UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1981

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127144.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127144.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127144-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127144-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127144-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127144-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127144-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127144-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127144-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127144.ris

Full Text

 Committee quits en masse
All five members of the student
accessibility committee resigned in
protest of continual student council
interference at Wednesday night's
council meeting.
Committee members charged
that council is unconcerned with
issues such as tuition increases, funding cutbacks and financial accessibility to post secondary education. They said council has totally
restricted the committee's ability to
take action on any of these issues.
"Council can go and find itself
McKINLEY AND GODDARD . . . members resign
'Differential
fees possible'
another bunch of puppets," arts
representative Peter Goddard, a
former committee member, said
angrily after the meeting.
The committee members were
particularity angry with a motion
council passed at its last meeting
which stated all committee activities
must first be approved by council.
Committee chair Maureen Boyd
said the motion effectively ended
the committee's usefulness.
James Hollis, Alma Mater Society external affairs officer, criticized
the committee's attitude toward
council.
"It seems they were not willing to
work through council, but rather
preferred to express their own personal views rather than those
achieved by council concensus,"
said Hollis.
Commerce representative
Frances Carey said the committee
should be re-formed, but with "different people."
"I have not been impressed so far
with their attitude towards council.
They seem not to be working with
council," he added.
There has not been a single executive council member on the committee since its inception. Until the
committee is re-formed, there will
be no official student organization
designed to pursue the issues of tuition fees and funding cutbacks.
But Goddard said committee
members are still willing to work
with council if given the mandate to
take action.
Goddard added: "Rituals and
words are fine. But only action will
get some justice for students in this
province."
Outgoing AMS vice president
Peter Mitchell received compliments for a job well done during
his partial term of office.
"Council should appreciate the
job Peter's done. He has done a
fantastic job reorganizing the vice
president's office after last year's
mayhem," said student board
representative Anthony Dickinson.
Mitchell resigned effective Oct. 1
after he was refused readmission to
UBC   this   year   for   academic
reasons.
« * »
The student leadership conference committee came under attack  for  refusing to tell  council
what was discussed during a two
hour in camera meeting Sept. 10.
Committee member Frances
Carey told council: "It would
taken three or four pages to print
what we did, we didn't think you
wanted to see it."
Arts representative Peter Goddard challenged the minutes, saying
a one page summary would have
been sufficient.
Despite persistent questioning,
Carey said it was not appropriate
for council to know what happened
at the meeting.
* * •
Council questioned the minutes
of a student administrative commission meeting which showed that
SAC designated a booth for a non
student organization affiliated with
the Communist party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist).
A booth promoting the committee against racist and fascist
violence will be staffed by students,
SAC chair Bill Maslechko said.
"Their use is in the spirit of clubs
day," he said. The group will be
recruiting new members during the
two day event.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 5
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, September24,1961
By HEESOK CHANG
It is probable that the B.C. Social
Credit government will introduce
differential fee payments for
foreign students next year, Philip
Resnick, a UBC poli\<cal science
professor said Wednesday.
At their annual convention, the
B.C. Socred Party will debate a
resolution which reads; "Be it
resolved that the Minister of Education and the Minister of Universities, Science and Communications
be requested to look into a two-tier
system of fee payment for all
universities, colleges and other institutes of higher training and
education, to be classed as: 1.
Canadian (including landed immigrants) and 2. Foreign."
According to Resnick the chances
of this resolution passing not only
on the convention floor, but also in
legislation, are better than 50 per
cent.
"There are more political reasons
for the Socreds to legislate differential fees now than ever before.
Given the fact there are three provinces (Alberta, Ontario, and
Quebec) which already have differential fees for foreign students;
given that there is a certain red neck
element in the Socred caucus who
feel that B.C. non-residents are ripping off resident taxpayers; and
given that universities are facing a
fiscal crisis, I wouldn't be surprised
to see a differential fee policy passed and introduced next year," said
Resnick.
The differential fee policy would
act as deterrent for low income and
particularly third world students
who might want to study in B.C. He
added. "The kind of foreign
students we'd be getting here, aside
from a few scholarship students,
would be almost exclusively from
independently wealthy, upper class
backgrounds. This is a certain consequence."
Resnick noted that the policy of
differential fees for foreign students
is not only a trend in Canada, but
all over the world. He cited Great
Britain — which this year tripled its
fees for foreign students as an example.
Other resolutions to be debated
at the convention,  which will be
See page 3: SOCRED
CLOSE CALL for cyclist. Nasty fire truck launched all out rampage
against innocent cyclists this week, opening and closing its doors menac-
—arnold hodstrom photo
ingly before sneaking up behind them to bump them off. Actually UBC's
finest fire fighters were just preparing for a flight over Point Grey.
Fewer gears get more government money
While most of the university is
suffering the effects of severe funding cutbacks, the faculty of applied science is anticipating a $1
million grant from the provincial
government and reduced class sizes.
Engineering dean Martin
Wedepohl said Wednesday he is optimistic the grant will be awarded
before the close of the current fiscal
year.
"The government wants us to expand to 2,500 students but we need
the resources," Wedepohl said.
"The present number of students is
bringing the faculty to its knees."
Despite the promised government
funding, enrolment of first and second year science students will be
limited to 450 and 460 respectively.
Currently there are approximately
470 first year students and 520 second year.
The  engineering   undergraduate
society officially opposes limited
enrolment, but engineering
students have complaints about the
size of classes.
Jeff Stasiuk, applied sciences 2,
said Wednesday, "In some labs
there are more than 100 students
and the ones at the back of the
room can't even see the labs performed. The standards of engineering are deteriorating."
The senate enrolment committee
informed senate of the limited
enrolment last week. The limits
were originally proposed by the applied science faculty.
Wedepohl said the provincial
government is encouraging B.C.
engineering programs because there
is a tremendous demand for
engineers which is not being met.
He said it is difficult to recruit
engineers   outside  the  province.
Engineering students who are not
admitted to UBC will be urged to
take science courses at Simon
Fraser University, Wedepohl said.
Meanwhile, plans are proceeding
to reduce the engineering program
to    four   years   from    five   by
September, 1983. Wedepohl said
the shorter program would mean
the omission of first year science,
and students admitted into the
faculty will need a high academic
standing in grade 12 science.
'Let them eat skippy'
(ZNS/CUP) — Nutrition and farm groups have launched a counterattack against Reagan administration plans to cut the size of school lunches.
The agriculture department wants to save money by substituting peanut
butter and nuts for meat and classifying ketchup and pickle relish as "vegetables."
The Food Research and Action Center says in poor neighborhoods,
school lunches are a student's most important meal of the day, and new
menus will provide only a fraction of their minimum nutritional requirements.
If the plan is approved, the centre says, a high school student's lunch
would consist of the equivalent of one-fourth the meat in a McDonald's
quarter-pounder, along with six French fries, nine grapes, and part of a
glass of milk. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24, 1961
Knock off a whole semester's reading
in one-third the time
with better comprehension.
We'll show you how...free.
Would you like to:
□ Raise your grade average without long hours
over texts.
□ End all-night cramming sessions.
D Breeze through all your studying in as little as
1/3 the time.
□ Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
□ Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding, and recall.
Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people,
including students, executives, senators, and even
presidents have proven it. A free 1 hour demonstration will show you how to save hundreds of
hours of drudgery this year (as well as how to
increase your speed immediately with some simple
new reading techniques).
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING -LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
up to 100% on the spot!
□
LAST DAY
5:30 p.m. or 8:p.m.
U.B.C. Holiday Inn
Student Union Bldg. 711 West Broadway
Room 205 Vancouver
8:00 p.m. ONLY
THE BAYSHORE, 700 West Georgia, Vancouver
 EVEIYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS	
©1978 EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS A URS COMPANY Thursday,. September 24,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Selkirk faculty face merger
UNRUFFLED MED STUDENT casually ignores arm lying beside her, left
by student who promised both arm and leg for basement suite on Fourth
—eric •gfiertson photo
Avenue without running water. Friend to left turned green when he saw
arm but could understand desperate housing.
