UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 16, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127149.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127149.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127149-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127149-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127149-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127149-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127149-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127149-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127149-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127149.ris

Full Text

Array Member of Quebec Five will speak at UBC
A member of the Quebec Five group of political
prisoners will speak at UBC next week.
Jacques Larue-Langlois, a Radio-Canada broadcaster
and probably the least nationally known of the major
accused in the FLQ hysteria, is free on bail and will speak
Feb. 25.
Michel Chartrand, Charles Gagnon, Pierre Vallieres,
Robert Lemieux and Larue-Langlois had seditious
conspiracy charges against them quashed last week but
await trial on other charges.
While he is little known in Canada, Larue-Langlois is
noted in Quebec for his fiery newscasts and editorials
condemning injustice and for his work on the former
committee to free Vallieres from prison while on charges
pressed in 1966.
Vallieres is now facing charges of FLQ membership
and assault.
Larue-Langlois also faces charges and has been
implicated with Vallieres in the assault charges.
He said in an interview: "Vallieres and I are accused
of simple assault against the person of Ron Golden a
journalist. This was an incident that happened at (Robert)
Lemieux's press conference:
"What is so funny is that Vallieres wasn't even there .
. . As far as I am concerned I stayed far away from this
incident, I wasn't even involved."
Larue-Langlois feels an immediate urgency to speak
to Canadians about Quebec as he says in the same
interview:
"What English Canadians can do I see not particularly
as support for the Quebec liberation struggle. I see it
above all as a struggle against a common enemy, American
imperialism ... If one is in Canada, that is to fight for a
socialist Canada independent from the United States."
Time and place of the talk will be announced later.
Because mid-term break is
a solemn occasion during
which all Ubyssey staffers
attend the pub of their
choice, there will no Ubyssey
on Friday.
THE
Vol. Lll, No. 32 VANCOUVER, B.C.,
AMS election
legal or not ?
By MIKE SASGES
The students' court will meet February 23 to hear charges of
irregularities in last Wednesday's Alma Mater Society presidential
election.
The complainant, AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce, is charging the
AMS and the elections committee with breaching the constitution.
"I am alleging that the conduct of the election infringed on
certain rights and privleges that I have as an individual member of the
AMS," Bruce told The Ubyssey Monday.
"There is no certainty that the favorite candidate got in," he said
referring to the third ballot win of Hanson Lau over student senator
Steve Garrod.
The irregularities include the use of proxy vote, the forced use of
preferential ballots, the late opening of polls, especially in Buchanan
where Garrod of the human government slate got his strongest backing,
and people voting more than once.
"It is more than obvious that several election procedures and
rules were broken by some candidates," Bruce said.
Bruce was able to convince the student discipline committee that
there were indeed some irregularities and they will be acting as his
counsel before the student court.
The disciplinary committee is holding a meeting Wednesday noon
in the AMS council chambers to gather evidence on the election
irregularities.
"We need additional evidence from other students to go before
the students'court and ask that the presidential election be declared
null and void," Bruce said. "Hence the Wednesday meeting."
Dawn Hasset, Arts 1, is also going to student court to protest the
irregularities in the presidential election.
"I really felt manipulated after Wednesday election," Hasset said.
"The irregularities amount to pure dishonesty."
to page nine: see ELECTION
Victoria may finance
student summer jobs
Provincial health minister
Ralph Loffmark has announced
that the Socred government is
prepared to use provincial funds
to provide summer employment
for university students.
"The government of British
Columbia is prepared to
appropriate a fund to be used in
providing summer employment
for university students,"
Loffmark said in a letter to Alma
Mater Society president Tony
Hodge.
Hodge said that he had a
telephone conversation with
Loffmark Monday.
"Loffmark is talking in the
terms of several million dolllars,"
Hodge said.
"He has called a meeting at the
legislature buildings in a couple of
weeks," he said.
Hodge said that letters have
also been sent to the student
society     presidents    of    the
University of Victoria and Simon
Fraser University.
Hodge feels that this
proposition could ease the
summer employment situation for
students.
"The influx of students on the
job market during the summer is
too great for the economy," he
said. 'This could help.
We didn't do it
The Ubyssey wishes to
disassociate itself from the
campaign leaflets that
appeared as inserts in several
copies of Friday's paper.
The leaflets for AMS
candidates Michael Robinson,
Adrian Belshaw, Don Palmer
and John Olson were placed
in the papers after they had
been delivered and do not
indicate Ubyssey support for
those candidates.
—Keren aunoar pnoio
UBC GUARD RON THORSEN TAKES OFF for the basket in Saturday night's Buchanan Trophy game
against Simon Fraser University in Pacific Coliseum. SFU's Alex Devlin (4) stops short in dismay as John
Mills follows up behind. The Thunderbirds won the game for the second year in a row as they defeated
the Clan 66-62 before some 6,000 fans. For a pictorial account of the game see page 11.
Birds win over Clansmen
By BILL RUBY
For those that weren't at the Coliseum on
Saturday night, the UBC Thunderbirds basketball
team defeated the SFU Clansmen 66-62. The
closeness of the score is probably the only exciting
aspect of the game.
It is the second year in a row that the annual
Buchanan Trophy has been awarded to the UBC
team.
Last year the Birds thrashed the Clan 107-67
for their first victory in the three year history of the
event. This year the Thunderbirds evened the score
at two apiece.
Saturday's game between the cross-town rivals
was such a Ho Hum event that words like thrilling
and exciting will probably never be considered when
discussing this sporting event.
The dull effect was created by a deliberate slow
pace set by the bigger Clansmen, who had to control
the speed of the game if they were to keep it close.
They accomplished this by using a good 2-3 zone;
by going to the offensive boards successfully (thus
cutting off the Bird's fast break); and by effectively
breaking the Bird's full court press.
The game, however, went along pretty much
like expected. The bigger and stronger Clan
out-rebounded the Birds 40-27, with SFU's Larry
Clark the top rebounder with 16.
The battle between SFU's Bill Robinson and
UBC's Ron Thorsen was not really a true contest.
SFU continually alternated between a zone and a
man to man defense, so Robinson was not always
responsible for Thorsen. UBC always played a
pressing man to man defense with Thorsen assigned
to check Robinson. One on one, the best man was
Thorsen, who scored 17 points, contributed six
assists, brought the ball up the floor if SFU pressed,
did a good defensive job on Robinson, and was the
team leader on the court.
Scoring for SFU was fairly evenly distributed,
with Wayne Morgan getting 16, Robinson 15, Clark
13, and Mike Charles 11.
Derek Sankey was high scorer for UBC with
17 points, mainly on long jump shots. He was also
five for five from the foul line. It was also Sankey
who scored the last field goal, brought down the
vital last rebound of the game, and sank two foul
shots at the end of the game to ice the cake.
Terry MacKay contributed 13 points while Jack
Hoy added 10. Guard Bob Dickson, substituting for
the injured Stan Callegari, played well defensively
and scored five points.
UBC coach Peter Mullins effectively summed
up the basketball spectacle when he cynically stated
that "it was a very THRILLING game." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 16, 1971
Soviet poet
to read
Russian poet Andrei
Voznesensky will be reading
Wednesday in the SUB auditorium
at noon and 7:30 p.m.
Voznesensky will read in
Russian, but Vancouver poet
Seymour Mayne will read English
versions.
Author of The Triangular Pear,
his reactions to the U.S., as well as
The Masters and The Antiwords,
Voznesensky is regarded by some
people as the most brilliant Soviet
Russian poet alive.
Students affected
Andrei Voznesensky
Poets to read at Free U
Vancouver poets David Zaiss and Pat Lowther will be starting off
the Vancouver Free University's poetry reading series.
Anyone interested in the series which is tentatively scheduled at
two poets a month, should send five poems to Poetry, The Vancouver
Free U, 1895 Venables. Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope if
you want the poems returned.
Lowther and Zaiss will be reading Saturday at 8:30 p.m. at the
Free U.
Student typing service in SUB
You say you can't type and your prof wants all essays typed?
Your worries are over.
Bring your rough copy down to the SUB information office and
two days later pick up the finished copy, neatly typed and worth 10
marks extra.
You pay 30 cents a page and 5 cents a carbon copy on picking up
your finished paper.
If you're not satisfied, you don't pay.
The state of affairs in the
English department does affect
English students, despite what the
administration says.
In an interview with The
Ubyssey last week, arts dean Doug
Kenny said the conflict within the
English department does not
affect the students and therefore
should not be introduced into the
public arena.
"It is patently absurd to say
that this situation does not affect
the students," said Evert
Hoogers, Alma Mater Society
graduate rep and English student.
"If you have an authoritarian
faculty the arbitrary decisions
make it hard for students to voice
their opinions on relevant issues,"
said Hoogers.
The conflict in the English
department centers around
department head Robert Jordan,
whose resignation has been
demanded by 17 of the 38
tenured English professors.
Most of the English faculty
members are following Kenny's
advice that they should avoid
"exacerbating the situation" by
refraining from comment and
discussion in the public arena.
Jordan is also following
Kenny's advice and is asking his
faculty to do the same, "during
this difficult period."
In an interdepartmental memo,
Jordan said: "I am asking you .. .
to subordinate whatever
grievances you may feel to the
imperative task of sustaining and
advancing the work of the
department, both inside and
outside the classroom."
In the same memo, Jordan
said, "The faculty's primary
dedication and responsibility: is
to serve our students well."
Hoogers said that if the policies
of the present English faculty are
followed the department will be
more of a publishing mill.
PREGNANCY
LAB. TEST
PORTE'S
UPTOWN PHARMACY
Granville at 14th Tel.: 738-3107
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
M
STUDENT CHARTER
FLIGHTS
ALL UBC STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
VANCOUVER to LONDON
FOR ONLY $258.00
Leaves June 1st, Returns July 7th.
Other departures and flight times available.
See LINDA at
WESTERN STUDENT       Room 237B SUB
SERVICES  TRAVEL
OFFICE
Hours 12:30-4:30 M-F
or call 731-0933
Drop In At Your
Campus Travel Office Soon!
Room 237B SUB.
Hours: 12:30-4:30 M-F
^_i-!|
NOW...
choose
CONTACT
LENSES
in 27 colors
■A better choice than ever
... 3 shades of blue or green
even intriguing new lavender
or oho cot's eye brown, blue,
ezure,  grey  or pink.
• PRECISION MADE
• EXPERTLY FITTED
• 27 COLORS
ONE PRICE ONLY
$49
50
Come in, No Appointment Needed
BRING YOUR
OPTICAL
PRESCRIPTION
TO US
OPTICAL DEPT.
677 GRANVILLE
681-6174
697 W. BDY. at HEATHER
879-9401
675 COLUMBIA, NEW WEST.
LA 1-0751
1825 LONSDALE, N.VAN.
987-2264
2987 GRANVILLE at 14th
736-7347
4068 E. HASTINGS, N. BUR.
(Across from Wosk's)
291-8491
5618 CAMBIE ST.
327-9451
1320 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA,
B.C. 386-7578
165 STATION ST., DUNCAN, B.C.
746-4322
■■fe
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY • Right to Your Door
Phone 2241720 - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
A Challening Career in Sales and
Sales Management Training
Full range of Life Insurance products. Equity-Based product.
Agressive Expansion program which incorporates a marketing
concept of total personal financial planning. Full training
program for qualified candidates. Salary $500.00 to $700.00
during training period which can be doubled within 5 years.
Send resume to:
David LaKusta, C.L.U.,
Manager,
The MONARCH LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY,
1520-777 Hornby Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
am
I
iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniminiiniiiniHiimii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinminie
STEREO RECORD SALE
ptW*
Bndge-
Over
•Iroubled
Water.
