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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1968

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Array Burnaby cops
got busted
Vot. L, No. 31
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1968
228-2305
CAUT blasts
UNB suspension
MIONTREAL (CUP) — The Canadian Association of University Teachers Sunday condemned the University of New Brunswick for
its actions in the Strax affair.
The teachers' association criticized the UNB
administration for suspending the nuclear physics professor "without stated charges or provisions for an adjudicative hearing".
The move came at the semi-annual conference of the CAUT council held here this
weekend. The meeting was closed.
The association asserted: "Matters of academic freedom and tenure are best handled by
arbitration within the academic community."
It then followed with an offer "to assist the
University of New Brunswick to establish proper procedures to deal with an settle this case."
The association did not follow through to a
censure of the UNB administration, similar to
the one imposed on Simon Fraser University
last year.
The association lifted that censure Saturday
following the recommendation of an investigation commission.
CAUT officials disclosed after the conference that an agreement had been reached between CAUT and the Canadian Union of Students to sponsor a joint commission on aca-
' demic freedom for students.
The commission, to consist of two members
each from CUS and CAUT, will report on disciplinary procedures and students' civil rights.
CAUT president C. Brough Macpherson said
the commission was called because "if there is
a real problem, the lack of satisfactory policy
for dealing with it obviously reduces the effectiveness of the university as a place for teaching and learning."
Occupation
BANJOIST JOHN
University's adm
and several hun
administration a
going   strong   as
— powell hargrave photo
MATE entertains students in Simon Fraser
nistration   building   Wednesday   night.   He
dred  other students weren't stringing the
line  though.  The demonstration  was  still
of  The   Ubyssey's   press   deadline.
carries on
By PAUL KNOX
BURNABY (Staff) — Their numbers have-
dwindled, but Simon Fraser University students
occupying the SFU administration building
show no sign of giving up their struggle for
freer admissions policies at the university.
An occupation force of about 130 students
Thursday night manned the two floors of the
building, which includes SFU president Kenneth Strand's office, the SFU registrars and the
university's complete admission and academic
files.
Strand cancelled all Friday classes at SFU
and called a general student meeting for 9:30
in the university's main mall where he will
attempt to explain the university's position.
Late Thursday, he rejected and refused to
negotiate with the students on a formula prepared by SFU senators Donn Korbin, a student
senator, and Gerry Sperling, a political science
prof.
The Korbin-Sperling formula, which was rejected without debate by the SFU senate Wednesday night:
• the university must accept the principle
of free transferability of all credits granted in
B.C. post-secondary institutions;
To Page 8
See: OCCUPATION
v*   *-    "**',*S8V- - 4
Evidence
The Combat Diary
of SFU's demonstration
>-
By JAMES CONCHIE
12:30 a.m. Thursday: Photog Powell Hargrave and I enter the administration building
through the chained first floor door. Outside,
city newsmen try to get in, but are turned
away. The student steering committee is only
admitting student press. We wander up to the
second floor, headquarters for the occupation.
The first thing that hits is the sound of voices
singing "The senators are bastards, we shall
not be moved" to the tune of We Shall Overcome. A walk around finds students moving
in food, toilet paper, tampax, cigarettes, baby
formula (two families in sight), blankets, sleeping bags, pillows and books. It looks like a
long stay.
1:00 a.m.: Earlier in the evening, the occupation force broke up into groups of ten for
discussions. Each group elected a spokesman
to sit on the central steering committee, which
is meeting now to discuss the senate actions.
Small groups go about their business — setting up the kitchen, writing and producing
pamphlets, relieving the guards at the door,
searching files, etc.
1:20 a.m.: Senate has finally adjourned,
after passing a motion to meet some of the
student demands. A senate spokesman slips a
copy of the motion under the chained main
door. The motion says senate will set up an
admissions and standing appeal committee as
a separate and distinct body from the senate
committee on admissions. It will consist of one
member of the senate committee, the assistant
registrar, both of whom will not vote, two
senators, one student senator, to be appointed
by senate and one student chosen by student
council. The steering committee breaks off its
meeting to gather all students for a discussion
of the senate offer.
1:36 a.m.: Downtown newsmen make one
final attempt to get in before they go off shift.
There is an elevator coming from outside the
first floor door to the third floor landing. The
stairs leading from the third floor are barricaded with filing cabinets. They hold. The
newsmen retreat. Fire hose is used to tie the
landing doors shut. Back on the second floor
there are four or five guys waiting to get their
hair cut in the free barber shop that has just
been set up.
2:00 a.m.: People are taking advantage of
the five minute hourly door opening to go out
Continued Page 2 — See: DIARY
Only one rag
Due to popular demand, exams, and severe
fatigue, The Ubyssey will appear only once
next week. Next Friday's mammoth edition
will be the last of the term, leaving Christmas
to Santa's little helpers.
The Ubyssey here reprints two letters
I  from the SFU registrar's files which show
1  that:
|| •    non-academic  — i.e.   political  —
g criteria are used in determining whether
Ia student is admitted to SFU, and
•    regional college students are not
given  credit  equal to SFU students  for
%  the  same  courses  when  they  apply for
admission.
The first letter, dated Sept. 20, from the Burnaby RCMP
detachment to registrar Harry Evans, details the procedure
for inquiring into the criminal and political status of SFU
applicants.
"This will serve to confirm a telephone conversation
yesterday between yourself and Staff Sgt. B. L. Northrop
of this detachment.
"When it is necessary to institute inquiries with respect
to students, these will normally be made by Staff Sgt.
Northrop, Sgt. G. V. Rasmussen, Const. R. A. Seeley, Const.
T. N. Baldwin and Const. R. A. Flowers. Should there be
any changes in our personnel, I will advise you accordingly.
"In keeping with your request, we will only direct
inquiries to yourself, Mr. Douglas Meyers, or Dorothy Mc- -"
Phie (assistant admissions registrar) unless otherwise ad- 1
vised." p
The second, from former SFU registrar D. P. Robert- -***1
son to present associate registrar Douglas Meyers (who f**
handles all admissions) suggests that students from B.C. '.
regional colleges should not be treated the same as those -
from SFU:
"You know that statement in the calendar about admission from  regional  colleges  in   B.C.  This  was  copied
from a regulation passed by the senate at UBC, and I think   I
there is a very serious statement in it which I just realized.
"The statement says that students who choose courses
at a recognized regional college that are appropriate to his
academic objective at university and who obtain adequate
standing in them may be accepted for further studies at the
university (SFU) under the same conditions that apply to a
student who has taken all his post-secondary studies at
the university (emphasis Robertson's).
"Does this imply to you that students who are accepted
for further studies would have to be granted credit for any  V
course which they have passed since we ourselves grant  '
credit for Ds regardless of the student's record at SFU.
"I have scratched this part  of the statement out  of
the admissions bulletin and I wonder if we shouldn't drop
it quietly from the calendar (emphasis ours). Let me have    ,
your thoughts on how you interpret this." ■*
•* Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
DANCING GROUP OF
THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA
Recently from the International
Cultural   Exhibition,   Olympic,   Mexico,   1968
SPECIAL CAMPUS PERFORMANCE
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1968
2:00 - 4:00 P.M. S.U.B. BALLROOM
Admission: FREE
Tickets Available From International House Before Saturday
U.B.C.  HOME  SERVICE
LARRY BROWNLEE
BETTER BE SAFE THAN SORRY
Complete Stock of Winter Tires — All Sizes
Home Glycol Antifreeze — Tire Chains
Batteries
2180 Allison 224-3939
DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
WHERE IT IS HANDY!
A Wide Selection of Gifts
For  Everyone
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5734 University  Blvd.
224-3202
(In The Village)
Anti-Freeze Time
IS HERE AGAIN!
Be An Early Bird — Avoid the Rush and Save I
Bring this Ad in and Save 50c on
a Gallon of Anti-Freeze — Offer expires Dec. 15, 1968
See us for Winter Tires - Batteries - Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
■*   CONCERT   +
from Winnipeg
Mc GUESS WHO
sing their big hits
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27
S.U.B.   BALLROOM
(Only 50c)
TEACHING INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
tor University Graduates
University graduates interested in becoming secondary teachers
are invited to apply for enrollment in the Teaching Internship
Program at the University of Victoria. Applicants must beat least 28 years old and hold good university degrees with
majors in two teaching subjects or honours in one. Initial
instruction begins during the period from May to August
of 1969; interns will be employed at an appropriate salary
as full-time teachers from September 1969 to June 1970.
Further work at a summer session will lead to full B.C.
certification.
For further information write to:
The Dean of Education
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
Victoria, B.C.
DIARY OF A DEMONSTRATION
From Page 1
and move their cars from the metered parking lot — they would be towed away if they
were left all night.
2:16 a.m.: The general meeting has decided
not to accept the senate offer. Feelings are it
is too vague, the terms of reference are not
clear — and besides the offer would still leave
admissions under senate control. The meeting
moves onto discussion of how long to remain
in the building.
2:24 a.m.: Associate registrar William
Nelles, who earlier in the evening had said "I
will stay here to protect the files until this
thing is over," is pleading to be let out the
chained door before the regular hourly opening 35 minutes away because "I have a heart
condition with all this strain, you know." He
is let out. A very up-tight rent-a-cop enters
and is divested of his official Dick Tracy
walkie-talkie. He phones his office and an
argument starts. Rent-a-cop—"But I am, I am
in the building I was told to go to." Pause.
Embarrassed cop covers receiver and asks
"What building is this?" Reassured, he tells
the phone. "Yes, I'm in the Administration
Building — what shall I do?"
2:47 a.m: People are still rapping about
how long we should stay. Martin Loney gets
up and urges people to leave before they get
thrown out. "We are making a good point here,
but this thing could go bad very quickly. This
is going to mobilize the right wing. People are
going to be very reactionary tomorrow. They
will talk about the occupation and ignore the
issues that caused it. If that happens all is
lost. We have shown that something is drastically wrong here, and we should leave before
we lose our strength." He seems to have some
support.
4:10 a.m.: The duration hassle is finally
solved. People agree with Loney, this thing
must not be allowed to die, but the feeling is
we cannot leave now. In the morning, we will
see what senate does, how the public reacts,
and decide then.
4:30 a.m.: Jay McGilvery, assistant to the
vice-president, gets up and tells us he is
pleased with our conduct so far. Suggests we
allow him to lock office doors so "the types
who just come to these things to steal, will
not cause trouble." He is told students will
police themselves and. will take responsibility
for any damage.
6:10 a.m.: Most people are sleeping now.
The steering committee is meeting to decide
tomorrow's policy. It's been a quiet night, no
trouble, no damage, no dope — all but five
students at the first general meeting voted
against its use because of the bad public image
it would present. Some interesting letters are
being found — letters to police, political or
ganizations, the provincial government etc.
asking about political, background of students
applying for admission. Seems to bear out the
charges of political discrimination in admission policy. It's been a long night.
6:45: The decision to stay is firm. Half our
number will leave later in the morning to try
and rally UBC and Vancouver College support.
Others will try and sway public reaction favorably — make them understand why the building is occupied, not just the fact it is. The rest
will continue the  occupation.
8:07 a.m.: At long last, waiting at the door
with 20 other people, we leave as soon as the
two rent-a-cops and the city newsmen back
off a bit. Bang! The door flies open, we charge
out, the cops charge in (without success), the
newsman snaps his prizewinning pic (but his
flash doesn't go off), and we are on our way.
Sleep for a change.
NO  MONEY
From Page 4
exploitation of B.C. resources is over-developed
(dams, highways, tax incentives, etc.); whereas
the public sector of the economy which is important to human needs is gravely underdeveloped (hospitals, schools, universities, etc.).
Thus the Socred government simply does not
make sufficient funds available to the universities (and those funds available are distributed by business-dominated BoGs to favor those
areas of the university considered "productive,"
science and education for example). The solution of the universities has been to limit enrolment severely. At Simon Fraser this is being
done without announcing a formal intention to
limit enrolment (that could upset the people of
B.C.) Furthermore, the enrolment limitation
criteria have not been spelled out and have
been applied arbitrarily by the Registrar's
Office without the knowledge of those affected.
And clearly the limitation has not been solely
on academic grounds, but on political, social
and personal grounds as well.
CANADIAN FINGERED
FORCES
Recruiting officers will be on
this campus today from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. in front of the armory.
Enlist in the J. Sutherland
Brown Memorial Brigade.
Help the Canadian army in
its war against American imperialism.
— james conchie photo
STUDENTS CONFER on the second floor of the SFU administration building. Friday, November 22,  1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
"BEER MAKES YOU STERILE," says UBC genetics prof David Suzuki  as he collects his beer
garden card from Gale Clark, nursing 4, "LCB causes mutations."
Thoughts of beer in the garden
draw line-up for membership cards
The Pit enrolled more than
180 members in its first step
towards operation yesterday.
Identity cards were issued to
prospective members to UBC's
beer garden between noon and
2:30 p.m. in the cloakroom on
the main floor of SUB.
Organizer Sean McHugh, sci.
2,  was  very pleased with the
Beering success is
'up to Joe Student'
By ALEX VOLKOFF
It's up to you, Joe Student, if you want a beer garden in
SUB.
So says the Pit Management Committee as the date of the
opening approaches.
"The Committee has worked hard making sure all the legal
provisions are upheld," said Bob Gilchrist, Alma Mater Society
ombudsman.
"Now it's up to the students who attend to keep it running
within the bounds of the laws of both the province and the
university."
"The main thing students must realize is the Pit is not a
pub, but a place conducive to promoting free and easy expression," said Cornel Dukoweki, arts 4, the public relations man
for the Pit Management Committee.
"We definitely do not want it to become an extension of
Fraser Arms," he said.
The Committee does not want the novelty of the venture and
the previous atmosphere connected with the pub-ins earlier in
the year to give students a wrong idea about the Pit.
In the words of prof David Suzuki in genetics, quoted from
his article in the October edition of the UBC Reports, the beer
garden would be a place "uniquely suited to ameliorate existing
frustrations."
And so this is why the committee has taken every precaution and delayed the opening.
This is why so much fuss was made over the need for three
pieces of I.D. to get a membership card.
And mainly, this is why students must act responsibly with
regards to the original concepts that gave birth to the Pit.
Students must show the administration and the public they
really do want this to be a solution to the communication problems the university community suffers under now, and not just
another place they can get drunk.
"The first session (on Thursday, Nov. 28) has to be a success
• in this respect or else we can say goodbye to further sessions,"
said Gilchrist.
"We're just starting this on a weekly basis, but if we can
prove it will work, we'll try to operate it daily," he said.
In order to do that, students must show the SUB Management Committee by their behavior a permanent beer garden
would be workable and providing a necessary function.
To begin with, the Pit will run totally with voluntary help.
