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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1972

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Array Council to ask students for $5 fee raise
By BERTON WOODWARD
UBC students will face three
referendums — including a fee
increase proposal — when they go
to the polls at the beginning of
next month.
Alma Mater Society council
decided unanimously Wednesday
to ask students Feb. 9 for a
$5-per-student increase in AMS
fees to expand the student
activity operating fund. That fee,
currently $9, combined with the
non-discretionary $ 15 building fee
and the $5 athletic fee form the
yearly AMS fee.
Another    SUB    expansion
referendum was also approved at
the meeting. The development of
area 18-D, defeated in a
referendum in October, with area
18-F in the basement, as well as
the development of rooms 30, 130
and the present lounge and music
areas is to be decided on Feb. 2.
In the same referendum,
students will vote on a finance
plan for the $350,000 expansion.
The proposal would extend the
term of financing to 21 years
from 18, "it being Understood
that such extension of tej;m will
result   in   no   increase-  in  .the
amount of the current $15
building fee portion of the AMS
fee."
The third referendum, not yet
drafted, will ask whether students
are in favor of the AMS taking
over SUB food services. It will
also be held Feb. 2.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. UH, No. 39        VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1972
The fee referendum provoked
council discussion as to whether
students would accept a full $5
increase.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat
proposed that there be two
questions on the ballot: one
proposing a $3 raise and a second
proposing an extra $2 raise.
The first would be to maintain
the existing operation, the second
to finance special projects.
Council finally decided to give
student generosity the benefit of
the doubt and voted unanimously
for the single $5 increase
referendum.
STANDING TOGETHER, Georgia Straight staffers express solidarity in front of Powell
Street office after taking over operation of paper from editor Dan McLeod. Editorial and
production staff took the step after repeated refusal of McLeod to allow co-operative
staff structure. Two Straights will probably appear on streets today.
Workers liberate Straight
By SANDY KASS
Revolution has hit the Georgia Straight.
Staff members of the Vancouver alternate weekly
Wednesday morning occupied the paper's publishing
office at 56-A Powell Street in an attempt to give the
Straight legal status as a co-operative.
The occupation, which began at 6:30 a.m., is
expected to last indefinitely.
While occupying the office, Straight staffers are
publishing an alternate Georgia Straight, due to hit the
streets this morning.
It will be sold by staffers themselves, with the normal
distribution set-up still controlled by the paper's owner,
Dan McLeod.
McLeod will be publishing his paper as the Georgia
Straight to be sold by the regular distributors, also this
morning.
When Straight staffer Jeff Marvin tried Wednesday to
have the alternate paper printed, during regular Straight
press time at College Printers, College owner Dave Nelson
said he could not allow this to be done for fear of a
lawsuit.
"McLeod still is the legal owner of the Georgia
Straight and I cannot allow any paper to be published
with that name without his authorization," Nelson told
Marvin.
As a result, the alternate Straight is being published at
Horizon Printers.
Straight business manager and former Alma Mater
Society treasurer David Mole said Wednesday the move is
the staffs first blow against the ruling class at the paper.
Mole described the Straight's ruling class as "the
paper's legal owner, Dan McLeod."
McLeod, who has been legal owner of the paper since
its beginning in 1967, was unavailable for comment
Wednesday.
Said Mole: "McLeod has had the ultimate power over
the inclusion or exclusion of anything for the paper.
"But the paper is really run by all people who work
on it, and the staff has wanted it to be a co-operative for
quite some time."
Mole said the definite decision to change the paper to
a co-operative status was made at a staff meeting early in
December.
Nominations open
The nomination period for the first slate of the AMS
executive elections for 1972-73 opened Wednesday and
will continue until 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27.
The first slate includes the offices of AMS president,
secretary, internal - and external - affairs officers.
Nominations and eligibility forms may be obtained
from the AMS general office or from the AMS secretary in
SUB 248.
A negotiating committee was set up following that
meeting to discuss the matter with McLeod but "McLeod
refused to negotiate," Mole said.
"He told us Monday that he never intended to give up
legal ownership of the paper," he said.
"The staff wants the paper to be a collective, with no
person having power over anyone else."
Supporting McLeod in his statements are Straight
staffers Mitzi Gibbs and Bob Cummings.
Straight co-ordinator Ken Lester said Wednesday the
staff has always thought of McLeod as "a benevolent
dictator," but added that things "have just gone too far.
"McLeod has an excellent alternate view of things,
but he cannot deal with things unless they really are
radical," LesteT said.
He said staff members discussed putting out an issue
devoted strictly to women, but added it was vetoed by
McLeod who said the subject "did not relate to
anything."
Lester said he thinks the paper will become more
sensitive operating as a collective.
"We will have the same staff as before, and even
though we aren't ideologically together, this is good
because well get some differences of opinion in the
Straight," he said.
"We want the paper to take new directions, with
better presentation and quality of articles and a broader
base from which to work."
See page 2: STRAIGHT Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Positive mood grips council
SUB will be open round the clock
starting next week and the Alma Mater
Society wants to join the UBC Daycare
council.
Furthermore, AMS executive secretary
Carol Buzas will keep her job.
Council was in a positive mood
Wednesday night. It even saw fit to donate
$100 to Liberal MP David Anderson's
campaign to challenge the American right
to send deep-sea oil-tankers from Alaska to
Washington state via the open sea west of
the B.C. coast.
A delegation of three from the daycare
council began important business by
asking, through a motion from internal
affairs officer Michael Robinson, that the
Straight
gets new
owners
Thursday, January 20,  1972
AMS guarantee a loan of $60,000 to the
council. The loan will pay for construction
of a permanent daycare centre in Acadia
Camp.
Corinne McAdam, a UBC secretary,
told council that the four daycare centres
currently in operation at UBC are all in
temporary buildings, three of those in old
army huts.
She said the huts do not provide the
kind of environment children need and
cited the steam pipes and radiators in the
huts and the lack of outdoor play areas as
detrimental conditions for young children.
The new centre, she.said, would not be
a place just for research and observation
but would provide a needed service for
parent and child.
Although she advocated installation of
two-way mirrors in the new centre, she
defended them as a means of keeping
adults visiting the centre infrequently out
of sight of the children.
The campus daycare centres are
currently financed by provincial day-to-day
subsidization and by a fee scale which
slides downward from $80 per month.
McAdam said the administration has
refused to provide capital funding for the
new centre but has given it an as yet
undetermined amount of land in Acadia
Camp.
Council voted unanimously to
guarantee the centre's loan but asked that
it be given two seats on the eight-member
daycare council.