SD 7202—STEPHEN STILLS—MFG.
SUGG. LIST 6.29—OUR PRICE 3.58
XDES 18050—WATT TEN YEARS
AFTER —MFG. SUGG. LIST
6.29   OUR PRICE 3.58
WS     1884
STREET
MORRISON
5.29 —OUR
UAS 6714-SUNDAY CONCERT-
GORDON LIGHTFOOT
RS 6341 - CLOUDS - JON I MITCHELL
RS 6360 - STAND UP - JETHRO TULL
RS 6368 - THEN PLAY ON - FLEETWOOD MAC
RS 6376 - LADIES OF THE CANYON -
JONI MITCHELL
WS 1884-HIS BAND & STREET CHOIR -
VAN MORRISON
DES 18038 - CRICKLEWOOD GREEN -
MAILORDERS ten years after
PROMPTLY FILLED
Just tick off the records
you want Enclose your
list with remittance,
plus 5% tax and
postage, and we'll get
your order away
promptly.
First Record 35c —
Each Additional
Record 20c Postage and
Handling Charges
—    HIS     BAND    AND KCS     9914    —     BRIDGE     OVER
CHOIR      —     VAN TROUBLED   WATER   —SIMON   &
— MFG;  SUGG.   LIST GARFUNKLE — MFR. SUGG. LIST
PRICE 2.79 6.29 — OUR PRICE 3.58
SD 8229 - CROSBY STILLS & NASH
UNI 73092 - TAP ROOT MANUSCRIPT -
NEIL DIAMOND
SP 4210 - AHEAD RINGS OUT-BLODWYN PIG
SP 4259 - SHAZAM! MOVE
SP 4258 - BURRITO DE LUXE -
FLYING BURRITO BROS.
DES 18017 - IN SEARCH OF THE LOST CHORD -
MOODY BLUES
DES 18025 - ON THE THRESHOLD OF A DREAM -
MOODY BLUES
SD 8216-LED ZEPPELIN  ~
sound
556 Seymour Street
682-6144
iiiiHiDiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiimininimmiHinMMii
OPEN
THURSDAY
& FRIDAY
UNTIL
9 P.M.
iiiiiimiiuhiiRiin Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
PACKED WITH  FANS, the SUB conversation pit was the scene of an AMS all-candidates meeting
Monday. Second slate contenders told on-lookers what is to be done. -dave bowerman photo
Slate, counter-slate
By JOHN ANDERSEN
The human government slate and the Hanson
Lau slate — opponents in the dirtiest Alma Mater
Society election campaign to date — met head-on
Monday at an all-candidates meeting in the
conversation pit.
An unidentified member of the audience asked
the Lau slate to "rationalize their opportunist
copying of the human government slate's posters
and platform."
Lau slate vice-presidential candidate Michael
Robinson answered the charge by blaming The
Ubyssey for forcing the slate to copy the human
government.
He said it is extremely difficult for his group to
get their their point of view printed in the paper and
therefore had to copy the human government to get
attention for the slate.
The Lau group was also attacked by AMS
assistant treasurer John Wilson, an independent
candidate for treasurer.
He said in his speech he was extremely angry at
some of the campaigning being done in the election.
He said he would be able to work with
members of the human government slate if elected
but doubted he could work with Lau's slate.
"Lau's group is not a party," he said. "Its
slate would continue working together as a team,
Wilson said if elected treasurer he would
attempt to make SUB self-sustaining by making
some of the profit-making groups using the building
pay a portion of its upkeep.
He stressed that the treasurer's position should
be apolitical and that he was running as an
"independent slate of one."
Lau slate treasurer candidate Don Palmer said
he would make sure undergrad societies get a
guaranteed annual income. He said he would work
with the approximately 150 clubs on campus and
promised to set up a student loan fund.
He also said he would review the procedures of
AMS business office with the aim of removing
bureaucracy in the office.
Human government treasurer candidate David
Mole attacked the Lau platform which he said was
"shamelessly borrowed" from the human
government platform.
He said the treasurer is not an apolitical
bureaucratic position and said he would do the job
as part of the human government team if elected.
"The AMS has vast resources and they're not
being put to use," he said.
He said AMS money should be used to set up
co-op housing off-campus, a co-op bookstore and a
student alternative to food services.
Harvey Tham, an independent candidate for
treasurer, said he had training in finance, accounting
and commercial law.
He promised tighter control over student
money.
He said allocation of student funds would allow
him to reduce AMS fees by next term and said he
would resign if he was unable to do this.
John Olson, Lau slate candidate for internal
affairs officer, said in a short speech he would
attempt to bypass The Ubyssey in communicating
with students.
"I hope to see you all out on Wednesday voting
for me," he said.
Bob Smith, a social work student and human
government candidate for internal affairs, said the
position has been a second rate public relations job
up to now.
He said he intended expanding the role to
include the organizing of course unions at UBC.
Lau vice-presidential candidate Robinson
promised AMS executive credibility referenda every
four months. (An improvement over the human
government promise made previously of a vote of
confidence in the executive to be made in October.)
He said he would support co-ed residences and
an "end to bureaucratic sexual repression"
He said he would examine the Canadianization
of the university and would "end the rule of the
dean of women."
Rod McDiarmid, human government candidate
for vice-president, promised his slate would keep in
close personal contact with students.
Lau external affairs candidate Adrian Belshaw
said if elected he would be responsible for
maintaining contact between students and groups
on campus.
He said he would work to prevent the Jericho
road being built and would work to preserve the
natural beaches and forests around UBC.
Sharon Boylan, human government candidate
for external affairs, said she would work to organize
students around the issue of unemployment and
hinted she would attempt to build a national
student union.
She also said she would attempt to have more
stress placed on the activities of women in course
content on the activities of women.
Boylan disagreed with Robinson's statement
that the office of dean of women should be
removed.
Microbi prof fights
'personality firing'
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Another tenure and promotion dispute has recently surfaced at
UBC, after almost two years of behind-the-scenes controversy.
At the centre of the dispute is assistant microbiology prof Joe
Clark who came here in 1967 after four years of post-doctoral work.
Clark told The Ubyssey Monday that he is being fired on the basis
of a personality conflict between himself and microbiology head John
Campbell. He said personality clashes between himself and other
department members are not at issue, and that he is not being fired
because of poor academic qualifications.
"There's no way they can shake my academic credentials.
"This university has got to learn to accept the spirit of the faculty
handbook — that tenure should be granted on the basis of capability."
Clark said he is being fired on the basis of rumors rather than
facts, and he called this a process of "character assassination."
"In the case of a judgment of poor character the burden of proof
is on the accusers," he said.
"I ask for open meetings and hearings, in other words, the chance
to face my accusers," Clark said.
"I was never allowed that (an open hearing) and I asked for it
over and over again," he said.
Clark said that when academic credentials are at issue open
hearings are not necessary, but in the case of character judgment the
debate must be brought out into the open.
He said he had not run to The Ubyssey at the first signs of
trouble, and had tried to work through conventional channels to have
his case reviewed.
Clark said it appears the university decided his career is
dispensable when balanced against the embarrassment the university
might suffer if the character conflict is acknowledged.
As a final step in seeking redress for his firing, Clark filed a formal
letter of protest last week with the Canadian Association of University
Teachers, but has not yet had a response. He outlined his history at
UBC as follows:
• Clark arrived at UBC as an assistant prof in 1967;
• In 1968, other microbiology department members were
promoted though they had fewer qualifications, according to Clark;
• In the fall of 1969 the department tenure and promotion
committee denied Clark promotion citing grounds of "hostility" and
"mistrust" on the part of Clark towards other department members;
Clark's academic credentials were not questioned;
• Clark then took the case to the personnel services
committee of the faculty association and the committee recommended
that the department review the case on academic grounds;
• In December of 1969 the department committee again
decided not to promote Clark, though this time the vote was split;
• In June, 1970, Clark was informed that the department
had decided not to renew his contract, which expired in June 1971;
• The case was heard by the science faculty's dean's
committee which ruled that there was "fault on both sides;"
• The dean's committee indicated in its findings that it
considered Clark one of UBC's outstanding young people in the fields
of teaching and research, but it confirmed the personality conflict and
recommended that for the good of the department and the university,
the decision to terminate Clark's contract should be upheld;
• The case went back to the personnel services committee
which came to the same conclusion as the dean's committee.
The people on the dean's and personnel services committees
"were extremely good people but were unable to sort out the
situation," Clark said. He said that the final review by the personnel.
services committee mainly interviewed those department people who
had made the decision to fire him.
Clark said one of the reasons he considers the department
decision to terminate the contract irresponsible is that two out of the
three graduate students he supervises won't be finished their degree
work before Clark leaves.
The Ubyssey was unable to contact Campbell.
More dismissals
A special notice from Hamish
Have you got a beef with the
Alma Mater Society bylaws?
Now's your chance to change
that.
Manifesting himself in The
Ubyssey office just before
Monday's final deadline and
sporting a nifty, to say nothing of
dapper, grey sweater, AMS
ombudsman    Hamish    Earle
remarked: t"I   come  to manifest
myself."
"Go do it in the can you
asshole," replied Ubyssey editor
Nate Smith.
"Actually, IVe come ..."
"My, God, no," said Smith.
".   .  .   to  announce   that all
proposed bylaw changes must be
submitted to AMS secretary Anne
Clarkson or president Tony Hodge
by Feb. 23 so council can
consider the proposals at the Feb.
24 meeting."
"Awright, Awright," said
Smith. "Now get the hell out of
my office so my kids can get some
work done."
By SANDY KASS
Three clinical nursing profs
are up for dismissal by the
nursing school on the grounds
that their teaching
qualifications are no longer
valid.
The Ubyssey learned
Monday that all have been
teaching at UBC for many
years and all have BSN degrees
and one may have a doctorate.
However, The Ubyssey was
unable to learn the names of
the three.
Nursing Undergraduate
Society faculty advisor Joanne
Wood said Monday a decrease
in enrolment with the faculty
has necessitated a reduction in
staff,   "for   the   next  winter
session at least."
She said the school further
plans to upgrade the
qualifications of its teaching
staff, but added that no final
decisions have been made.
NUS president Kathy
Hunter said she is aware of the
situation but added that it is
between faculty members
alone.
"It is not the concern of
students."
However, she hinted the
situation may involve more
than an enrolment decrease
and upgrading of faculty
qualifications. i Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ind not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 16, 1971
Got a job yet?
Today we offer a bit of heartening news for the
few thousand graduates who will be pouring out of this
place in a couple of months wondering if their degrees
are worth anything.
A major downtown department store recently
hired four new stock boys, three of them with Bachelors
degrees, one with a Masters. Not having lost all its
respect for the academic hierarchy, the management put
the one with the Masters in charge of the other three.
Meanwhile, an education prof we know is advising
grad students not to complete their Masters theses,
explaining to them that school boards won't hire
anyone with a Masters because they would have to pay
too high a salary.
Honors chemistry students graduating this year
were advised that, since there are so few jobs in their
field, they should consider going into real estate.
An increasing number of graduating law students
are unable to find firms to article with and we're told
that Vancouver has some of the most educated cab
drivers in the country.
The stories are endless, but everyone probably
knows enough pf them. The old guaranteed ticket to the
good life just ain't what it used to be. Even graduates of
once safe faculties like engineering and commerce are
now unable to find jobs.
UBC student services director A. F. Shirran said
last week that the situation didn't seem quite so bad,
but admitted he was only going on placement office
records and only 94 of last year's graduates have
registered there.
So where does that leave us? Putting in time while
being trained for non-existent jobs, not even learning
anything in the process because the university is only e
training centre.