Beer will be served three to the dollar, and sandwiches
will be the price of one beer ticket.
The main thing is the Pit will be run almost entirely at
cost. The little that might be made will be going into providing
extras to produce a better atmosphere, or to pay student assistants once that system gets implemented.
But the organizers beg that you, Joe Student, don't put all
.their hard work to waste. In the words of Dukowski, "the Pit
is a place for social exchange, not an end in itself."
number, especially considering
they only have one of every
piece of equipment.
"The surprising thing is the
lack of females who bought
cards," he said.
Only 15 per cent of the total
number were brave sweet
young things.
Students Who produced three
pieces of I.D. and signed a
pledge they were over 21 years
of age and not on the interdict
list were issued special cards
with their photographs on them.
But these aren't merely memberships for the Pit.
"These are actually Student
Club cards which permit the
holder into the Pit," said
McHugh.
"The idea behind this is to
foster better relations on the
academic campus, as prof
Suzuki (in genetics) suggested
in his article," he said.
The faculty are associate
members while students in the
Alma Mater Society are active
members.
"We haven't yet decided what
to do about staff," McHugh
added.
Gail Clark, nursing 4, said
there were no problems with
people trying to pass false
identification.
The only people they had to
turn away were those without
enough I.D.
"Not everyone realized both
the old AMS card plus the
new library card and two other
pieces of I.D., all stating the
age of the applicant are necessary," McHugh said.
Miss Clark said the Pit will
open for the first time next
Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. in rooms K, L, and M
of SUB.
The club will be open once
a week after that, she said.
No guests will be permitted
at this first opening. Only card
carrying members will be admitted.
Membership cards will again
be sold at the price of $1 tomorrow and Wednesday and Thursday of next week, from noon
to 2:30. After that, cards will
only be sold on Thursdays.
SUB management
creates art committee
SUB has had a room off the main foyer containing pictures
and objects d'art since it opened, but now it has an art gallery.
The distinction is functional rather than aesthetic and was
formally passed at the SUB management committee meeting last
night.
The action creates a SUB art gallery committee to be responsible for programming and management of the art gallery, maintenance of the Brock art collection, and the purchasing of new
acquisitions.
Up until now the only similar group was the Brock art committee whose function was only that of maintenance and acquisitions for that collection, worth some $30,000.
The purpose of the gallery in SUB will be experimental
exhibitions rather than a collection.
The motion also named Illyas Pagnois, a grad student in fine
arts, as curator, along with a full slate of committee members
and executive.
Pagnois indicated that a show was presently being planned
and would be presented before Christmas.
He also said in an interview that the authority the committee
has now been given was needed to prevent abuse of the gallery.
He said that the gallery was not being used for its intended
purpose nor to its full potential.
"The place is being used as a lunch room and flophouse,"
Pagnois said. "People can't properly view paintings with bodies
lying around."
He also said that some paintings had been damaged byv
fingerprints and writing on the pictures, resulting from a lack
of supervision.
Pagnois cited as an example the work 'Tension', currently
on display and a part of the Brock collection, saying that some
one had written in ink on the work.
The work is a collage, and the writing cannot be easily removed. "Unless extensive repair is done, it can be considered
as aesthetic write-off."
He said it was insured for its purchase price of $1,200 but
was worth some $4,000 on the contemporary market.
The committee also wants to consult the architect over the
lighting in the gallery which Pagnois claims is very inadequate.
Computer trouble
delays exam sched
The handwriting will be on the wall later than expected.
Publication of the fifty-fourth annual edition of the Christmas exam schedule has been delayed by your friendly neighborhood  computer.
"The schedule will not be posted before next week," registrar's assistant Andy Wilson said Thursday.
"It just can't be any later than that."
Wilson said the delay has been caused by problems with
the computer system analysing possible exam conflicts.
"I can't give a definite date," said Wilson, "I'll post the
schedule as soon as it's ready."
— james conchie photo
"LAW AND ORDER, that's my game boy," says one of the
SFU force. "If'n ya breaks the law, we locks ya up!" Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
THE UBYSSEY      Some historical facts on
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
Quebec  occupation
NOVEMBER 22,  1968
Ust •*-■**
Classroom cops
Think twice before you get up in class again to
denounce your professor.
That bearded guy with the shades in the next seat
taking notes may have more than an academic interest in
what you are saying.
As outlined in the front pages of today's paper,
the occupation of the SFU administration building turned
up some very interesting documents concerning police
activity on campus.
It seems the Burnaby law, and undoubtedly Vancouver as well, have special officers investigating the
activity of students and, we imagine, certain outspoken
professors.
It is also shown that so-called 'academic' authorities at SFU are aware of, are assisting, and basing some
decisions on the material these police informers, and
also faculty informers, are turning up.
But UBC, we understand, is a lot more sophisticated
in these matters than their counterparts at SFU.
UBC files that the administration would not like
to see get in the wrong hands have been safely locked
away so that in the event that an occupation of UBC's
administration building takes place, they would not be
found.
If travelling Ken, our intrepid president, is so much
on the side of the students and academic freedom, as the
unsubstantiated rumors go, you would think he would
stage a public file-burning, or at least open up all files
to press perusal.
What all this proves, however, is that university
authorities will spare no means, lies, or hypocrisy in
order to protect themselves and their institution against
disruptive influences, that is students or professors who
dare to challenge the undemocratic and totalitarian way
in which they are run, and the direction which university education is taking.
Empty rhetoric about communication between the
administration and students is just that — empty words
— when administrators base their decisions not the consensus of freely-exchanged discussion, but on pre-con-
ceived ideas based on secret discriminatory information.
In every instance of student requests and demands
against university authorities, it can be shown that students have consistantly striven to obtain their just ends
through debate as equals, but every time the administration provokes confrontation by their lack of good
faith.
SFU senate did take a principled (its principles)
stand at first in flatly rejecting proposals that the majority of students and the population of B.C. are in favor
of, and provoked the occupation, the only real means
students have to back up their demands.
We hope the SFU students will continue their occupation until they have won totally what they are fighting for.
Drug injustice
Jail is a hell of a place to take a sabbatical leave.
But mathematics assistant professor Eugene Sobell
chose to spend five months there in lieu of paying $1000
fine for possession of a small piece of hashish, which
apparently he forgot he was carrying in his suitcase.
Why he chose to do this we don't know, but the fact
that he was given the opportunity to pay a fine rather
than the normal automatic jail sentence points out a
blatant inequality in the justice meted out to 'respectable'
members of society as opposed to others, like students.
Other injustices revolving around police narcotics
investigations, well-known to anyone having the remotest connection with people who use pot or hash, is
the unhesitating willingness of narcs to violate basic civil
rights laws in tracking down users; an example outlined
in Thursday's paper.
The injustice of, and ignoring of, the laws in relation
to non-addictive drug investigation and prosecution are
secondary, of course, to the injustice of having anti-pot
and hash laws in the first place.
A large section of the population, from high school
teeny-boppers to Ottawa's go-go politicians, choose to
consciously flaunt these laws against drugs they know
are no more harmful than, and more enjoyable than,
cigarettes.
From THE McGILL DAILY
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP) — "I have all the requirements and all the marks", said Jean-Louis
Poirier, a student at CEGEP Maisonneuve, "but
I bet I won't be able to go to l'Universite next
fall."
There are 5,000 fewer new places in the
French universities (Montreal and Laval) for
the upcoming year, than there are students
like Jean-Louis Poirier.
Jean-Louis' dilemma is one of the keys to
why most of the province's CEGEP's have been
occupied by their students.
The immediate problems are due mainly to
administrative bungling and indifference on
the part of the government. Promises for increased loans and a second French university
in the city both lie unfulfilled, and poor organization and co-ordination within the hastily put
together CEGEP's.
ROOTS IN HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
But the roots of the mess go all the way
back to La Nouvelle France and La Coquete.
Under the French regime, the Catholic
Church had all educational institutions (that
is, some elementary schools, a couple of convents, one trade school and two seminaries
which after became the French universities)
firmly under its control, and the only way for
a Quebecois to get a higher education was to
enter a religious order.
After the English took over, the control of
the Church was strengthened. Gradually, the
Church became entrenched alongside that of
the English rulers, and the Church would receive an allotment of money in addition to the
tithes to organize Catholic education.
The Church, in conjunction with the government, ran education with very little visible
long-range planning. It was content to add an
Ecole Normale here and a Technical School
there ,and somewhere along the way it set up
l'Universite de Montreal and Laval to handle
the College Classique graduates.
ENGLISH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
The generally much richer Protestant English, on the other hand, took after the Americans and set up a secondary school system
that led straight to University, and the community saw to it that there were enough new
places in University for all financially and intellectually qualified students. There was a notable lack of English speaking trade and technical schools and an even more notable lack of
demand for them.
Then came 1960 and "La Revolution Tran-
quille". For a start, the new Liberal government commissioned an inquiry into the state
of education in the province.
The Parent Report was firm in its reply:
Quebec must initiate and complete a unified
public school system, making educational institutions of both language parallel and offering
to both sectors secondary and post-secondary
educational opportunities. One of the Report's
proposals was the creation of "Institutes" to
incorporate the twelfth and thirteenth years
and offer both a pre-university course and a
trade and technical curriculum. Hence the name
CEGEP — College d'Enseignment General et
Profesisonal.
CEGEP'S ALONE MEAN NOTHING
But by themselves, the CEGEP's mean nothing. What's the use of giving students pre-
university training while making no provisions
for expanded universities?
The old Liberal government, recognizing
the problem, commisisoned the Rocher Report
in 1965. It recommended the immediate construction of a second French-language university in the city. But when the Union Nationale
came into office, the Report was tabled. It has
been at the bottom of a big pile of papers ever
since.
Another more immediate sticking point is
the scandal over loans and bursaries. Back in
1966 the government set up a Comite du Plan
to project the amount that would be needed for
loans and bursaries each year. Before UGEG
would send representatives to sit on it, it
extracted from the government the promise
that a policy of universal accessibility would
be pursued, and that the government would
increase bursaries over loans.
This year the government ignored the
Comite's recommendation and not only decreased the total allotment but made the greater
proportion in loans. In practical terms, this
means the student will have to take a $800
loan (as opposed to $700 last year) to become
eligible for a bursary.
There is no tuition at the CEGEP's . . . they
are part of the public education system — but
for the students who are taking the pre-university course the prospect of not being able to
attend university next year is worse than bleak.
It means they will have taxed their families'
financial resources for two extra years to no
purpose. Understandably, the students find this
combination of factors intolerable.
CEGEP'S LIKE  B.C. REGIONAL  COLLEGES
Regional disparities (ironically one of the
things the CEGEP's were created to overcome)
within the network of collegees is another complaint. Courses cancelled at the last minute,
poor facilities (most are old schools and other
buildings bought by the government and hastily transformed into CEGEP's) add to the students' ill feeling.
But these are the superficial problems, nothing that can't be overcome by better organization and a more concerned government. There
is nothing remotely radical in these complaints:
you can't radicalize an education system which
doesn't exist. These are merely demands for
modernization.
However, some more basic problems are involved.
For instance, early estimates were that the
relation of vocational to pre-university students
would be 70% -30%. In fact, it is almost exactly the reverse.
And worse, more than 60% of the professional (vocational) graduates have not been
able to find jobs in their line of work.
Neither of these is the fault of a bungling
government. Both are parts of the basic Quebec
fabric — a new desire for higher education and
an economy as yet unable to absorb well-
trained technicians.
Referendum backflip
By CAREY LINDE
Monday night council did its famous back
flip and reversed an earlier decision to hold
a campus-wide referendum on the constitutional revisions. Now it is back in the circus
we call a general meeting. Wielding his
bureaucratic knowledge with great ineptness,
Donn Aven said it would cost $1,000 to hold
the referendum. Bull Shit! He talked of a
nine-page ballot, when in fact it could be
four one-page ballots, each about the size of
last year's athletic referendum.
So, on some foggy day in January, we
will all go traipsing into a general meeting
to watch the engineers show us their serious
concern for reforms. And when engineering
president Fraser Hodge decides it is time to
proceed, he will permit his lieutenant, Dave
Zirnhelt, to start the program.
Therein will unfold the most confusing,
heated debate in the history of the joint.
In the name of democracy, efficiency and
sport it is off to a general meeting again.
Somehow I think it would have been so
much more sensible to simply have a referendum, so we can ALL take part, in the
peace and quiet of our sterile surroundings.
What would happen in Vancouver politics
if everytime a decision had to do to the
people, we all had to go to a general meeting at city hall rather than merely going to
the nearest polling station? Let's fact it, we
are not the high school the AMS thinks we
are. This campus has a total population of
nearly 28,000 people. It's time we reacted
to this fact in a more realistic way. The day
of the general meeting is over — we are
just too big. Friday, November 22,  1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Background to SFU
By John Conway from The Peak
"They think about nothing but screwing
But we are the ones who get screwed."
— From Marat Sade.
The censure has been unconditionally lifted.
We are still strangled by the same, disease-
ridden, bureaucratic, rotten, and unaccountable
structure that we had before. What has changed? Nothing. McTaggart-Cowan was fired on
the faculty's request. Shrum resigned as BoG
chairman on the faculty's request. These are
the answers of our profoundly wise faculty to a
decrepit and authoritarian university structure.
With this new crisis uncovered (nothing becomes a CRISIS until we become conscious of
it) regarding the political, social, and academic
discrimination in the admission of students to
SFU, once again we confront a manifestation
of the deeper structural crisis in this and every
other university.
CONSISTENT TRANSFER SCREWING
There is probably not a student here in one
of the Grade 13 graduate, transfer from another
university, transfer from a community or regional college, or draft-dodger categories who
has not been screwed on being admitted to
SFU. Unaccountable bureaucrats in the Registrar's office apply unclear criteria inconsistently to students applying for admission, especially those in the above categories. Such
standards as do exist apparently change with
the whim, mood, or political inclination of the
particular bureaucrat. Admission standards are
not clear either to the applying student or,
most importantly in this particular case, to the
faculties and administrations in B.C.'s regional
and comunity colleges (e.g. Vancouver City
College, Selkirk Junior College, Columbia College, etc.). Hence, such transfer students often
find their credits reduced as a condition of admission, some find credits promised arbitrarily
withdrawn upon admission, and, most psychotic, find that they must appeal through the
same persons who made the original decisions!!
Furthermore, there are some cases in which
the Registrar's office has sought (and often obtained) personal and political information about
students who apply for admission. The purpose
of such information is obvious and strikes down
at the very root, any flourishing of academic
freedom at SFU. Again, we see that the slogan
"academic freedom" applies only to the faculty,
and in no way can it be said that students
function in conditions that can be described
as academically free.