Endless prison sentences 'unjust'
Giving indeterminate sentences to
habitual criminals is an archaic procedure in Canadian courts, lawyer
Richard Brail told a group in Law
157 Wednesday.
Brail said this form of punishment, made on the basis of an offender's past criminal record and
psychiatric opinions, is like "crystal
ball gazing" by the courts.
"People are being sent to prison
without ever knowing when they
will be getting out. It is not the sort
of thing we should be dealing with
in this day and age," said Brail.
Students check investments
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
McGill university board of governors is keeping silent and angering
McGiU's South Africa committee
after an extensive investigation of
their corporate holdings.
The SAC has been pushing for
divestment from such companies investing in South Africa.
Preliminary letters were sent to
the companies that McGill invests
in asking them to disclose their
holdings.
"The replies have to remain con-
Reform then revolt
The 1956 Hungarian revolution
was really the first war between two
socialist states according to a New
York professor.
Socred dreams
From page 1
held on Nov. 19, 20, 21 at the Hyatt
Regency, will focus on issues of
labor, housing and party organization.
One of the seven labour resolutions read: "Be it resolved that all
essential services including ferries,
police, firemen, hospital
employees, ambulance attendants
and those in water, electricity, B.C.
Railway and/or oil and gas services,
be covered by Legislation outlawing
these persons against striking."
Under the agenda heading of
"Party Organization," a resolution
calls for the provincial party to "investigate the possibility of a paid
weekly or monthly television program featuring the Premier speaking out so as to provide accurate
reporting of what our Premier
says."
The revolution was originally a
reform movement, Bela Kiraly,
New York University study of
society in change program director
told about 60 people in Buch. 100
Tuesday.
The Hungarians tried peacefully
"to give a human face to communism" by ousting a totalitarian
government, said Kiraly. The
reforms failed he said, because of
local Stalinist opposition and
Moscow's intolerance.
In October 1956 Hungarian
university students enacted a "sixteen point program" which became
the doctrine for successful revolution.
According to Kiraly, by
October's end a new government
and new institutions were installed.
"Nobody, nothing, could have
overthrown these, and none tried,"
he said. He added that the revolution was countered by the Soviets,
not by Hungarians.
Kiraly said it is a widespread
myth that Hungary's demand for
neutrality resulted in war. "The
declaration of neutrality was an effect rather than a cause of the
war."
fidential, because if we made them
public, other companies would
think twice about giving us information," claimed Liz Norm student
society president and committee
member.
Richard Flint, student council
vice president and SAC member
said: "the policy of confidentiality
in this case was reprehensible."
He added that there is danger of
the board overlooking the issue if
student awareness of the issue is
lost.
"If student pressure does not remain, the board of governors could
shovel the South Africa issue back
under the carpet. The reason why
this policy and the committee were
formed was because the average
student was writing letters and
demonstrating."
The board did not invite the
McGill SAC's participation causing
some members to doubt the validity
of the investigation.
He said persons serving indeterminate sentences are confined for
an average of 12 years, longer than
any other class of criminal except
murderers.
Brail described a case involving a
40-year-old homosexual, who was
convicted of gross indecency for
sexual acts involving five boys in
their early teens.
Because of three previous sexual
assault charges, the man was judged
likely to repeat his offence and was
given an indeterminate sentence,
Brail said.
He called that judgment unjust
and unproductive.
''The courts are designating these
people ill and are denying them the
possibility of being cured," Brail
said.
"Maximum security prisons have
practically no programs to rehabilitate sex offenders. They (sex offenders) are considered by other inmates to be outcasts in the prison
society and are often subjected to
verbal and physical abuse."
The courts also come down
stronger on homosexual offenders,
Brail claimed.
"Because these youngsters were
boys, the offence was considered
more serious than if they had been
girls."
Clarke seta in West
In a move that surprised no one, save those who expect the sun to
rise in the west tomorrow, UBC's man in Parliament, Vancouver
Quadra MP Bill Clarke, was renominated Monday night to once
again carry the Tory standard.
Clarke's main claim to fame is that he, along with five other MPs,
uttered not a single word in Parliament during the ill-fated Progressive Conservative government of 1979-80.
Besides remaining seated in the House of Commons, Clarke is
noted for advocating a system of staggered cross-country voting that
would see B.C. voters voting at the same time as Newfoundlanders.
Clarke says this would improve the present situation whereby
eastern voters can decide an election before polling is over out west.
So far Clarke's campaign has not met with an overwhelming
public response. He has been an MP since 1972.
CASTLEGAR (CUP) — The
Selkirk College administration is
asking the B.C. labor relations
board to merge two bargaining
units that stood on opposing sides
of picket lines earlier this month.
The Selkirk College faculty
association voted at Selkirk campuses in Castlegar and at David
Thompson University Centre in
Nelson to cross picket lines
established by vocational instructors, members of the B.C. Government Employees Union. Campuses
in nearby Rosemount and Trail
were closed until Sept. 14 after the
16 day strike.
Instructors' negotiator Al Walker
said the union was "extremely
disappointed" by the faculty's actions.
Al Lowndes, BCGEU staff
representative, added: "We were
pretty disgusted with the way they
fooled around." Faculty association president Gerry Ehman said he
favored establishing one bargaining
unit for both group's. But he realized the faculty was "pulling the
ground" from under the strikers.'
"It is impossible for us to be
neutral," Ehman said. "If we continue to teach we are obviously supporting the administration. Not going to work supports our fellow
workers and the students are
caught."
If the faculty association supported the strike about 30 per cent
of faculty members would have
respected the pickets, he added.
Educators' Association would not
get involved.
Tom Wayman, David Thompson
University Centre writing instructor, condemned the faculty decision.
"When the faculty crosses (the
picket lines), it teaches the students
it's okay to cross picket lines,"
Wayman said.
"They also teach the public at
large that though the faculty
association wants to use the collective bargaining process, they will
not support anybody else using the
collective bargaining process."
The union ratified a contract with
the administration Sept. 13, including a complicated formula for
student contact hours, a major
stumbling block to a settlement.
Instructors' wages will increase
12.5 per cent in the first year of the
two year contract, and 13 per cent
in the second.
Hardest hit by the strike were
students on Rosemount and Trail
campuses where students' work
training programs were cut off with
one day's notice.
Hiring cuts
hurt TAU
While negotiations continue between UBC administration and the
Teaching Assistants Union, the major issue of wages has not been
discussed yet, TAU recording
secretary Malcolm Kennard said
Wednesday.
He said the union is pushing for
wage increases, adding members are
concerned about Vancouver's high
cost of living.
Other issues in negotiations are
the quality and method of education, the number of assured TA
positions and the problem of sexual
harassment, said Kennard.
Cutbacks in TA hiring are not as
serious as was feared, he said, but
he added the administration does
not want to include a specific
number of TAs in the contract.
The TAU wants more input into
the way courses are taught, said
Kennard, citing class sizes as one of
their concerns. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24,1981
No help
Last night the Alma Mater Society lost its hardest
workers. The mass resignation of the student accessibility committee is a rebuke to the student council and
AMS executive for failing utterly to support students
in their fight for a fairer shake.
In March, against all odds, the committee mobilized
more than 1,500 students for a rally that carried our
concerns to the university administration. The students gave administration president Doug Kenny more
than enough ammunition to take to the provincial
government as proof that their policies were unpopular among students and probably damaging to
the university.
The AMS threw in its 'support.' Current AMS president Marlea Haugen spoke disparagingly of the rally
and called for us to trust only the AMS executive to
deal with accessibility problems. Our non-leaders then
proceeded to do absolutely nothing.
The accessibility committee was never able to follow
up on its first partial success as the AMS tried'to let it
die through careful negligence. When this year began
and the committee found itself all but ignored entirely,
it had no choice but to make its one last dramatic
statement by resigning, hoping it could get the attention the AMS has inexplicably denied it.