We can't blame the university for the
unemployment situation. That is the result of our.
resource based economy and quick-buck mentality by
governments and private enterprise.
But we can blame the university for not speaking
out on the situation. There has been a noticeable silence
from high administration officials and the senate on the
employment crisis.
Maybe they're just too engrossed in being
academics to care about what happens to students once
they leave.
Sjncerest flattery
The human government slate should congratulate
itself on winning a unique distinction.
We're not referring to the group's success in last
week's election or whatever other victories they may
win this week.
What we're talking about here is the fact that their
opposition has randomly stolen large chunks of the
human government platform and has even copied the
design of the human government campaign posters.
It's not every political group that manages to
convert its opponents.
McCUNE'S  MUSINGS
BY SHANE McCUNE
McCune goes slumming
Sunday being Valentine's Day, I became quite
the mover.
I moved into a house, along with four other
people. The move involved moving my junk (old
yo-yos, Disneyland buttons, etc.) from West Van
and moving everybody else's junk from their Kits
apartment. This remarkable feat was accomplished
with the help of a U-Haul trailer and a borrowed
1956 Meteor.
To help set the mood for this article, I'll
describe the people involved:
Steve is a UBC arts student and consequently
has trouble expressing his individuality. Five feet
and nine inches of fighting fuck-up, he gets his own
room in case he breaks it. Unfortunately, he
possesses a guitar. Though you wouldn't think it to
look at him, he's actually quite tidy.
Jim is Joe Science student—cool, calculating,
mind like a steel trap. He plays classical guitar and
reads science fiction books by the dozen. As he
comes from a family of 10, you can imagine how
accustomed he is to orderliness. Well, you're wrong.
Jim is heavy on the "why-wash-any-dishes-till
they're-all-dirty?" philosophy.
Claire receives the deference that is her due as a
liberated woman. Besides, she's the only one of us
with a car. She really gets off on boutiques, groovy
posters, a wardrobe worth $2000 and general
all-round trendiness. Despite this, she is an arts
student.
Ken is . . . uh . . .like, a freak, y'know. Like, I
mean, he's got . . . a . . . rilly heavy beard an'
everything, man. Y'know?
Ken collects some far-out welfare and...
like ... if he turns sideways he disappears. Trippy.
I'm a packrat and a messy one at that, so
naturally I share a room with Jim. I'm not the
easiest person to live with, but they let me drink all
I want and that's cool.
Put these people together with a couple of tons
of furniture and you have a fun Valentine's Day.
The landlord at the old place was responsible
for the whole thing. After all, he was the one that
evicted us.
Joe (that's his name) used to send us notes,
telling us to take fewer baths and protesting our
frequent overnight visitors ("If this continues I will
have to charge an extra ten dollars a month. It's not
the money, I just want to keep a respectable
house.") Which was funny coming from a guy who
lives common law with a woman downstairs.
The Landlord-Tenant Act was to Joe what Mein
Kampf was to David Ben-Gurion.
He wasn't all bad. He didn't charge extra for
Ralph and George, our pet mice that came with the
place. Or for the unusual bathroom, a surprise no
matter how often you used it.
Joe didn't like our long hair or the clothes we
wore or the music we played. (He once played his
45 of "I Never Promised You a Rose Garden" for a
solid hour and a half.)
More on the move next week.
LETTERS
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday . Tim Wilson
Thom Wescott wanted to be a rock
'n roll star along with John Andersen
and Mike Sasges. But Mike Finley and
Sandy Kass said they preferred Bach so
Judy McLeod and Leslie Plommer
hauled out the harpsichord to the tune
of Dick Betts and Brucie the Curtis
doing a Stones act. Nathalie
Apouchtine and Josephine Margolis did
the things you'd expect while Jan
O'Brien hitchhiked over to tell Shane
McCune to drop dead. She got there
too late though. Jinny Ladner had
already finished the poor kid off. Head
jock and photog Keith Dunbar grilled
Steve Millard and Bill Ruby, while
Dave Bowerman was tickled pink by
Dave Enns of the magic lens.
'One - sided'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The article on page 9 of your
issue for Feb. 9, headed
(somewhat misleadingly)
'Vancouver Jews take to streets',
seems to have fallen below your
usual standards of journalistic
accuracy and objectivity. In
reporting last Monday's rally in
the courthouse square to protest
the denial of human rights to
Soviet Jews, your reporter seems
to have relied on a most one-sided
presentation of the facts, which he
apparently did not trouble to
check out with anyone better"
informed.
Your report does not make
clear that the 'religious leaders'in
the    platform    party    included
representatives of the major
Christian denominations side by
side with their Jewish counterparts,
or that the rally actually had a
Christian co-chairman, Rev.
Be mice Gerrard, Pentecostal
Chaplain to UBC, along with
Rabbi Marvin Hier, director of
Hillel House on this campus. A
reader of the report would gain
the impression that the rally was
actually organized by 'a group of
young Vancouver Jews', instead
of, as was the case, by a
broadly-based committee
representing all persuasions and
groups, young and old, within the
Jewish community, and
commanding full support from
the Christian churches. Some
credit should be given to the
many adults who did the actual
spadework.
Your readers might also have
been interested to know that
three of those who felt
sufficiently strongly about this
universally human, as well as
specifically Jewish, issue to join
the platform party (the two
co-chairmen and myself) are
connected with this University.
Had your reporter approached
any one of us, he could have
obtained a balanced picture of the
origins and nature of the whole
rally, instead of the one-sided and
politically distorted view he seems
to have received from an
individual who played at most a
peripheral part in the events
connected with Monday's rally.
WILLIAM NICHOLLS,
Religious Studies
Department Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Candidates' statements
Vice-Pres.
ROB McDIARMID
As candidate for vice-president
with the Human Government
slate, I want a students' council
which not only attempts to come
to grips with the real problems of
you, the students, but also one
which has personal "human"
contact With individuals within
the student body. This is the only
way to make student government
work for you.
Give this new approach a
chance. Vote for me, Rob
McDiarmid, for Vice-president,
and vote for the Human
Government slate.
MIKE ROBINSON
The job of vice-president is to
assist the president and to carry
out his duties in his absence. Elect
me, and I will do this and initiate
other programs of genial activism.
—AMS executive credibility
referendum every four months.
—Coed residences, open
habitation.
—Tenure investigation.
—End the rule of the dean of
women.
—Elimination of unnecessary
bureaucratic structures within the
AMS.
—Revive the corpse of course
unions — examine
Canadianization.
My middle name is Playfair!
Treasurer
DAVID MOLE
The treasurer has some very
specific jobs which require
conscientious work and good
organization. As I am doing
graduate work in economics, AMS
money will be in reasonably
competent hands.
But I don't believe the job ends
there. I will not be just another
bureaucrat nor do I believe that
simply pushing the money from
place to place gets us much
further than "constitutional
revisions."
Working with the Human
Government slate, the treasurer's
task will require not only
competence but imagination and
the energy to transform the AMS
into something more than an
organization that sits on its hands.
DON PALMER
As treasurer I will work with
three prime purposes. First, I will
develop co-operation and
communcation between the AMS
and other student organizations
on campus: undergrad
guaranteed income —
communication to clubs.
Second, I will review the
financial policy of the AMS: Give
students more for their money —
student loan fund — lounge space
in SUB basement — make
bureaucratic system as simple and
straightforward as possible.
Third, I will work with Hanson
Lau as a team and get things done
for you.
HARVEY THAM
David Mole would be an
incompetent as treasurer because
he lacks expertise and competence
in the area of funds control and
allocation. That is not his bag.
Don Palmer's policy is
wasteful. His formula for
allocating funds to undergrad
societies is wasteful and unfair.
John Wilson, assistant treasurer
this year, has proven his
ineffectiveness and incompetence.
Nothing concrete has come out of
his past service.
A third year commerceman
and part-time accountant, my
platform is tighter control and
proper allocation of your money.
I'll oppose all expenditures not
beneficial to you. If we have
nothing better to spend the
money on, return it to the
students.
I'll announce a reduction in
AMS fees next term or I'll resign.
JOHN WILSON
A treasurer must have
administrative experience, be able
and have initiative to institute
new programs for the students.
I have experience as assistant
AMS treasurer, special events
treasurer and food services
committee member. I also have a
background in accounting and feel
I have proven ability and an
effective program.
My program includes a self
sustaining SUB so there is more
money available for student
needs, more lounge space in SUB,
better food or a student-
controlled food services and more
students services such as a student
typing service and an enlarged
music listening lounge.
Vote for effective and efficient
management of you money —
vote John Wilson.
Internal
JOHN OLSON
The job of internal affairs
officer is to keep students
informed of what is going on in
students' council and the
executive. No decision regarding
the relevancy of the AMS can be
made without unbiased
information being available to all
students. The Ubyssey has failed
in this task. Elect me, and I will
keep students regularly informed
of council business. I will also
make a special effort to
communicate with undergrad
society executives and UBC clubs.
BOB SMITH
There is only one issue in this
election: is it possible for the
AMS to be effective and relevant
to students?
In the past, the AMS has
effectively seen to the problems
of empty cigarette machines and
broken windows, but now there
are larger issues that are facing
students directly and the AMS
can no longer be a practice ground
for future business administrators.
In   the   past   the   position   of
Le Chateau
LE CHATEAU
*-■
Le Chateau
VIVE L'AMOUR
CLOTHES FOR THE
"BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE"
FEATURING
THE BODY LOOK FOR '71
OPEN TILL 9 P.M. THURS.  & FRI.
687-2701
776 GRANVILLE
internal affairs has only served
students as a second rate public
relations firm when it could serve
as a development agency for
course unions. This I can and will
do if elected to the office with the
help of the rest of the Human
Government slate.
External
ADRIAN BELSHAW
The job of external affairs
officer is to keep students' council
informed of government
education policies and to present
student needs to governments. He
should provide lines of
communication to other outside
organizations relevant to students.
If elected, I will also revive
worthwhile programs, such as high
school visits, which died last year
due to lack of leadership. I intend
to co-operate with the
president-elect,  Hanson  Lau, in
implementing    constructive
policies.
SHARON BOYLAN
There are specific tasks that
the AMS can do to serve UBC
students. One of the most
important things the external
affairs person can do is to try to
rebuild working relationships
between student bodies across the
country.
Unemployment is a national
problem for students. We must
initiate demands nationally for
adequate summer and permanent
employment as well as the end of
fees and addition of stipends for
students who otherwise wouldn't
be able to return to school.
We must also initiate programs
of speakers about Canada. Poets,
musicians and other performing
artists would be welcome at free
concerts.
Vote for the Human
Government slate for direction
over your own lives.
Today, Tuesday, at 12:30 Noon
SUB 205
Some say: "I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic
church?" What is it that makes their church "holy?" Who are
these people that dare to travel under the title of "holy ones" or
"saints?" What happens —
"When you come to the end
of the perfect church?"
—Hear the Rev. James Voigt, North Vancouver
A Lutheran Student Movement UBC Presentation
GOME IN TODAY!
STOP BURNING
MIDNIGHT OIL
ON YOUR
INCOME TAX
Thi,     year-get     smart! COMPLETE Q
Dont burn the midnight 21
oil, worrying with tax fig- RETURNS
ures. Why not let BLOCK
figure your return quiet
ly, dependably and insure you of maximum benefits? Drop in today!
LIFE
GUARANTEE i
We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return.
If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or
interest, we will pay the penalty or interest.
(CANADA) LTD.
Canada's Largest Tax Service
With Over 5000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST
6395 FRASER           I
3519 E HASTINGS
3397 KIIMGSWAY       I
I           1685 DAVIE ST.            I
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.-327-0461
 , NO APPOINTMENT NFrFWAPv Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February Id, 1971
v i e w.