DRAFT-DODGERS OUT
Perhaps most shocking is the well-documented fact that draft-dodgers find it increasingly
difficult to gain admisison to SFU. The Associate Registrar has admitted that he has asked
students from the U.S.A. questions regarding
their draft status. Why he asked such questions
becomes clear when one hears of case after
case of draft dodgers with excellent academic
records, and excellent qualifications, who are
turned down with no reasons given. Often, the
more common ruse of keeping these people out
is simply not to answer them when they write
letters of application.
Why can this happen? The answer is clear
— the persons making the decisions are not
held accountable to those who are affected by
said decisions. We have access neither to a
formal and clear-cut statement of admisisons
policy, nor to the procedures used in reaching
a decision regarding the admission of students, nor to exact information as to extent of
this discrimination. We must have control over
decisions that affect our lives. We must be
aware of the criteria upon which decisions are
made.
CRISIS IN EDUCATION MONEY
Why is this happening? The reason this is
occuring lies at the very heart of the growing
crisis in education in B.C. All educational facilities in B.C. — at every level, and in every
region (especially working class and poor areas)
—are over-crowded and under-financed. This is
the consequence of the Socred government's
financial and industrial polices — the "public"
sector of the economy which is important to
and subsidizes big business in its breathless
To Page 2
See: NO MONEY
EDITOR: Al Birnie
New*  -  John Twigg
Ass't News   John Gibbs
City   Peter Ladner
Ass't   City    Alex   Volkoff
Managing  Bruce Curtis
Wire      Irene   Wasilewski
Photo .... Dick Button, Powell Hargrave
Sports  Jim Maddin
Associate   Mike  Finlay
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox
Page Friday  Andrew Horvat
The rag was put to bed, as we say
in the trade, with love. Conchie, The
James, worked (?) all night on his part
of the production. Twigg did likewise,
taking a brisk shower after the fact.
Nate Smith and Frank Flynn applied
emotion in generous quantities while
Peter Kennedy just applied. Rob Ty-
hurst and Coverntoi**, Jane of, sought
physical and mental union—in an underwood fashion. Cavorting over the
wood Jim Maddin scored again with
the physical types. Gibbs experienced
his maiden masthead. Dick Button and
Frizzel gained carnal knowledge of the
darkroom. Tony Gallagher learned a
litUe too. Dirk Visser, everybody lovingly agreed, learned far too much. Ah
—sweet knowledge! Bruce Curtis cruelly
raped bureaucratic tradition and descended from the heavenly confines of
of journalistic virginity to partake of
human pleasures—in triplicate. Knox,
upon seeing the hill, went up on the
hill, and made manifest. Alex, innocence among innocents, was plyed with
liquid love and succumbed to temptation, selling out to the pits of iniquity.
She loved it. Yes, we all loved it and
look what happened — The Ubyssey,
sporting temptress that she is, is exhausted. Allen, the big, appeared in
blushing pink and announced a staff
meeting in the orgy hall at noon today
with editorial jollies to follow. In the
same profusion was red the intention
that all should gather for a repeat of
today's profusions on Monday — yes
Virginnia, on Monday! Al wants all
week to love Friday's copy. She's sleeping soundly,  what  now my  love?
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
International Affairs Conference
Applications now being received for those interested in
attending the Ninth Annual Conference on International
Affairs from January 21 to 24, 1969 at the University
of Manitoba. This year's conference will center on the
theme — Latin America! Progress or Revolution in our
Hemisphere. Apply in writing to A.M.S. Secretary,
Room 248, S.U.B. before 4 p.m., Friday, November 22nd.
Chairman Required for Special Events
Applications are now being received for chairman of
the special events, performing arts committee. This
person will be responsible for planning events of a
specialized nature which are of campus wide interest.
Apply in writing to AJVI.S. secretary, Room 248 S.U.B.
before 4 p.m. Friday, November 22.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
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THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
Activism key
in platform
An independent city aldermanic candidate
has urged students to become active in the
Dec. 11 civic elections.
"Student protest is no good unless it is
followed by constructive action," restaurant
owner Murray Rabinovitch said in an interview Tuesday.
"Students can become active in the civic
elections by voting or by backing a candidate."
Rabinovitch stressed that students do not
have to own property to vote in the election.
"Any British subject 21 years of age or over
can vote if he has been a resident of Vancouver since Jan. 1 or owned property as of
Aug. 1.
Rabinovitch said he will work to reopen
now-illegal housing suites in the city on an
annual licence basis, "with proper inspection
and controls to ensure that rents won't be
exorbitant and living conditions are satisfactory."
(Illegal suites were closed down by city
council to meet city zoning laws.)
"Opening the suites will ease the Vancouver
housing shortage. In the Point Grey area this
will especially benefit students," he said.
CEGEP administration
creates police state
MONTREAL (CUP)—You wonder why there is uproar
in the Quebec CEGEPs? The following list of "temporary
regulations" set by the administration and governing the
students at CEGEP Maisonneuve may shed a little light on
the question.
The rules are in force until such times as the students
hold a student council election, to be run by the administration, so that "dialogue" can be re-established with "responsible" representatives of the students.
Breach of any of the following regulations will result
■n automatic expulsion:
• No general assemblies of students, during or after
school hours, can be held without administrative approval.
9 There can be no distribution of pamphlets "of any
nature" and no placing of posters without administrative
approval.
• There can be no boycotts of classes.
• Therj can be no "reprisals against or provocation
of" administrators or "other" students.
• Two student media, Radio Maisonneuve and Trait
D'Union (newspaper) are suspended pending establishment
by the administration selected student council of a code of
ethics of communication.
• The offices of the student council are closed until
further notice.
• There can be no "strangers" allowed into the school
without administration approval.
• The "temporary regulations" may be "negotiated"
only after the new student council is formed.
G
ELDORADO
m
ELDORADO NUCLEAR  LIMITED
ELDORADO NUCLEAIRE LIMITEE
Eldorado Representatives
will be available for interviews
on Campus
November 28th
Opportunities exist in the following fields:
PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT:
Geologists
Geophysicists
Mining Engineers
Chemical or Metallurgical
Engineers
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT:
Geologists
(Post Grads & Undergrads)
Mining Engineers
Chemical Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Contact the Student Placement Officer for
interview times and further information.
Blue stockings'
for French fix
Les Bas Bleu decided to take French department head Dr. Larry Bongie to task over
the outmoded exam regulations of the French
department at a meeting Wednesday noon.
Les Bas Bleu (the blue stockings) is a group
of French students pushing for reform in the
French department.
There are two major problems facing the
French students now. One is the exam systems,
the other is the lack of a reading room for
French students.
The group plans to submit a report to
Bongie outlining the French students' grievances.
A solution to the question of exams would
be solved best, they feel, by an individual class
discussion and vote. They also want the whole
second term outline reviewed as it is based
on what they feel will be past policies.
Students gain
limited power
TORONTO (CUP) — Students at York University were given a measure of control over
the governing of their activities and conduct,
control which previously was
held by the university's administration president.
A new university committee
will handle all legislative and
judicial matters dealing with
student activities and conduct
and will be composed of 15
students — eight elected from
the student body and seven
appointed by the administration
president.
Though the administration
head has seemingly relinquished a great deal of his power,
he is still given room to manoeuvre. He has the right of veto
over any of the committee's
decisions though he must present his reason in writing to
the committee. As well, he has
the right to determine the committee's sphere of competence
and may evoke particular cases
to faculty councils.
The new set-up came out of
a report presented to the board
of governors by a four-man
commission created in December 1967 to investigate the
powers of the administration
president.
The committee was made up
of one representative each from
the student body, the faculty,
the    administration    and    the .
board of governors.
35 run for
arts dean
The field has been narrowed
to 35 in the great dean of arts
sweepstake.
"We're approaching the stage
where discussions will be long
and difficult," said English
prof M. W. Steinberg, chairman
of the faculty committee to
choose the new dean.
"We're still hoping to meet
the late December deadline we
set for ourselves but it is not
certain that we will."
Steinberg said his committee
began with 120 names for consideration and has received 170
more applications and nominations since September. .ices pla  ■•
-all-molecule "so
..... .xact details are unknown.
tant to realize that protein biosynthesis
ulated in two ways, either through D
in turn must first produce m-RNA, or pf 2WO
Perls' wisdom
By DALE  WIK
After getting past the guard at the door I was
Me to have a non-interview with Dr. Perls in the
tea-room of the faculty club. All was quiet respectability with the cultured tinkle of teacups in the
background. Dr. Perls asked me not to use a tape
recorder, not to write anything down, and not to ask
questions. Other than that it was a normal interview.
He refused to tell me any of his personal history
so I slinked over to the Extension Department and
deviously  obtained his  dossier.
Dr. Perls is the founder of Gestalt Therapy which
is becoming recognized as the most important innovation of psychiatry since Freud's psychoanalysis.
Dr. Perls was born in Berlin, Germany in 1893.
He received his M.D. there and left for South Africa
in 1934, where he founded an institute of psychoanalysis. Going to the United States in 1946, he
established a private practice there and received his
Ph.D. in 1950.
For the past four years he has been psychiatrist
in residence at the Esalen Institute of California,
Conducting seminars and workshops in Gestalt
Therapy, particularly its application to education.
"I love having people hate me."
This man has no front. He plays no games and
he destroys yours. You don't have to search for
the real Dr. Perls because there is only one and
he is real, always.
When you met him he will look at your mind
and you will be stripped. Look at him but don't
try to censor your thoughts because he knows
people. You can feel the power of his mind because he has self-knowledge and, inevitably,
knowledge of others.
"Come closer to me. You make your voice soft
because you want people to come to you but I
won't play your game."
His perception is frightening. You reach for
conventions to bring the dialogue to a safer, more
impersonal plane.
"Are you happy?" I asked.
"Why do you ask me these stupid questions?
You invent questions for answers that are already
there. What do you want from me? I must be
stingy with my time."
"I want to know what you're like." Then there
was that look, the head slightly tilted back, a
narrowing of the eyes under prickly eyebrows
and a who-are-you-trying-to-kid expression.
"You won't know me, not for fifty years. Now
t-11 me what you really want."
He is completely invulnerable to people because he sees through their guises and destroys
their illusions about themselves. His honesty is
penetrating and ultimate. He turned my questions
back on me.
"How would you feel if people wanted to suck
information out of you to use? You are power
mad. When I first saw you I knew that."
I felt discomfited.
"You don't like ambitious people?"
"Questions again. What is it with this like,
don't like? You pass judgment all the time. Talk
slowly to me instead of tripping along. When you
ask questions you're projecting yourself onto me.
Don't ask me any questions. Why don't we start
from the beginning and you can be honest for
once."
You will see the impatience in his eyes with
the deep wrinkles beneath them curving to his
cheekbones. His* hair, grey sparked with white, is
the most sensational element of his appearance,
but it is the eyes that draw you. They are unfathomable.
Dr. Perls is the most human thing I have met.
He lives his concept of unity of body and mind, a
belief in the now which creates a mind of amazing
strength.
Gestalt therapy is an assimilation of previous
schools of psychology and psychiatry with the
emphasis upon awareness and integration of self
and environment. One of the basic concepts is
that the whole of the personality determines the
parts rather than the whole being a sum of the
parts.
Dr.  Perls'  psychotherapy revolves  about  dis
entangling the outside pressures upon personality
from the inner conflict. What he tries to achieve
is a balance, a realization in the mind of what is
internal and what is external. He does not want
a segregation, an artificial barrier between the
two. Instead he tries to establish an awareness
of conflict so that the ideas can be integrated.
Neither sides of the conflict should be suppressed
because this is a loss to the whole personality.
Both should be expressed and assimilated.
Dr. Perls' voice is slow but never lethargic.
The thought knows where it's going and doesn't
hurry to express itself.
"I remember when I woke this morning there
was a grey mist over the ocean, a grey mist like
mist in Japan. I thought that maybe I would come
here to live."
He is stingy with words so that you listen intently to each word as if it were his last.
"People in Tokyo were unhappy. A lot of the
women I met were bitches. But in Kyoto I met
very few bitches. The people there were happy.
A bitch is someone who is not open to people, a
manipulator. To stop being a bitch is to start
being a human being."
I wondered if Dr. Perls had ever been a phony
person, had he gone through the agony of making
a human being from a shell, or had he spontaneously come to be as he is now, so real, so honest?
I wanted to ask him how he had become himself, yet as the question was crystallizing I realized
it for the inane thought it was. Each person has
the potential for becoming himself and it is his
choice whether or not he realizes this potential.
There is little that a psychiatrist can do for anyone. When a person wants to become a human
being in total, to fill the holes in himself, he must
do it himself. As Dr. Perls states:
"You have the responsibility for your existence."
My time was up. I felt the change in his speech.
He gave me his hand, warm and solid, and we
kissed each other. It was me, not him that I had
discovered. I said goodbye but not thank you.
Big Mother fosters Biafra
By VALERIE HENNELL
Mark Derrick tries again!
It's a benefit: for him, for
you, and for the starving
children of Biafra.
And the name is The Big
Mother.
Mark Derrick is not a big
mother. He is not even a big
father, at least not that he'll
admit. He is, however, a
man who has greatly influenced the pop music
scene in Vancouver, founder
of that illustrious establishment known as the Village
Bistro.
But Derrick recently de-
Bistroed. He sold the club
to two young Europeans and
is off to seek bigger and
better things.
And his latest venture is
The Big Mother. This is a
new club cum discotheque
cum coffee-house located at
11.1 Dunsmuir opposite the
Greyhound Bus Depot (the
old location of Stage 2). The
club will be run on much the
same basis as the Bistro with
several significant advantages. The auditorium has a
300 - person capacity with
generous room for dancing.
It is air-conditioned and has
ample refreshment and
washroom facilities (a relief
to those who are used to
lining up to try to spend a
penny at other local establishments).
The Big Mother will open
this Monday night with a
Red Cross Youth sponsored
benefit for the children in
Biafra. Admission is 50
cents minimum donation.
The benefit will run for two
nights, featuring four groups
nightly playing from 8 to
sometime after midnight.
Monday night offers
Tomorrow's Eyes, Seeds of
Time, Trials of Jason Hoover
and The Fraser Delta Fertility Band.
Mother Tucker's Yellow
Duck, The Revolving Door,
Cast of Thousands and The
Mock Duck play Tuesday.
Lysergia provides the
light show which utilizes
four slide, four movie and
two overhead projectors, as
well as a strobe. This light
show will be a regular
feature at The Big Mother.
John Jervis, classical
guitarist, will perform both
nights.
The club will be open
every night but Mondays,
with groups performing on
a weekly basis. The Mock
Duck will play through to
Nov. 30.