The lesson is clear for all of us. We can expect no
more help from the AMS in the fight for assured accessibility than we can from the administration or the
provincial ministry for universities.
Set it at 1,7.2 Hx^uoti QvKsitAox&Jb!
V
Letters
'Committee can't do effective job'
Effective Sept. 23, the active
members of the student accessibility
committee have resigned en masse
from this committee.
At a time when the university
faces serious financial difficulties,
when tuition is rising regardless of
students' ability to pay, when student aid remains inadequate, when
there are cutbacks eroding the
quality of education, one wonders
why the committee undertakes such
a move. After all, students are paying more and getting less. Does the
committee think that these are not
serious issues, or that in fact there is
no need for a committee?
No the committee feels these are
vital issues facing UBC students.
The committee has resigned because
it feels that it cannot do the job in
an effective and worthwhile manner
due to student council policy and
intervention.
On Sept. 3 council passed a motion which essentially rendered the
committee a useless piece of
bureaucratic baggage. Rather than
being given a functional framework
within which to work with council
on these problems, the committee
was given a mandate to "investigate, inform students through
council and recommend action to
council with respect to this problem."
So what's wrong with this? After
all, it is technically the framework
within which all AMS committees
work, and futhermore it is the constitutionally correct framework.
Firstly, other committees do not
really work this way with council.
The regular process is for council to
pass a committee's minutes —
essentially a rubber stamp procedure — and these minutes are
often   passed   retroactively.   The
mandate passed by council implies
that the student accessibility committee is not allowed to inform
students or take any action without
first getting a motion put through
council as opposed to the standard
procedure of the committee passing
a morion in its own meeting; in
other words, all committee business
must be discussed in council.
Secondly, council does not wish
to have anything to do with such
hot issues. Its concern lies almost
wholely with such problems as
"What should be put into vending
machines?' to "increase awareness
of non-alcoholic beverages in the
Pit?' "create a major lounge,"
"replace space lost for tennis and
dances due to Armories
demolition," and put in "jogging
paths in UEL," to list a few.
Granted, council does do some
good work, but it has trouble getting its priorities straight. Student
accessibility, student aid, tuition,
and government funding are not big
priorities (even though you may
hear much rhetoric about it from
council executives).
Thirdly, the committee is not
allowed any autonomy or
"power." Traditionally, committees are formed to deal with matters
that are too large and time-
consuming for council to handle.
Committees replace council for a
simple reason: they get people who
wish to deal with a specific problem
and then these people are able to
devote necessary time to solve that
problem.
Under the present framework,
the Committee cannot continue to
act effectively. They are essentially
limited to a research group which
'Childbearing is a female Js responsibility*
Re: letters in Sept. 22 issue of
Ubyssey regarding abortion.
I find it most confusing that Stephen Parker and Brian Farkes feel
their opinions on abortion are
valid. In fact I'd like all gents at
UBC to think back to the first (or
last) time they made love to a female.
Before that delightful moment,
was the woman asked if she was on
a birth control program? Did he in
anticipation, think to bring any?
Most women I've talked to have
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
If your letter is not published
right away, it may be because it
wasn't typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
space line. Typewriters are available
in The Ubyssey office for this purpose.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included in
the letter for our information only,
and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality and taste.
Neatness counts.
never been asked before the act.
The subject is usually brought up
sometime, but not at the necessary
time.
Since childbearing and child rearing is still the female's responsibility, why do men figure they have a
right to say what is to happen in
abortion cases? From the moment
of conception, if the man is willing
to assume half the responsibility for
that baby, only then does he have
any say in what to do about the situation.
I am a 26-year-old female who
had an abortion last year. I fully realized the state of the fetus when it
died. Life involves a lot of painful
decisions at times. I would have carried the child to term and gladly
given it up to an infertile couple if
certain things were different: if )'
would have been able to continue at
my weekend job (my boss wouldn't
allow a pregnant bartender), if I
would have been able to continue
my studies (not enough money, also
you sleep and eat more), if I could
have been asked out on the same
amount of dates and felt as desirable as in my non-pregnant state
(have any of you two men ever asked out a single pregnant female, or
do you automatically assume she's
taken?), and if I could have gone*
home to my parents at Christmas
and had a normal holiday (can any
female say there wouldn't be tears,
threats and hassles?).
If pro-lifers are only interested in
life, then they should devote their
efforts to making things easier for
pregnant females, socially and financially.
Current advertising stiil puts all
the onus on the female. How about
ads saying "What would you do if
your 14-year-old son impregnated a
13-year-old girl?" instead of the existing one that says "What would
you do if your 14-year-old daughter
came home pregnant?"
I could understand pro-lifers if
they advocated readily available
birth control for all ages, but the
majority of them don't. They seem
to be anti-intercourse.
So what happened to me? I've
been on birth control for 10 years.
Women are not supposed to be on
the pill for that long a stretch. It
was during a recommended time-
off period that the pregnancy occurred, diaphragm and condom
proving to be ineffective. Smokers
and people with a family history of
circulatory problems should not
take the pill.
Parker and Farkes, if one of your
summer flings phoned you and said
she was pregnant, would you be
willing to be responsible for that
baby 12 hours a day, regardless of
your feelings for that women? Or
would you be willing to help pay for
the expenses she will incur during
her pregnancy and take the child
yourself, even if that meant quitting
school tomorrow? Or would you
whine "There's no way you can
prove it's mine." Even if you
weren't sure it was, how willing
would you be to take on that responsibility?
I rest my case.
Name withheld
arts 4
collects data, gives it to council, and
then council decides what is to be
done. But we ask you, who is better
able to do the job? The council who
spends much of its time doing other
things, and furthermore doesn't
wish to deal with these issues, or the
students who are particularly interested and knowledgable in the
matter?
Why doesn't the present student
council want anything to do with
this matter?
The answer should be rather obvious. Council members at large,
and in particular the executive
members, are interested in getting
names for themselves. Council positions, board representatives, and
council executives are all good
resume items. If, however, the committee takes somewhat of a "progressive" attitude towards getting the job done, it causes trouble
with the government. And if this
happens, then being a member of
student council is no longer a good
resume item, but rather a bad one.
In conclusion, all that needs to be
said is that the committee can no
longer work with council and in its
opinion, council does more to
create a weak student body that
cannot stand up for its interests
than a strong one.
Maureen Boyd (chair)
Trish Boyd
William Clark
Peter Goddard
Mike McKinley
Charles Menzies
THE UBYSSEY
September 24, 1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
You think all these media-minded intellectuals who hang around The Ubvssey office really
have a lot to contribute? Well, I was there for three hours just to see what it was all about,
gained nothing except the names of a few of them ... let me embarrass them by revealing
their identities. The first person I met was Mina Wong who suffered from chronic headaches.
Verne McDonald was staring blankly and when I asked Verne what you staring at?' he said
the paper needed his imagination more than anything else. Heesok Chang and Eric Eggertson
argued over beer costs while Julie Wheelwright and Nancy Campbell planned a weekday trip
to P.E.I. Kathy Collins and Craig Yuill went to get an eggburger when Mike McLoughlin said
the beer was sour. Glen Sanford gave Steve McClure a crewcut and Chris Wong fainted.
Glen Schaefer offered grass to Muriel Draaisma, who screamed. Pat Burdett sang 'Sweet
Hour of Prayer' with Kevin McGee while David Marwood and Mike Bocking dozed off. Brian
Jones broke down right then. Thursday, September 24, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
AMERICAN
ATROC/TfeS
rCOtLECT
E WHOLC
rstTT, KIPS!
TORTURE, INC.
USA
DAN MITRIONI.A U.S.
ADVISOR TO THE URUGUAYAN POLICE,
FOUND THAT THE
POLICE WERE USING
08SELETE  ELECTRIC
NEEDLES TO TORTURE
PRISONERS. HE ORDERED SOME NEW, MODERN NEEDLES.
