remember voting
for a new PM after Trudeau bid
adieu. And we bet no one else does
except perhaps the 3000 delegates at the Liberal convention.
It is not really Turner's fault —
he is well within the boundaries
of the Canadian democratic system. Mackenzie King resigned in
1948 and Louis St. Laurent took
power. Sir John A. MacDonald
died in office in the early 1890s
and was succeeded. In these cases
the party in power chose the successor and that's what the Liberals
did this year, no questions asked.
Why not? Because that's the
way it's always done? There is a W<
basic flaw in the system so that in
Canada people vote for the party
and once the party is elected,
anyone they choose is leader. The
electorate have no say. WN;
Maybe that is acceptable if the
prime minister is elected by the ^
party the people choose.
However, Turner doesn't even
hold a constituency seat. He cannot claim to represent one section
of Canada, aside from the Liberal
delegates. *^
Turner says he will only appoint
elected people to his Cabinet and
he has come through on this
promise. How ironic.
Turner, should you be in your
Cabinet?
THE UBYSSEY
July 4-10,1984
The summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays throughout the
summer sessions by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia, with additional funding from the Walter H. Gage Memorial
Fund, the UBC Alumni Association, and the federal summer career
access programme. Editorial opinions are those of the staff, and not
necessarily those of the university administration, or of the. sponsor.
Member of Canadian University Press. The summer Ubyssey's editorial
offiuce is SUB 241K. Editorial department, 228-2301/228-2305.
Advertising 228-3977/228-3978.
"I'm in love." squealed Neil Lucente to Charlie Fidelman who winked knowingly to Robert
Beynon Stephen Wisenthal gtggled — his ears weren't uspd to such things Elena Miller and
HenryTsang toldhimtoshutup.BabyKirk Brown, not used to such umnhiDi ted expressionism, whispered to fellow newcomer Pat Barry who said she s rather be at a^y garage sale
than here Patti Flather. still hurtfrom.being called Flatncakes repeatedly remained obii^ious
She found noconsolement from F>ic Eggertsontooiar away in West Van to know his photo
had been printed '^
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Don MacKenzie
Kaboodles is lor kids — big and small.
Stop by and find summer playthings like hula
hoops, bolo bats, sand mills, beach balls, quiet
games for backseat travelling, baby gifts, party
supplies, jelly beans, helium balloons.
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The Summer Ubyssey
Page 5
Faculty to create
firing procedures
By NEIL LUCENTE
UBCs faculty association will
again try to develop faculty firing
procedures agreeable to the faculty
which the administration can use to
deal with future financial emergencies.
A facu.'ty committee will draw up
the procedures.
Although laying off faculty is distasteful, the faculty association must
develop a new agreement with the
administration because without one
the university can fire faculty
members for financial reasons, said
faculty association president Elmer
Ogryzlo.
The new faculty committee will
consider the wide variety of complaints voiced about an earlier
agreement., said Ogryzlo, who chairs
the committee.
"Right now we are left without a
financial exigency agreement but
whatever the failings were on the
original agreement, the committee is
trying to fix those problems," said
Ogryzlo.
Faculty members criticized almost
every proposal in the earlier agreement, said Donald Fisher, social/education studies associate professor and committee of concerned
academics member. Fisher said the
proposed agreement allowed for
much injustice because it targeted
some professors over others and because it denied much input from faculty members.
"The procedures for laying off
people were unfair. The faculty association was giving way too much
power to the university in laying off
faculty," said Fisher.
' The faculty association members
voted to reject the original agreement
in an April 4 ballot.
A more equitable solution than
firing staff or faculty would be to
close down the university for two or
three weeks during term, said Fisher.
COCA (committee of concerned
acade'mics) has already proposed
>uch a motion to the faculty committee, he said.
"Closing down the university is not
exactly a financial exigency agreement. However it is preferable to
laying off faculty of staff and should
be implemented before layoffs," said
Fisher. "This motion spreads financial exigency evenly across the uni-
. versity because it will not target staff
over faculty or some professors over
tenured professors," said Fisher,
adding that implementation of the
proposal would send a political mes-'
sage to the provincial government.
"Closing down the university
would show that we (the faculty association) have a united-front to resist
their damaging policies," he said.
The reduction of 77 faculty
members through "regular retirements, attrition and voluntary early
termination" makes faculty termination unlikely this year, president
George Pedersen said in a May 8
speech to the faculties.
But Pedersen added faculty may
be terminated in 1985-86 if UBC receives a  threatened  five  per cent
funding decrease from the provincial
government.