Prices will be phenomenally reasonable at The Big
Mother, running $1.00 on
weeknights and $1.50 on
weekends, with reduced student and couple rates.
So do yourself and the kids
in Biafra a favour — catch
the opening of Mark Derrick's latest. Vancouver
could use another hopping
night spot, and its success
will depend on your support.
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 pfi 3hree
By K. TOUGAS
Barbarella is a lot better
than I expected it to be. For
one thing there are the
flourishing and luxuriant art
nouveau sets serving as
backdrops for an endless
fashion display, probably a
new record for costume
changes. Barbarella is the
ultimate Barbie doll. And
then there's little miss Fonda
insisting every step of the
way that she's no plain
Jane. Folies Bergere meets
Disneyland, naturally with a
space-age first: a first-class,
weightless condition striptease, with traces of humour
and with swarms of credits
messing around ... In any
case, Barbarella is a pop
parody that almost works,
and when not taken seriously, provides the fairy-tale/
comic - strip entertainment
(albeit sporadic) of puritjK?)
and good combatting evil
(otherwise referred to as "a
state of primitive neurotic
irresponsibility") which governs the Queen of Sogo and
Durand-Durand, earthling on
a power trip. The openly
feminine Buck Rogers who
leaves a silver bullet and
democratically makes love
to every eligible male candidate . . .
The film-medium and the
comic strip are virtually
identical.   Resnais'   Harry
Pfollyticks
■?
By REILLY BURKE
For some reason the current passion for student versus
authority confrontations turns me right off.
It is far too much like the old rugby "scrum down"
approach where the opposing groups face each other and
then proceed to knock heads. At the end of the game all
the players are tired and battered, and there is no real
winner no matter which way you look at it.
It is quite conceivable that the whole student power
bag was created by the authority mongers as a diversionary "head 'em off at the pass" tactic, and the students,
amazingly enough, seem to have fallen into the trap. They
are confined, and seem to enjoy it, content to shout a
little bit and push against the fence as a gesture, but they
never  really use their  thinkers.
"Like, it's a safe activity, It's a good way for the
little buggers to let off steam," is the way the feeling goes
in city hall, "but if they ever really get in our way, we
can always knock the shit out of them but good."
It is precisely this patronizing attitude that gets me
thinking that, as a supposedly intellectual community, we
should be able to get together and out-think and out-smart
the whole damn country.
For instance, in December, the Vancouver city elections for mayor, aldermen, school board, are coming up.
There is no reason whatever for ignoring these elections,
for the city decides on a lot of issues that directly affect
students. The requirements for a candidate for mayor or
alderman are no obstacle, in fact it is easier to run for
city government than it is to run for the AMS.
Quite possibly the student community is in the best
position of any group to run for public government. We
are not bound by overly rigid time schedules, nor are we
under the thumb of dogmatic reactionary employers who
would be unwilling to give us time off for government.
And finally, we have the manpower available for campaigning, door-knocking, and all the other assorted arm
twisting that goes with steering a person into government.
The only difficult part would be getting the first student into office, but this shouldn't be insurmountable as
we are as much aware of the image making process as the
best of the outsiders.
By this time it should be either a shoo-in or a bust for
the succeeding students. The only way to get the system
by the bag is to try it and see what happens.
Anything else is just farting in the wind.
Dickson, Godard's Lemmy
Caution and Jessua's The
Killing Game demonstrate
the awareness and concern
of French film-makers with
the intertwined mediums. At
all times one is conscious of
the medium—the question of
"real life" is non-existent. If
at any time the viewer started believing what is happening in Barbarella, the film
would be immediately doomed to dismal failure.
Taken seriously or under
close scrutiny, the film often
falls flat. After the introductory "I've got to get rid
of this tail" the puns often
drag, and the jokes and
satire are sloppy—an exaltation transference pill and
the ultimate pleasure organ
are both fun sequences that
are just too drawn out. The
film searches randomly and
incoherently for comedy;
effects are repeated and become tiresome, and even the
marvelous fantasy aspect
occasionally becomes monotonous.
For years Hollywood has
been feeding the commercial
circuits with films (good and
bad) which progress in a
slow crescendo towards one
or more scenes of violence
or sex (or some combination
thereof . . .). However, where
do you go when sex is happening all the time, all over
the place, the subject of
endless visual and verbal
gags? Sadism. When the
heroine is captured, let's
torture here! A somewhat
decadent attitude towards
women, perhaps, but it'll
sell tickets . . . And then, I
must admit, there is a rather
Impressive scene where a
group of seemingly innocent
toys become a horde of
flesh-tearing, gnashing mechanical dolls, operated with
glee by a cluster of excited
children . . .
However, back to the
mocking caricatures offered
by the movie. David Hem-
mings in fact steals the show
as a bumbling, fumbling,
absent-minded revolutionary
whose secret-passages never
work and who loses the purloined key to the demon-
queen's evil secret shelter.
Milo O'Shea comes off
reasonably well as the fiendish torturer who plots the
overthrow of the universe
with the aid of his ray
machine. And then, Anita
Pallenberg, arch-tyrant and
Queen of Sogoi who greets
our adventuress with "Hello,
Pretty, Pretty" which degenerates later to "How pretty,
Pretty, Pretty". She also
does nasty things prompting
some sweet utterances from
Jane-baby: "Decrucify the
angel! Decrucify him or I'll
melt your face!" Finally,
there's the talking computer
who sounds like he's missing
some teeth while voicing
some superb weather pronouncements.
In this case, rather than a
put-on, Barbarella is the
first exemplary sci-fi flick
take-off.
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Last weekend's Vancouver Symphony concerts were
important events, for they marked the beginning of a musical revolution which has been brewing for some time. The
particular work which started this train of events was the
now-notorious oratorio-cantata The Whale by the young
English composer John Tavener.
What had been billed as "the biggest musical happening on the continent" turned into much more. A small but
representative contingent of about twenty of Vancouver's
famous Little Old Ladies' Brigade eventually left The Whale
on Sunday afternoon, and at the end of the piece about
half the audience got up and walked out without applauding, while the younger and less conservative element remained behind to loudly acclaim the work. On Monday
night, the situation was much the same, though a larger
number of young people remained to whistle and cheer for
their new hero Tavener, who temporarily assumed the
status of a pop star.
This was not, as Province music critic Lawrence Clud-
eray maintained, "the first time in memory people walked
out at a Vancouver Symphony concert." People walked out
of The Rite of Spring in July, 1965, and the Estudios Sin-
fonicos by Ginastera last year. Vancouver Sun critic Max
Wyman chided those who walked out, saying "such small
mindedness can only help Vancouver gain a reputation for
musical intolerance and sheer bad manners." At least walking out is better than starting a noisy riot which drowns
out the music like at the world premiere of The Rite of
Spring in 1913. Lloyd Burritt, UBC composer whose own
Assassinations for Orchestra and Electronic Tape will be
world premiered on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, later said of the
musical exodus, "At least they did something!"
What caused such a reaction after the light and delicate
flute-playing of guest artist Jean-Pierre Rampal was a work
which appealed both to the senses of sight and sound. Tavener, in an informal discussion in the UBC Music Building
Students' Lounge last Monday noon, stated he thought his
piece was "visually interesting — if you get bored with the
sound, you've still got something to look at."
The visual element ranged from UBC's mini-skirted
Chamber Singers to baritone Steven Henrikson sticking
his head into the open piano and yelling, symbolic of Jonah
trapped in the whale (which Travener said was not supposed to be funny in spite of outbursts of giggling in the
audience at this point in both performances). As well, there
was CBC newsman Harvey Dawes reading assorted biological data about the whales, plus seven percussionists, an
electronically amplified harp and piano, choruses of vomiting, snoring, chattering teeth, and shouting with the aid of
bullhorns, and the composer himself adding tone clusters
on the organ. For the grand finale, the entire orchestra
played and stamped their feet loudly in rhythm, which
jarred quite a few people.
On the whole, the playing (and stamping) of the VSO
was extremely admirable; The composer himself later commented that the playing, especially the brass, was "much
more aggressive" than the London premiere performance,
where it was "tame, and sounded like Elgar or Walton."
In fact, if the high standard of performance set at the VSO
concerts this year continues, I don't see why the symphony
couldn't develop into one of Canada's and North America's
top orchestras.
If you're sorry that you missed The Whale (and there
were more "young" people at these concerts than is
usually found in the QueeniE), have no fear, for Tavener
said at UBC that the piece will be recorded on the Beatles'
new label, Apple. (He's a close friend of John Lennon, and
commented "I'd like to do something with Yoko Ono, but
I'm not sure about The Beatles.")
In the meantime, while waiting for the record of The
Whale, you could help in Vancouver's musical revolution.
The ultra-modern Sounds of the Century concert coming
up next Tuesday night at 8:00 in the QueeniE is CHEAP
and will be a valuable experience if you've got a receptive
musical mind which isn't back in the nineteenth century.
Friday, November 22, 1968
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By KEITH FRASER
With really a paucity of English
drama in the nineteenth century, as
seen especially in the untheatrical
kind written by the eminent Romantics like Byron and Shelley, it was delightful to discover at the Dorothy
Somerset Studio on Wednesday night
(its official opening, evidence that
French drama from approximately the
same period couldn't be blanketed
with quite a similar generalization.
Alfred de Musset's No Trifling With
Love, which received a commendable
production by cast and director alike,
left me with no doubt that the French
reaction against its strict classical inheritance in theatre was worthwhile
so far as it went, and meaningful insofar as the adaption by Frank Canino
was a good approximation of de Musset's original conception.
Considered one of the four great
French Romantics, de Musset gave us
a play equipped with a narrator and
a chorus comprised of village lads and
lasses who comment on the action in
a manner that is freer than their
Greek predecessors both in language
and in movement — the latter thanks
largely to the choreography of Richard Blackhurst in the local production.
This tragical comedy, unlike many
plays under thesis production, was not
plagued by untrained voices that grit
like sandpaper across the script. The
players here were cast with care by
the director, Miss Adrienne Winter-
mans, and costumed with help from
Miss Josephine Patrick, both duties
accomplished through eyes of an immediate audience rapport.
This immediacy was achieved by the
assistance of the chorus which engaged initial attention with a frolic
and dance that are characteristic of
English drama — especially that of the
Restoration — primarily at the production's conclusion when the cow is safely in the stall.
Since No Trifling With Love ends in
a suicide, any similar embellishment
its conclusion would have been obviously inappropriate. Instead, the
death of the simple Rosette (Brenda
Sheebin), occasioned by the aristocratic Perdican's (Lionel Doucette) insouciant disregard for her feelings
after Jae has pledged love, becomes
more pathetic if one considers the purposeful juxtaposition of the play's prelude and resolution.
No less appropriate was the opposition of the natural scenes outdoors
where Perdican reminisced in true Romantic fashion about his younger days
spent in nature, and the artificial
drawing room inside which the likes
of the foppish Baron (Jim Colby)
schemed for Perdican's marriage to
Camille (Susan Cadman).
Camille's refusal-acceptance-refusal
of her cousin in marriage, and her
ultimate decision to withdraw to a
protective convent in face of Rosette's
suicide for which she shares responsibility, were paralleled for the most
part in this production by music composed and arranged by Mr. Colby.
This music added an intelligent lyricism to the play and, together with
smooth scene transitions, was responsible for a crisply-paced production.
Outstanding performances, while
not easy to highlight in this fine cast,
would have to go finally to Miss Cad
man and to Ellis Pryce-Jones who captured, as he generally does, particular
enthusiasm from the audience for his
marvellous portrait of the obese Father Bridaine — one of two priests
responsible for the comic  subplot.
Miss Cadman can only remain a
talent to watch for in the future; instead of rendering another nancy-
pants heroine, often the case with
young actresses, she explored the nuances of her role with tenderness and
perception.
It is never simple to determine the
director's share in the success of a
role, but from what I've seen previously of Miss Winterman's work (Orion,
a one-act play she directed last term)
it's a good bet she aided Miss Cadman,
at least, in her stage movement, and,
at most, in the modulation of this
actress's fine voice. Mr. Pryce-Jones,
on the other hand, was likely most
responsible for his own role's success:
his timing and reactions, always professional, appeared intuitive.
My reservations, brief indeed, might
be summed up as follows: the production could have done with a slightly
less effeminate voice by Mr. Colby,
who appeared occasionally to play
only for laughs, and whose asides were
not always so. And too, the play itself
is perhaps marred by Perdican's gift
to Rosette, a dagger, which seemed
gratuitous at best and an obvious indication of the suicide to follow.
But it was to the credit of a sound
production-that melodrama was never
permitted to intrude here. This play,
to recapitulate, was very well done
and is quite worth your patronage. It
runs until Saturday evening.
Pacific Coliseum - Saturday, Nov. 30 at 8.30
LAST APPEARANCE TOGETHER OF
JANIS JOPLIN with
BIG BROTHER and the HOLDING
COMPANY
featuring
THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY
$4.50, $3.50, $2.50
TICKETS: THE BAY BOX OFFICE, MAIN FLOOR, THE BAY-DAILY 10 to 5; Phone 681-3351
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 p£ 5ive
Joe Hill
is gone
By KEITH ROUTLEY
Joe Hill is gone. The Pinkertons are no longer
cracking the skulls of those shouting, "solidarity".
The idealism of those radicals of 1919, the Winnipeg Wobblies, is also no longer with us. Max
Tessler is today an old and dissillusioned man.
What has happened to the dreams of unionism
these men held?
Because the union movement operated outside the established order it represented no interest group. The union movement did exercise its
limited power in ways that benefited great
masses of people.
A union is powerless without a contract. A
contract is a legal agreement, the existence of
which depends on the maintenance of the legal
and social order. The union has to maintain this
order to maintain its power. And that, Jim, is
why the union is becoming a reactionary force
in society.
At its birth the union movement had a class
self-concept. When Red Doran stood on a soapbox
in Seattle during the winter of 1917 shouting
"Workers, the sab-cat will meow," (in Wobbly
jargon the sab-cat was the symbol of sabotage)
nobody asked what a worker was. But the later
successes of the movement created class-mobility.
Class-mobility destroys social stratification and
class self-concept. Lacking a class self-concept
unions have fallen into the hands of regional interest groups.
A tragic example of this in the U.S. is labour's
opposition to anti-poverty programs. National
union leaders may join* in singing "We Shall
Overcome", but when the economic interests of
regional members are endangered by negro de-
feHaveFMIYou
all A Thousand
^Yeary
Voem tyan unknown Proletarian
Muskly Rudolph VtmLiekick- -
Pub.by IWV Educational Bureau
CHUrafjo, USA
mands   for   the   abolition   of  the   colour  bar  in
membership requirements, the music stops.