By LEAH FRITZ
One of the by-products of the women's
liberation movement — or perhaps it lies at the
very centre of it — is a re-evaluation of female
sexuality.
We know that we have been exploited in
advertising, the media, and "art" as sex objects;
that is, we are displayed as consumable
merchandise or often as attractive-packaging for
other consumable merchandise, rather than as
human beings with needs and desires of our
own.
Indeed, from infancy we are raised to think
of ourselves as consumer items in the "marriage
market", and in many cultures daughters have
actually been sold by their parents as marketable
goods. Being attractive to men is a matter of life
and death to most women. In addition to
whatever other talents we may have, good looks
and/or the ability to enhance men's egos are
essential for getting the few career promotions
available to women or hooking a man to take us
out of the job competition for life and setting us
and our children up in physical comfort.
I
|f the competitive mercantile world we live
in is distressing for men, it is an even heavier
burden for women who must maintain a passive
facade while fighting the same basic battle for
survival, to which the weight of subtle and
not-so-subtle prejudice against women "in the
world" at all is added as a depressing obstacle.
Since much of the oppression we suffer has
been internalized over the millenia of female
subjugation, it was natural for women to look
for the root of the problem in our sexual and
procreative functions —to which, at once, we
owe both our "right" to survive and our
oppression.
Once our eyes opened up in our long
enforced somnambulism, we found all around us
vivid signs that we are regarded as legitimate
objects of men's pleasure — like food and wine
— and that our pleasure, if permitted to us at all,
is conceived of as an automatic out-growth of
the male's: the lamb enjoying its slaughter!
I,
In many cases (see male pornographic
literature) men freely admitted their sexual
pleasure was increased to the extent that the
female partner showed she was not enjoying the
act and had to be forced into it.
Remember the old Errol Flynn movies?
"What a little spitfire you are!" he says as the
heroine scratches and bites to defend herself
from his assaults, her straitjacket clothing
preventing her from giving him the knock-out
punch he deserves, her strait jacket mentality
forcing her finally to submit.
Errol Flynn was a groovy looking man with
a generally pleasant manner and it's altogether
possible that most women would want to make
it with him from the start. Women watching
these films felt that the heroine put up a phony
protest to begin with and that her arm finally
creeping around his neck was not really a gesture
of submission but of genuine desire. The point is
that the poor woman did have to pretend to be
conquered over her objections to prove she was
w&%
a "good" woman. If she had just said, "Errol, I
have a thing for you. Let's screw," she would
have been given the "character" role of the town
hussy .. . right?
While it's true that movies — even American
movies — are changing with the change in
acceptable sexual behaviour in society, we
women are obviously being staked out for new
commercially profitable roles in life as well as in
"art".
T
■ he clitoral controversy, though, has just
begun,  and —oddly enough —  I  find myself
personally in the middle of it! Or rather, on the
counter-revolutionary  side of  it  ... which is
even a stranger place for me to be.
Masters and Johnson, two indomitable
sexologists —one male and one female — have
proved to their own satisfaction and with much
corroboration from woman who have read their
findings, that the only way women can achieve
sexual satisfaction is through the active
stimulation of the clitoris, that small projection
just   inside   the  vagina  which   corresponds  in
"A desire for wildness and freedom beats as
strongly in the heart of the woman cooking
dinner as in the man at the IBM machine; the
same sickness overwhelms them both."
stimulative power to the "head" of the male
penis. The scientists demonstrated this by
electronically recording the reactions of subjects
engaged in the sex act.
The rediscovery in America of the
importance of the clitoris in female sexual
pleasure is a boon to women's liberationists who
have always insisted on the women's right to
seek her own satisfaction actively, not merely to
serve as a device for satisfying men.
Women now have something to demand
from men in bed other than screwing because
screwing will seldom produce a clitoral orgasm.
In a recent Danish book called "I Accuse", the
author, Mette Ejlersen, produced female
witnesses to say they had never gotten anything
out of simple sexual intercourse, even with a
routine amount of clitoral stimulation prior to
the act. In other words, indications of female
pleasure — sighs, groans, grunts — while screwing
are all fabricated to assure men of their prowess.
Women who had previously been taught by the
Freudians to think of themselves as frigid
(sometimes the statistics went as high as 90 per
cent of American women!) because they
couldn't "achieve vaginal orgasm" now had the
long-awaited last laugh: no such thing as a
vaginal orgasm exists, and any women who
claims to have experienced one is a phony!
I hus Masters and Johnson effectively
squashed the myth of female frigidity. Every
woman must be grateful to them for removing
one psychological burden from our sex lives. If
you can have a clitoral orgasm, you are not
frigid; that term of contempt can no longer be
applied to miserable femininity writhing under
an unwelcome penis.
But, out of Masters and Johnson's "answer"
new questions arise: can the term "orgasm",
well-understood by men, adequately describe
the female sexual response? Why must the
female pleasure be defined by male
terminology?
There is a superficial resemblance between
the clitoral reaction in women and the male
climax. Both send a kind of shock through the
body and deliver a certain release. But women
do not, to my knowledge — and against the
evidence of male written pornographic novels —
ejaculate semen. And we are capable of having
many clitoral climaxes in a row, each an
improvement over the one before, so that the
first release, rather than satiating us, often is just
an appetizer for things to come!
"If our bread and water and air are
contaminated and our country earns its
livelihood from genocide, past and present, and
women are regarded as legitimate subhuman prey
by male creatures who call themselves men and
colored people are used as beasts of burden by
white creatures who call themselves human, then
our love lives cannot be anything but grotesque
shadows of what they should become."
Another fact of life the scientists might
look into is that female potency seems to grow
as women mature, while male desires tend to
diminish after adolescence. It is likely that such
effects are not "natural" but produced by the
increasing and decreasing pressures imposed by
society on women and men at different age
levels. Still they should be checked out.
A\
iany men in our society seem to be
sensually shallow and emotionally inhibited to
an extreme. Emotional expressions such as tears
which are permitted to women are denied to
men. Is it possible that by objectifying women,
relegating us to a purely physical corner of their
lives and denying our humanity, men are losing
out on sexual ecstasies which go beyond the
orgasm? Are men afraid to abandon themselves
completely and reciprocally to women — afraid
of the emotional waves that may be stirred in
them? •
5'
MM
rmw*A
OPERATION KON TEMPORARY
THE        RAINBOW       A   C T   I    V  I  S T   •   F   E   S  T  1   V A  L. VIOLET SUNDAY Feb
11
EEKT "SOFT
ALL DAY and ALL IEEft7»S&H SCULPTURE PIECE"
the world's largest air supported structure.
Designed and built by Alec McKenzle (4th year
Plant Science student). Assisted by Harry
Otsuki, Bob Painter, Jeff Painter, Dan Jenkins,
Jerry Lister, Jeremy Smith and others.
SEE IT near Thunderbird Stadium.
[Foul February rainfall
■ay delay completion,]
BLUES MONDAY Feb.
22
Wwr something Blue today.
Blue baby Blue.
Com blue up Lasserre lobby.
11 a.m.-4 p.m.
"ROTH R E C Y C L E S" SUB Art Gallery.
Bring In old discarded socks, sieaters,
skirts, etc. Evelyn Roth will cut up and
KNIT into ARTicles. OR bring in and EXCHANGE.
Phone Evelyn at EXCHANGE 224-5916 or
EXCHANGE 738-7809.
"S A T E R 8 E D" Lay yourself on this.
ALL WEAK - SUB Art Gallery.
"ONE TON": Newsprint pile equals
17 trees.
"COLOUR IN LASSERRE BLUE". You do it.
Lasserre Lobby.
11 a.ra.-2 p.m.
"Meet BOB  I R II M" Los Angeles
artist: guru to the L.A. art scene.
Fine Arts Gallery.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Free One Act Play: "IT'S CALLEO SUGAR PLUM"
by Israel Horowitz. Directed by Peter Gala.
Freddy Wood Theatre.
12:30-2:30 p.m.
TRI-SOLAR-POOL:
INTRA GREEN
Play by Gilles Folsy.
Performed by Tetractys: Candida Jane Thomas,
as Lum; Sill is of the World, as First Adept;
Tern Fiehtr, as Second Adept; Ian Kenneth,
ac Intra Green.   Music by Marcia Stone.
Voice by Ed Varney. ^
PARALLAX      £$§
Dancers: Gil lis of the World, Nansi Weiner,
Ian Freund, Gilles Folsy, Billy Budd, Tracy
Loomis, Paul Baird, Kathleen Harned, Jackie
Granberry, Robbie Richard, Leo.
Music: Alex Barrin [Guitar], Darryl Webb
[wind instruments], Max Perry [drums],
Richard Woodson [trombone], Brad Wenkos
[lead guitar], Psyche Woodson [piano],
Williams Stables [vocals], Janes Harned
[vocals], Ed Varney [lords].
Sound engineer: Terrill Wilson.
Lights: Don Granberry. 3118 BALLROOM - 500 Admission
3:30-4:05 p.m.
•THE SPIRAL JETTY" film by Robert Smithson.
Powerful statement of ecological significance.
A document of an Earthwork:   A Guernica for
the 70's.   Projectionist:   Mr. Ken McCarthy.
Lasserre 102.
Add a blue KNIT to Evelyn's ARTIcle.
SUB gallery.
8LUE BEARD ~ BLUE MOVIES ~ BLUES IN THE NIGHT ~
BLUE SUEDE SHOES ~ BLUE DENIMS ~ BLUE OINTMENT PRESS
DANISH BLUE CHEESE ~ LITTLE BOY BLUE ~
8LUE GRASS ~ BLUE BELLS
Look for SPEC'S booth.
THIS
IS    YOUR    FESTIVAL    PROGRAM
NO OTHER PROGRAM WILL BE PRINTED
KEEP ITl
ALL    EVENTS    FREE    EXCEPT    WHERE
ADMISSION    PRICES     INDICATED
TUESDAY GREENS Feb.
23
Special Request: Forestry students
please contribute your unwanted
Green WEARABLES to Evelyn.
11 a.m.-4-p.ia.
Evelyn continues to "RECYCLE". SUB Gallery.
"W A T E R B E D" SUB Gallery.
"ONE TON" SUB Gallery.
"COLOUR IN LASSERRE LOBBY GREEN". Do it.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Alan 60WANS, Prof, i Chairman, Dept. of
History in Art, U. Vic.   "Principles for a
Net North American Art History", Lasserre 102.
MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN:   "On E X T R A
SENSORY     PERCEPTiO
SUB AUDITORIUM.   Free.
NEW MUSIC
"INTERFACE" (Electronic Chamber
Ensemble) Ross Barrett, Wayne Carr,
Brian Hoover, Craig McCai.
"Sonic SoundScape #1" (1970) for Horn
and Electronic Tape, by Barry Truax.
"Sonic SoundScape #" (1971) for flute,
piano and electronic tape, by Barry Truax.
"Elegy for clarinet, cello, and tape
(1971) by Jerry Summers.
MUSIC RECITAL HALL
FREE ONE ACT play. Ditto Blue MoRday.
Freddy Wood.
2-4 p.m.
"RUSHES" Sequences from Films in
Progress. Sanplings from IMAGE BANK'S
film file. Compiled and edited by Gary
Lee-Nova, Michael Morris, and Vincent Trasov,
tith accompanying SOUND and SLIDES projected.
SUB Auditorium.
3:30-4:05 p.m.
"The Spiral Jetty" Ditto Blue Monday.
3:30-4:30 p.m.
Fine Art of E D I B L E S: JAMES BARBER
cuts ft. Lasserre 104. Bring an EDIBLE object.