AMS membership on the council is.
subject to approval by that council.
After a council decision to rescind a
motion of Dec. 6 to open SUB 24 hours a
day and to authorize a trial opening period
of two weeks, treasurer David Dick said the
new policy would be effected "fairly
quickly, certainly next week."
He said all that is required is the hiring
of a night shift guard, probably from either
the campus police force or the physical
plant.
Asked by science rep Svend Robinson
about the status of Carol Buzas, Dick said
he has received a confidential report from
AMS general manager Brian Robinson
which in effect affirmed her competence.
He said the letter took note of the
Ubyssey report Jan. 13 of the in-camera
council meeting that discussed Buzas'
status as secretary, stressing in view of that
article it should be kept secret.
-|jfe>.J^$^
From page 1
He said the Straight will
temporarily drop the personal
classified page to afford more
room for articles.
The paper's staff this week
opened a Georgia Straight
collective bank account into
which all monies owing the
Straight are being paid.
"Also, we've placed a lock on
our cash register so no one but the
co-operative staff can get at our
money," Lester said.
He said McLeod is the only
person with official signing
authority for monies in the
paper's regular account, "so the
staff has no access to them.
"McLeod could do something
drastic like declaring bankruptcy,
but we've had offers of up to
$25,000 for the paper, so I don't
think he will."
He said the Straight's mail has
been cut off from the post office
and added that "McLeod may
have had something to do with
that."
The Straight's phones were cut
off shortly after noon Wednesday,
but Mole said he was in touch
with B.C. Tel and expected them
to be reconnected by Wednesday
night with a new number.
"McLeod could cut off our
electricity too, but we feel at the
moment he's more interested in
getting his own paper out," he
said.
Lester said the staff-published
Straight is not expected to lose
money because "our readership
should go up due to the better
quality of paper we'll be putting
out."
—kini mcdonald photo
AGGIE PRESIDENT Niels Holbek gets painted green and well hung Wednesday, as forestry comrades string him from goal posts on playing
field behind SUB. Holbek was not immediately available for comment.
Grad class elects 1972 executive
Mike Tratch, applied science 4, was elected
president of the 1972 graduating class at a
meeting in the SUB auditorium Wednesday.
A quorum of 10 per cent of the 3,235
member class was not reached at the meeting
but Alma Mater Society president Grant
Burnyeat declared the meeting legal
regardless.
About 225 students attended.
After Tratch's election Burnyeat stepped
down as chairman of the meeting and Tratch
presided at the election of the other officials.
Following  what  Tratch  called a "ladies
first" order in the nominating speeches Gai
Hughes, recreation 4 was elected
vice-president of the class.
"I can't give you another leg show but I
hope you'll vote for me anyway," Hughes said
the audience which was composed largely of
engineers.
She won by a 35-vote margin over
candidate Doug Ford, applied science 4.
Marian Chapman, microbiology 4, was
elected secretary in a close race over the
engineers' candidate, Ron Royal, applied
science 4.
The new treasurer is Bob Bird, applied
science 4, and Bill McKenzie, applied science
4, was acclaimed social convener. The public
relations officer is Phil Poirier, applied science
4, who defeated C. Fox, applied science 4.
Tratch closed the meeting after the
elections saying the new executive had to have
time to meet to draw up recommendations
about allocating the $22,645 grad class
budget.
The money was raised last September when
each member of the graduating class was
assessed $7 for the fund.
NURSING U. S. - FEE LEVY
Held Mon. Jan. 17/72
30% voted and of those 96% voted
in favor of a $2.00 fee levy.
SCHOOL OF LIBRARIANSHIP
U.S.
FEE LEVY
61% of eligible voters voted 86% in
favor of a $5.00 Undergraduate Fee
Levy for the-72-73 session.
Paris Boutique
Exclusive agents
DOROTHY PERKINS
Quality English Ladles Wear
2105 W. 16th
Tues. — Sat.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
SUB FILMSOC presents ...
CATCH 22
with Alan Arkin
THURSDAY — 7:00                                 50*
FRI. & SAT. — 7:00 & 9:30               SUB
SUNDAY — 7:00                       THEATRE Thursday, January 20, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Pqge 3
Students set up parallel courses
SHERBROOKE, QUE. (CUPI) - More
than 200 social work students at the
University of Sherbrooke have organized
an alternate department in defiance of
faculty attempts to restrict student
participation in course determination and
grading.
The students believe the entire
department, not just the professor, must
decide the goals of the teaching process.
They decided to create a parallel
department rather than organize sit-ins or
demonstrations because they believe this
will show they are capable of responsible
action.
"The record confirms that students are
capable of assuming their responsibilities
and not simply of saying so or of claiming
them," a student bulletin reads.
Since the creation of the social work
department in 1967, students and
professors had been unofficially
co-operating in planning the curriculum
and in grading.
After closed conferences last summer,
however, the professors decided they had
4he sole right to grade students.
The students issued a statement at a
Nov. 2 general meeting claiming equal
rights with professors and declaring any
other situation was unacceptable.
The professors rejected student
demands for participation in grading by a
vote 17-1 at a closed meeting Nov. 5.
At    another    general    meeting    on
November 10 the students decided to set
up a parallel department and to open
formal .negotiations with faculty and
administration.
They named a five-person negotiating
team and a twelve-member committee to
operate the department.
Immediate and overwhelming
community support have helped to make
the parallel department a success. Some 88
resource persons from across Quebec
consented to lecture free of charge and 35
appeared before Christmas.
But negotiations have made little
progress. Department head Jules Perron
attempted to divide the students by
threatening to fail those who did not
submit their term work, due in December.
Only thirty students met the deadline.
Failing grades were recorded for 72
other students and the department's refusal
to expunge these grades is one of the major
remaining obstacles to a settlement.
A student assembly on January 12
decided to publicize the struggle across
Quebec. Five hundred information packets
were prepared but just as they were about
to be mailed a group of professors
including Perron requested new meetings
with the students.
Some progress has since been made
toward a compromise on the issue of
grading procedures but the two parties are
still some distance apart.
2-year orientation plan
stalled again by senate
By VAUGHN PALMER
UBC's senate used a stalling tactic to
block a two-year arts-science orientation
college proposal Wednesday night, thus
squashing the possibility that the plan
might be implemented next year.
A proposal that such a college be
established was returned to a joint
committee of the arts and science faculties
by a meeting of the UBC senate Wednesday
night.
It was originally referred to the
committee by a senate meeting of March
18, 1970.