ELECTRIC NEEDL
ARE INSERTED i)NOER
THE SHIN AND A POWERFUL ELECTRIC CURRENT
MSSED THROUGH IT. THEY
LEAVE ONLY A SMALL
HOLE IN THE SKIN. THE
NEW mDLES EVENTUALLY ARRIVED VIA
US. DIPLOMATIC POUCH.
AN ISOLATED INCIDENT ? UH-UH.
THE UNITED STATES HAS BEEN
KNOWN TO SUPPIY TORTURE TEDf-
WLOGV$ INSTRUMENTS TO
-CLIENT STATFS'MlLITARy f POLICE 'FORCES THERE'S ALSO CON-
SttRABLE EVIDENCE THAT THE
US. SETSUP 'im&OGAMN
SCHOOL? AND DEMONSTRATES
METHODS, USIN6 POLITICAL PRISONERS AS 6WNE4 PIGS.
A GOOD EXAMPLE IS THAT
OF SMK% THE IRANIAN
SECRET POLICE. SAIM
WAS PROBABLY THE MOST
VIOOUS AND SADISTIC
POLICE FORCE IN THE
WORLD? SAWK AGENTS
HAD BEEN  KNOWN TO
AMPUTATE THE LIMBS
OF CHILDREN IN ORDER
TO GAIN INFORMATION
FROM  RELATIVES.
THE CIA SET UP
SAVAK IN N5?.
ITS ASENTWERE
TRAINED BY THE
US. "AGENCY FOR
INTERNATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT"
WHO SPENT OVER
$ 2 MILLION ON
THE PROGRAM.
THE ONLY THW6 WORSE THAN THE US. TRAINING TORTURERS (IF AWTHING COULD BE
WORSE) IS THE USA'S CONTINUAL SUPPORT
(FINANCIAL ? MORAL) OF TORTURE IN CLIENT
STATES. OF THE 35 COUNTRIES IN THE
WORLD THAT USE TORTURE* ON AN ADMINISTRATIVE BASIS.26 0FTHEM ARE U.S.
CLIENT STATES RECIEVING US. MILITARY
AJD,MiLITARy PERSONNEL, AND IN MOST CASES
US TRAINING FOR THIER POLICE FORCES.
'COUNTRIES USING TORTURE FROM  tf70-W7<?.
EISatv-Kfor
no figures available
VarwziMla
5.341
$142.2
Shaded—use torture
First figure—Number of
U.S. military personnel,
1950-1975
Second figure—Total U.S.
military aid in millions,
1946-1975
WICNEVER   A  CLIENT STATE SEEMS
TO REFORM   ITSELF ^EG-CHILE IN
N7Q),THE US TAKES STEPS TO KEEP
THE COUNTRY IN UNE - USUALLY BY
MANIPULATING THE   MILITARY (E&-
CHILE IN W3). TORTURE IS USED
TO PERPETUATE TrC SYSTEM.
TORTURE RAN&ES FROM SAVAGE BEATING,
TO SENSORY DEPRIVATION; FROM HITTING
A VICTIM WITH A TWO-BY-FOUR,TO UTILI7ING
SOPHISTICATED TECHNOLOGY   DESIGNED TO
CAUSE EXTREME PAIN IN A HUMAN BaNG.
ALL METHODS AK DESIGNED TO HUMILIATE
AND MAIM, PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY.
THE WORLDS CHIEF EXPORTER OF TORTURE
IS THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
6
©      MAOS IN U.S.A,
jy^+r
FOR MORE INFORMATION
ON THIS DISGUSTING
TOP\C, READ "THE WASHINGTON CONNECTION AND
THIRD WORLD FASCISM'By
NOAM CHOMSKY \
EDWARD' HERMAN. ALSO
'HIDDEN TERROCS" BY
A. J. LANGGUTH (ABOUT
THE OVERTHROW OF TH£v
BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT).
AND, OF COURSE, AMNESTY
INTERNATIONALS'REPORT
ON TORTURE.
SOUNDS GRIM?
WELL.DONT
WORRY, KIDS. WE
ONLY DO IT FOR
FREEDOM AND
DEMOCRACY.
"0
>•  iFW.-TU.tetT MB* Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24,1981
'System not too viable
Brief to the Special Committee
on
THE FEDERAL PROVINCIAL
FISCAL ARRANGEMENTS
concerning
ESTABLISHED PROGRAMS
FINANCING
By JAMES HOLLIS
The Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia is
the student representative government. Students are elected to sit on
Students' Council by their respective faculty constituencies, or
campus-wide vote. The views of the
Alma Mater Society reflect those of
the 25,000 students it represents.
perspectives
The question of the continuance
of Established Programs Financing
in some form is of paramount concern to the students of the University of British Columbia.
We have been fortunate that for
the largest part of this century the
University of British Columbia has
been able to provide students with
first class instructors and programs
which have both enabled graduates
to be welcomed in any of the
world's finest post-graduate institutions and produced men and
women whose minds and acquired
skills have contributed so much to
the culture and well-being of Canadian life. Any fiscal restraint which
would compromise the quality of
the system would spell disaster at a
time when Canada is hard pressed
to maintain technological advancement status quo with the world
community.
The financing ot this and other
post-secondary educational institutions in Canada has relied almost
entirely on funds from federal and
provincial coffers. If the Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada 1979/80 figures of S2.775
billion and $3.15 billion (for federal
contribution through tax point and
cash transfers and total operating
income respectively) are accurate,
the federal government is funding
universities by just under 90 per
cent.
Therein is what is perceived to be
the focal point ef federal misgivings. The stone-etched statutes of
the British North America Act
assigns the responsibility of education to the provinces, albeit the
financial responsibility has de facto
been largely borne by the federal
government.
The key to this anomaly is some
form of shared responsibility. The
word "functional" must be stressed
for until the Honorable Prime
Minister returns from Westminster,
scrolls in hand, a major constitutional reform which could reassign
educational responsibility is not
likely.
The shared responsibility could
manifest itself initally as increased
visibility for the federal government. Increased visibility can be
achieved in three ways: Direct
grants/transfers to students; Direct
grants/transfers to institutions;
Conditional grants/transfers to the
provincial governments.
There is a general consensus that
unconditional grants, such as now
witnessed,  are  simply  not  viable.
Provincial administrations are
shirking fiscal responsibility
themselves while Ottawa money arrives in effectively unmarked sacks.
Conditional grants must be earmarked and acknowledged as funds
for post-secondary education.
Grants of this nature must never
return to the stipulations pre 1977,
pre EPF, which would have provincial governments rampaging with
less than hundred cent dollars. Conditional grants as well as direct
grants to institutions and/or
students must be based on enrolment and operating cost considerations, with annual increases tied to
See page 10: DON'T"
STUDENTS
HELPING STUDENTS
SPEAKEASY is looking for volunteers
for the 1981-82 year. If you are interested
in working with us, or want further information about what we do, drop by our
desk in SUB and pick up an application
form.
Training starts
Sept. 25th
Campus Wide
Veeturing
Manfred Bahn
und zee
Edelweiss Echo
COMPLIMENTARY BEERSTEIN
AND VIRST BEER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3rd.
ARMORIES
TICKETS AVAILABLE ASAP FROM
AMS BOX OFFICE
& OTHER ILLICIT SOURCES
Succeed
in business.
'It's a lot easier with a Texas Instruments calculator
designed to solve business problems."
Touch a few special keys on these Texa-
Instruments calculators, the Tl Business
Analyst-irand The MBA? and lengthy
time-value-of-money problems suddenly
aren't lengthy anymore.You can automatically calculate profit
margins, forecast
sales and earnings and perform statistics.
And problems with repetitive calculations
are a piece of cake for the MBA, becau>e it's
programmable.
These calculators mean business, and what
they give you is time-time to grasp underlying
business concepts, while they handle the num ■
her crunching. To make it even easier, each
calculator comes with a book wriiten especially
for it, which shows you how to make use of the
calculator's full potential.