The national executive of a union is generally
elected through a long process of delegates and
conventions. They require the support of the regional groups. This explains the disheartening attitude taken by union officials towards those people
who disagree with the U.S. position in Vienam.
At the December, 1965 convention of the
AFL-CIO, anti-war demonstrators were not only
thrown out of the convention hall, but once outside, had their signs ripped up.
Not one union leader attacked these actions
of George Meany and his supporters.
George Meany, head of the Executive Council
of the AFL-CIO, describes those American people
critical of the present U.S. foreign policy as those
"who are either a little woozy upstairs or who are
victims of communist propaganda ... it is up to
all of us, on affairs outside the boundaries of this
nation, to have one policy. We can't disagree outside the boundaries of the nation and have an
effective foreign policy."
Why? The economic interests of the regional
groups of American unions (the 'word commonly
used is international) is tied to the military economy of the welfare capitalist state.
So when you see the California Grape Boycott billboard at the south end of the Granville
Street Bridge that the B.C. Federation of Labour
paid for, remember, the vines are 1500 miles
away.
FLY
Continued from pf 9ine
until she was afraid it would escape, to multiply
itself into millions before death.
She dared not stop it. Such a trespass would
seemed sacrilegious.
It was resting on the bottom now cleaning
its legs, perhaps spitting a sugary substance upon
them to cling more easily to the sides of the bottle.
It almost seemed to be praying, to some Fly God.
With its whole being it wanted escape. Yet
once it had escaped there would be no memory
of anything that it had endured. Its efforts could
be so easily annihilated.
Would over-exposure to Coke kill it? Why
should it care whether it lived inside the bottle
or outside? Surely the air was the same in both
places and it was so tiny that there could be no
claustrophobic feelings.
Was there a loneliness for its fellow flies? Yet
it was so like them, its company should be enough.
She lay there in the heavy twilight between
waking and sleep and dared not turn the lights
off.
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Our Representative, Mr. J. B. Murphy, will be on campus
NOVEMBER 25th & 26th, 1968
to arrange interview appointments for November 27-28-29
Mr. Murphy will be located in the office of Student Services
Friday, November 22, 1968
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A Hawk from
a Handsaw
A re-examination of the
work of Robert Forsythe
By FREDERICK IAN NOEL KIRKWOOD
Department of English
"I   am   but   mad   north-north-west;   when   the   wind   is
southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw."
(Hamlet II ii 375.)
It is now some sixteen years or more since the death, in
mysterious circumstances, of Robert Forsythe, the "mad critic".
My excuse for this reappraisal of a man who, in his own day,
was dismissed as a "lunatic" by T. S. Eliot, a "fake" by F. R.
Leavis, and a "damned impertinent bastard" by Ezra Pound,
is the discovery of new material which throws a fresh and
startling light upon his position. Since Forsythe is so little
known today, however, some kind of brief biography may
be helpful.
Forsythe was born in 1881 on the island of Arran, in the
Firth of Clyde. His father was a gloomy religious recluse, and
something of a mystic. After his death, Forsythe and his
mother—with whom he had very strong connections—moved
to the city of Glasgow, where Forsythe attended university
from 1902 until 1906. His subsequent career is ordinary and
undistinguished.
He held various university teaching posts off and on until
1943, when he went into semi-retirement. His first scholarly
article was published in 1913; Faber published a collection
of his essays, The Muse's Tablets, in 1932, and he himself
supervised the publication, at his own expense, of The Four
Binri in 1947. At the time of his death, in January 1952, he
was working on a more extensive work, The Binraic Cosmology. The cause of his death has never been determined.
His housekeeper claimed that he foresaw it and was prepared.
He died peacefully at home, from no apparent medical cause.
(Forsythe himself doubtless would have said that he had
merely been "assumed" by the Four Binri.)
Forsythe's eatly essays, if not brilliant, were always sound.
He was a fine prose stylist, and had a gift for summing up
arguments, which meant that he had the final and definitive
say in some of the minor critical controversies of the day. He
was also a perceptive critic of contemporary literature, and
among the first to appreciate the true value of Ezra Pound's
verse. (See The Muse's Tablets, page 17.)
But from his earliest days he showed a tendency to
strange and bizarre theories, which gained him a certain
amount of fashionable disrepute. Among the more notorious of
these were his attribution of The Ring and ihe Book to Mrs.
Browning; and his contention that Lycidas is largely reworked
from lost MSS by Edward King himself.
Despite, or perhaps because of, these eccentricities, Forsythe continued to be a critic of some standing until the early
40's, when he first began to put forward his theory of the
Four Binri. (Forsythe's spelling varies between "Binri", which
seems to have been the preferred form, and "Binrai", which
is closer to the cognate adjective, "Binraic". Nowhere in his
writings does he use a singular form: we can only conjecture
—Binrus? Binra?) This theory emerged gradually in his essays
over the years, and did not appear in cohesive form until 1947.
Briefly, the theory may be summarized thus.  Forsythe
saw the whole creative life of man as being controlled by four
Spirits, extra-terrestrial Beings, immortal but incarnate, whose
inspiration lay behind the  work of  all true artists—taking
"artists" in its widest possible application. These four were:
Tanra, the Lover
Docril, the Philosopher
Hilmar, the Politician
Zidral, the Saint
Docril and Hilmar are male; Tanra and  Zidral  are female.
Yet Forsythe seems to have made a close association between
the Binri and his four elder sisters, Ruth, Eve, Esther, and
Mary, all of whom died in infancy. Those who regard Forsythe
simply as a madman make a big point of this, and see the
death of his sisters as the origin of Forsythe's psychosis.
All aspects of human creativity were fitted in to one of
these four categories, and all the genuine creative minds (i.e.
those whom Forsythe approved of) were regarded as being
inspired by the appropriate Spirit. Those who had not been
"visited" by the Binri were ignored or contemptuously dis
missed; except for a select band
to be a leading member) who w
of "The Enemy", a rather shad<
purpose of an "Antichrist" figure
evil opponent of the Binri.
Such are the main outline-
need here to go into the immense
wove around these basic concep
may read my forthcoming edit!
work, The Binraic Cosmology,
by the University of Manitoba I
Now this system in itself is
for example, the system advanc
bears certain affinities to the c<
Forsythe would have been forj
had built some solid creative acl
But, on the contrary, its results
apparently, disastrous.
Forsythe's interpretations 1
now they became bizarre to the
be explained by his trying to tw
categories; but with others, it i
can account for Forysthe's p
examples:
Don Quixote: there really :
identification of her with a. loci-
culpable error by Sancho Pans
Enemy.
Madame Bovary: Forsythe
interpretation of herself, and s
Tanra.
Edward Young's "Night. Tl
is the only truly great poem of
missed as a "prattler" and Swi
Shakespeare is really the
with "Mr. W. H." being Walsinj
an original theory, but Forsyth
shows up in his attribution of SI
tion to Zidral, the Saint.)
King Lear: Cordelia is not,
a personification of Tanra, but
Enemy.   She   is   a   cunning,   ©
diabolic plans against her inhocc
her fate.
Wordsworth was a bore, Cc
Homer was Sappho's husbai
Donne was a homosexual, j*
And so on — these essays :
Yet many of them are not entire
rejects the whole Binraic cosr
arguments in these essays, groui
of literary criticism, which are
stance, Forsythe's switch from l
to a full-blooded detestation of 1
some piercing criticisms. And
ences to Hilmar, the essay on
brilliant a piece of Chaucerian i
However, in or around 195
ther, and lost even the few f<
writings for valuable insights. H
trying to publish) reviews of
existent authors. It seemed that
existing evidence: in order to
theories he was now creating his
and absolutely discredited, and
ment barely summoned a relu(
Upon his death, his private
and mine, Professor David Cal
sity. Professor Caldwell, whb
Forsythe as something approa
attention to these papers. I ca
fessor Caldwell died about 18 :
a great loss to the world oi h
executor, and hope to bring on
tion of his critical essays.
As Professor Caldwell's en
Forsythe papers. They were of '.
accepted the common estimator
valued his insights, and even —
THIS SKETCH of the Four Bir
sythe's papers. It appears to b
and was probably made v
"assumption."
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 pf 6ix & 7even
(of whom Ezra Pound came
jre.fegarded as direct agents
>wy entity which served the
, the powerful but essentially
of the system: there is no
y/eb of detail which Forsythe
ts. Those who are interested
>n of Forsythe's posthumous
to be published next spring
ress.
ho better and no worse than,
3d by Yeats in A Vision. It
smology of Blake. Doubtless
iven his eccentricities if he
lievement on this foundation,
in Forsythe's criticism were,
iad often been individual—
joint of absurdity. Some may
ist works into fitting Binraic
: hard to see how even this
jrversities.   A   few   random
s a Lady Dulcinea, and the
1 peasant girl is a gross and
a, who is an  agent  of The
accepts 100% Emma's own
;e her as an incarnation of
oughts", inspired by Docril,
he 18th century. Pope is dis-
t as a "scribbler",
jxiled Christopher Marlowe,
Ham. (This is not, of course,
;'s characteristic eccentricity
akespeare/Marlowe's inspira-
ts might have been expected,
)f Hilmar, perverted by The
nniving politician, ^weaving
it sisters, and fully deserves
eridge a quack,
d.
love with Ben Johnson,
aake bizarre reading indeed,
ly unconvincing. Even if one
lology, still there are some
ded purely on the principles
very hard to refute. For in-
s early admiration of Pound
ie Cantos is accompanied by
f one deletes all the refer-
The Canterbury Tales is as
riticism as I have ever seen.
), Forsythe went a step fur-
llowers who still sifted his
began publishing (or rather,
non-existent books by non-
he had tired of twisting the
substantiate his own wierd
own evidence. He was finally
the Times Literary Supple-
rant obituary for his death.
papers passed to his friend
well, of Manchester Univer-
ihfired the general view of
hing a lunatic, paid scant
not really blame him. Pro-
ion ths ago, and his death is
tters. I am proud to be his
at some future date an edi-
ecutor, I also received the
ttle interest to me, as I also
oi Forsythe. Although I had
n a jjerverse way — enjoyed
i was found among For
based on a dream vision,
ry  shortly   before   his
his wilder flights of fancy, I could never take seriously the
man who had tried to palm off serious reviews of books which
existed only in his own imagination.
It was therefore with idle and slightly indignant curiosity that, one rainy afternoon, I opened the file which Professor Caldwell had marked "Reviews of Non-existent Books."
I was flicking through it when my eye was caught by a review of a set of four novels which Forsythe hailed as the
complete and final justification of his system. The novels
were all to deal with basically the same subject, but each
one was to represent the viewpoint of one of the Four Binri.
Forsythe indeed referred to the novels as Tanra, Docril, Hilmar. and Zidral. The author's name was given as "Leonard
Durrant". Several quotations were given; they seemed familiar. I checked. I checked further: they matched almost word
for word. I realized that I was reading an accurate and extremely perceptive review of Lawrence DurrelFs Alexandria
Quartet.
Yet Forsythe died three years before the publication of
Justine.
Since then I have done extensive work on the "nonexistent" books reviewed by Forsythe. There are 53 of them
in all. In the sixteen years following his death, some 17 of
these works have been published. Forsythe's reviews display
intimate knowledge of these books. In one review he quotes
a full page of Iris Murdoch's The Unicorn with word-for-word
accuracy.
Calligraphy experts testify that these reviews are definitely the work of Forsythe, and that they cannot possibly be
forgeries by Professor Caldwell.
I have found, in the "rejected" files of the Times Literary
ROBERT FORSYTHE
Supplement, a copy, dated 1951, of a review of William Gold-
ing's Free Fall.
Mr. Ezra Pound has refused to confirm or deny the accuracy of Forsythe's quotations from an as yet unpublished
Canto.
I have sent to Gore Vidal a prediction of the plot of his
next novel. He confirms it absolutely.
I cannot stress strongly enough the importance of what
I have in my possession. The Four Binri apparently dictated
to the dying Forsythe a complete picture of the course of
Western literary culture over the next fifty years. All is foreseen; all is predestined. The Binri have already decided
what forms our poetry shall take, what philosophical doctrines shall appear plausible to us, what modes our musicians
shall work in, what designs our architects shall create for
us. In Robert Forsythe they gave us a warning, a map, signposts by which we may recognize their presence.
Sometime within the next two decades there shall arise
a novelist of awesome power, the fullest and final expression
of the genre, a giant greater than Dostoevsky, than Dante,
than Shakespeare. Forsythe calls him James Trevis, but, as
we have seen, the Binri seem to be careless about names.
But he is already living. In some small magazine, somewhere
in America, he has published his first short story.
F.I.N.K.
University of British Columbia.
November, 1968.
DUTHIE
BOOKS
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Species: Pisces Perskensis
in which it is discovered
that the origins of a certain
student leader may be traced
back to a fish
Dick Lazenby's tattle-tale (Page Friday,
Nov. 15) about ID cards cum American conspiracy is much more in the style of the
American hit-em-below-the-belt smear story
than it is in the mythic Canadian tradition
of fair play.
As a dirty card carrying member of
the student body, Tm sorry to hear that
my ID isn't worth the plastic it's laminated
between.
Let me straighten out Mr. Lazenby on
my citizenship: as many people know, my
folks and I are from Dagger Lake, B.C.; in
fact, my people have been up at bagger
Lake for nearly 300 years, before there
was even a west.
The only reason we got stuck in the
States for a while was because when the
self-righteous Canadian government was
shipping my parents (who are of Japanese
ancestry) to a concentration camp during
World War II (stealing our cattle and wapiti in the process), a slight administrative
error landed them in a relocation centre
near Weed, California. Shortly thereafter I was impressed into the American
Navy where I was made to suffer bestial
sexual degradations (cf. de Sade's Justine)
which accounts for such eccentric concepts
as I presently espouse, e.g. love, community,
democracy.
However, by dint of hard work, adher.
ance to a 400-year-old Marxist family tradition, and with the instinct of one of our
native salmon I have made my way back
to our beloved homeland. My first act upon
my return was to kiss the very water of
the Fraser River that beautiful boys have
swum in since time immemorial. The only
citizenship I maintain is that of The
People's Democratic Planet of Mars. When
one of our Canadian spaceships lands there
I will be among the first to welcome us.
Mr. Lazenby's sick paranoia (as contrasted to the healthy justified paranoia of the
pitiful Americans) reminds me that giving
more importance than is due to ID cards,
Faculty Club damages, how to administer
SUB, etc., is a way of frightening people
and turning them away from a serious
issue: our university does not give students
a good education.
Love,
Stan Persky
Canada's leading trust company
can offer rewarding
opportunities to students
graduating in 1969
A Royal Trust representative
will be interviewing interested
graduates December 3 & 4
Make a point of talking
with him.