The proposal was one of the
recommendations in a report made two
years ago to the senate by
anthropology-sociology head Cyril
Belshaw's committee on long range
objectives.
The joint committee's recommendation
to the senate stated that even though
improvement of counselling facilities at
UBC is desirable, a college is not the
structure for such a program, and therefore
the proposal of the Belshaw committee
should be rejected.
Speaking in defence of the Belshaw
committee recommendation, Asian studies
professor Bill Willmott said: "If the senate
rejects this proposal it will once again have
petered out on its fundamental
responsibility of providing more avenues of
choice for first and second-year programs.
"The present structure of courses,
encouraged by the faculties and
departments, puts students in specialized
little boxes very early in their academic
life, while an orientation college, such as is
proposed would remove those boxes,"
Willmott said.
Belshaw said that apparently the joint
faculty committee was confused, as his
committee's original proposal had nothing
to do with a counseling service.
"An orientation college would provide a
group of general courses, combining
various aspects of various departments, to
give first and second-year students a chance
to discover just what academic programs lie
open to them," Belshaw said.
The proposal that an orientation college
be formed was returned to the joint faculty
committee with conditions that the
committee be broadened to include
members from other faculties.
The enlarged group will then hear
additional explanations on the matter for
Belshaw and others.
Court reserved
,«*••«/
SMASHING SERVE by women's volleyball team member Barb Dalton was caught against
backdrop net by photographer Kini McDonald at last weekend's invitational volleyball
tournament. Story, page 7.
Student court Tuesday reserved decision
on the validity of the Nov. 24 Alma Mater
Society elections to Friday noon.
That was the result of more than five
hours of indecision as to how the court
should be conducted.
The majority of the session was devoted
to debates between council and court over
whether non-existent documents could be
entered as evidence and how much time
council could have to question witnesses.
The non-existent documents were
copies of several elections committee
minutes which Ed Safarik, lawyer for
defeated secretarial candidate Tom
Mackinnon, who is contesting the election,
claimed  "are   somewhere  but  can't  be
produced because I can't find them."
The court decided to hear testimony
relating to those minutes and said it would
consider later whether it is admissible.
Frequent recesses, ranging from 30
seconds to 20 minutes, were incurred to
allow the court time to rule on the
procedures.
New witnesses called by Safarik and
AMS lawyer Hein Poulous reiterated the
evidence already presented at Thursday's
hearing.
Judge Steve Nathanson indicated the
court was bored when he told Safarik to
"please be a little more dramatic so as to
retain the attention of the court to the
case." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20,  1972
THS UBYSSEY
JANUARY 20, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of'the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,   228-2301,   228-2307;
Friday, Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Page
Sports types first today, as an abbreviated masthead
takes shape. It was Gord Gibson from Kent Spencer and
Mike Gidora, as photographers Kini McDonald, Garry
Gruenke and Warren Mayes flashed bulbously. In the
stands, Sandy Kass screamed Yay Gord while Sandi
Shreve and Lesley Krueger guzzled orange crush. Berton
Woodward got his hot dog confused with John Twigg,
and it was standing room only for Paul Knox, Vaughn
Palmer, Tricia Moore, Kathy Carney and Jim Joly. Staff
meeting at noon today.
Take from the poor . • •
We are asked by the writer of the first letter
on this page to clarify The Ubyssey's position on
the UBC bookstore's scuttling of the five per cent
rebate policy.
Our position is, of course, the same as that
taken by the writer of the letter, Gerry
Armstrong.
As he correctly points out, those of us who
never bothered to save our bookstore receipts and
thus take advantage of the rebate, are not
particularly affected by the new policy.
However, students who did take advantage of
the five per cent saving on books have suffered a
real loss under the new policy.
And, as Armstrong observes, these were
precisely the students who demonstrated their
need for the saving by using the rebate system.
We're digging in
Current actions by social work students
at the University of Sherbrooke — as
reported on page 3 of today's Ubyssey —
form a real landmark in the recent history of
Canadian student struggles for university
reform.
Briefly stated, the specific problem at
the Sherbrooke social work school is that
until last summer students considered it a
right to participate in their own grading and
curriculum planning.
In summer meetings, however, faculty
members made it clear that they considered
this process merely a student privilege, and
they used their power to try to put the
students back in their traditional places.
The student response was simple: 'If
you don't acknowledge our rights, we won't
attend your university.'
And they didn't.
In one of the most politically
sophisticated and serious moves in years of
university struggles, the Sherbrooke social
work students set up their own parallel
department and continued their education,
making use of invited lecturers.
In the meantime, they continued to
send polite and firm letters to the
administration stating their position, and
they continued negotiations.
Particularly encouraging is the fact that
the number of social work students involved
in the parallel department has not dwindled
over the 21/2-month period of struggle.
On the contrary, solidarity and numbers
have increased markedly, so that now a large
majority of the students are participating in
the parallel department.
The situation at Sherbrooke — and the
tactics employed by the students there —
deserve the attention and thought of
everyone at UBC who is seriously concerned
about student rights and university reform.
They are an indication that although the
hey-day (and the usefulness) of student
sit-ins and demonstrations is far from over,
we have arrived at a time when the
spectacular in student political action is
being partially replaced by more long-term
efforts.
In short, students across the country are
digging in.
Thus it is the money of needy students which
has been redistributed (i.e., given back to the
bookstore) — an interesting commentary on the
bookstore's degree of concern about students.
Indeed, we have not even seen the
bookstore's new-found wealth reflected in a small
reduction in the cost of the high-priced volumes
that currently line its shelves.
At least under those circumstances the store
could have argued that all of us were benefiting
by the withdrawal of the rebate system.
Even this, however, is a less preferable
alternative to that of maintaining the rebate
system for the people who need it, especially
since — rebates or no rebates — the price of books
on this campus is outrageous and must be
lowered.
heh, heh
Letters
Rebate
It is just possible that I've been
very unobservant, but I have yet
to notice any significant amount
of concern over the actions being
taken by the UBC bookstore to, in
effect, raise the price of all books
a flat five per cent.
I refer to the abolition of the
rebate policy.
I understand little of the
operations of the bookstore, but
it has been pointed out on
numerous occasions that the
prices charged by that institution
seem to reflect its notion that it is
dealing with a captive market.
The Ubyssey has, in the past,
been critical of bookstore policy
— where are you now?
Most odious about this whole
affair is the fact that while the
nominal price increase is five per
cent to all students, the only
students who will suffer under the
increase are those who have been
in habit of saving their receipts
and cashing them in for a rebate.