Look for the SPEC Booth today.
KEEP B. C. GREEN
Sailer's Hammock.
9
YELLOW WEDNESOAY YELLOWS I
11 a.m.-4- p.m.
"ROTH RECYCLES". SI
"ONE TON" SUi
"W A T E R 8 E D" !
"Colour in Lasserre
"Meet JACK W I
meditate, commune, i
12:00-1:30 p.m.
RITUAL ORAfii by "is*
Lord Jupiter, Doctor
Jacques Chaos, Bob •;
procession into SUB
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Free One Act Play: B
Rene de Obaldia. Di
Freody Wood.
"INTERFACE"
Ensemble) (See Green
Lasserre Lobby.
.12:30-3:30 p.m.
Preview of THE VISUA
see your brain waves
of MATRIX ONE. Lass
1:30-3:30 p.m.
Open Workshop discus
of GATHIE FALK's The
Environmental Projec
"I Am Curious, 6rey -
3:30-4:05 p.m.
"The Spiral Jetty" d
3:30-7
"A Series of Tests ar
gauge the PSYCHIC am
those who wish to par
by CHRISTOPHER ROGEf
professional HYPMOTiS
EXCHANGE YELLOf
Feed a Yellow id
ARTIcle. Exchan
Yellow is the co POSITION  OF
OBSERVER'S  EYE
IN   JANUARY
RED FRIDAY REDS Feb.
-7<
**«4U
*X
4
sry.
*y.
lery.
Have tea,
;k In Lasserre 210.
ralon Society"
ngrid*,
SUB Plazas thence
'\\m.
AND A6RIPPINA* by
by Rodger Dunn.
ronic Chamber
y)
: plug in and
. Or. Paul Spong
6.
out the filming
ece and
Orange Thursday:
Lasserre 202.
j« Monday.
26
Tiring
position or
OBSERVER'S EYE
IN JUNE
THURSDAY ORANGE Feb.0 C
11 a.m.-4- p.m.
"Roth Recycles" "Baterbed" "One Ton"
"Colour Lasserre Orange" Free Marmalade
Sandwiches.
"I Am Curious, Grey Scale". Ponograph? of
the ordinary. Using a collection of props
and visual aids, Michael Morris and
Vincent Trasov till FILM IN COLOUR, black
and white, various locations and activities
on campus. Participants, questioners,
scrutineers are welcome. Michael and
Vincent will collaborate with 6ATHIE FALK
and Cast in the filming of GATHIE's Theatre
Piece and Environmental Projects.
Location Info, at 228-2757.
11 a.m.-2 p.n.
Dennis Neman: "A U 0 S B L E S", primitive
sound percussion instruments for group gestault
participatory encounters.
SUB GALLERY
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
"INTERFACE" (Electronic Chamber
Enseable, see Green Tuesday.) SUB Gallery.
Attention Engineers: Tring your unwanted
Red gear to Evelyn in SUB GALLERY.
Wear Red. Think Red. Be Red. Red lips.
11 a.m.-4-p.m.
"Roth Recycles"
"waterbed" and "ONE TON"
"Colour in Lasserre Apple Reds"
"I an Curious, Spectrum". Ditto Orange
Thurs.: "I am Curious, Grey Scale".
The New School visits Education Lounge.
Be there.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
RETINA CIRCUS: Sound and light
confrontation using QUA0RASON IC
sound system and giant 60 x 20 foot screen.
SUB Ballroom. [Students $1.00, others $2.00]
Free One Act Play "PLAY" by Beckett.
Directed by M. Van Caapen. Freddy Wood.
Violin Recital: John Loban. Including
Ravel, TZIGANE. Music Recital Hall.
12:30-2 p.m.
"SMASH GLASS for Recycling". University
Hill High School and JOSHUA. SUB Plaza.
12:30-3:30 p.m.
Preview of THE VISUAL BRAIN, Ditto Yellow Wed.
Lasserre 206.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
MANDRAKE:   "On Magic and the OCCULT".
SUB AUD.   Free.
Premiering a New Work by Elliot Hieisgarber:
"KYOTO LANDSCAPE" (MIYAKO-NO-KESHIKI).
Also Beethoven Symphony No. 1; and Bach,
Overture No. 3.   UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.
Music Recital Kail.
"RETINA CIRCUS"   SUB Ballroom.
Giant QUADRASON IC sound.
Giant projection on 60 x 20 foot screen.
[Students $1.00, others $2.00]
11 p.m.- ?
12:30-2:30 p.m.
"SLEEP IN" the "SOFT SCULPTURE PIECE".
Bring steeping bags. Red flannels.
"PLAY" by Beckett. Directed by M. Van Campen.
"EDWARD AND AGRIPPINA". Ditto Yellow *ed.
Freddy food. Free.
PAUL HORN: Jazz Workshop. SUB Ballroom.
[Note: 50 cents]
12:30-3:30 p.m.
IS" designed to
. capacities of
te."  Directed
•nalfst and
] AUD. CAF.
) Evelyn's
•5916.
: God.
Preview of THE VISUAL BRAIN. Ditto Yellow Wed.
Lasserre 206.
1:30-4 p.m.
AL NEIL and Marguerite. Concert of sounds:
grand piano, voice, violin, tapes (including
the voice of SKANA) and assemblages.
Free. Free. SUB AUDITORIUM.
4 p.m.
Cone to SUB gallery: Crawl into Evelyn's
ARTIcle.
4:30 p.m.
SIN6: "Love of Three Oranges".
Clocktower and Music Library.
3
Q.
E
8
UJ
CO
CO
O
CO
3
8 p.m.
MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN:   "Illusions and
ELATI0NS".   [Students $1.00, Others $2.00.]
SUB AUDITORIUM.
Ditto "KYOTO LANDSCAPE" etc. (see 12:30 above,
Music Recital Hall.)
io1 (i'6), interj. [L. io, = Gr. 16, an exclamation
of joy or pleased excitement: ef. 0, oh, etc.]
A Latin interjection, or exclamation of joy or
triumph: sometimes used as a noun in English.
Hark! how around the hills rejoice,
And rocks reflected ios sing.
Congreve, Ode on Namur, st. 10.
Io2 (I'd), n, [L. Io, < Gr. 'Id.] 1. In myth.,
a daughter of Inachus, metamorphosed into a
heifer and caused to be tormented by a terrible
gadfly by Hera, in jealous revenge for the favors
of Zeus. See Argus, 1.—2. The innermost of the
four satellites of Jupiter.—3. In cntom.: (a) A
genus of vanessoid butterflies, (ft) [I. c] The
peacock butterfly, Vanessa io: used both as the
technical specific name and as an English word,
(c) [I. c] A showy and beautiful moth of North
America, Hypercfiiria io, or Saturnia io, of yel-
Hyperchiria io, natural size.
low coloration, with prominent pink and bluish
eyes on the hinder wings. The larva is covered with
bunches of stinging spines, and feeds on isany plants
and trees, as Indian corn, ootton, hops, clover, elm, and
cherry. The eggs are laid in clusters on the under side of
the leaf. _L_L Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
As for the so-called clitoral orgasm, the
most efficient means for producing it is the
mechanical vibrator, despite the fact that there
is little spiritual excitement to be gained with its
use. Directed by a woman who knows where she
wants to be stimulated, this little device can
provide multiple achievements with very little
arm strain. Next best is the woman's own hand.
Further down the list is another person's tongue;
and at the very bottom, another person's hand.
ly all means, women should have as many
clitoral orgasms as we wish, but I maintain —
from my own experience, which though long,
may not be universal — that when the clitoral
potential has been exhausted there is still a hole,
physical and spiritual, to be filled. And when it
has been filled well, with penis and ejaculated
semen, satisfaction comes with a certain finality
which I have never achieved clitorally — a feeling
of complete physical and emotional
contentment.
It is as if the body has been saturated with
love. This release may have more to do with
osmosis than nerve endings (which we are
advised by Masters and Johnson and others do
not reside in the vagina) and perhaps that is why
such a reaction is not electronically perceptible.
Or it may have to do with a sense of fecundity
or of communication passing mental and
nervous limits which simply does not happen
under laboratory conditions. The microscope
does affect the organism (or orgasm) being
observed.
I
believe such a spiritual release is also
possible to men, over and above what they are
satisfied to call "orgasm", but seldom occurs
because of the sensual and emotional limitations
imposed on them by our civilization.
Of course it is impossible for most women
"If the positions were reversed and women came
at men with force and promises and
expectations of chastity and expectations of
extraordinary prowess and demands for bottled
beauty and instant relaxation and threats and
the danger of giving birth to children they
couldn't feed or didn't want, with the extra
reward of the world spitting in their eyes for
being 'unwed fathers', they might find it
difficult to have an erection, much less come
every time!"
to achieve this kind of nirvana in the midst of
t.he rat race.
Men frighten women with their aggressive
and egotistical overtures. If the positions were
reversed and women came at men with force and
promises and expectations of chastity and
expectations of extraordinary prowess and
demands for bottled beauty and instant
relaxation and threats and the danger of giving
birth to children they couldn't feed or didn't
want with the extra reward of the world spitting
in their eyes for being "unwed fathers", they
might find it difficult to have an erection, much
less come every time!
T,
of the
clitoris
the sexual experience to make it complete for a
woman, and men must also take into
consideration the terrible beating her ego takes
from society every day. This is why we
frequently "neurotically" insist on assurances of
love.
Marilyn Monroe committed suicide because
she didn't have a date on Saturday night. A
beautiful mind destroyed by exploitation.
If men complain about their domestication
here, they have no one to blame but themselves.
If they insist on taming us, they must behave
like gentlemen. A desire for wildness and
freedom beats as strongly in the heart of the
woman cooking dinner as in the man at the IBM
machine; the same sickness overwhelms both.
fm&
convince women that the aggressiveness of one
man, at least, is a product of his own culturally
induced hangups and his feelings toward "his"
woman are well-intentioned if clumsily
expressed. The long relationship also gives a
woman a chance to express her own
aggressiveness, to take an active part in the
making of love.
rm
I he clitoris is a thing of joy; I wouldn't be
without one. And  I  do think, from my own
experience again, it takes time for some women
to receive satiety from screwing, but I do not
believe    this    inhibition    in    young    girls    is
psychological. It just takes a hell of a long time
to get over the feeling that you're a butterfly on
the end of a pin — a feeling justified by the ugly
predatoriness of the typical male approach.
She will find there are times when her needs
are greater than his. And much of the life lovers
enjoy  together  is spent in  ordinary  humann
companionship  in which the beast of prey is
domesticated. Women in our society are treated,
if anything, like domesticated animals and for
this reason cannot cope with the ruthless and
wild.
I'e are constantly the objects of
degradation, contempt and exploitation and the
man who would win our confidence must marvel
at our endurance, encourage our originality,
passionately endorse our efforts to break out of
the feminine bind.
The dependence on men is so intricately
woven into a woman's every breath that perhaps
some of my sisters are right when they say my
insistence that there be more to sex than a
clitoral orgasm is counter-revolutionary.
We must somehow extricate ourselves from
this mesh of madness. A lie — or half-truth —
may seem one way to do it.
But, ultimately, we must rely on the truth
— the whole truth — to set us free. As close to
the truth as I can come is that we live in a world
where all human enjoyment is thwarted by an
acquisitive system forcing us to malinger in the
marketplace. All human beings must be more or
less frigid in a robot-run society.
If our bread and water and air are
contaminated and our country earns its
livelihood from genocide, past and present, and
women are regarded as legitimate subhuman
prey by male creatures who call themselves men
and colored people are used as beasts of burden
by white creatures who call themselves human,
then our love lives cannot by anything but
grotesque shadows of what they should become.
he Freudian dictum, that women should
outgrow the need for clitoral climaxes in
jnaturity, is patently Victorian.