Opportunities to advance with Royal Trust—
Canada's leading trust company—are
limited only by the individual's desire to
get ahead.
If you are interested in a rewarding career
with a company that has been respected
throughout Canada for 69 years, talk to your
University Placement Officer with a view
to seeing the Royal Trust representative.
TALK TO
Royal Trust
it's in your best interest
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 pf 9ine
The revolution is a drag
By ARNOLD  SABA
America is being swept by the strife which is
precursor to upheaval and disaster.
I fear we are to suffer slaughter and chaos.
Thousands of people will be killed; each one of
those souls shall suffer his own death. There will
be dying in the streets, carnage in homes and on
newly-created battlefields*. There will be scenes
of horror and outrage perpetrated against a pitiable humanity. Nature is cleaning house again.
I can not support this revolution. There is
nothing more foolish nor vainglorious than this
type of violent action. It has never done a bit to
improve the human condition. It reshuffles, rearranges, but keeps the human population down
none-the-less where they started — right down
here, feet on the ground, moving around the chess
pieces they call reality.
I am grieved by the untold harm the revolution will effect. It has already done more harm
than good: people have been killed, people worry
themselves to the nuthouse over it, masses of
people filled with hatred expend large amounts
of energy to this destructive end.
I am not a reactionary or a conservative. As
much as any political activist I dislike the Establishment or any deviously worded, cynical, utilitarian so-called philosophy which keeps man
bound in chains of his own forging, and worse,
keeps him binding other men.
It is that dislike, in fact, which makes me so
unsympathetic toward the revolution. It is an essentially conservative movement, involving all the
traditional political-military trademarks: violence,
dogma, organization, hatred, and most of all, a
belief in physical changes designed to free
humanity.
The revolution is, if possible, worse than the
creeping meatball. It is the rampaging bullshit-
burger. It is not a revolution at all, but a continuation of the wrong-headed regime which has
ruled the earth since Adam and Eve were turned
out of the garden.
Now my friends and contemporaries are preparing to lead the continent into civil war, in
which, as in all other wars, man will maim, slay,
and enslave his brother. I wish to dissociate myself from the evil which has gripped this generation.
To let man and peace grow from within, outward to attain their predetermined shape, or in
other words, to leave well enough alone, is, I believe, the only way any type of peace on earth
may be established.
However, I must allow the violent ones to do
their thing. I can't stop them anyway. Perhaps
it is just another manifestation of the universe's
energy, one which I have not yet learned to appreciate.
But I want no part of it.
Fly undone
By DALE WIK
"The mind is its own place and of itself can
make a Hell of Heaven or a Heaven of Hell," said
Milton.
She lay on the bed and watched the fly inside
the Coke bottle. First there had been the noise of
air sawing through pipes, that would be the logical explanation, but when she opened her eyes
she saw it there, the fly like an ugly helicopter
inside the bottle.
It clung to the sides of the bottle, creeping
past the lettering to the neck. Flies have their
hang-ups. It probably had agorophobia. And yet
there was one desperation to climb the air of the
neck, as if trying to cross the Hellespont escaping
the Sirens.
Nothing held it back; nothing but air; yet
each time it failed and sulked and plotted on the
bottom of the bottle.
It was nothing but a black rounded hill sitting
there on the bottom with one black line jabbing
out in profile. She stepped closer to it, her mouth
slightly open to make breathing easier. It was
quiet now and when she listened there was that
tingling noise of silence.
The fly was looking at her, it must be, for
flies have eyes all about their bodies. It moved
and she closed her mouth for it seemed that it
would be able to cut the glass and air between
them and invade the privacy of her mouth with
its germs.
She stepped back and watched it test the sea
of Coke on one side of the bottle. The sea was
stagnant and the fly didn't drink. It was saving
its energy, fiendishly obsessed with escape. Its
attempts were more erratic now, it barely flew
to the bottom of the "C".
Yet how could she predict what it would do?
In a burst of super-fly strength it climbed crazily
Continued on pf 5ive
TEAM WANTS YOU
As a member       As a campaign worker       As a voter
We'll tell you all about it at our fund-raising breakfast on Saturday,
Nov. 23rd. Come down to the Commodore, on Granville Street around
8:30, clutching 29c in your hot little fist. Team flakes — naturally — will
be served.
You'll meet Alan Emmott and the candidates and you'll hear why
, we're doing what we're doing. You'll also see the slide presentation
'MAN-MADE VANCCdJVER', produced by TEAM members Geoffrey
Massey and Bruno Freschi. It will show you what this city is — and
what we hope to make it.
TEAM is a balanced slate of candidates, with clearly established
policies upon which all members are agreed. This organization is designed
to give people the opportunity to participate in the democratic process.
This is your chance to get involved.
You can meet these people, see the show, ask questions and get
answers and have breakfast, all for 29c. It's the best offer you'll get this
Saturday. See you at breakfast.
VOTE FOR THE WHOLE TEAM ON DEC 11
Friday, November 22, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY "Where else
can you achieve
so much so quickly?"
Gord Clements of Vancouver, a
23-year-old student at the University
of British Columbia, had been thinking
of joining a stock brokerage firm on
graduation — until he met a marketing
executive from London Life. That was a
couple of years ago. Today he's a
successful London Life representative
— and a man who is convinced that
no other field can offer so much to the
college graduate. Read why.
At first, Gord thought the life insurance business had more than its share of hang-ups. As he
put it: "I thought a life insurance salesman was
a plodder, a man who pounded on doors day and
night. And I thought everyone had insurance
anyway, so there was really no market for the
product."
But Gord had an open mind. He was curious.
So he talked with a couple of his professors, who
cleared away many of his misconceptions. "They
helped me realize that selling insurance takes
technical knowledge and skill in influencing
people. Plus imagination and creativity, because you're working with an intangible product," says Gord. "They also pointed out that
insurance offers real opportunity, a great deal of
responsibility, and even the chance to name your
own income."
Gord still had doubts. But life insurance now
held some appeal for him.
VIGOROUS COURSE
After an aptitude test, and a series of interviews
at Vancouver and the company's head office in
London, Ontario, Gord was invited to join the
London Life team. On graduating from university
in 1967, he began a 21-month training and
development program. During the first three
months he was at London, where he was given
a thorough training in professional salesmanship,
and a background knowledge about such subjects as the uses of insurance, financial planning, business insurance, taxation and group
insurance.
(From his first day with London Life, the
college graduate receives an assured income plus
the opportunity for additional earnings.)
UNLIMITED POTENTIAL
"By the time I completed the course, and returned to Vancouver to work with a regional
manager, I realized that the life insurance market
is unlimited, and therefore unique. That's because insurance is the only product everyone
needs. And most people need more than they
own."
(Early in his career, the life insurance salesman is given a significant job with a great deal
of responsibility.  His work has a beneficial im
pact on the lives of his policyowners, and a direct
effect on his own success and on the success of
his company. In many other industries, a man
might have to wait five or ten years for opportunities and responsibilities as meaningful.)
"I found out, too, that most people buy insurance many times during their lives, and for a
variety of reasons. That's because insurance has
so many uses. People who already own insurance, therefore, are willing to buy more as their
needs increase. Because the market is so broad,
you can build your own clientele, and you can do
it by picking people with whom you want to do
business."
(More than any other people, Candians appreciate the value of life insurance, because they
buy more. And Canadians own more life insurance with London Life than with any other
company.)
EARLY INDEPENDENCE
"Apart from what insurance can do for the
public, I know what it has done for me. Like
most students, I was in debt when I graduated.
My only asset was a commerce degree. Today,
most of my debts have been paid off and I am
beginning to accumulate some fairly substantial
assets. Frankly, I can't think of another field in
which you can achieve so much so quickly. Insurance is the job for the young man who wants
real opportunity, who wants to get into business
for himself, and who even wants to name his own
income and achieve financial independence at a
relatively early age."
(At London Life, you have the opportunity to
grow. Plus the freedom and help to develop your
own skills, knowledge and income at the pace
you choose. Nobody holds you back. There is
no limit to what you can accomplish. If you wish,
you can build your entire career in sales — or, if
you prefer, you can move up to management).
To learn more about London Life, ask your
placement officer for the booklet "A Career for
You with London Life." Or arrange an interview
with a London Life representative.
Interviews will be held on campus November 27, 28, 29
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 pi I2welve
Meanwhile, back at the
backsides, Ferd and Martha
were discussing the cultural
potential of pre-Christmas
entertainment . . .
I think I'll go to the opera,
said Michael Quigley: Wagner's Gollerdammerung, the
last of the Ring of the Nibe-
lung cycle; about five hours
of music to keep you occupied on a Saturday afternoon
(tomorrow on CBC-AM). Begins at noon and continues
forever . . .
To which Martha answered: Tee hee! Guess who's
coming to UBC? The Guess
Who, that's who, in concert
at noon Wednesday, SUB
Ballroom, 50 cents. So Guess
Who to you, too!
To which K. Tougas added:
Ice Station Zebra, the latest
Cinerama effort at the Capitol is a competent film
Which provides reasonably
good entertainment. However, very simply, the film
has absolutely no reason
whatever to be in Cinerama;
Art
I detected a small element
of surprise and some confusion amongst the guests at
the opening of Paul Wong's
latest exhibition of Shuimo
paintings and collages in his
own Bau-Xi Gallery. Most
were touched by the subtle
elegance of the harmonies of
black ink on paper but many
expected a didactic exhibition thoroughly expressive
of a changing chaotic society. Instead, they received
a non-manipulative show,
the inspiration of which was
drawn from the primarily
passive philosophy of Taoism.
The light delicate stroke
of the Shuimo is much more
personal   than   the   unques-
at no time is the effect of
this medium used in any
way of interest. Otherwise,
Patrick McGoohan provides
a wealth of lively mannerisms in his portrayal of an
English agent, and the final
scene is appropriately interesting without being
nearly as tense and effective
as it could have been. It's
just not worth the hard-
ticket circuit .  .  .
Just then Tomorrow's
Eyes phoned the assistant
editor to seek assistance.
Our fourth member, Andy
Suttles, has finally got his
visa to immigrate to Canada,
they said. We've been waiting for more than a year for
him to rejoin us. He is
arriving at Vancouver International Airport at 11:30
Friday, and we hope anyone
and everyone will come to
meet him.
On Sunday night we are
holding an open reception to
welcome Andy and to intro-
tionable boldness of Western
art, and is therefore hard to
criticize artistically. Drawn
from Tao, it is a spontaneous
creativity derived from a
quietistic life which flows in
harmony with the natural
order. The flourish of spontaneity can be examined in
the light of this Taoism:
"Doing something doesn't
mean anything, but doing
nothing means something."
This creation, then, is a valuable outgrowth of contemplation. From this one can
see a very personal relationship between the brush and
artist, and the painting's
worth, in this case, can be
gauged only by the sensitivity of the viewer.
Paul's Shuimos are of
landscapes, birds and matters
of nature. Most show great
strength and boldness and
some, like Birds, ring with a
duce him to our friends and
followers here. It will be
from 8:30-1:00 at the James
Cowan Hall, Canada Way
and Gilpen in Burnaby.
There will be no admission
charge for a two hour concert and refreshments.
Which having said ihey
fled.
But Sid Williams arrived
to tell us that the Village
Bistro is on a communication
campaign: on Monday nights
they will be having poets,
folk-singers, and just plain
people all doing their own
things of self-expression.
Communicate Night is the
interaction of ideas, the sole
purpose of which is to exchange, not to propagandize.
Worth looking into if you
have a cause, or even if you
don't. Students $1.
Which was our backsided
day for this week. Accordingly we backed out and
tried to decide where to go
from here. Cheers.
Compiled by Valerie Hennell
diffusion of sound through
the forest. Still others, such
as Apart From Tao, exhibit
clouds of black in which
masses are pulled, forces
twisted and fusions of shades
create a spectrum of colours.
Action and serenity occur
within the same strokes, a
conscious reminder of the
symbol of Yin and Yang.
The collages, which use
the textures of Japanese
Mulberry paper and Chinese
rice paper, which in turn,
serve to illuminate and temper the black and white, did
not achieve the same powerful affect as the Shuimos. I
felt that Paul was more expressive with the Shuimo.
If you have time, I suggest
you visit the Bau-Xi Gallery
before November 30.
Bruce M. Watson
This is the place where, every week,
we put the names of the people who
worked on the paper, and indulge in in-
jokes which nobody understands, or even
reads.
This may contribute to the widespread
but erroneous idea that Page Friday is an
elite closed exclusive group. I have noticed
very often this term that when I ask someone to write for PF, they assume that what
they write will not be published, because they think there is a set team of
PF writers who do it all. This isn't true.
If the same names appear in our columns
week after week, the reason may be
simply that they turned articles in and
nobody else did. (I say that in the nicest
way, not meaning to insult our regular
columnists!)
But there must be hundreds of people
on campus who have their own special
interests,   about   which   they   could   write
clear, entertaining articles of some relevance and/or irrelevance to the university
community at large. We want these articles.
So please don't be shy, or modest;
pleas© don't assume that you haven't a
chance.  You  probably have.
The in-jokes follow:
A vast horde worked: only Maureen
the Mountain Girl brooded i n solitary
splendour, pizza-less. This left the rest of
us down in the Valley, who didn't really
notice, since she had Eyes only for Tomorrow. Stephen Scobie was giving geography lessons to Andrew Horvat, explaining to him that Elgin is a town in the
north of Scotland, whose inhabitants eke
out a precarious living by drawing ovals.
Out at the office. Sue Gransby and Bruce
Dolsen fought to a draw, while down at
the printers poor Dale had completely lost
her Wik.
The Four Binri watched over all.
*iH
rj^^
§tegH&
Lauris Innes        vW    ^
Joan Bodlak
VSq2)        2705 ^^^w. broadway
l                   Vancouver 8, b.c
phone: 732-7322
50c Benefit Dance
Mon. & Tues., 25th & 26th
THE BIG MOTHER
111 DUNSMUIR opposite GREYHOUND BUS DEPOT
4 Groups Monday & 4 Groups Tuesday
Tomorrow's Eyes Mother Tuckers
Seeds of Time The Mock Duck
Fraser Delta Fertility Band       Cast of Thousands
Trials of Jason Hoover Revolving Door
Wednesday, November 27 Thru Sunday, December 14
"THE MOCK DUCK"
The BIG MOTHER is a coffee house
with lots of room to dance.
First Time in
Vancouver
IN PERSON!
LOS INDIOS
TABAJARAS
Famed guitar duo
R.C.A. VICTOR
RECORDING STARS
With a concert of unprecedented quality
Thursday, Nov. 28, 8:30
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Tickets: $4.00, $3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 al Vancouver Ticket Centre,
630  Hamilton  St.,  MU 3-3255; all  Eaton's  stores  (charge  them);
Townhouse Electronics in Kerrisdale.