The Business Analyst-II and MBA business
calculators from Texas Instruments.Tw< >
ways to run a successful business ma- ^J C -
joi-, without running yourself ragged.       \^-
Texas Instruments
NCOR PORA I ED
Now available at:
ubc bookstore
2009 Main Mall, University Campus
228-4741 Thursday, September 24,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
McGill gets bad bucks
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill
International, an association which
acts as a liaison between the university and third world countries, is being criticized for getting $300,000
from the Royal Bank of Canada to
set up a research program in the
Caribbean.
The purpose of the three year
program is to improve agricultural
operations in the Caribbean
through a series of small scale projects. McGill anthropology professor Peter Gutkind, an outspoken
critic of McGill International, said
he is less than happy about the involvement of the Royal Bank in the
project.
"I'm not enthusiastic about the
whole idea. It's not suprising they
(McGill International) got the funding from the Royal Bank when one
considers its stranglehold on the
West Indies," said Gutkind.
Although McGill International
has been criticized in the past for its
use of corporate money, McGill International director Gerald Farnell
denied suggestions that the group is
being used by multinationals to
establish links with the Third
World.
"I don't see McGill International
introducing links for multinationals, although 1 can see them being interested in McGiU's resources
in the Caribbean," said Farnell.
The Royal Bank has assets of
close to $4.8 billion in the Caribbean, making it the second largest
bank in the area after Barclay's of
England.
Economics professor Kari Levitt,
a member of McGill International's
Caribbean Advisory Group, said
McGiU's Caribbean project is relatively small.
McGili International has also
been accused of neglecting 78 Kenyan exchange students brought to
the university by the group.
McGill students' society vice
president Keith Hennessy says the
plight of the Kenyans was brought
to his attention two days after their
arrival when an employee of McGill
International told him they were
"lost and lonely," and asked if
Hennessy could help.
Hennessy said he asked the
organization to assist in orienting
the foreign students to their new environment, but was told "it's
beyond our mandate."
The Kenyans are instructors
enrolled in the faculties of Education and Agriculture, hoping to increase their teaching skills. The Kenyan government is sponsoring
them.
"I think McGill International is
avoiding responsibility for these
people," said student society president Liz Norman.
Norman said she was concerned
that the students would suffer from
culture shock without adequate
orientation. She claims McGill International informed her they help
as*. 5
visiting professors get settled, but
leave students to other campus
groups.
According to Judy Stymest,
director of McGill Student Aid,
about 50 of the students were
housed in residences while the rest
were living in the downtown YMCA, or had apartments.
"We gave them all the help we
could," said Stymest. "The faculty
of education gave them a special
orientation, and they will have
another later.
"McGill International clearly
bowed out after setting up a
meeting to plan the adaptation process," she added. "They let us
know last spring about this, but
they are on the organizationai level!'
&''''"V"i'».
eri'_ uggertsun photo
IT'S A BOY shouts gleeful father as he grabs newly born child wrapped in
latter day swaddling clothes from newfangled baby machine recently discovered in men's changing room at Aquatic Centre. Man told photog that
he would keep machine a secret for fear the craze would catch on and admin would up the price of a swim at the centre.
Grab a club and swing into UBC
Karate, punk rock, feminist issues, it's all yours
at Clubs Day in SUB main foyer and upstairs
AIESEC;
Amateur Radio;
AquaSoc;
Bahai;
Ballet;
Bridge;
Cavaliers;
V
□ Campus Crusade For Christ;
D Campus Prolife;
D Caribbean Students;
O Charismatic Christians;
D Chess;
D Chinese Christian
Fellowship;
D Chinese Students;
Q Chinese Vanity Club;
D Christian Science Club;
D Collegiate Adventists;
D Computer Science;
D Dance;
D Debating;
D English Students Publication;
D Environmental Interest;
D Fencing;
D FilmSoc;
D Armadillos;
D Gay People of UBC;
D Health Sciences;
D Interfraternity Council;
D Intervarsity Christians;
□ Windsurfing;
D Japan Club;
D WUSC;
□ Karate;
D Toastmasters;
D Kendo Club;
□ Ctee Against R&F;
D La Club Francaise;
□ CAUSE;
D MusicSoc;
D Curling;
D My Jong Kung Fu;
D Hispanic Cultural Club;
D Navigators;
D Wado-Ryu Karate;
D Newman Catholic Club;
D Tae Kwon Doe;
□ PhotoSoc;
□ Wing Kung Fu;
□ Pottery;
D Japan Karate;
D Predental;
D Womens Athletics;
□ Premed;
D Intramurals;
D Psychology Students;
D Ubyssey;
D Rockers Coop;
□ CITR;
D Sailing Club;
D Maranatha Christians;
D Science Fiction;
D Baptist Students;
D Shito-Ryu Karats;
D Progressive Conservatives;
□ Ski Club;
□ NDP;
D Skydiving;
□ PIRG;
□ Social Credit;
D Womens Committee;
D Sports Car Club;
D Senate Caucus;
D Student Christian Movement;
D UBC Pipe Band;
D SC for Exceptional Children;
D Science Psychology;
n Student Liberals;
□ Frosh Club;
□ T-Bird Crew;
D Orienteering Club;
D Trotskyist League;
D Judo Club;
D Varsity Outdoor Club;
□ Astronomy Club;
D Wargamers;
D Lutheran Students;
D Waterpolo;
D Returning Mature Students
(BET-ACQUAINTED DINNER
of the
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
GUEST: BERNICE GERARD, M.A.
OPEN-LINER & PASTOR
Thurs, Oct. 1, 6:00 p.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre
RSVP - 325-8291
325-1905
SHOTOKAN KARATE
(UBC Karate Club)
Senior Instructor: Don Gee
3rd Degree Black Belt
Practices at Thunderbird Winter Sports Complex
Tues. & Thuirs. 7:00-9:00 p.m. Gym "E"
Sunday 10:30-12:30 a.m. Gym "A"
New Members We/come Starting Now
Look for us on Clubs Day
INTERESTED IN
CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1982 graduates/
for Vancouver and a!l other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resume to the Canada  Employment Centre onl
Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by Oc-i
tober 5, 1981.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be con-'
tacted on or about October 12th regarding campus interviews which will take place during the weeks of October 19 and 26th. Additional information is available at!
the U.B.C. Canada Employment Centre and the Ac
counting Club.
Tbuche Boss &Co.
Chartered Accountants
Make the most of your degree. Chartered Accountancy
can be the stepping stone to the career you really want for
yourself.
The teams of professionals at Touche Ross & Company
provide an ever broadening range of services to business and
industry. In order to effectively counsel our clients on their
current and future needs, it is increasingly important to
understand the changes in accounting, economic, finance
and marketing environments. To achieve this, we are looking
for skills and academic disciplines from a range of selected
areas.
We are established leaders in the areas of public accounting, taxation, business valuations and, through our associate
firm of Touche Ross and Partners, in providing a variety of
management consulting services. To continue growing we
need more people with new ideas and the determination to
make them grow into reality.
To achieve this, our professional support programs, in
tandem with ongoing "hands - on" experience will help
transform what you have learned into applied skills. These
skills will open doors for you leading to a career in which you
can expect the challenges, the respect and the rewards that
accompany a lifetime commitment of professionalism and
personal growth.
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession, we
invite you to meet with representatives of Touche Ross & Co.
October 19 - 23 on campus. Interviews may be arranged
through the Employment Centre on Campus until October 5.
Applications should be accompanied by recent course
transcripts. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24,1981
*v^>
A civil challenge to you
Knowledge of EnfliJh an asset th* MO-MUM appfearttg «dN <ftxrt>Y enough Snitiatto to find SU8
SMC.*** tt-30 Mowtfr* to TtMMtkw wd»(« b« w»dy to 1»wb *»joiB»i«*»«^KJ»,»o**fy »*-•««
time between ctessei. Resumes »« be ignored, »«or^iho<K interested in coveting Toent*^^
m»«frtg» should www three tUtta wjit*. I*t» A* unWttwed width* veteran a»e»h«»i* a sswfcwroB
news writing f rtdoy at 3:30 In SUB MIK. Bi Tieleman. former Canadian Universrty Press national
bureau chief wW ba officiating. Coma and have a beer.