I think a fairly good case can
be made to the effect that these
students are the ones who can
least afford the cost increase.
The new policy, then, involves
a redistribution of income from
those   students who  once  took
advantage of the rebate policy
(and by doing so presumably
demonstrated their need) to the
bookstore which, if the opinions
expressed in The Ubyssey are at
all valid, is a grossly inefficient
operation.
Please   clarify  The  Ubyssey's
position on this matter.
Gerry Armstrong,
Arts 4.
Levy
This will serve as official notice
that the UBC law students have
approved a 1972-73 fee levy of
$3.50.
The approval was given on Jan.
18 by a vote of 121 to 57.
Bob Bellows,
Law 3,
LSA External V-P.
J
Fish
Those colorfully-sweatered
bands of slide-rule freaks in
engineering, agriculture and
forestry have inspired yet another
letter to The Ubyssey's
pseudo-entertainment column.
Although not an ardent letter
writer I was so overcome by the
high calibre of their last festive
event (I believe it was a prelude to
the forthcoming 162nd gala
anniversary celebration of Sir
Sydney Fudd's first attempt to
barn-train milk cows) that I felt
compelled to take the time to
enlighten the unfortunate readers
who, by some misfortune, missed
in witnessing or taking part in
UBC's social event of the year.
The first event that struck my
eye as I emerged from SUB with
Kaiser roll in hand, was that
perennial event of the pythagorian
jet-set, that scintillating statement
of our halogenic intelligentsia —
the boat race. After this
pre-dinner cocktail, the
participants and the audience
were ready for the afternoon's
"tour de force".
The main course of live
goldfish "a la cue" was being
prepared by a famous Etrurian
chef that the agriculture students
had engaged especially for the
occasion. I began to feel a sudden
revolting sensation in the pit of
my stomach as I turned away and
tried to finish off my now-bland
Kaiser roll.
I suppose contestants in the
three faculties concerned must
continually strive in their
undertakings for the title of
"asshole of the year" as events
such  as these are probably the
only things which keep us
students from experimenting with
drugs, however, I would almost be
willing to take the chance than see
poor goldfish and/or any other
living things be treated in this
manner.
Gary Davis,
Arts 3
Teachers
It seems to be the regular thing
for students to complain when
faculty members get canned.
To most readers this bitching
must seem to come from a small
group of people who grind out the
same words each time: excellent
teacher. .. gets wonderful class
response .. . arouses a great deal
of interest in the course — you've
heard it all a dozen times.
But when, like me, you have
only two professors out of six
who can teach, and both of them
get canned in the same year, it's a
bit too much.
While the students' fees don't
even amount to enough to pay the
salaries of the faculty and staff, I
do believe that the prime reason
for the university being here is to
provide a place for learning to
occur. If that is the case then
shouldn't we have teachers at the
front  of the  rooms  instead  of
frantic researchers or tenured
zombies who "made it"?
The English department nailed
Seymour Levitan because he
didn't publish enough and doesn't
wear the same color tie as the
department head. Initiative in
teaching and non-conformity are
discouraged it seems, and the
tenure system — which was
designed to preserve freedom —
now excludes the new
intelligentsia from the club.
In the psychology department
an even more ridiculous situation
exists. Carol Marx had a two-year
contract which will not be
renewed.
The department must have had
some respect for her because she
is teaching Psych 401 — the only
clinical psychology course offered
at UBC - as well as Psych 206, an
introductory course for
non-majors.
The department, however,
chose a totally asinine excuse for
canning her, and that makes the
situation more untenable. Since
her husband lives in Bellingham
and teaches university in the state
of Washington, it was concluded
that Carol would be unable to
make a lasting teaching
commitment.
A women's liberation
discussion on this point would be
futile since it is obvious that this Thursday, January 20,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
More letters
cannot be the real reason for
dismissal. Carol is an educator,
not an instructor or lecturer. She
initiates throught and interest on
the part of her students, and this
combined with her personality
and intelligence provides her
students with an excellent prof.
Students in the department of
psychology find few good profs —
on the whole we are presented
with a bunch of rejects with little
or no teaching ability. It almost
seems like a conspiracy, and it
takes little effort to see a
relationship between the
businessmen who never hire
anyone smarter then themselves,
and the acting department head
who never quite made it.
Perhaps problems like this exist
in other faculties as well.
The only remedy I can see is a
new composition for tenure
committees, and more powers, as
it appears that neither the
department heads nor the dean
are capable of handling the power
they presently have.
Name withheld,
Psych major
More
Pschology prof Carol Marx has
been fired from the UBC faculty.
Her two-year contract has not
been renewed and she has been
given no adequate reason for her
dismissal. (She was given some
horse-shit story about her being a
female with a married life ahead
of her — she should now become a
housewife?)
What is department head Edro
Signori trying to hide? Do females
not belong in the psych
department? Can his personal
view of what Carol should do with
her life control Carol's position?
Let's hear the real reason.
Signori — of course, only if Carol
wants it made public, but she has
nothing to hide.
I am a student in Dr. Marx's,
206 class, and I certainly back up
statements made in Tuesday's
Ubyssey by Dave Patterson.
Carol's classes are excellent. It
certainly can't be her teaching
ability that is at fault, but at UBC
teaching ability seems to be of
only tertiary importance, ranking
behind such all-important criteria
as department politics and often
meaningless research.
It is my opinion that teaching
ability should be a primary factor
in hiring and firing profs. If it was,
Carol Marx would not be released
like this.
Name withheld,
Psych 206
Mildred
Hi there, all you 'mature
students', wandering across the
sloshy, cheerless campus, wearied
by the post-Christmas blues.
You are not alone — there are
hundreds of us here, fulfilling
some unexplained ambition and
urge to fulfil ourselves, to prove
that we can do 'it', that we are
bright and energetic enough to be
good at being mate, mother,
housekeeper (and often
breadwinner too) as well as a good
students, all at the same time.
Sometimes we wonder whether
it's all worth it — whether we are
going to make it — whether
something is going to give —
somewhere.
What 'gives' is that we often
feel so pressured by duties and
commitments, that we leave out
precious moments of being, of
sharing - the very things which
would help to renew us, enliven
us, give us the much needed
energy and courage to carry on.
As a result, we often feel
lonely, left out, misunderstood,
and everything becomes a chore.
Remember, we came out here for
positive reasons, hoping for
positive experiences and results,
not added chores.
If you are at all like me, and I
seem to be speaking about myself,
and those of you I have shared my
thoughts with lately, you begin to
doubt yourself and your purpose
about this time.