Long love affairs or marriages in time can
I he insatiable search for variety in partners
is probably symptomatic of male frigidity - an
inability to come spiritually, to fuse the physical
with the psychological needs, to abandon
themselves to the marvel of being close to
another human being who can only begin to be
appreciated in a lifetime of such moments.
Strangely, it is men's pride in their penises
and the performance thereof which gives them
such confidence in their mental achievements, in
the arts, for instance.
Keeping women, who in early years exhibit
superior intellectual abilities, chained to menial
chores and the fine craft of aggravating men's
egos, men can assure themselves that Beethoven
is the final accomplishment in music,
Shakespeare in poetry, Michelangelo in
sculpture. Once women are released, men may
discover undreamed of realms of beauty ... if
they are, indeed, able to appreciate them.
As for sex — like eating, like walking in
fresh air, like all human activity — it should
re-create us, help us to find one another, make us
real and tangible as the earth. It should put us
together again, body and soul, male andfemale,
in harmonious intercourse. §
"All human beings must be more or less frigid in
a robot-run society."
Sensitive women are often on the verge of
self-destruction, feeling their quest, recognition
for making a dent in anyone's consciousness, to
be hopeless. We were taught from childhood to
receive love from other people and no other
success will compensate. Indeed, no other
success is likely to be achieved!
A woman's entire body must be involved in Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 16, 1971
Bibb best yet at UBC
by Nettie Wild
When Leon Bibb described the southern blues belter, Ma Rainey
he said, "she kind of gets a hold of you somehow." In fact, he could
have been describing himself to the small audience in SUB ballroom,
Friday who witnessed what must have been one of the best shows in
Vancouver this season and certainly the best UBC has seen.
The trouble is, not many Canadians know about the man or his
songs yet. Bibb is a relatively well-known folk/blues singer in the states
but unfortunately his popularity has not jumped the border into
Canada. Judging from the second of two performances on Friday (the
first was on Tuesday), it is certainly not due to any lack of talent but
rather — to his lack of exposure to Canadian audiences. However, that
problem is being solved as he has moved from New York to live in
Vancouver where he plans to give more concerts... lucky Vancouver.
Bibb is extremely intimate, tossing aside the mike as if it would
get inn the way between himself and the audience, giving an
understanding to his songs and music. He is professional yet not slick,
so that you get the person Leon Bibb, not a glossy package. His voice is
rich and easy — easy for him to sing, easy for us to listen to. Listening
to Bibb one feels a sense of relief, for here is somebody you don't have
too make excuses for.
So often the groups and singers we hear today are simply a
product spouting a manufactured sound. In person, they often are dull
and lifeless, giving an off performance. Bibb gives the impression of
never having given a bad performance in his life, his talent is too
ingrained within him to produce anything but good true music. You
begin  to wonder why groups like Ian and Sylvia, who insulted the
Toes., Feb. 16 af    12:30 P> HI.
ARAB-ISRAELI
CONFLICT TODAY
Speaker — ISSA FAHEL
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
"PEOPLE"
Applications are now being accepted from students for the
position of DIRECTOR of the programme "PEOPLE - AN
EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND HUMAN
SEXUALITY", '71-'72. These should be directed to Sean
McHugh, Office of Interprofessional Education, Woodward
Library, Rm. 324.
Letters should include  all  material   that   the applicant
considers relevant to the position.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL LYNN, 228-3083
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
ELECTION OFFENCES
The following candidates of the AMS Executive Election held
Wednesday, Feb. 10th have been fined by the AMS Elections
Committee for the given offences as listed in the Election Rules
and Procedures, Spring 1971:
Failure to remove all banners and posters by 4:00 p.m. the
day preceding election excepting one poster allowed at each
ballot box.
Kelvin Beckett
Steve Garrod
John Scott Mitchell
Joan Campana
Sue Kennedy
Clayton Vogler
Failure to submit a statement of campaign expenditures to
the Returning Officer by 4:00 p.m. on the day preceding
the election:
Hanson Lau
Dave Mackenzie
Using Sound Truck:
Hanson Lau
Painting on permanent or semi-permanent fixtures on the
University Endowment Lands:
Hanson Lau
 John Scott Mitchell	
audience with their shoddy performance when they last played here,
were able to pack the auditorium - while Bibb barely half-filled the
ballroom.
The songs and poems he chose were strung together with
personal anecdotes, conveying the understanding that these works
were more a heritage to him than a pleasing sound. He saing about Ma
Rainey who would draw people from all over the south to hear her sing
the blues and make them cry and was able to tie the new and old
together, combining songs hundreds of years old with the
contemporary poems of Malcom X and the sound of Otis Redding's
"Dock on the Bay."
All the while Bibb kneaded his songs and poems into the music of
Al Shackman's guitar. Shackman is a fine performer in his own right,
easily surpassing the role of a backup guitarist, becoming simply one of
the two equally good performers on stage. Bibb's realization of
Shackman's talent has resulted in two synchronized artists blending
together to give a perfect sound.
THE GREATEST LIVING SOVIET RUSSIAN POET
ANDREI
VOSNESENSKY
WILL READ SOME OF HIS POEMS IN
RUSSIAN AND ENGLISH
ON
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17
AT 12:30 AND 7:30
IN
SUB AUDITORIUM
Slavonic Circle — Dept. Slavonic Studies
CHARTERS 71
If You are Travelling on a
Charter to Britain or Europe
Please Remember to Reserve
NOW for
U-DRIVE — HOTEL
ACCOMMODATION
DISCOUNTED RAIL TICKETS
and
Call for your Passport
Application Forms if you
do not have a Passport
NO EXTRA CHARGE
For COMPLETE Travel
Information
and Brochures - Call
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
WORLD-WIDE
B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
NOW!
* D.B. Tuxedos
* Notched S.B. Tuxedos
* Shawl Tuxedos
* D.B. Blazers
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
Wed
like to make
a few
promises
If you use Tampax tampons
you'll never again be bothered
with pins, pads and belts. Nor
with odor, chafing and the
bulge.
*    *    *    *
Because Tampax tampons are
worn internally, you'll be comfortable. So comfortable, in
fact, that you might even forget all about your period.
You'll have a choice of three
absorbency-sizes:
Regular, Super and
Junior. No one else can
offer that, and the
Juniors are just right .for girls
just starting to menstruate.
■
You'll never touch the tampon.
The smooth container-applicator enables you to place the
tampon properly.
* *    *    *
You'll get real protection.
Tampax tampons are made of-
pure absorbent cotton. They
expand in three directions to
conform with the' contours of
your body.
* *    *    *
Disposal problems just don't
exist because both the tampon
and the container-applicator
are flushable.
* *    *    *
Another promise, a most important promise, is freedom.
Freedom to swim, dance, ride,
run, or just relax. All because
of Tampax tampons, the
world's most trusted tamponT
Right from the start...
DEVELOPED   BY   A   DOCTOR
NOW   USED   BY   MILLIONS  OF   WOMEN
TAMPAX  TAMPONS  ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PARTFOURTEEN
One of the questions I'm most often asked
about Viet Nam is "what was your worst
experience?"
I never had any really bad experiences but a
very good friend of mine who came home on the
same plane as I did told me of a pretty shattering
thing that had happened to him.
He had been stuck with day watch, sitting in a
hole out on the edge of the base and watching kids
and water buffalo walking back and forth all day.
About noon he got a phone call from the guard
shack telling him that his lunch was waiting for him
at the next post down the line. When he got there it
was just what he had expected, Orations without
any fuel to heat them.
Just as he was heading back to his hole the
other man asked if he smoked. Living in a military
situation produces a remarkable paranoia and the
question took a good dozen ominous meanings.
He finally decided that an instinctive no would
be the best reply, and stammered it out. This turned
out to be the right answer anyway, as the other man
just wanted to know if he could have the cigarettes
from the C-rations, and my friend was trying to give
up tobacco.
He was so relieved at not being busted that he
even offered him the matches to go with the
cigarettes. Since he didn't have anything else to
smoke and there was no fuel to heat the rations, this
didn't seem to be too much of a sacrifice.
After he got back to his hole he sat down and
ate as much of the C-rations as he cpuld stand,
which amounted to a chocolate bar and a can of
pineapple.
Since he didn't want to risk being caught taking
an after dinner nap, he decided to permit himself
the luxury of a walk around his hole. He walked
around behind the hole, threw away the meat and
crackers and turned around to walk back. But then
he hesitated. If he was going to keep his walk
around the hole artistically pure, he would have to
make a complete circuit.
And so, with a sense of imminent grandeur,
he turned around again and prepared to continue his
promenade, but suddenly he was transfixed.
There, two yards in front of him, sun drenched
on a huge boulder, was a joint.
To be sure, it was an old, rained on, sunned on,
wrinkled joint, but it was still a joint. He picked it
up reverently and felt the seeds to make sure. It
looked, felt and smelled good.
It may be a little confusing as to how finding a
joint could be the worst thing to happen to a
person, but anyone who has had some dope laid on
them and hasn't got any way of smoking it will
understand.
The old paranoia hit him full force right away.
He could sit beside the hole and watch for people
sneaking up behind or beside him and get rid of the
roach before they caught him, but first he had to
get it lit.
He couldn't walk down to the next hole and
ask for a match because the man down there already
knew he didn't smoke cigarettes.
He thought about looking for a light from the
man in the hole on the other side of him.
"D'you have a light?"
"Sure. Got a cigarette?"
"Uh, I don't smoke."
"What you want a light for then?"
"Uh, well, not cigarettes, anyway."
"You're under arrest."
He decided not to ask the other hole for alight
either.
Next he tried pulling some of his bullets apart
and smashing, grinding, and swearing at the powder.
When this didn't work he tried pulling the telephone
apart and getting a spark from the bell mechanism.
That didn't work either.
After that he tried rubbing sticks, which were
too soggy, focusing sunlight, which was very
difficult without a magnifying glass and pulling
apart a hand grenade which was really too
dangerous to be worth it so he gave up.
But, like all good stories, this one had a happy
ending. He got it lit. The only trouble, was, it was so
good he couldn't remember how he finally managed
to light it.
&
JHE CURRY HOUSE
3934 MAIN ST.
(at 23rd)
Tel: 879-7236
finest EAST INDIAN food
$3.0Q for groups of 10 or
more - CLOSED MONDAY
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare or Straight Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIA1   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT PRESENTS:
"WHEN YOU COME TO THE END OF THE
PERFECT CHURCH"
WITH REV. J. VOIT
TUESDAY, Feb. 16 AT 12:30 IN SUB 205
"TECHNOLOGY—ONCE AGAIN—WITH
FEELING"
WITH DR. JOHN ROSS
MONDAY, FEB. 22 AT 12:30 IN SUB 205
(Q/he Jmocmguage of
Nothing speaks of love
like a diamond. In the
depths of its sparkly
brilliance love is
enshrined forever. Our
diamonds are hand
picked as superb
examples of the
diamond cutter's art
and always reflect the
brilliance of love.
&z.am*
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Pender at Granville Since 1904
Page 9
Election procedures under fire
from page One
'This is the first time that I have voted in an AMS election and I
didn't have a clue to what a preferential ballot was, but I was told to
vote preferentially."
She also plans to protest the late opening of the Buchanan poll.
"I will be taking a petition before the students' court and have
them declare the presidential election invalid," said Hasset.
"I also intend to get at the mechanics of the election procedures
by getting the by-laws changed through a referendum.
The Ubyssey is constitutionally required to print the following
statement.