To Gord Peterson of the Aggies,
Paul Yascowich of AUS, Arlene
Henry of Commerce Undergrad Society, Doug Conn of Dental Undergrad Society, Debbie Gorval of the
Education Students Association,
Dave Waddell of Forestry Undergrad Society, Connie Low of Home
Ec Undergrad Society, Dave Hobbs
of Law, Karen Marotz of Library
Students Association, Ivor McMahen of Medicine, Barb McFad-
den of NUS, Kerry Armstrong of
Phys. Ed. Undergrad Society, and
Dave Frank of SUS:
We, the engineers, are challenging all undergraduate societies to a
blood donor competition. The nature of the competition is as
follows:
We engineers have put $100 ($50
from the EUS and $50 from the
civil engineering club) into a pool.
All undergrad societies wanting to
compete are asked to either match
the $100 or to put in what they can.
The undergrad society that donates
the most blood during the Blood
Drive Week, Oct. 5 to 9, 10 a.m. to
4 p.m., at SUB, via a percentage
formula, will win all the money in
the pool. The money will be donated to their favorite charity.
For registration and details,
phone Cathy at the civil engineering
office at 228-2637.
The Red Cross wants 2,500 donors to alleviate the present shortage in its blood banks. So to everyone, please come out and give the
gift of life.
As a token of thanks to those giv-
'Ubyssey
stimulating \
I am pleased to see The Ubyssey
back in fighting shape. We students
are very fortunate to have an alternative to the commercial press. Keep
up stimulating our besieged minds.
Your articles and editorial on the
Bank of Montreal is an excellent example of journalism at its socially
responsible best. I can't understand
why, given the talent, money, and
the need for jobs that exists on this
campus, a credit union run by students for students is not in existence.
The B.C. Central Credit Union, I
am sure would provide assistance.
This would be an excellent project
for our student council to provide
leadership on. The funds available
to the AMS should be more than
sufficient to start the credit union
on the right foot.
F. J. Frigon
grad studies
VOLUNTEER
your  valuable   services  to  the
Canadian Ski Patrol System.
WHEN: Saj-Jl^t. 3, 9 a.m.
Classes heldj||!.p, 10,17.24,
WHE^ftwssioli'^r^^Jital,
82plloi|MiSon
Andre rouiin,
683-6493, Vancouver
(Evenings only)
NEED A
PERMANENT
ADDRESS?
RENT A
POSTAL BOX.'
Use a suite number or an apartment
number and our street address — not
a box number.
Phone in to check for mail.
THE BOX OFFICE
POSTAL BOX RENTALS LTD.
810 W. Broadway
873 9621
ing blood, we (being the co-sponsors of the blood drive) have arranged for the following prizes to
be given away: five $25 Keg dinner
certificates, 10 AMS tickets to see
the Villains, five AMS tickets to see
Graham Chapman of Monty Python, four tickets to a play at Freddy Wood theatre, five double two-
term passes to Cinema 16, five dou
ble two-term passes to SUB films,
and at least two tickets to the Commerce Reno Fun Nite.
Also watch for radio station
CFMI at SUB during blood drive
week!
Nelson Santos
civil 4
Bob Vidoni
civil 3
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, THIRD FLOOR
GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BLDG.
WISHED TO REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE FIRST
INSTALLMENT IS DUE ON OR BEFORE:
FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 25, 1981
r
Coopers
&Lybrand
chartered accountants providing
the full range o* financial and
business services in 21 Canadian
cities, and 90 countries around
the world through Coopers & Lybrand
(International).
THE PIT
p
R
E
S
E
N
T
S
^^^^HFjM*^*^F^A^ffl9|[^^H
mmmmmmmmmmmWWmW       f         ^^|Bi                m^m\\\\m]m\\\\\\\\\\\\                        ^^Si^^^^^^^^^H
BARRELHOUSE
Sept. 23, 24, 25
9-12 Midnight
$1.00/Door after 9:00 p.m.
Sub Lower Floor
J
The GALLERY LOUNGE
proudly presents!
from
San
Francisco
Sept. 23-26
■ssf
Wed.-Sat.
8:30-
Midnight
Sept. 30-
Oct. 4
ALSO APPEARING:
"Peter Chabanowich"
at the piano
Mon &■ Tues 9:00 - Midnight
Sept 21, 23, 28Er29
Student Union Big - main Floor
an INVITATION for a
TOYOTA
GENUINE PARTS
FREE SERVICE CLINIC
THURS. OCT. 1 & FRI. OCT. 2/81
55 critical areas of your TOYOTA wilr be inspected
to make sure it is in good shape. Absolutely
NO OBLIGATION
FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL AL FAIRBAIRN
263-2711
GRANVILLE
TOYOTA at 41 st
TWO FOR ONE
TAC0 SALE
For 1.20 and the coupon below, you'll get two of our
delicious tacos . . . two for the price of one I
(MCTACOV)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 12 Midnight 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(Closed Sundays)
2 TACOS FOR 1.20
This coupon is good for purchase of two tacos for 1.20
Coupon must be presented. One offer per person.
Offer expires October 3, 1981
I
I
I
I
I
.J Thursday, September 24, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Belushi and Brown bland
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The first environmentalist comedy of the eighties is here, and it is
an embarrassment. Continental
Divide takes its cue from the forties
commedies about the battle of the
sexes, and injects a conservationist
theme into a hodge-podge of poor
character development and a less
than "serviceable" plot. The hero,
a journalist (John Belushi) — a
movie type if there ever was one —
have worked for a newspaper, apparently.)
The hike up the Rockies is, of
course, laden with close calls, cute
bears, National Geographic shots
of snow-capped mountains and
soaring eagles.
The character Brown plays rings
false from the first moment she's on
the scene. For a recluse who hasn't
talked to anyone for four years, her
cabin  is  remarkably  well-stocked
eye-level shots that are unoriginal
and uninspiring.
John Belushi's character is
worse. New American filmmakers
like Steven Spielberg, who produced this movie, and John Landis
(The Blues Brothers) admire
Belushi for some inexplicable
reason. He is a giant, but not in the
way these filmmakers imagine. And
Apted doesn't let Belushi display
any   inventiveness.
BELUSHI AND BROWN ... are they boring? Yes.
is a columnist who thrives on
scoops. The heroine (Blair
Brown) is a conservationist with a
PhD, who lives atop the Rockies
taking care of eagles.
Continental Divide
Directed by Michael Apted
Playing at The Vogne
Written by Lawrence Kasdan
(The Empire Strikes Back), Continental Divide has the tight structure of a "well-made" screenplay,
with none of the wit one expects to
find in "well-made" plays or
movies. The excuse for getting
Belushi and Brown together is as offensive as it is proposterous.
Kasdan and director Michael
Apted would have you believe that
a tough journalist would be
frightened by threats on his life and
then opt to do a story about a
reclusive environmentalist just
because his editor suggests that he
do so. (Neither Kasdan nor Apted
with supplies and gourmet spices.
In the middle of the movie,
Brown announces that she's from
the federal department of the Interior. Someone should explain to
Kasdan that with a man like James
Watt as the department's head,
concerned environmentalists are
currently an extinct species. The demand here is not for an abject
realism, but for an awareness on the
filmmakers' part. Nothing turns off
an audience more than a false-
sounding detail.
Furthermore, there is no conflict
or tension in this movie, no sense of
relation, climax or denoument.
For the most part, Michael
Benson's cinematography is about
as energetic as the characters. It's
pretty, but it doesn't go anywhere;
there is nothing spectacular or interesting about the camera work
that impresses you. There are many
static shots, and Apted doesn't
seem to know the value of using a
moving camera. He opts for safe,
And the concluding scene in
which Apted reconciles the two
lovers and lets them retain their individual lifestyles doesn't pay off,
and Continental Divide ends up exposing its shallow, hollow self.