Student Protest
f^smm
Gerald E McGuigan
Student Protest
The Student
Radical in Search
of Issues . . .
or
Please Don't
Shoot the
Piano Player
G.F. McGuigan
Just Published!
A Methuen Paperback       $2.50
Available at
THE BOOKSTORE
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968 pS llleven
Pf airy tale
By RICK ROBERTSON
Once upon a time I met at groovy chick. Instant
electric communication and love — love was ours. So I
said "Baby I LOVE you and I want you to be mine." And
she said to me "Do you really love me — how much do
you really love me?" And I said "Darling I REALLY love
you — like the chocolate in a Smarties candy loves its
candy coating." But she said "Do you really love me —
I've got to know." So I took her hand but softly — and
she withdrew it. She said "Not the physical — first I've
got to know if you love me truly." So I gave her a flower
— but a beautiful flower. And she said "The flower is
beautiful but its beauty can't win my heart — only love."
So I leaned over and kissed her — gently— on the cheek.
And she said "Your kisses will only have meaning if I
know you love me — love me deeply." So I took her to
a cafe — a romantic cafe — with soft music, wine and
candles. And she said "It was beautiful — it is beautiful
— to be with you but tell me you love me — how much
do you REALLY love me?" And I said nothing. And I said
"I hate you." And she said "I knew it right from the
start." Then she was mine (and I hated it).
A flower dosen't have to talk to you to look good.
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
IN S.U.B. AUDITORIUM
THE TAMING
OF THE SHREW
rr
/•A j ViS
'*£■ &r£L«
TODAY
50c - 6:30, 9:00
fiction  and autobiography
if you were god
or a writer of sorts
you would  make a  play
written
produced
directed
by you
acted by you
viewed
criticized
and finally
forgotten
by you
and you would call it you
and pretend it was me
if you could see  me
or call it me
and hope to confuse
for you being god
and a righter of sorts
are allthings to allpeople
all inclusive to yourself.
-valerie hennell
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and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you fo use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
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• An in-store merchandising course given by Bay executives to
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Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the Personnel
Office, fifth floor in the Bay.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
December 3rd, 4th and 5th
Friday, November 22, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY Friday, November 22,  1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  19
ZAP: a column of general irreverence
Is it just co-incidence that the new administration
building looks like a fort, is build like a fort, is
back-to-back with the Jock Shop, is as far away as
possible from GSA and Faculty Club hotspots, as
close as possible to the local copshop, and has no
windows on the first floor?
Alas, haggard stair-climbers, here's what could
be in store for you if you want to use the exclusive
SUB elevator hidden away behind the Info office.
First go upstairs to the AMS office and fill out in
triplicate ten forms at the AMS co-ordinator's office.
Then get them ratified at the administration building and get a stamp from the library.. You can now
come back to SUB and use the elevator. AMS locko-
crats started in this direction when they recently
restricted use in the lift to paraplegics and AMS
executives, who are now the only key-holders.
If Jesus is really Jewish, how come he has a
Puerto-Rican name.
If a senate snub brings an administration building takeover at SFU, could the same be planned
here? And while we're at it, what do the UBC files
of radical students and radical-refused-admission-
students look like?
Speaking of takeovers, the library staff got wind
of a library takeover rumor (why steal books when
you can take over the whole library?) following the
faculty club snafu. The keys to the central file
(which would apparently take two years to sort out
if it got messed up) were checked out, staff were
given instructions in case of invasion, security police
were snooping around. Lotsa fun.
About the same time head librarian Basil Stuart
Stubbs was thinking of closing down the whole
library to prevent mass messups with the AMS-
library card thing.
Hare we go again . . . faculty members (some of
them) are apparently getting a little perturbed over
the come-and-go administration of the Great White
Doctor. He's back in England in December.
Mike Lange has resigned as secial events head,
but John Mate hung on when he heard a couple of
commerce students were after his job as head of
special events speakers committee. Mate has lined
up Jerry Farber, author of Student as Nigger, Dick
Gregory, unsuccessful U.S. presidential candidate,
and Realist editor Paul Krassner for the next few
few months.
It's almost funny watching the Sun trying to
promote The Ubyssey's 50th anniversary party (Dec.
7) but still smear this year's rag. The headline on a
recent article says "Truculent Ubyssey Reaches Half-
Century Mark" then quotes editor Al in a smaller
head saying, "Nothing to Celebrate." The whole
thing is being promoted by Sun managing editor
Bill Gait; could it be he wants to get back some of
the old Ubyssey stars to solve the Sun's chronic
staff turnover? One example: three reporters on the
education beats have quit since May.
Either the Sun's anti-intellectual or else, as
one senior staffer there said when he heard stories
of Ubyssey editors quitting, lack of staff, etc.,
"Sounds like the same thing that's going on here."
And what's this we hear about Al Fotheringham
resigning?
At least the underground likes us. Both the
Georgia Straight and Berkeley Barb reprinted the
pic of recent faculty club visitors smoking the weed
and burning money. And the L.A. Free Press (Nov.
1) printed Peter Lincoln's "Yippie Mafia coalition
exposed" article from Page Friday.
At Pete Elli Trudeau's recent visit to Queen's
university where he got an honorary degree and a
standing ovation from 1500 students, someone asked
the First Minister, "What are you doing about
Charlie Boylan's citizenship?"
Charlie Boylan, for the uninitiated, is a CCC
■(card-carrying-communist) who was AMS first vice-
pres. two years ago. He was born in the U.S., but
has lived in Canada for all but a few months of
his life. He has sent letters to the immigration dept.
in Ottawa from former UBC administration pres.
Senator Norman McKenzie, Conservative bigwig
Alvin Hamilton, and former UBC BoG chairman
and judge Nathan Nemetz, over the last year. All
he gets in return is a letter from Ottawa saying, in
effect, forget it.
Trudeau reportedly said "Ah yes, the Charlie
Boylan case, ah, well, of course we're looking into
it." A long hard look, n'est-ce pas?
Arts I types were warned recently to cut out
pot smoking in their building. Smoke it wherever
you want, they were told, but not here.
Is it true John Lennon is uncircumsized? See for
your self in the latest issue of the Village Voice in
SUB reading room where John and Yoko show themselves as Allah made them.
When Einar Gunderson quit the board of govs.
this week, he was going into his 13th year on the
esteemed body. In a farcical paragraph of the universities act it says "no member shall hold office
for more than nine consecutive years." It's farcical
because another clause says "a member of the board
shall hold office for three years and until his successor is appointed or elected." So Einar could have
just sat there for years and years and years until
Cece and he agreed to move in another of Cece's
friends.  The  question is, Why did  Gunderson  quit
now?
Anatomical distortion of the week: (admitted by
Dave Zirnhelt) "When senate rejected the idea of a
joint conference, my gut reaction was that I had
been kicked in the head."
Auto thefts
plague UBC
A black '64 TR4 with wire
wheels was stolen from C lot
between 8 a.m. and 11 p.m.
Wednesday.
The local RCMP say they are
investigating the disappearance
and have published the B.C.
licence number — 112-378.
The owner has offered a
reward.
There have been reports of
other like thefts, mostly of auto
parts.
A graduate student's Corvette
has been taken twice from D
lot and found out in the woods
with signs of an abortive
attempt to take the wheels.
The Sports Car Club has also
had parts stolen.
The university traffic patrol
says car theft is not their problem, but they sometimes drive
around in their truck and help
people find misplaced cars.
Indian monk
talks at SFU
Interested in Vedanta Philosophy?
Swami Vividishananda, a
monk of the Ramakrishng
Order of India, will be giving
two talks at SFU, Monday, Nov.
25.
The first, at noon in Rm. 3150
of the Academic Quadrangle,
will be on Hindu Religion and
Philosophy, while; the second,
at 8:00 p.m. in the formal dining room, will be on Yoga: its
Method and Goal.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits and Tuxedos
Remodelled
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($3) that says you're a member of Air Canada's Swing-Air Club.
(Your I.D. card will also be honoured for fare discounts by
other airlines in North America, and for co-operative rates with many hotels.)
Get the details from your Swing-Air campus representative. For flight arrangements, see your Travel Agent. Or
call your local Air Canada office.
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ON CAMPUS
5700 University Blvd. — 224-4391 Page 20
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
Occupation continued
From Page 1
• Elections will be held
immediately for a parity student-faculty appeal board to
hear grievances of would-be
and actual students, with
access to all admissions files;
• Establishment of an SFU
student society committee of
investigation with access to all
files;
• Initiation by the SFU
senate and administration of
a public campaign to increase
funding for higher education
and end the present school
construction freeze;
• A policy statement that
non-academic criteria will not
be applied in admissions policies,  and that equivalent aca-
-,* demic criteria will be applied
for all students.
An unofficial general student meeting Thursday noon
overwhelmingly supported the
Korbin^Sperling proposals and
declared a lack of confidence
in the student society executive.
The meeting was closed to
Vancouver's commercial press.
About 600 students attended the meeting, wtyich was
advertised by wall posters
throughout SFU. A vote count
on the non-confidence motion
showed that it carried 250-
207, which indicates there
were about 450 SFSS voting
members in the meeting.
The others were UBC and
Vancouver City college students who are expressing solidarity  with  the  SFU   students.
The meeting, punctuated by
catcalls and often bitter heckling, mainly of minority speakers, also voted to endorse the
occupation of the administration building.
As a week's notice must be
•*- given of any SFSS general
meeting, this one was not
legal. However, its motions
will be presented to a meeting
Thursday for ratification.
The SFSS student council
Wednesday presented a number of proposals to the SFU
senate which were adopted by
the senate.
Chief one is establishment
of an admission and standing
appeal committee similar to
the one proposed by Korbon
and Sperling, but with senate
rather than faculty representation and the power to investigate only "relevant" registrar's   files.
Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra
Meredith  Davies,
Music  Director
and Conductor
SOUNDS
OF THE
CENTURY
PART 2
PROSPECT
Tue'day, Nov. 26, 8 p.m.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
TICKETS
$1.00-$1.50
Your symphony in an  informal
concert of exciting  contemporary music.
Program
ic Banks, Tirade; ic Ginastera, Es-
t u d i o s Sinfonicos; it Messiaen,
Chronochromie; ic Penderecki,
Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima; ic Stockhausen, Kontra-
punkte; ic Stravinsky, Agon; ic Ze-
nakis,  Metastasis.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre
683-3255 and all Eaton's stores.
Thursday's general meeting
repudiated that action and
voted non-confidence in the
executive.
Student president Rob
Walsh, who opposes the occupation, labelled the meeting
"an exercise in railroad tactics."
He charged that it had been
packed by what he called
"radicals."
"I have persisted in fighting
these tactics all year and I will
fight you beggars to the end,"
he said.
He was drowned out by sarcastic applause from the supporters of the occupation, and
left the platform with his
thumb in the air as a gesture
of contempt.
Former UBC student and
Alma Mater Society special
events chairman Brian Plummer was one student who told
the meeting of what he called
SFU's unjust accreditation
policy.
Plummer said he attended
UBC for two years and received credit for 21 units. However, when he applied at last
summer SFU he was told he
would be given credit for only
one year. He was not informed of this until Aug. 29 and
did not have time to appeal
before the semester began.
He has since reapplied but
has heard nothing from the
registrar on his request for
admission to the winter semester.
SFU associate registrar
Douglas. Meyers, who handles
admissions, is out of town and
unavailable for comment.
Registrar Harry Evans has
said he does not handle admis
sions and cannot deal with the
students' demands.
Meanwhile, in the administration building, a spirit of
revolutionary discipline prevails.
The occupation forces have
split up into groups of about
15 and elected representatives
to a central steering committee.
Other committees, such as
food and security, have been
formed.
Students are guarding the
files to ensure they are not
broken into. Strand reportedly
told SFU student ombudsman
Ace Hollibaugh that he would
call in police if the files were
touched.
The doors to the offices are
locked, being opened only at
specified intervals to let students out and in. Observers
say this is to ensure that only
those who support the occupation are allowed in.
(Earlier, a tiny group of SFU
athletics students gathered
outside the office and threatened to forcibly expel the occupation  forces.)
Thursday night a number of
"teach-ins" were held on topics such as the Canadian new
left, the women's liberation
movement, and the role of the
university. These were open to
all  students.
Leaders of the occupation
include former UBC AMS
presidential candidate Michel
Lalain, VCC Student Democratic Union leader Lyle Osmondson and SFU student
politicians Jim Harding, John
Conway and  John Cleveland.
They appear to be prepared
to stay until all the Korbin-
Sperling demands are met.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 21
Soccer T'Birds ready —
big game on Saturday
NEW YEAR'S EVE CRUISE
on the
"MALIBU PRINCESS"
with the
"Spectres'
.##
Welcome aboard the "Malibu Princess" for a New Year's Eve Cruise up
Indian Arm with dancing to the "Spectres". The price includes a hot and
cold smorgasbord and a (ree professional bar. Call 922-9470 <Fri. 9:30-11 p.m.
Or Su*i. 1:0C-3:00 p.m.) for tickets or information. Don't delay. Numbers are
limited. Cost: $25.00 a couple.
With a 2-0 victory over the North Shore
Luckies, the Thunderbird soccer team is starting its move to take over control of first place
in the Pacific Coast Soccer
League.
Coach   Joe   Johnson   got
good   performances   from
Harvey   Thom   and   Tony
Mayor who scored the goals
and from Barry Sadler who
notched his sixth shutout.
Mayor     got     his     goal    by
intercepting a pass back to
the North Shore goalie and
knocking    it    home    from
about sixteen yards out.
Thom got his after making innumerable  set-ups  to
his   companions   and   after
the game received Johnsons
commendations for the best
overall play of the night.
Another outstanding performance came from
Bird goalie  Barry  Sadler who  turned in his
sixth shutout in 10 games in league play.
BARRY SADLER 6 shutouts in 10 games
The coach was also pleased with the
defensive play of specialists John Haar and
Ken Elmer who he says did a good job of containing the two key offensive players for North
Shore.
In planning for their next
game against 7th place Bur.
naby Villa where a win will
put them undisputedly on
top of the league, the team
will make no major lineup
changes and will try to increase their goals-for average.
All fans are invited to
turn out, even those 'out
walking their dogs' as league
officials will be in attendance and a large home
crowd will convince them
that the team deserves more
home games.
Game time
stadium.
is 2:00 p.m. at the Thunderbird
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Until December 31, 19(8
Swim team readies for
Thunderbird Relays
The T-Bird swimmers begin their competitive season on
December 1 at the Thunderbird Relays. In the meantime, under
Jack Pomfret, their coach, they workout four times a week for
one and a half hours.