"... faculty terminations without
an agreement, of fiscal exigency
criteria and procedures, if it can be
avoided in any way, would clearly
not be in the best interests of this
university. The latter comment
should not be construed, however,
to mean that it may not be necessary
to take such action at some time in
the future, even the near future, and
we must-take the responsible position
of anticipating such a possibility,"
said Pedersen.
Plaza features restaurant
Students can expect s/uu.UUU more
per year-in salaries when the $1.5
million SUB Plaza renovation is
completed in December.
The renovation project, which began June 27, will feature a restaurant
and snack bar, a typing service where
students can rent IBM Selectric
typwriters, and a word-processing
service, said Pat Darragh. capital
projects aquijitions committee
treasurer.
"The restaurant and other retail
space will generate $200,000 in salaries yearly for students," said Darragh
adding that all retail businesses will
be owned and operated by the Alma
Mater Society.
SUB Plaza will create 15,228
square feet in the Student  Union
Building's currently empty basement,
said design coordinator Michael
Kingsmill. Retail and service space
will account for 20 per cent of the
renovation while the rest will be dedicated to clubs and student space,
Kingsmill said.
Although daycare received a
higher priority on last year's $20 fee
referendum, CPAC will finish construction on SUB Plaza long before
funding a daycare centre.
Darragh said the Plaza will be built
first because project planning was
finished before planning for daycare
started.
Darragh could not estimate how
long daycare construction will be delayed.
AMS student council fails to reach quorum
The Alma Mater Society council failed to reach quorum at its
meeting last Wednesday. Student council will not meet again until
at least mid-July.
Vice president Doug Low said five budget committee meetings
have also been cancelled recently because members did not show
up. Low said this trend is unacceptable.
'    "I'm getting fed up with it. We're accomplishing nothing," said
Low, adding important expenditures like Joblink must be approved.
President Margaret Copping said the bus strike and summer
apathy caused the poor turnout. She added one arts representative,
Roger Holland, has not attended one meeting. Council was three
short of its 18 voting member quorum.
Copping said the previous council meeting just reached quorum
and to ensure members attend in the future she or Low may
organize a carpool.
Because budget and selections committee meetings failed to
reach quorum nothing could haveibeenpassedanyway,Copping
said.
At the meeting Copping announced SUB expansion excavation
will begin this Tuesday and council members gave reports. Afterwards council proceeded to SUB's lower level to-christen the
expansion project. - ,     *
r       T&lKntil.  if"1"-  "'■**•**     ■
SSj.
x ' " .ys?5
FISH HEADS, FISH heads, roly poly fish heads. Fish heads, fish heads, eat them up. Yum. July 4-10,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 6
Visfa.
«
Summer Film Series, SUB Auditorium UBC, The Right Stuff, July
5-7, 8 p.m. only.
Hollywood theatre (3123 W. Broadway, 732-3211. Deal of the Century,
7:30; Alfred Hitchcock's North by
Northwest 9:20, July 2-8; Exposed
with Kinski and Nureyev, 7:30 p.m..
The Hunger, 9:20 p.m., July 9-15.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus.
738-6311) That Sinking Feeling, a
Bill Forsyth comedy, 7:30,9:30 p.m.
Gary Oliver/Robert Karpa: a photographic display featuring commercial
success of fashion, still lie and advertising product work, until July
11, 333 Chesterfield Ave., North
Van., 988-6844.
80/1/2/3/4 TORONTO: CONTENT/ CONTEXT: a group exhibition of 15 Toronto artists who present
a sense of what it is like to be alive
now, June 29 - July 21, Contemporary Art Gallery, 555 Hamilton St,
687-1345.
Bedroom Farce by Alan Ayckbourn,
directed by simon Webb, a comedy
of 3 beds and 4 couples, until July
14, Frederic Wood Theatre at UBC,
228-2678. Beyond Therapy from
Fly-By-Night Theatre tells the story
of a "meaningful relationship", starts
July 4, 254-9914.
Lauren Roberg returns to Vancouver
with two large sculptural works. The
works were created to accommodate
the unique spatial aspects of the UBC
Fine Arts Gallery, until August 10,
basement. Main Library.
Contemporary photoworks from the
Canada Council Art Bank showing
concurrently with Ansel Adams:
Photographs of the Southwest, until
August 26, 333 Chesterfield Ave.
North van., 988-6844.
Jacqueline Sephton: Rich abstract
watercolours titled Discovering
White until July 21, Procope restaurant. 8363 Tranville St.