STUDENT
CYCLE
SALE!
Have you seen the selection and prices at the
new Peddler store?
SPECIALS OF THE WEEK!
STURDY, QUALITY 10 SPEED
NORCO SPORTS
An affordable 10 speed with high quality components,
SUNTOUR GEARS,
DIACOMPE BRAKES,
SUQINO COTTERLESS
CRANKS. Available sizes
19"/21'723'72B"	
$10 LOCK FOR FREE
(Shorn Your Student Cmrd.)
189
.95
PLETSCHER
ALLOY CARRIER
WW At any 10 ipMd. Rat trap Myte.
R«g. 12.K. SALE
9.95
NORCO
PANNIER BAGS
IdtMl for book* and binder*.
4 Coflipartmwits. SALE
17.95
"The Bicycle Specialists"
820 East Broadway    4266 E. Hastings
874-8811       also       298-4322
Parts & Service, 874-4421
We Have a Complete Parts & Service Dept.
THE ALTERNATIVE
/VdFeB
The best solution on how to get there .
The Alternative to cars, buses, feet, etc
THE BICYCLE:
"Norco" Monterey
light alloy mudguards
"Norco" alloy carrier
the "Norco" lock
Reg.
299.95
17.45
29.95
9.95
SALE
269.95
9.95
21.95
5.95
$337.80     $307.80
Save $30.50
WEST POINT CYCLES
3771 W. 10th at Alma
224-3536
"Sales Tailored to YOUR Needs"
r
Not all engineers end up
in design...
our engineers end up in
command.
As one of the nation's leading recruiters of entry-level engineers,
Schlumberger wants you to be aware of alternative career
opportunities awaiting you. Not all engineers sit behind a
desk. . .
our engineers take command in the field.
After an initial six-month training program, you will have
mastered the art of interpreting complex well data. You'll be an
engineer consultant, trouble shooter and supervisor.
To be considered, you must be a graduate Electrical or
Mechanical Engineer. A four-year degree in Physics or
Geophysics will be considered as well.
Your benefits package will include 21 days vacation, a company
car and monthly bonuses.
At Schlumberger, we promote totally from within. We hire only
those individuals who show the potential to move up. If
autonomy, self-reliance and decision-making are your strengths,
you might find yourself at Schlumberger, too.
SEE US AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,
CAREER DAYS, SEPT. 30 AND OCT. 1, 1981
Schlumberger Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24,1981
w
r wee ii I
] hisses
j
TODAY
ROCKERS CO-OP
Open stage jam sessioft, all musicians welcome,
noon, SUB 212.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Marxist literature and discussion, 10:30 a.m. to
noon, SUB plaza.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Organizational meeting, bring lunch, noon, St.
Mark's College music room.
UBC MEN'S J.V. VOLLEYBALL TEAM
Team tryouts, 6:30 p.m., Osborne Gym "B".
PYSCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Angus 426.
COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDENTS' SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, CSCI 306.
TOASTMASTERS
General meeting, 7:30 p.m.. Forestry 278.
STAMMTISCH
German conversation night, beginners welcome,
7.30   p.m.,   International   House,   Gate   Four
Lounge.
COMPUTING CENTRE
Self-guided computer  room  tour,  noon to 4
p.m., CSCI 100.
INTRAMURALS
Referees clinic,  noon, Wer Memorial Gym   —
211. Volleyball begins 7:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym.
Cycle tour organizational meeting, noon. War
Memorial Gym — 211.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Discussion   on   "being   not   ashamed   of   the
Gospel," noon, SUB lit.
FRIDAY
INTRAMURALS
University gates road run for men and women,
noon, meet between SUB and Main Library.
Final registration for women's soccer,  novelty
swim meet, and men's basketball, football and
soccer, 1:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym — 211.
GAY UBC
Wine and cheese party,  location available at
SUB 237B.
AMS CONCERTS
The Blues Band with Paul Jones, Dave Kelly and
Tom McGuinnesa, 8 p.m., SUB Ballroom. No
minors.
UBC WARGAMING SOCIETY
Risk tournament and boar night, 7 p.m., SUB
212
SATURDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khoja night, Gastown Curry Inn, 8:30 p.m.
INTRAMURALS
Cycle tour of Saanich Peninsula, cycling and
pubbing.
MEN'S VARSITY VOLLEYBALL
Alumni game and social gathering, spectators
welcome, 7:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
MEN'S VARSITY SOCCER
First league game, 2 p.m., Wolfson Field.
I
Hot Flashes
Mike; bf frees
If you fffrees
The same folks who brought you
"friendly" hamburger hockey are at
it again. This time their project is
"alternative modes of transportation." UBC intramurals are having
an organizational meeting for a
planned bicycle tour Saturday to
the Saanich peninsula. It all happens today at noon in room 211 of
the War Memorial gym.
To complete their study, they will
be staging a University gates road
run at noon on Friday. All interested participants of both sexes are
asked to gather between SUB and
the Main library at that time before
proving conclusively that the wheel
is faster than the Nike.
To MiberM
Been suppressing feelings of
rampant megalomania lately? The
UBC Wargaming Society has just
the tonic for those hard-to-satisfy
Freudian urges. This Friday, at 7
p.m. in SUB 212, they are hosting a
Risk tournament and bzzr night.
You would think that high school
Don't cut. . .
From page 6
an inflation index.
Direct grants to students is unquestionably the most effective way
to highlight federal contributions.
In lieu of actual cash given to
students, a voucher, redeemable at
the university selected, could be
distributed.
Direct grants to institutions is
another reasonable alternative to
improve federal visibility. The advantage of payment to schools
rather than individuals is the reduction in administrative costs as well
as tighter control of the program.
Quebec, however, is not likely to
agree to this type of funding approach, eliminating this alternative.
Federal support of post-
secondary education has been a
long standing fact. Elimination of
the $1.5 billion cash grant in the
short time span proposed will
critically wound the system which in
all likelihood was used to educate
the Honourable Members of the
Special Committee and of the majority of the government itself. The
committee must consider the long
term ramifications which will undoubtedly be deleterious should the
proposed cuts become fact.
The federal government is entirely justified in its quest for recognition for job-well-done, however,
there is little justification for crippling the system by amputation at the
financial knees.
James Hollis is the external affairs co-ordintor of the Alma Mater
Society. Perspectives is a column of
reports, briefs, essays, and, on occasion, wit, humour and opinion
open to members of the UBC community.
graduates would at least be able to
spell "beer" properly, but as they
say, "War is hzll!"
Just remember to start off in
Australia.
Bonf Fenders
Air guitarists need not apply. The
Rocker's Co-op is having an open
stage jam session in SUB 212 at
noon today and Friday. All musicians are welcome, but please kids,
leave those tubas at home. Ditto
cellos, harpsichords . . . you get
the idea.
Anyhow, all you would-be Claptons, McCartneys, Moons (heaven
forbid), etc., show up with your
axes for a real axe-kicking time.
Hi-fecfi check
Want to find out who really runs
this university? You can personally
meet Big Brother between noon to
4 p.m. today in room 100 of the
Computer Sciences building. The
folks at the computing centre are
conducting what they (it?) describe
as "a self-guided computer room
tour."
Ain't modern technology grand?
And I'll bet you thought the Russ-
kies would beat us to it.
Stop the proMM
Got a bone to pick with The
Ubyssey? Here's your chance to hit
us where it really hurts.
This Friday at noon,, in SUB 241k,
The Ubyssey will be having its umpteenth annual beer bash and recruitment drive.
Whether you hate us or view us
with the same curiosity you felt
when you first looked through a
microscope at a lab specimen,
you'll never have a better opportunity to soak up free suds and meet
the creatures who sustain this rag.
|SUBFILMS presents
STUNT MAN
Thurs. & Sun. 7:00
Fri. & Sat.
7:00 & 9:30
$1.50 SUB AUD.
16MM COLOR
40 MINUTES
An OutofthisWorld
Sports Spectacular!