Agriculture Undergraduate
Society
Jan. 14, 1972
Activity Fee Levy
50% of the eligible voters voted
85% in favor of levying a $3.00
Undergrad Soceity activity fee for
1972-73       ______
Capital Fund Levy
50% of the eligible voters voted
88% in favor of levying a $2.00/yr.
capital fund levy for the next five
years to be contributed to the
Agriculture Sciences fund.
TRIUMF
CUPE
WILL YOU?
The Canadian Union of Public Employees
Don't despair — there's always
the quiet Mildred Brock Lounge,
open all day, every day, where
you can relax, study, and meet
and chat with kindred souls, to
gripe about courses and exams
and to share your concerns.
Occasionally we have a
program, such as today at noon,
Mildred Brock Lounge, when
George Hermanson, our young
UBC chaplain, will discuss with us
the significance of his work in the
70s. We are one of his concerns.
Bring your lunch, coffee will
be available. See you there.
Anne Bryant,
Sociology 4.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible typed.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste.
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to
students in Fourth Year Arts, Fine Arts, Music, Commerce,
Science, Elementary Education and Fifth Year Secondary
Education. Applications are available in the Faculty Offices
for all other Faculties. For students in Graduate Studies
Programmes the Graduate advisor will have application cards.
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are requested
to complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office.
(Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15
1972.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in
the Office of the Registrar and students in the above
graduating years who do not receive cards in the mail
should check their addresses in the Registrar's Office.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the
student to MAKE APPLICATION for HIS
DEGREE. The list of candidates for graduation to
be presented to the Faculty and the Senate for
approval is compiled from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
Child of the Week
Do you remember seeing Rob's
picture in the autumn? We are
still looking for a family for him
to grow up in.
Rob is a lively, appealing
eight-year-old with red hair and
freckles who desperately needs
parents.
Rob is now living in a treatment
centre and is learning to cope
with emotional problems
precipitated by foster home
breakdowns,   neglect   and
abandonment by his own
parents. Without parents, Rob's
future looks pretty bleak to him.
He needs to meet and get to
know his "new parents" over a
period of time before he can go
"home" with them.
If your family can work with
Rob with continued special help
from us, please phone Lois
Bonnell, Catholic Family and
Children's Service, 683-0281.
ROB
BRUCE ALLAN
TALENT PROMOTIONS LTD.
presents
THE FINEST IN ROCK ACTS
We exclusively represent the following acts in all fields
CROSSTOWN BUS
MCA Records
THIN RED LINE
TOM NORTHCOTT
UNI Records
• STREET NOISE
• WEATHER
• SWEET BEAVER
• UNCLE SLUG
• SUNSHYNE
• EVERYDAY PEOPLE
GRT Records
• UPROAR
The above groups cannot be obtained through any other agent or agency.
We also represent:
* SEEDS OF TIME
* SPRING
* STALLION THUMROCK
* FLASH PAN
* THE BURNER BOYS      * SUNDANCE
* MOCK DUCK *IMITE-TRAIIN
* RAM * lAcniu nr>n
* NORTHWEST COMPANY     * AT THE ZOO
* HIGH FLYING BIRD
SHY LOCK
* NITE-TRAINS
* JASON HOOVER
* WICKED ORANGE
* MOTHERHOOD
688-7274
No. 117 — 845 HORNBY ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
ASK FOR BRUCE ALLEN or SAM FELDMAN Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20,  1972
Hot flashes
Treaty under
cffSCUSSIOft
As part of a continuing series
on American influence in
Canadian affairs, the UBC
academic activities committee
(not affiliated with the Alma
Mater Society) will hold a
discussion today entitled The
Columbia River Treaty - What
Happened?
Civil engineering prof S.
Russell, formerly with consulting
engineers on the Columbia River
Treaty Project will take part in
the discussion in the SUB clubs
lounge at 12:30.
Following last year's successful
completion of the West Coast
Trail, the UBC West Coast Trail
club has announced a second hike
to begin immediately after April
exams.
Students and others are invited
to join the expedition on the
50-mile trail between Port
Renfrew and Bamfield on the
south-west coast of Vancouver
Island by contacting John Twigg
in the Ubyssey office or by
phoning 732-6829.
Last April four men and one
woman completed the trail in five
and a half days — which was the
only mistake they made. This
year's trip should take about eight
or nine days.
Minimum equipment is a pair
of good boots, one tent for every
two people, a pack capable of
carrying about 40 pounds and a
lot of good vibes.
If enough people sign up the
group could look into chartering a
bus to Port Renfrew, Twigg said.
Teachers
A Vancouver free high school
needs volunteer teachers.
"We need people who are
mainly interested in teaching
something to people who are
interested in learning," said Phil
Kaniger, one of the teachers at the
65-student school called Total
Education.
Kaniger said Monday the
students, who are 15 to 19 in age,
dance, Spanfsh, pottery,
economics, general science,
German and medicine.
The school, at 557 West
Twelfth, is financed by the
Vancouver School Board.
Its number is 879-6626.
'Tween classes
TODAY
CRAFT CO-OP
Talk about pottery glazing and glaze
recipes, today noon, SUB 251.
SPECIAL EVENTS
NFB film City of Gold shown noon,
today and Friday in Lasserre 102.
Pierre Berton narrator.
N.V.C.
General meeting today noon, SUB
205.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Discuss economic nationalism today
noon, SUB 213.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Civil   eng.   prof   Sam   Russell   will
speak    on    "The   Columbia    River
Treaty;   What    happened?"   today
noon, SUB club's lounge.
UBC SKYDIVERS
General   meet,   first   jump   course
today noon, SUB 119.
VCF
Hubert   Butcher   on   Prayer,   today
noon SUB 125.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film postponed, meet today noon,
Bu. 100.
BAHA'I CLUB
Open Invite to hear about
Baha'u'llah today noon, Bu. 23230.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Three free films, I.H. upper lounge
today noon: "Hymn",
"Pardonnez-mol M. Karsh", "Quo
Vadis Mrs. Lumb".
T'WARGAMERS
Alcibiades vs. Trojan planning for
ancient Greek-Roman campaign,
today 7:30 p.m., SUB 111.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meet St. Mark's music room
today noon.
BICYCLE CLUB
Radsoc presents Ann Mortifee
today noon in SUB auditorium,
admission 50 cents.
CCF
Discussion today noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
YOUNG SOCIALIST
Tarig 'Ali, Internationally-known
Pakistani revolutionary, speaks on
the liberation of Bangladesh, Friday
noon,   SUB   auditorium.   Donation
25 cents.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker from Crisis Centre, Friday
noon, SUB 105B.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr.    Richardson   on   Hinduism   —
Buddhism, Friday noon, SUB 111.