University of British Columbia
STAGE CAMPUS '84
BEDROOM FARCE
by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Simon Webb
JULY 4-14
OH, WHAT A LOVELY
WAR
by Charles Chilton &
The Theatre Workshop
Directed by Henry Woolf
JULY 25-AUGUST 4
Adults        $5
Stud./srs.   $4
Tuesdays - Two for One
Curtain 8pm
Frederic Wood Theatre
Res. 228-2678
1.99 MOVIES
■      Sun - Thurs
NOW IN        STOCK |
Terms of Endearment
To Be or Not   to Be
Educating Rita
The Right Stuff
and 22 movies From the
Vancouver International
Film Featival |
COMING SOON
| Return of Martin Guerre |
Yentl
| Footlooae
Reckless
Blame it on Rio
Broadway Danny Rose
. and hundreds of
movies to choose from
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INFO  ANDRES     2549578
wTHE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 tines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 66c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
85 — TYPING
FAST accurate typist available for manuscripts, theses, resumes, essays, etc.
$1.00/page. Refs. avail. 736-1305
WORD PROCESSING
SPECIALISTS: U write we type
theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings,
weekends 736-1208	
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222-2661
WORD PROCESSING -Essays,
reports, thesis work done on
the best. See the SONY Series
35 and decide. Bilingual service.
Fast turnaround. Convenient to
campus. Weekend work by ap-
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TYPEWRITING
Essays, resumes, letters.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED
Tapes transcribed
Layout help on resumes.
Phone 224-6518 day or night.
WORD PROCESSING
Theses, dissertations, term
papers, novels. MICOM 3003 -
letter quality printing.
Regular rate $1.49/page.
Student rate $.99/page.
Low Cost revisions.
WINONA KENT 438-6449
Theatresports: improvisational
comedy every Friday night at 10
p.m., to August 31. Presentation
House in North Van. 986-1351.
The Late Blumer: premier performance of Vancouver playwright
John Lazarus' fantastical comedy at
the Arts Club Theatre on Seymour
Street. Opens July 2 at 8:30 p.m.
687-1644.
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COPY CENTRE
BEST DEAL ON CAMPUS
3.30 per copy
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COIN-OPS STILL 50 A COPY
CALL 228-4388 for more info.
LOCATED IN SUB.
UBC's Theatre Department
Auditions    Auditions    Auditions    Auditions    Auditions
for
LOOK BACK IN ANGER
by John Osborne
(September 19-29)     •
Directed by Stanley Weese
Open to all UBC Students, Faculty & Staff
FRIDAY, July 6,1:30-4:30 pm
ALL AUDITIONS IN ROOM 206, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE BLDG.
Scripts Available in Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre Bldg.
Audition appointments may be arranged in advance through the Theatre
Department Office, Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre Bldg. or Telephone
228-3880
Auditions    Auditions    Auditions    Auditions    Auditions
Play Racquetball and Squash
this Summer at
THUNDERBIRD
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with:
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Reduced Rates for UBC Students,
Faculty and Staff
Convention Delegates Welcome
COURTS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
FROM 7:15 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
Call the courts at
228-6125 July 4-10,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 7
If cutbacks continue more faculty will resign
From page 1
program will take 25 fewer students
next year.
Lusztig is trying to keep discontented faculty another year. But he
warns if faculty see UBC's financial        "The whole continent knows we're
crisis as ongoing, "It is likely they
will succumb to the sirens from
abroad."
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in trouble." Lusztig says articles on
UBC's financial problems appeared
in the New York Times and the Wall
street Journal.
Due to this, Americans come to
UBC to "raid" faculty, Lusztig says.
Then he laughs. "Well, we used to do
it to them."
He says commerce and UBC risk
losing the best faculty first.  The
commerce faculty is hardest hit now
because many unfilled positions exist
in U.S. business schools, he adds.
These jobs' availability only add to
UBCs comparatively low salaries for
business profs, and the provincial
government education cutbacks, he
says.
"The academic environment is in
a state of seige," Lusztig says. Then
indignantly, "The provincial government's setting up Discovery Park and
then castrating the university located
nearby."
Commerce is not the only area
suffering the "restraint" side effect of
faculty loss, says Lusztig. He says
restraint will severely affect computer
science, engineering, physics and
economics and "It's not going to be
long before it becomes a university-
wide phenomenon."
Lorna Gibson, an assistant civil
engineering professor, resigned this
year for a position at the prestigious
Michigan Institute of Technology:
She says she resigned for two reasons.
"One, I got a very good offer. And
I find the financial situation at UBC
discouraging," Gibson says.
Gibson fits under the term junior
faculty; Laughing she says she was
the the junior faculty in her department. She stayed at UBC for two
years.