Take notice that the students' court will hear charges of breach of
the AMS constitution preferred against the students' council of the
AMS of UBC and the election committee of the same in rooms 207 and
209 in SUB at 12:30 p.m., February 23,1971.
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body.
Eczema. Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
EAT IN .TAKEOUT. DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIilli.,
PUCCINI'S MASTERPIECE
MADAMA
BUTTERFLY
FEBRUARY 18, 20, 25, 27
School Matinee February 23
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE, 8:00 P.M.
LAST MINUTE CLUB — $1,00
Unsold seats to students under 25
7:50 P.M. Night of Performance only
No phone calls please
For Best Chance Come Opening Night
FEB. 18th
For Reserved Seats at Regular Prices
Phone 684-4464
uoa
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSOCIATION
-MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIII'
Students in all faculties:
A CAREER IN
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY?
Learn How and Why
Thursday, Feb. 25, 1971
12:30 P.M.,
Room 106, Buchanan Building
Members of the Institute of Chartered Accountants B.C. and the
U.B.C. Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration will be
on hand to:
—Show a film "Men of Account" describing the work of a C.A.
-Discuss the Licentiate in Accounting programmes and other
U.B.C. pre-C.A. training programmes.
—Discuss the opportunities afforded by employment in training
with practicing chartered accountants. Chartered accountants
play a decisive role in Canadian business, industry and
government.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
651-3264 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 16, 1971
TUESDAY
ARAB   STUDENTS ASSOC
Talk on Arab-Iraeli conflict today, in
I.H.   at noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting to prepare for Fr. Crunican's
visit    to    St.    Mark's   College,   music
room  at  noon today.
cuso
Nigel   Hawkesworth   on   international
development   and   political   action   in
Caanda at 7:30 p.m. in I.H.  402.
LUTHERAN   STUDENT  MOVEMENT
"When Yon Come to the End of the
Perfect  Church"   with  Rev.   J.   Voit,
at noon in SUB 205.
AQUA  SOC
Beer   night   and   whaling   slides   from
4-9  p.m.   in  SUB  215.
PRE-MED   SOC
Speaker from V.D. clinic in Wesb. 201
at noon.
'tween
classes
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Failure of UBC, part 2: The Political
Clubs—Karl Bureau vs. Dave Moore-
house, Young Conservatives, and Sfteve
Boggis, Young New Democrats, a Left
Caucus rep. and a Liberal rep. in
SUB 125 at noon.
BLACK CROSS
Join    a    subversive    organization    in
Brock 164 at noon.  Over 20,000 sandwiches   served.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting in Bu." 104 at noon.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
Open general meeting at 1776 Alberni
St.  at 7:3Q p.m.
WEDNESDAY
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
For  those  going  to  Abbotsford  meet
by SUB info booth at 5:30 p.m.
CIRAP—POWER  &   PEOPLE   OF   B.C.
Left-wing  views  on organizing  industrial unions in Bu. 100 at noon.
PrtS-LAW
C.   C.   Locke,   guest  speaker  in   Ang.
414 at noon.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Reading of poetry by Andrei Viznesen-
sky in SUB Aud. at noon, 7:30 p.m.
UNIVERSITY   DAY  CARE  COUNCIL
Mary  Rupp   will  speak  on  "Dialogue
on    Parenting",    Acadia    Park   -playschool at 8 p.m.
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 105A.
ECO
"The   Skagit   Valley   Controversy"   in
bio. sciences 2000 at noon.
THURSDAY
NEWMAN   CLUB
Fr. Paul Crunican leads discussion on
"Living Christianity — What Does It
Mean?" in St. Mark's College at 7:30
P.m.
PRE-MED  SOC
Surgery trip to VGH. Details at Tuesday's meeting.
FRIDAY
YO.UNG  SOCIALISTS
Analysis of Kate Millett's book Sexual
Politics by Women's Liberation Alliance speaker at 1208 Granville St.. 8
p.m.
PRE-MED  SOC
Ski trip to Whistler. Details- at Tuesday's meeting.
SATURDAY
VIETNAM   ACTION   COMMITTEE
Anti-war    conference    to    build    the
spring   mobilization   at   1881   E.   Hastings,   NDP  provicial  headquarters,  at
8 p.m.
CSA
Drama night in SUB aud.  at 8 p.m.
MONDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
'"Technology, once again, with feeling" with Dr. John Ross in SUB 205,
at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
UBC  18th  CENTURY  CLUB
Lord Foppington's Rout, 18th century
costume dinner with suckling pig,
the Minuet. To be held March 11 in
Cecil Green Park at 7 p.m. Tickets
soon.
LEGAL AID
Mon., Wed. and Fri. at noon in SUB
228 and 232.
WHERE ALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
OIL CAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
NIGHT TRAIN
THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 20's
From  Los Angeles
MAC  TRUQUE
DIRTY SAL'S
Listen to the unique voices
of JUDY & JIM GINN
OPEN
MON. THRU SAT.
752 THURLOW ST. 683-7306
YOU. . .
have probably read in this paper
the campaign speeches of the
candidates   for AMS EXECUTIVE
YOU probably have reached some sort of an
opinion.
How about putting that opinion on paperl
VOTING HAPPENS
S.U.B. (by cafeteria)
11:30-3:30
RESIDENCES (Ft. Camp, Place Vanier, Totem Park), 5:00 - 7:00
BARN
BUCHANAN
ANGUS
EDUCATION
CIVIL ENGINEERING
MAIN LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY     ]()00
S.U.B.
WOODWARD LIBRARY
4:00
N.B. This election will
fill the positions oi
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
Don't leave for your mid-term
skiing blitz   UNTIL you've voted!
TODAY
TOMORROW
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
FOR DANCE ENTHUSIASTS:
Vampire and The Ballerina and
Diary of a Madman, Thursday,
Feb. 18, 9:00 to midnite, SUB
Theater. Twenty-five cents cheap.
"SUNSHYNE" AT FEBTEBER
Fest featuring Bavarian Gardens
and Cabaret 9:00, Feb. 27, Saturday.   I.D.   required.
Greetings
12
Lost ft Found
13
I LOST MY TELESCOPIC TJM-
brella, blue patterned with silver
chain.  Finder call Judy 224-9047.
Rides & Car Pools
14
DESPERATELY NEED RIDE TO
Campus from Ladner and back.
Mon. to Fri. 7:30 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. Start March 1. Phone Carrol,   228-2878   or   879-6943.
Special Notices
IS
"WHEN YOU COME TO THE END
of the Perfect Church" with
James Voit, Noon, SUB 205. Sponsored by Lutheran Student Movement.
SAVE   $20.
Waterbeds   all   sizes   and  shapes
Phone Florence 738-3464 2-6 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.
"DIALOGUE ON PARENTING',,
Mrs. Mary Rupp, Acadia Park
Playschool,  Wed.,  Feb.  17,  8 p.m.
CRUNCH IS COMING. JOIN FR.
Paul Crunican, National University Chaplain, discussing "Living
Christianity: What Does it Mean?"
St. Mark's College, Thursday,
Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m.
DOUBLE BILL OF HORROR.
Thursday, 9:00 to midnite in SUB
Theater, Vampire and the Ballerina and Diary of a Madman.
Twenty-five  cents  cheap.
THIS IS TIME TO ENJOY! A HAP-
pening! Febteber Fest. Two types
of refreshments—hard and soft.
Feb. 27. I.D. prerequisite. Sunshyne will be there.
FEB. 20. RUMMAGE SALE, BETH-
el No. 14, I.O.J.D. Lions Gate
Hall, 2611 W. 4th. 11:00 a.m.-2:00
p.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St., Van.  1,  B.C.
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON   A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information, desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver 9, B.C. Tel. 738-3128
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'68 VOLKS, BEAUTIFULLY KEPT;
many options including radio.
Phone 244-7265 after 5.	
1964 AUSTIN 850 (MINI) IN GOOD
condition. Call Alex at 224-9974.
offers?
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
1970 YAMAHA ENDURO 250 EX-
cell. cond. 1000 miles. Call Tim,
224-7884,   4515   W.   12th.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care ft Baby Sitting    32A
Photography 34
Scandals
37
110 REWARD. NEED 2-BEDROOM
unfurnished apt. under $150.
Starting   May.   263-9774.	
FLYING CIRCUS PETITION ! !
Outside Buch. 207, Mon. 8:30 -
11:20,   Tues.   12:30-3.20.	
CAN CHRISTIANS BE PEOPLE?
Ask Fr. Paul Crunican, National
University Chaplain. St. Mark's
College, .Thursday, Feb. 18, 7:30
p.m.	
VINCENT PRICE IN DIARY OF A
Madman and Vampire And The
Ballerina provide nite of chills,
Thursday, Feb. 18, 9:00 to midnite.
SUB Theater. Twenty-five cents
cheap.	
RESULTS OF EUS FEE REFER-
endum. Yes: 325. No: 136. Spoiled:  4.
Scandals
37
IT'S COMING! ARE YOU GOING?
Febteber-Fest. This year's happening. Save Feb. 27 for it. Stay
tuned!
Typewriters & Repairs 39
Typing 40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call Mrs.   Ellis,   321-3838.
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Ann  Treacy.   738-8794.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat Accurate Work. Reasonable
Rates.   Phone  263-5317.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING, IBM
Electric — 35c/page. Call after
noon,   733-4708.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
Experienced Typist, Electri Typewriter.  731-8096.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al and Technical Typing, IBM
Selectric—Days, Evenings, Weekends.  Phone: 228-9304—30c per.
TYPING SERVICES BY MALE
Secretary, Manuscripts, General
Typing, etc., Evenings and weekends. IBM Selectric Typewriter.
Pick up and Deliver. Reasonable
rates to students. Phone 522-8378
after  4:30  p.m.
YEAR ROUND ACCURATE TYP-
ing- from legible work; 738-6829,
ten a.m. to 9 p.m.; reasonable
rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
COACHING FOR ENGLISH 100
students for whom English is a
new   language.   261-6410.
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101.
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-1644—10 a.m. to
3  p.m.
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 687-6494. Alain
Neumand  (804),  1949 Barclay St.
IS ONE OF YOUR COURSES A
drag? Need help? Come to the
UBC Tutoring Centre. Almost all
subjects, SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-
2  p.m.,  daily.
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & Grammar, by qualified
ex-University Teacher, Native-
Speaker, Group & Quantity Discounts.  Eves. :   731-0156.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
ROOMS FOR RENT, MEN ONLY.
Near UBC. $40100 a month. Call
682-2581.
Room ft Board
62
FREE ROOM AND BOARD FOR
girl student in exchange for help
with children. Near UBC Gates.
224-6192.
Furnished Apts.
63
EXCHANGE OR SUBLET; APRIL
to Septembtr, modern 2% (Faculty), everything included, downtown Montreal, close to McGill;
write Daniel LaTouche, Dept. of
Political Science, McGill University.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. it Unfurn.      86
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT wishes
same immediately to share cozy
furnished house near campus $65.
228-9504. Tuesday, February 16, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
Buchanan Trophy Basketball
CAPTAIN TERRY MacKAY (left) and coach Peter Mullins hold
symbols of the winning circle after Saturday night's sweet victory
over SFU (see front page story). By the look on their faces, the
symbols should have been reversed.
BASKETBALL
WCIAA Semi-Finals
February 19-20
Memorial Gym - 8:00 p.m.
U.B.C.   THUNDERBIRDS'
vs.
U. of ALBERTA  'GOLDEN BEARS'
Under the jurisdiction of
THE WESTERN CANADIAN INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Student price $1. — General admission $1.50
High School 50 cents
SPOR TS
Hockey Birds win two,
still share first place
Going into the weekend, the University of B.C.
hockey Thunderbirds were aiming for second place
in the Western Collegiate league. Now they will only
settle for first place.