MONDAY
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Derrll Warren, leader of B.C. Tories,
speaks   Monday  noon,  SUB  party
room.
ELCIRCULO
Spanish meal served Monday noon,
I.H. 402.
Where's your HAIR at?
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
Can Get it Together
SUB Lower Floor - 2244636 - 9 a.m.-5:30 Mon.-Fri.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parkins at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
WESTERN PROMOTIONS PROUDLY PRESENTS
mCONCERT
B. B. KING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27
Q.E. THEATRE 8:30pM.
$4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Tickets: concert Box Office, 680 Robson — 687-2801
■   Outlets: Rohan's, Thunderbird Shop, Grennan's,
Totem Music (Lougheed Mall)
SUB FILMSOC presents
CATCH 22
with Alan Arkin
THURSDAY — 7:00 50'
FRI. ft SAT. — 7:00 ft 9:30 SUB
SUNDAY — 7:00 THEATRE
Starring
JANE FONDA
MICHAEL SARRAZIN
SUSANNAH YORK
GIG YOUNG
BONNIE BEDELIA&
RED BUTTONS
HEBB
THEATRE
UBC    7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
FRI., JAN. 21
SAT., JAN. 22
admission 75c
CLASSIFIED
*«*•$: Campus - 3 Haas, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Cammarciaf —' 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
line* 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads tire not accepted by telephone and are payable
m advance. Deadline ia 11:30 a.m., the day before publication,
Pubficatiom Oltce, Room 241 S.O.B., VBC, Van. 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dance*
11
Greeting!
12
SUZANNE  CHERIE
Je T'aime •
  TOMA 	
Lost tt Found
13
LOST LAST THURS. SCARF, BLUE
green     and    purple    near    Educ.
Please  phone Florence.  253-2159.
SILVER     COIN      BRACELET      IS
lost. Reward If you find it. Please
call 224-3698.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
I NEED SENIOR POLI SCI. STU-
dents for exciting (non-profit)
project on civic affairs. 732-3470.
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box 4002 Vancouver, B.C.
DISCOUNT — STEREO AM-FM
FM - Stereo Tuner - Amplifier,
Turntable, base, cartridge, plexl-
glas cover, two speakers, 2-year
guarantee. List $200.00, your cost
$125.00 Call 732-6769 for savings.
Also carry Sony, Dual, Akai and
Sansui.	
AN EXPERIENCE IN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
ANN MORTIFEE IN CONCERT—
12:30. Jan. 20th S.U.B, Auditorium
Admission 50c.	
ZAZEN-BUDDHIST MEDITATION
Zen Centre, 139 Water St. T. Th.
7:30  p.m.   Sat,   morning  8:00 a.m.
ANT MALE CURLERS INTEREST-
ed in playdowns for WCIAA finals
please contact Alex Coffey at 738-
9605 between 6 and 7, before Jan.
20.
Travel Opportunities
16
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment servicese etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St., Ventnor
I.W., England.	
Wanted—Information
17
WANTED TO RENT — CABIN AT
Whistler, midterm, eight (8)
people. Marian, 922-6334 after
7 p.m. 	
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TO BUT OR BORROW
any or all issues of: The Modern
Utopian, January 1970 to January
1972. Phone 874-8849.
AUTOMOTIVE
Auto* For Sale
21
1954 CHEV 2 DR. SEDAN GOOD
mechanical and body $195'. 224-
1976: 228-4301.      	
Auto Repairs
24
WANTED — CHEAP BODT WORK
for '62 Renault, for cash or new
Raleigh 10 speed. Harvey 261-5652
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
Photography
35
Scandab
37
A.G.S. C-90 CASSETTES GUARAN-
teed against all defects. Quantity
price $1.50 each. Minimum purchase 6. Can: arrange for delivery
or pick-up on campus. Call 732-
6769 for savings.
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctuary 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.	
LONGHATRS!! TRUCK ON DOWN
to lower floor SUB. Let CAMPUS
STYLISTS & BARBER SHOP do
it to your head.
Typing;
TYPING. 40c a page. Petra, days
685-9388; nights 327-1037. Professional.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable Rates — 321-3838,
Mrs.   Ellis.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends., Phone Sharl
at 738^745—Reasonable Rates.
Typing—Conx.
40
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
Papers, etc. Mrs. Troche, Phone
437-1355.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates. Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE OR MALE person for
week-end deliveries. One dollar
per delivery. Apply in person, 2850
Grandview Hwy., Vancouver. Car
necessary.	
FULL ROOM AND BOARD PLUS
remuneration for 2 or 3 days
weekly assistance incl. driving
paraplegic working woman. Dun-
bar.   733-2819   (Eves.)
EARN WHILE IN SCHOOL
$300-$500 per mo.
Campus representative for
resume forwarding service.
Flexible hours. For full information write National
Resume Services. P.O. Box
1445, Peoria. 111. 61601.
SUMMER    1972
CAREER   -   ORIENTED
SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT
PROGRAM
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Biological, Chemical. Life
and Physical Sciences. Engineering and Applied Sciences, Economics, Social Sciences.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time university students in the above
fields who intend to return to
university in 1972-73. Canadian
citizens have statutory preference
for appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UCPA application form (available from
your University PJacement Office)
and a list of courses taken, to
the Public Service Commission of
Canada Regional Office, 203-535
Thurlow St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Apply before  January 31,  1972.
INSTRUCTION 8c SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BARGAIN SALE FROM TURKEY!
Lambskin embroidered suede
coats, sheepskin Iinins and Angora trim. Selling fast in SUB'S
AMS Co-op Store.	
PAIR NORESCO AIR SUSPENSION
speakers 10", woofer $130. List
$220. Phone 926-3905 or see Fred
at Hut 6, Rm. 10, Ft. Camp. Also
pair size 12 buckle ski boots.	
FOR    SALE       — ROSSIGNOLS
Stratos 200. Good condition; 1972
Lange competitions, size 8%m.
Phone) Joy 732-9160.
215 METAL'S WITH BINDINGS,
$45. Antique pump organ, offers.
Phone  Barrett,   731-9753.
RENTALS at REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM. QUIET,
private entr. Near gate — now
ready — no cooking.   224-7623.
COMFORTABLE ROOM SEPA-
rate entrance and bathroom; hotplate, linen provided. Dunbar area.
Phone   733-5772.	