"The academic
environment is in
a state of seige."
"I haven't had a raise since I got
here. It doesn't look like I'd get one
next year. Or the next year," she says.
Gibson says she will be paid more
money and has better prospects for a
raise at MIT, though she will probably work harder.
Gibson saw an advertisement for
the position and responded. "I think
the provincial government has a lot
to do with it.... I wouldn't have
looked if things were better," she
says.
Applied science dean Martin
Wedepohl says among the junior faculty discontent is a real problem. If
salaries at other universities increase,
a big gulf will open between them
and UBC, he says.
Wedepohl says there was only one
early retirement and one resignation
- Gibson's - in his faculty. He says he
is worried but the problem is not yet
troublesome.
If headhunters are raiding his faculty, Wedepohl says he would not
know until a'resignation arrived on
his desk. Headhunters discretely seek
out the top people, he says.
Physics department head Llewellyn Williams agrees junior faculty
restlessness is serious but says no one
in physics has left yet. But he adds, "I
shouldn't discuss this. There are
people considering this option."
Williams says physics' major
problem is its inability to hire talented young faculty — only one physics
prof is younger than 38. Williams
says if he cannot hire young faculty
now the current quality of UBC's
physics department will decline in
five years.
Computer science department
head Jim Varah says his department
is lucky no one resigned to date. "A
lot of people are depressed and discouraged (by the situation)," he says.
He says computer science cannot
attract faculty to fill one year appointments. "In other areas they
would get, oh, what you call an inducement to stay," Varah says. "The
salaries here are very much out of
line."
The faculty reduced enrolment and
will cut sections of courses to meet a
decreased budget, he says.
"I certainly disagree with the provincial government's priorities because they don't fund higher education. This is certainly the root cause
of the present problem. I deplore
that."
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The Summer Ubyssey
Page 8
Two for one at toss of col
B\ HENRY TSANG
O isterly Feelings by Alan Ayckbourn, playing at
Langara's Studio 58, is a complex yet simple play;
complex in concept, and simple in plot.
Conceptually, the play's structure is unconventional.
A "performance map" is included in the program to
explain to the audience how the performance evolves.
This chart tells us that the performance path depends on
the flip of a coin; therefore, there are different versions
to the same play.
Sisterly Feelings
By Alan Aychbourn
Directed by Antony Holland
At Studio 58 until July 1
In fact, there are four different "stories". There are
two different kinds of performances, either "chance" or
"predetermined". Chance nights are those which are
left up to the coin's flip - even the actors do not know
what lines they will be saying.
The only constant factors on a chance night are the
beginning and the end. Everything in between can
change, and does.
There are two specific stories reserved for predetermined nights. The plot deals with the lives of two sisters,
Abigail and Dorcas. They both become involved with
Simon, brother to their own brother's girl-friend. This
apparently complicated situation actually is quite simple
In that it represents a typically mixed up set of relation^
ships, the type'one can find on any mid-day televisi<
drama. Depending on what version you see, one siste:
becomes involved with Simon, then either she continues
her affair with hip, or else her sister takes over.
Nothing extra-ordinary occurs in these adventures*:
and thus the emphasis of the play seems to be on its'
concept, and the element of chance.
But it is not until intermission that the importance of
chance becomes obvious, for that is when - somewhat
confused as to the purposes of the play - one deciphers
the performance map, and fits the pieces of the performance puzzle together.
It is certainly a fault that the strength of the play lies;
in the intriguing structural format of its concept, and!
not in the development of its characters or plot.
The theme is unoriginal, with a traditional opening;
scene of death (funeral), and ending with one of renewal
(the wedding). The transitions between various scenes
throughout the play, are not very polished, especially at
its conclusion. But this is to be expected with such a
complicated storytelling format.
The various British accents employed were confusing,
ranging from a thick Scottish brogue to an almost
American southern drawl. The actors had a special
dialects coach who may have helped, but certainly did
not perfect the dialects.
Sisterly Feelings is an intriguing play because of its
conceptual merits. But as a performance, it lacks the
depth to stand on its own. However, since the concept is
so unique and therefore, invigorating, it overshadows
the weaknesses of the plot and theme.
To err is Willy funny
By ELENA MILLER
" rather tedious farce opens this
year's Vancouver Shakespeare Festival. The production of The Comedy
of Errors is commendable, mostly
for making this dreary early effort of
Shakespeare's into a lively production.
The Comedy of Errors"
By William Shakespeare
Vanier Park until July 10
In an attempt to make the play
more than an interesting theatrical
experience, director Henry Woolf
throws in some show-stopping song
and dance numbers. The play hovers
uneasily between being a farce and a
musical because of these. Stops in
the play's action occur unexpectedly
such as when actors belt out "And
this is love."