Thunderbirds grabbed a share of top spot with
9-0 and 3-2 wins Friday and Saturday respectively
over the University of Victoria Vikings.
Meanwhile the University of Manitoba split a
pair of games in Winnipeg with the University of
Winnipeg. The weekend action leaves UBC and
Manitoba with 14-4 records, two games better than
the Unive rsityofCalgary.
Friday, the 'Biif^s scored six times in the third
period to win going away. Tom Williamson led the
attack with three goals and two assists. Barry Wilcox
added a goal* and three assists, while Rich Longpre
connected for two goals.
Bob MacAneely, Doug Buchanan and Roy
Sakaki finished off the UBC scoring.
Thunderbirds outshot the visitors 59-23.
Saturday the Vikings proved tougher. They led
Soccer Birds
gain two ties
In soccer action last weekend
the Thunderbirds completed the
first half of their schedule by
tying two games — with
Firefighters and Eintracht.
On Saturday the Birds blew
two one goal leads after Gary
Thompson and John Hibberson
had put them into the lead over
the Firefighters.
A tired team met Eintracht
Sunday on a rain drenched Tartan
Turf at Empire Stadium. The
Birds took a 1-0 lead with a goal
by Robin Hart. In the second half
Eintracht forced the play in the
'Birds' end but could only manage
one goal. Outstanding play by
fullback Wayne Larson limited
Eintracht's scoring.
1-0 after the first period, and were even with the
highly-favoured 'Birds 1-1 after two periods.
Victoria goalie Daryll Sparks was outstanding
stopping 39 shots. Ian Wilkie in the UBC nets
handled only 14.
Bob MacAneely, Norm Park and Buchanan
scored for the winners. Buchanan's broke a 2-2 tie.
with nine minutes left in the game.
George Walton, in the game's first 11 seconds,
and Bill Gidden in the third period replied for
Victoria.
MacAneely picked up five points in the two
games to continue leading the league in goals with
30 and points with 52.
Thunderbirds close out the regular season with
two games in Calgary against the University of
Calgary next weekend. If the 'Birds win both games
they will finish first. (If UBC and Manitoba are tied
in points, UBC would get top spot due to a better
points for and against record than Manitoba.) A
split in Calgary will give the 'Birds second place.
Aitrarowai
Ski Meet Standings—1. Ken MacKinlay,
Arts; 2. Derick Laurillad, Beta Theta Pi;
3. A. Hastings. Union College; 4. J.
Denny, St. Andrews; 5.B. Hall, Fort
Camp; 6.  B.   Shugg,  Beta Theta Pi.
Team Standings — 1. Beta Theta Pi,
191;2. Arts, 161; 3.  Union  College,  138;
4. St. Andrews, 111; 5. Fort Camp, 92;
6. Commerce, 74; 7. Delta Upsilon, 57;
8. Phi Gamma Delta. 41; 9. Engineering,
31;  10.   Science.  22.
Individual Wrestling Results — 123,
Jack Chan, Forestry; 137, George Map-
son, P.E.; 145, Dana Wallage, D.U.; 152,
Robert Robertsin, Ed; 160, Ken Anderson, Beta's; 167, Charlie Beamin, Fort
Camp; 177, Colin McLeod, P.E.; 191,
Winson Morrison, P.E.; Heavy, Joe
Laing, P.E.
Co-Recreation Volleyball — Volleyball
will be played as usual on Tuesday at
noon in War Memorial Gym. Everyone
is welcome.
LORNE ATKINSON'S
ACE CYCLE SHOP
Student Discounts
10% OFF on Accessories
5% OFF on Bicycles
(With Student Card)
3155 W. Broadway 738-9818
SbG
arsity Sports
4510 w. 10 Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
MID-TERM
SPECIAL!
SPECIAL STUDENT
RENTAL RATES
4 DAYS
SKIS — BOOTS
POLES
$]2'00
ALSO-25% OFF SKI-JACKETS - GLOVES
SKI PANTS - WARM-UP PANTS
We carry all Skiers needs
from Novice to Expert
4510 W. 10th Ave.
Just 2 Blocks
Outside The Gates
224-6414 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 16, 1971
Rent hike unites tenants against owners
Tenants from nine apartment buildings, owned or
managed by Wall and Redekop Realty Ltd., have united in
a fight against unrealistic rent increases.
Increases, effective April 1 in most of the buildings,
and affecting approximately 300 suites, range from ten to
sixteen per cent of the present rents. In several buildings,
such as the 32 suite unit at 2336 York Avenue, tenants
have been given notice of $18 per month increases. In
other buildings a blanket increase of $12 to $15 on every
suite is being imposed.
This brings rent for bachelor suites to $130 per
month, many one-bedroom suites to as high as $190 per
month.
"We feel this is particularly unjustified," said Jim
Miller, a tenant of the York building, "as just basic
services are offered.
"We have no sauna, no pool, no lobby or game room,
and must pay $7.50 a month for underground parking."
Other   tenants   are   complaining   of poor  laundry
facilites, lack of proper insulation, poor heating, lack of
hot water, and other inconveniences that make the
proposed increases entirely unwarranted.
The tenants of the buildings have met in two
well-attended meetings, and have elected representatives
from each building to represent their cause and to
organize steps to be taken.
Bruce Yorke, and other members of the Vancouver
Tenants' Council, are co-ordinating the efforts of the
group.
The tenants present at the meeting Sunday decided
that they should not be made to pay for poor managmenf
on the part of Wall and Redekop.
These increases came into being at about the same
time that Frank Ellchuk became Wall and Redekop's new
properties manager.
Tenants at the Sunday meeting quoted Ellchuk as
saying, "If you don't like the rent increases you can damn
well move out."
Other tenants tried to get in touch with him to
negotiate, but a surprising number found him "unable to
come to the phone."
The aim of the tenants is to have rent increases
changed to correspond with the cost of living index. This
year's increase is 1.6%, a big difference from the ten to
sixteen per cent demanded by Wall and Redekop.
Bruce Yorke and a group from the Vancouver
Tenants' Council are travelling to Victoria today to try to
persuade the Provincial government to make this law.
In the meantime, Wall and Redekop tenants are
attempting to meet with Wall and Redekop in a unified
struggle for fair rent adjustments.
A negotiating committee of four tenants and two
Tenants' Council workers has been chosen to meet with
Wall and Redekop.
A general meeting of all tenants involved will be held
at the Arlington Dance Hall, Sunday, February 21, to
decide on measures to be used.
Pollution protest over refinery
A demonstration to throw
some sand in the great Yankee oil
machine is set for 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Canada-U.S. border.
Richmond alderman Harold
Steves said Monday in an
interview that anti-pollution
groups throughout B.C. are urging
citizens to mass at the Blaine
border crossing to protest the
Cherry Point oil refinery just
below the border.
The massive refinery would
spread oil along the Lower
Mainland in the event of a leak or
spill. Experts believe such a leak
would be inevitable in time.
"Representatives from SPEC,
the Sierra Club, the Richmond
Anti-Pollution Association, Zero
Population Growth, the Don't
Make A Wave Committee and
other anti-pollution groups will
take part," Steves said.
He said the B.C. Federation of
Labor will also send delegates.
AMS president Tony Hodge
assured The Ubyssey Monday that
the Alma Mater Society will
charter buses to take students
down to the Peace Arch.
Charter buses and carpools are
also being organized at Simon
Fraser University and Vancouver
City College.
"I hope that the B.C. Fed will
also provide some
transportation," Steves said.
Sun columnist Bob Hunter is
the only speaker confirmed so far
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In -Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.       224-6121
In the Village
on
SAVE UP TO 50%
over   1000   New   and
Used
Standard Portable and Electric
TYPEWRITERS
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
Equipment Supermarket
Absolutely the largest selection
and lowest prices in Canada
Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
LOW HA I£S
WE DELIVER & PICK-UP
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
Open Daily inc. Saturday—9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
but several other people are being
asked.
The demonstration, which is
supposed to be peaceful, will also
feature guerilla theatre and
folksinging.
Steves said he does not expect
the location of the protest to
present special problems.
The Peace Arch was the site of
an anti-bomb demonstration 18
months ago when 6,000
Canadians turned out to protest
the detonation of a U.S. nuclear'
device on Amchitka Island in the
Aleutians.
Last spring, a symbolic
invasion of U.S. territory to
protest the invasion of Cambodia
escalated into a window-smashing
and U.S. flag destroying event in
Blaine that prompted the locals to
organize a full vigilante group.
Hodge said the main problem
for UBC will be the fact that the
demonstration is set for the
middle of mid-term break when
many students are out of town.
Grads discuss monkey tree
The grad class of '71 allocated
$20,000 to various community
services Thursday.
The Environmental Crisis
Operation received $5,000;
Speakeasy, $3,000; Get It On,
$5,000; the University Day Care
Council, $4,000; birth control
information distribution, $450;
the Mental Patients Association,
$1,000; Health Services, $200 and
the Asian studies library, $1,350.
The planting of a monkey tree
was easily the most contentious
issue at the meeting.
About 15 minutes were spent
discussing the relative merits of a
monkey tree and the original
proposal of a sequoia tree.
Eventually the monkey tree was
agreed upon.
The grad class decided not to
support the booze cruise, a grad
ball and the election of an
honorary president,
vice-president, poet, historian,
prophet, valedictorian and
will-writer.
They finally approved in
principle a motion to "support"
the graduation ceremonies.
ARTS II 71/72
On Wed. Feb. 17 at 12:30 there
will be a meeting for all students in
their First Year in the Faculty of
Arts who are interested in
participating in a new Arts 2
programme for next year. Tentative
professors include well-known poet,
Stan Persky. Come to the Blue
Room of the Arts 1 Building.
if
Last 2 Days
BOOK SALE
At least
50% off
Everything Must Go By Feb. 17th
NEW TITLES ADDED
FURTHER PRICE REDUCTIONS
FEATURES
TUESDAY-"Grab Bag"-S 1.49
—Buy Two Books at Sale Price &
get a third at % Sale Price.
WEONESDAY-Buy    a    Book   Case
Full-$9.99 per "Book Foot"
Hours-11:00-7:00 P.M.
UBC BOOKSTORE
Room 30
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION,
uec
DRAMA NIGHT
PROGRAMME:
Mandarin Song Performance,
Creative Dancing & a one-hour
(2 act) drama. Everybody welcome.
TIME:
February 20, 1971,8:00 p.m.
PLACE:
SUB Auditorium UBC
TICKET
:    $1.00 per person for the whole
show
YOUR STUDENT CARD
IS WORTH A PILE OF BREAD AT
steieo mart
613 GRANVILLE ♦ 681-1825
DISCOUNTS ON STEREO COMPONENTS TO ALL
U.B.C. STUDENTS UPON PRESENTATION OF
VALID STUDENT'S CARD.
OPEN THURSDAYS AND FRIDAYS 'TIL 9:00 P.M.
We carry everything in Stereo Sound!
Now that you're in
university what are
your plans'!
You need a plan. So
you know where you're
going. Financially. And
academically.
We have a good career
plan. It's called the
Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP).
ROTP pays your tuition
and most other expenses
while you earn a degree
in Engineering. Sciences.
Or Arts.
Under our plan you
continue your studies
right where you are.
You'll have no summer
employment problems
as ROTP pays you while
you train to be an officer.
And you'll get 30 days
paid vacation each year.
For more information
on our plan, contact your
local Canadian Forces
Recruiting and Selection
Unit at:
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St.
Vancouver
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127149/manifest

Comment

Related Items