CAMPUS ROOMS WITH KITCHEN
privileges $60/month, co-ed. phone
224-9549. 5745 Agronomy Road, behind village.
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE DKE
House. Large spacious rooms;
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691.	
ON CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION
St. Andrew's Hall, 224-7720.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apt*.
84
SUITE FOR RENT (AVAILABLE
immediately) on campus (5760
Toronto Road). Three rooms &
washroom, private entrance. $90.00
a month. Also large lounge (fireplace). Ideal for serious students.
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
4TH GIRL TO SHARE 4 BDRM.
house Feb. 1, $60. 224-3166. Dunbar
at  29th. Thursday, January 20,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS
UBC stars do get bread
By KENT SPENCER
Athletic scholarships at UBC?
Impossible, you say, the
administration is too cheap.
Scholarship athletes are at SFU,
otherwise known as Dingaling U.,
aren't they?
No. Last summer the federal
government, under the
Department of Health and
Welfare, alloted $1,100,000 for
young athletes who "wished to
combine both their educational
and competitive careers."
A selection committee chaired
by Bob Hindmarch (the hockey
coach at UBC) and Pierre
Charbonneau of Montreal met in
Ottawa last June to award the
money. The ten man group
analyzed sports data on hundreds
of applications from across the
country.
Financial need, character,
marks, placement on the Pan Am
games team, the report of the
sports governing body on the
player, and the rating of the
player on an 'ability' list prepared
by the governing body were
criteria of consideration during
the hectic three day period.
The result was 392 grants to
student-athletes across the
country, including 69 in B.C.
Some of the UBC athletes who
received the bread money were
Terri McGovern, Derek Sankey,
Ralph Hutton, Karl Jonker,
Brenda Eisler, Debbie Brill,
Sandra Kolb, Joanne Sargent,
Rick Cuttell, and Norm Trerise.
The    list    includes    swimmers,
It's time for the big game.
It's a vitally important game
that you will have to win to stay
on top of the league. You have to
win it - at all costs.
Go out onto the ice and keep
an eye on your check. If he goes
near the puck, line him up for a
shot against the boards. Make sure
the ref doesn't see you slip the
butt of your stick into his groin.
Give him a good shot. Punish him.
You've got to hate him to win.
Onto the basketball court.
When the ref isn't looking, see If
you can wrench your opponents
knee and maybe tear a few of the
ligaments. Don't worry about the
hoop, it's not important. To win
the game, you've got to be mean.
Make the game into an awe-
inspiring spectacle for the fans.
Show them that you're powerful
enough to rub your opponent
through the crap. This makes for
good entertainment and a fun
time.
EUS FEE LEVY
47% of eligible voters voted 92.3%
in favor of $3.00 Undergraduate
Fee Levy for 1972-73 session.
"""St*-"
Run the score up, rub it in
some more. Dirty opponent!
You're going to sweat for this
one.
Back on the ice again. You
take your check into the boards
and grind your stick across his
head. You take a penalty.
You're being unnecessarily
rough, says the ref. What, me, you
say. How was I supposed to know
that his head would get in the way
of my stick? I'm innocent.
Go to the penalty box and sit
it out. Luckily your team is ahead
so this isn't an important penalty.
Now the game is over and
you've won it. Go and shake your
opponent's hand, and tell him you
enjoyed playing against him.
What's this? He won't shake
your hand. Oh, well, he's just a
poor sport.
Get off the ice and into the
dressing room.
Then try to become a human
again.
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
732-0311
A REFERENDUM
was held at the Law School, Jan.
18, 1972 asking whether students
are in favour of a $3.50 fee levy to
fund the activities of the Law
Students' Association for the
1972-73 term.
RESULTS:
174 votes cast
In favor of the $3.50 levy 121
Against     52
Spoils        1
Ian MacKinnon, L.S.A. Secretary
UBC CAMPUS
MINISTRIES
Office SUB 234
Phone 228-3701
OPEN
Mon. 10-12; Tues. 10-4;
Wed. 10-4; Thurs. 10-12
Fri. 10-4.
DROP IN
Come to the experts and
specialists at Henneken Auto —
Because we specialize (we don't
have to stock parts for all makes
of cars) and when you repair
only a few cars you can repair
them faster, hence we can save
you money on VW,
Mercedes, Porsche
and Volvo car repairs.
No repair too big or
small. All work fully
guaranteed.
rowers, a football player, high
jumpers, badminton players, and
track stars'. Almost every sport
was included.
Hockey players received
scholarships and bursaries under a
separate programme funded by
Hockey Canada. Bob McAneeley
and Ian Wilkie of the
Thunderbirds got $2,000 each,
while Steve Fera, Laurie Yaworski
and Laurie Vanzella got bursaries
of  $700   each.   .
The other awards were of
three categories: $2,000 a year for
four years renewable, $1,000 a
year for one year renewable, and
grants of $500, $1,000, or
$1,500.
The programme will ,be
continued this year in full.
Applicants should see their coach
for additional details.
Uiunderettes
place third
The UBC Thunderettes
volleyball team made it to the
semi-finals but not to the finals of
their own Thunderette
Invitational Tournament held on
the weekend.
UBC finished tournament play
with a 7-3 record and won the
quarter-finals against Kay Jays
with wins of 15-7 and 15-10,
advancing to the semi-finals
against Premier Cals of Calgary.
The Calgary team beat the
Thunderettes 15-13 and 15-7 to
advance to the finals against the
Vancouver Calonas, the defending
Canadian Champions. Vancouver
emerged as tournament
champions by scores of 15-9 and
15-3.
In the B division of the
tournament, the Junior Varsity
team defeated Victoria Y 18-16
and 15-10 in the final match to
take the B championship.
RECORDING ARTISTS
MARTY GILLAN
and
KAREN O'BRAY
Appearing Nightly
from 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
with THE
TOWN PUMPERS
Described by Leisure Magazine as
THE BAND OF THE YEAR
Their new Stereo L.P.
"WE DID IT OUR WAY"
NOW AVAILABLE AT LOCAL
RECORD STORES
THE
TOWN
1   PUMP
Two overtime puck wins
For the second night in a row,
the Thunderbird hockey team
won the game in overtime.
Tom Williamson flipped the
puck past University of
Saskatchewan goalie, Lauren
Schmyr, at 7:40 of the overtime
period to win the game 3-2. Alex
Dick did most of the work on the
play, out-hustling a Huskie
defenceman to the puck to
prevent an icing call. Dick shot on
goal and the rebound went to
Williamson.