The play is not seriously damaged
by such interruptions. The plot —
about twin.brothers who cannot distinguish between twin servants — is
mainly a vehicle for farcical happenings.
Nonetheless the musical numbers
drag on, making the play longer than
need be. This is something to think
about when one is sitting on wooden
benches under a canvas tent.
Even Shakespeare's lesser works
such as The Comedy of Errors tend
to bring out the best in actors.
Last season's veterans Christopher
Gaze and Susan Williamson perform
well. Doctor Pinch (Gaze) is a show-
stealing quack as a voodoo witchdoctor. Williamson plays a maid and
an abbess with accomplished ease.
Adriana (Gillian Barber), wife to one
of the brothers, pouts, glares, and
grimaces to make the most of her
role.
l ne best performances come trom
the two servants, both called Dromio
(William Samples, Frank C. Turner).
Samples is a lascivious Cockney servant, and Turner is the traditional
melancholy, much-abused servant of
farces.
Director Woolf need not worry if
his show will be a crowd pleaser when
it contains such quality acting. Aside
from the musical numbers, Woolf
deserves credit for a well-directed
show, particularly in the inventive
buffoonery segments.
A lively musical score composed
and directed by Bruce Ruddell and
performed by Lloyd Arnzten's
Ephesus Ragtime Four enhances the
play. A few words of caution: on a
wet night, rain on the canvas roof
competes with the sound on stage.
Off Off and away into alter-space
By PAT BARRY
* ' elcome to the show! Welcome
to yet another attempt by Theatres-
pace to meet the rent," the emcee
bids just after the lights dim. Surprise! You're trapped. They might
have held a garage sale instead.
Written and performed by a collective of theatrespace members. Off
Off Granville Island is billed as a
Cabaret-style revue. The collage of
skits, anecdotes, and familiar Broadway tunes attempts to expose the
banalities of Vancouver living. Unemployment, "vapid" transit, and an
obscene labour climate is an oasis of
humour but unfortunately Theatrespace runs it dry during a two
hour presentation.        	
Off Off Granville Island
Theatrespace 400
310 Water St.,
until July 15
When the action flounders. Rick
Sledge, a would-be sleuth, and his
Bogart side-kick and secretary Stella,
appear to solve the ongoing case of
the psychopathic seawall cyclist. The
gag chokes on yet refuses to die. A
running gag should be funny.
Why must American cliches such
as Private Eyes and Casablanca be
dredged up in an evening devoted to
Vancouver jokes and asides? (Is it
another insinuation that we live in
the shadow of the U.S.A.?) To hear
one more rendition of "As Time Goes
By", is enough to pop those cookies
(by George) downed during intermission.
Cabaret-style theatre is known for
its socio-political satirical bite. There
were moments when the material
approached the satirical: The barbershop quartet of construction
workers lamenting Expo site difficulties, "There's a place for us, a B.C.
Place for us..." Or the criminally insane version of "Ain't Misbehavin'"
delivered by an inmate in a strait-
jacket. Jabs at labour and the justice
system provided glimpses of s.c.t.v,
brand humour. But moments like
these were few.
Several scenes failed to generate
audience interest due to lack of conflict. Actors appeared at cross-purposes with each other. In the Ostrich
sketch, a mother talks of her obsession with shoes while her daughter
keens about the heartbreak of unemployment. Sadly, two actors
speaking at each other don't make a
scene. Potentially funny scenes were
spoiled by inept writing and excessive
verbiage. If the actors writers used
liquid paper with more tenacity.
Theatrespace may have had a solid
hour of entertainment.
Theatrespace was formed to provide Vancouver with an alternative
theatre to professional stages like the
Arts Club and Playhouse. That's fine;
but must they be so amateur? During
intermission one of the actors
mingled with the audience. 1 don't
care if it is cabaret-style, and the
house is small, and your Aunt Bessie
flew all the way from Red Deer to
see you. When an actor breaks out of
a role, it's enough to make you want
to slap your thighs and shout,
"Shucks Ma, there goes an ac-tore.!"
Valeda Hett flexed her professionalism and showed courage in the
face of mediocrity. She handled the
roles of Fanny Freedom and Rosa
the"Jeep-sey Womb-man'" with ease
and an amazing depth of characterization.
So, if you have five dollars and
want a cackle or two about UIC and
the Socreds... go ahead. It is original
and contains moments that are genuinely funny. And there's free peanuts to munch on.
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