"SPORTS GALAXY" vividly displays the
action-packed excitement of skydiving ,
ballooning, ski flying and space flight.
"SPORTS GALAXY" is a spectacular,
free flowing motion picture capturing
the lifestyles, emotions, and the impact
of Christ's message on those who
challenge nature's most exciting highflying sports.
THURS. SEPT. 24
AT 7:00 p.m.
In the Buchanan Bldg. Rm 104
FREE ADMISSION
DON'T MISS THIS EXCITING MOTION PICTURE!
SKI SALE
DOWNHILL SPECIALISTS
SKIS
BOOTS
CLOTHING
BINDINGS
pg   jM   B
669-6333
SP0RTSH0P1975)LTD
569 SEYMOUR, VANCOUVER
(ACROSS FROM A « B SOUND)
- Rossignol, Fisher, Elan, K-2, Dynastar, Etc.
- Hanson, Salomon, Garmont, Nordica, Lange
- Roffe, Images in Flight, Head, Sportcaster
Alpine Joe, Anba, Aspen, Kristin, Ditrani, Etc.
- Salomon, Tyrolia, Look, Marker, Geze
Demo Skis Available
Ski & Boot Servicing Available
]
ARTS
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Nominations now open for
the position of
1 COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE
Nominations close Oct. 6, 1981
By-Election to be held Oct. 14, 1981
Pick-up nominations forms in
Buchanan 107
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 HitM, 1 day -WL00; additional llnaa. Be.
Commercial - 3 Hnae. 1 day *.«• additional lln-aa
66c. A-Mtttonal daya *3.30 and BOe.
Ckuaified Mb are tm accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline k 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boon241, SMB.. VBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AS
5 — Coming Events
30 — Jobs
A ONE DAY WORKSHOP
WITH
DR. WM. GLASSER
FOUNDER OF
THE INSTITUTE OF
REALITY THERAPY
FRI., OCT. 2/81 - COST: $30.00
AT
THE RICHMOND INN
7551 WESTMINSTER HIGHWAY
RICHMOND, B.C.
For information call
THE PASTORAL INSTITUTE
879-5788
HELP WANTED part time, clerical and sales
oriented, for insurance office. Must have
good telephone voice, typing. Well
-groomed, outgoing person with driver's
licence. Please call John Adams 324-6266,
9-5.
EDUCATION COORDINATOR Lillooet
District Indian Council Box 465 Lillooet,
B.C.
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS; A store packed
whh ski wear, soccer boots, hockey equipment racquets of all kinds, jogging shoes
and dozens of other sports items at
reasonable prices, (including adult small
hockey jerseys for ladies hockey teams at
$10.95). 3615 W. Broadway
11 — For Sale — Private
77 MOPED. $300.00 Phone 732-6174 after
8:30 p.m.
MUMMY BAGS. Two nylon 44 oz. polyester
fill can zip together. $65 pair. Call 224-0404.
1976 MAVERICK - 36,000 .miles, audio
radials 2 door, white with blue interior,
$2,900.00 O.B.O. 228-0736.
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hair-
styling. Student hairstyle - $8, haircut
$3.50. 601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
ESSAYS. THESES. MANUSCRIPTS IN-
cluding technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric Call 736-4042.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
25 - ??????
90 - Wanted
PLAN AHEAD, tutoring in statistics. $9 per
hour. Regular basis preferred. Joan
734-3684.
99 — Miscellaneous Thursday, September 24,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1981 Autumn Lectures
Ronald P. Dore
Professor Ronald Dore is considered one of the western world's leading
authorities on Japan. He is internationally known for his scholarly work in the
field of Japanese studies and in the area of developing nations. His mastery
of language, grasp for detail and keen power of analysis combine to make
him one of the most stimulating and informative social scientists in his field.
These lectures should be of interest to people in a variety of areas including
anthrolpolgy, sociology, political science, history and Asian studies.
THE CULTURAL FACTOR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Thursday, September 24 — In the Auditorium,
Asian Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
THE INNER MECHANISM OF JAPAN INCORPORATED-
Saturday, September 26 — In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Nominations now being accepted
for position of
VICE-PRESIDENT, AMS
Applications must be returned
by 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24
Applications being accepted
for positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
Applications must be returned
by 3:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2
The following A.M.S. Committees
are accepting additional members:
Programs       Elections       Art Gallery
Concerts Student Accessibility
Speakers External Affairs
Special Events Ombuds Office
Code & Bylaws Student Housing
Teaching and Academic Standards
Applications being accepted
for seven positions on
STUDENTS COURT
Applications may be picked up from
and returned to the A.M.S.
Executive Secretary in Room 238,
S.U.B.
"*'2*£**£**&
:
W*-*VV*V*>*%-*V*W*VV*V*V**V'*V'V'*V'V-V'V*^^
<*1A«VV«^V<1^V<>>VVV^^^VV-VVVV\
ii!
:
:
:
:
BALLET UBC
Fall Session '81—September 28-December 13
Ballet and Jazz classes at all levels
Beginner to Advanced
All Classes Taught By Professionals
Open to Students, Staff and Faculty
For Men and Women
Registration—Clubs Days—Upper Level by Partyroom or Room 216E During Lunch hours
*¥
I
I
l:
?
iiZiittiSZZSiZiiitiZZiittiiZttttii&tlS
t^^^^X^^^^lVf^
•V*v-^-£*J-tf'tf*-tf*^iVV*V*W
;-tf->re--^»sg-gc-*g-^x*^^ Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 24,1981
•   •    •
S-8250CP
AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER
V        •>      <■«•     ,,      ,,!*
1 . i'ii o n o o pi r*
f"**?a
Package
of 3
BASF
Wmmm
90!
/   .ti&^^tir "^ww^, ft_
"»
BASF 90 minute cassettes.
Special price on the C90I Sounds great
on any deck or player!
,•#
Unequalled in its price range, the
sophisticated Sherwood FM and phono
pre-amp delivers a clean, accurate 25
watts min. RMS per channel.
249
$
149'
Now   you   can |
enjoy the amazing        performance of
Shure's   incomparable V-15 IV I
phono cartridge
at an affordable I
price
DUAL CS 508
Belt drive semi-automatic turntable with
ULM   tonearm   and   new   anti-resonance
base.
Includes   ortofun    ULM   52   low   mass
cartridge.
V15TV
179
^
:. t
l(&
EPI 100V
Loudspeaker is a 2-way
system with 8" woofer
and 1" tweeter with
ferro-fluid suspension
for EPI's famous
"Linear Sound". This
speaker can accurately
reproduce a roomful of
music across virtually
the entire audio range.
An excellent investment!
SANYO M9902
Sanyo M9902 portable j
AM/FM stereo cassette
recorder. Stereo that
goes anywhere with
deluxe features like slide
rule tuning dial, record
level LED, slide volume
controls.
i-*5*i
139
r.cr
■jzcf
CRAIG T617 + CRAIG 9427
Craig T617 In-Dash AM/FM and Auto Reverse Cassette gives~*\*Wtrsuper
fidelity, and outstanding tuner section and the ultimate convenience of
Auto-Reverse operation I No more fumbling around trying to flip the
cassette over to hear the other side — this one does it for you!
Craig 9427 Car Speakers are full-range units that are only 5%" in diameter,
so they'll mount almost anywhere in any car! These hot-sounding speakers
come complete with all mounting hardware and beautiful wire mesh grilles
with chrome trim ringsl
249
PACKAGE INSTALLED
llMtEUiViSiON
By
MATT-EL
354
It plays more than super action games like NFL Football, Major
League Baseball, NBA Basketball, Las Vegas Blackjack and
Poker, and ABPA Backgammon. There's a whole library of
INTELLIVISION programs for your family's enjoyment.
PRICES VALID ONLY WITH THE PRESENTATION OF THIS AD.
WE TAKE
TRADES
PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED
MasterCard
VISA
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127144/manifest

Comment

Related Items