Friday night, Bill Cartwright
scored the winning goal just two
minutes into the overtime period
to give the 'Birds a 6-5 win over
the University of Winnipeg
Wesmen.
The 'Birds are now solidly in
second place in the Rockies
Division of the Western Canadian
intercollegiate hockey league with
16 points, two behind the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears and two ahead of the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs.
The 'Birds will be in Victoria
this weekend and not Calgary as
was originally scheduled because
of the Air Traffic Controllers
strike.
They will play two games
against the University of Victoria
Vikings, on Saturday at 1:30 and
Sunday at 2 p.m. at Esquimalt
Arena.
Intramurals
BOWLING league play begins
tonight at 7 p.m. in the SUB
bowling lanes.
SNOOKER tournament round
is posted outside the intramural
office. Games start tonight at 7
p.m. in the SUB. Check the list to
see when you play.
GROUSE MOUNTAIN
SKI SCHOOL
U.B.C. SKI LESSONS
Group Lessons start Jan. 24 — 25
5 nights, $33.00 - 4 nights, $27.00 .
All tips included 4:30 p.m. - 12:00 p.m.
See RANDY in V.O.C. office at
noon-time this week in SUB
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
■ FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 am. - SUNDAY 4 p.m to 2 a.m..
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
ELECTIONS FOR 72/73
Elections for frie AMS.
Executive will be held as fo/fows
FIRST SLATE— Wednesday, February 2
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
SECOND SLATE-Wednesday, February 9
VICE PRESIDENT
TREASURER
COORDINATOR
OMBUDSPERSON
The Nomination periods for the 2 slates are:
FIRST SLATE - 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 19th to 12:30
p.m. Thursday, January 27th.
SECOND SLATE - 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 26th to 12:30
p.m. Thursday,,February 3rd.
All students interested in running in these elections should pick up
nomination and eligibility forms at the A.M.S. General Office, or from the
A.M.S. Secretary, SUB 248. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 20,  1972
PLUGGED IN to Beethoven and Schoenberg, students in Wilson listening library ponder
turntables. Playing your own psychedelic rock records is frowned on, but some still
—billy gin photo
succeed in getting contraband discs past the front desk and settle in for a spaced-out hour
or two.
CUPE workers may strike Ryerson
TORONTO (CUP) - The
possibility of picket lines around
the Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute campus before the end
of the month arose this week as
the strike deadline for
maintenance workers drew nearer.
About 112 maintenance, boiler
room and motor pool staff,
members of Local 233 of the
Canadian Union of Public
Employees whose contract
expired last Sept. 30, can legally
strike Monday if no agreement is
reached with management at a
meeting scheduled for Friday.
"If conciliation proceedings
fail to bring about a satisfactory
agreement," said CUPE
representative Jim Anderson, "the
union could set up picket lines at
all the main entrances to the
campus by the end of the
month."
"Members voted on Jan. 6
rejecting the latest offer of the
administration by 80 per cent,"
added Anderson, and in addition,
"authorized their bargaining
committee to proceed with strike
action if it became necessary."
Officials of Local 233
emphasized that "it is the
negotiating team's desire to
continue talks with the
administration in the hope of
avoiding a strike."
Since the contract expired a
total of 10 meetings have taken
place between union and
management.
The basic rate of pay for
janitorial and other staff was
$3    per    hour.    The    union's
negotiating team is now
bargaining for a basic rate of $3.65
per hour. In their vote last
Thursday, the members rejected
an offer of $3.24 as proposed by
the administration's negotiating
team.
They are now asking for a
one-year contract instead of a
two-year contract in order to
enable them to get an
eight-per-cent raise this year and a
six-per-cent increase next year.
CUPE members at York
University  recently negotiated  a
contract for a $3.50 basic hourly
rate. Union members at the public
school level had an agreement
expire Dec. 31 which had ensured
them a basic rate of $3.57 per
hour.
In a recent labor dispute
between the administration of
Glendon College and a CUPE
local, the union was supported by
the students. When it was evident
the CUPE local at Glendon, an
affiliate of York University in
Toronto, would go out on strike
to   strengthen   their   bargaining
.im
position, the students voted to
honor the picket lines in the event
of a strike by the local.
With the support of the
student body at Glendon, the
CUPE local was able to settle their
dispute with the administration.
"If Ryerson's staff did go out
on strike at the.end of the month,
they will be able to draw upon a
strike fund of $2 million,"
commented Anderson.
CUPE is the largest
independent union in the country
which has no formal ties or head
offices at an international level. It
is the second largest union in
Canada, slightly short of the
United Steelworkers of America
in total membership.
In the Toronto area alone,
CUPE has 40,000 members.
A union member commented
that, "in the event of a possible
strike at Ryerson at the end of the
month, the administration's
supervisory, personnel would have
a hell of a time keeping the place
heated."
Five restaurants in new food service
By JIM JOLY
The Alma Mater Society's local restaurant
alternate food service will begin Monday in
SUB 207-209, Adrian Belshaw, AMS external
affairs officer said Wednesday.
The service is being set up to provide an
inexpensive alternate to the food available in
the administration's SUB cafeteria. It will
offer meals from five local restaurants on a
regular basis.
Belshaw said the meal prices will be held to
a maximum of 90 cents. The AMS will take
16.6 per cent of this to cover SUB mortgage
and clean-up costs.
Wanda Halpert, manager of God's Kitchen,
said Wednesday that her food prices will have
to rise above the break-even point to cover the
costs of the AMS percentage levy.    „
"Our cheapest sandwiches are going to cost
55 cents," she said. "That's even more
expensive than food services' cafeteria prices."
"Even though our sandwiches are twice as
good as the administration ones, students
might not look at it this way and go buy
administration food," she said.
Halpert wondered why her restaurant had
to pay a levy and the alternate book store or
food service did not have to.
Belshaw explained that all non-student run
services must pay for their SUB building
space.
There will not be any profit made by the
restaurants participating in the service.
'The main reason we're involved is because
we'd like to give people a chance to have good
food," Halpert said.
Belshaw feels the upstairs location of the
food services will not be convenient but said
there was no room available on the main floor
of SUB.
"The art gallery is the only possible place
on the main floor to put it and it's used for
other things."
Belshaw said four restaurants have
committed themselves to the service and
expects a fifth, a Greek restaurant, to do so
soon.
The restaurants will offer food as follows:
Hong Kong Kitchen: Monday.
Simpatico Restaurant: Tuesday.
Curry House: Wednesday.
No commitment for Thursday.
God's Kitchen: Friday.

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