At each training session the men swim approximately two
miles interspersed with a rigorous set of dry land exercises.
Pomfret, who has coached the team for many years, is
confident of a winning team this year.
His predictions are based on the performances of returnees
Phil Dockerell, Terry Lyons, and Frank Dorchester.
The team's freshman additions include Chris Hanna who last
year swam for the Canadian Dolphins and Don Cooper, another
new member this year, who is returning to swimming after a
four-year absence.
These swimmers are representative of the excellent team
this year.
Hear
a  lecture
on
Scientology
introduction
by Canada's greatest
musical comedy star
dean regan
Thursday, November 28
Lecture Angus Bldg. Rm. 104—12:30
Seminar & Books     Rm. 104— 1:30
Sponsored by:
Scientology Center Vancouver
3605 West 8th Ave. 732-7722
"books available at campus bookstore"
TODAY
UBC CONSERVATIVES PRESENT
Lincoln   Alexander,   M.P.
72:30 — Angus 7 70
" CANADA    19 6 8"
4 poets. 2 novelists. 6 important books.
The Owl Behind the Door. Stanley
Cooperman. New poetry that gets under
the skin and moves from an Associate
Professor of English at Simon Fraser.
Wild Grape Wine. Al Purdy.
From a Governor-General's Award
winner and one of the most
vital poets in the country, 68
new poems.
Heaven Take
My Hand. David
Weisstub. A young
poet's involvement
with the Jewish
cultural myth. An
evocative resolution
of culture and now.
Selected Poems: 1947-
1967. Robin Skelton. The
best writing from
the Editor of the Malahat
Review from eight
previous collections.
Erebus. Robert Hunter.
"It's as formless—yet as
disciplined—as most of
Millers' work ... a big,
joyous, sad funny, hugely
ambitious, marvellously
successful book."
Alexander Ross.
Ox Bells and
Fireflies. Ernest
Buckler. ". . . it reaches
down to touch
everybody's dream of a
world of beauty, when
we were 'green and
carefree'." Claude
Bissell Page 22
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
W"       gm     DAY ATMR'
DAY IS      if Inf MIKE'S
CHARBROILED STEAKS
l4TwcL-,r       4489 w-  10,h af Sasamat
Open to 12:30 week nights
8:30 on Sundays
DANCE
to the
Wiggy
Symphony
(Vancouver's Top  Rock Band)
•
Saturday - Totem Park Ballroom -9-12:30 |
 b
Look Your Best This Christinas!
FOR HE:
FOR SHE:
A New Shipment of 2 & 3 Piece
Cord i nates
Hundreds of Dresses for
the Festive Season
2140 Western Parkway
At the Village Square
224-0915
NBA BASKETBALL
GET YOUR TICKETS NOW
IN ADVANCE
FOR SPORTS EXCITEMENT
Mon. Nov. 25-8:15
PRELIMINARIES 6 P.M.
PACIFIC COLISEUM
SUPERS0NICS
vs
Milwaukee BUCKS
with
OLD TIMERS HALF TIME EXHIBITION
SPORTS HALL OF FAME
Tickets:  Vancouver Ticket Centre
683-3255  ... All Eatons Stores, Townhouse Electronics
PRICES $4, $3 & $2. STUDENTS $3, $2, & $1
Weekend Bird to watch
A probable starting forward on this
year's basketball team, after taking a two-
year break, is this weekend's athlete to keep
your eye on.
As a starter on this year's team, the 24-
year-old Bob Barazzuol at six foot two inches
and one hundred eighty pounds is a potent
member of coach Peter Mullins not-too-weak
team.
Bob grew up in Vancouver, and has already had three years of varsity experience.
Bob has also been a two-time member of
Canada's national team, in 1964 and 1966.
This will be Bob's last year as he is now
in fifth year education.
In the 1965-66 season he set an all-time
UBC scoring record, hitting for 586 points
for a tremendous 20.2 points per game average.
His single game scoring record of 44
points has not been beaten yet either*.
Playing with the IGA senior A's last
year he was instrumental in their winning
of the Canadian Amateur Championships.
He and his team mates go out onto the
Memorial gym floor for their first important game on Saturday night at 8 p.m.
Thunderbird basketballers
open year with UVictoria
TONY GALLAGHER
The University of Victoria Vikings are on
the mainland this weekend and will provide
the first official opposition for this year's edition of the Thunderbird basketball squad.
The Vikings meet Simon Fraser this evening, and on Saturday will be at War Memorial -
gym to take on the Birds in their first meeting
of the season.
The game will allow Bird fans to get another look at this year's team, led by the
talented Ron Thorsen; possibly the best guard
in Canada.
Saturday's game will serve as an excellent
indication of what might happen in next weekend's Totem tournament at UBC, 'when the
Birds meet Simon Fraser University Clansmen
in their first of three encounters this year.
The Clan, with three American stars recruited in San Francisco, -will be one of three
visiting teams competing in the tourney, and
will clash head on with the Birds next Saturday evening. The other two teams are powerful American schools, Portland State and Great
Falls from Montana.
Ticket troubles
The spectators who go to the game this
Saturday night when the Birds play UVic will
be given special tickets that will grant them
reserved admission to the Saturday night game
against SFU the next weekend.
People who do not have these special tickets
will be admitted on a first come first served
basis until the capacity of the gym is reached,
then they will be turned away.
This will go on until the feature game starts
at which time all reserved seats will be filled,
so the special tickets are only good until game
time.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
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for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
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Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YQU
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICERS TRAINING PLAN
A military career counsellor will be on the campus to provide details of the various government sponsored university
training plans on the 29th and 30th of November.
There are many advantages to be gained by making a
career in the services and both graduates and undergraduates would be well advised to investigate the possibilities of such a career — arrangements for interviews
may be made through the Student Placement Office or by
contacting the
Canadian  Forces  Recruiting Centre
545 Seymour St. 684-7341 Friday, November 22, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 23
Intramural Report
Standings:
PE is in first place in the overall September
to November standings with  1,168  points.
Second is held by the Beta Theta Pi fraternity with 549 points.
In third place, is engineering with 543 followed by forestry with 334 and in fifth is law
with 272 points.
Tied for twenty-first and last place are ATC,
Place Vanier and science, all with 10 points.
First term event champions are:
Softball —
Badminton        —
Golf —
Swimming        —
Cross country —
Law
International house
(Kwan Kee-Sin)
Physical education
(Mark Ryan)
PE won final meet
Aggies won dual meet series
PE  (Allan  Smith)
Next term:
Activities—Soccer, wrestling, skiing, volleyball, rugby, field hockey and track and field.
Entry deadlines—Jan. 15, Jan. 28, Jan. 28,
Feb. 11, Feb. 11, Feb. 24 and March 4.
Starting date—Jan. 20, Feb. 5, Feb. 9, Feb.
24, Feb. 24, March 3, and March 13.
You can play any of the above sports by
registering with your unit or faculty sports
rep. or by coming to the men's intramural
office, room 308, Memorial gym any day between 12.30 and 1.30 p.m.
Referees are also needed for these events,
so if you want to do it, and pick up a little
money, get in touch with Bill McNulty, chief
referee, in room 308, Memorial gym.
— dick button photo
PETER DEWITT, a  member of the frosh  rugby team  which
has a seven win — no loss record this! year. Obviously this
team gets the ball more than most other UBC teams.
Frosh rugby team
ends winning season
The frosh rugby team became UBC's first athletic success
of the year as they clinched the Junior Intercollegiate Rugby
League last Saturday with a 12-0 win over BCIT.
Outstanding performances by most 6f the players on the team
have contributed most to the team's success. Captain and kicker
Dai Williams has been a standout all season with an enviable 85
per cent kicking record, plus a good percentage of the tries scored
this year. Fullback Brian Taylor came on strong toward the end
of the season to strengthen the attack, playing his best game of
the year last weekend.
Coach Bob McGill also credits their powerful scrum for the
team's showing. Throughout the season the scrum, led by such
colorful competitors as Dave Barlow, and Stan and Bob Rox-
borough, has pushed through the opposition in their never-ending
quest for more points. Also deserving of credit for a fine performance is scrum half Tony Shephard, who Valiantly played the
last game with a broken hand.
It is expected that the frosh team will play second division
teams next term, and play junior teams from other universities.
With their impressive average win of 30-3 this in league play this
season, it is expected that this team will continue its winning
ways next year. If UBC can continue to produce frosh teams as
good as this for the next few years, we will continue to be the
collegiate power in west coast rugby.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Nov. 22
Nov. 23
Nov. 23
Nov. 23
Nov. 23
Nov. 23
Nov. 29
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Dec.      1
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
1
7
7
14
Dec. 15
Dec. 20
Dec. 21
Dec. 20
Dec. 21
Dec. 23
Dec. 26
.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
27
3
4
4
4
6
Sport
Ice hockey
Ice hockey
Basketball
Wrestling
Cross-country
Soccer
Ice hockey
Ice hockey
Rugby
Soccer
Wrestling
Basketball
Basketball
Swimming
Cross country
Soccer
Cross country
Soccer
Basketball
Basketball
Ice hockey
Ice hockey
Basketball
Soccer
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Cross country
Soccer
Basketball
Opponent
U. of Winnipeg
U. of Winnipeg
U. of Victoria
YMCA Open
League race
Burnaby Villa
U. of Manitoba
U. ofManitoba
Meralomas
Croatia
UBC Invitational
Totem tournament
Totem tournament
Thunderbird relays
League race
Firefighters
End of season race
Eintracht
Lewis 8c Clark College
Lewis & Clark College
U. of Victoria
U. of Victoria
California State
Columbus
Portland State
U. of Winnipeg
Western Wash. S.C.
Abbotsford Champs.
Royals
Fresno Pacific College
Location
away
away
Memorial gym
Vancouver "Y"
Stanley Park
Thunderbird stadium
Thunderbird arena
Thunderbird arena
Wolfson field
Thunderbird stadium
Women's gym 7
Memorial gym
Memorial gym
Percy Norman  pool
Victoria
Callister Park
Stanley Park
Callister Park
Memorial gym
Memorial gym
Victoria
Victoria
Memorial gym
Callister Park
Portland
Memorial gym
Bellingham
Abbotsford
Thunderbird  stadium
Memorial gym
Time
8:00
1:00
11:00
2:00
8:00
2:30
2:30
2:00
a.m.-l 1
7:30
3:00
all
2:00
11:00
2:00
8:00
8:00
p.m.
p.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
day
p.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
8:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE CENTRE
Service - Parts - Accessories
2185 W. Broadway 731-7510
An M.A. Thesis Production
No Trifling With Love
By   Alfred   De  Musset
NEW SOMERSET STUDIO
Nov.   20-23  —  8:30   p.m.
Box   Office:   Room   207
Frederic Wood Theatre
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
State Farm's
low insurance
rates for
careful drivers.
See me.
Jack Mellor
8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER 14, B.C.
, STATE   FARM
INSURANCE
261-4255
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
AUTOMOBHE  INSURANCE COMPANY
TORONTO, ONT.
GOOD STUDENT? 25% DISCOUNT
BE CAREFREE
IN EUROPE
'69
"Ask For Brochure"
WORLD-WIDE
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
on campus
5700 University Boulevard
224-4391
CUSO
AFRICAN
SYMPOSIUM
Films, Speakers, Discussion
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd
10:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
COFFEE SERVED - BRING YOUR LUNCH
THUNDERBIRD  TOTEM
Basketball
Tournament
* &-*
SATURDAY, NOV. 30
7:30 Portland State vs. Great Falls Montana College
9:15 - U.B.C. vs. S.F.U.
SPECIAL OFFER
In order to ensure that regular U.B.C. supporters can obtain
admission to this game the following format has been
established.
All U.B.C. fans attending the UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
GAME ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23 will receive an advance admission ticket to the November 30 game of the
Totem  Tournament. Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Lincoln  Alexander,
M.P., noon  today
TODAY
M.P.   SPEAKS
Lincoln Alexander, speaks on Canada
1968, noon today, Ang. 110.
LUTHERAN   STUDENT   SOC
Stan  Persky   and   Allan  Emmott   discuss What Makes A City, noon today
in SUB  conversation pit.
DEBATING  UNION
Today's debate cancelled. Tues. noon,
Bu.  202.
VOC
Last day today for membership fees.
SDU   FORUM
Rev. McGuigan and B. McKee on
socialism. SUB upper lounge or SFU
Admin,   building,   tonight  7:30 p.m.
SOCIOLOGY  200
Guerrilla theatre movement meeting
noon today, SUB 254.
SKI  TRIP
Pay  deposit   as  soon  as   possible   to
John  or  Cherry.
LECTURE
Dr. C. N. Parkinson on The  Science
Of   Politics,   noon   today   at   Freddy
Wood theatre.
Dr. Erich Kordt on Soviet Foreign
Policy As Seen In The Eyes Evolution Of World Politics. Wed., Nov. 27,
noon, Bu.  100.
PHRATER5S
All   pledges   meet   noon   today,   Bu.
104.
VCF
Paul   Little   speaks   on   Christianity—
Dead or Alive. Noon today, SUB ballroom.
CIRCLE   K
Meeting   with   speaker,   noon   today,
council chambers.
FILM  SOC
Taming  Of  The   Shrew  in SUB   aud.
today, 6:30, 9 p.m. 50 cents.
UBC   INDP
Labour   committee   meeting   noon   today,   STUB  208.
COSA
Skating   party.   T-bird   arena,   tonight
7:30-9:30 p.m.
SIMS
Daily meditations: SUB 213, 7:30-9:30
a.m. and 4-53 p.m. Film Thurs., Nov.
28, noon, Bu. 104. Initiations on
Thurs. call 228-3706.
COMMUNICATIONS COMM.
Meeting   in    AMS   exec,    conference
room   noon   today,   on   the   financial
state of The Ubyssey.
LEGAL   AID
Free legal aid in AMS offices at
noon  Mon., Wed.  and Fri.
PRE-LAW   SOC
Faculty   club   pres.,   Dr.    Huberman,
speaks   noon   today   on   the   law.
WEEKEND
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
International ball at SFU, Saturday.
Tickets today noon in IH at meeting.
Meeting with Dr. Grover on French
authors at Dr. Bongie's home, 3746
West 13th Ave. tonight at 8 p.m.
UBC  SCC
Closed gymkhana Sunday 9:30 a.m.
D lot.
P.E. CONFERENCE
Conference on new concepts for P.E.
All day Friday in SUB. All day Saturday in Carnarvon Elementary. Cost,
including meals, $7.50. Extension dept.
DANCE   GROUP
Dancing group of Republic of China,
SUB  aud.. Sat.  2-4 p.m.  Free  tickets
in IH.
CUSO
African  symposium.  Sat.   10  a.m.-1:30
p.m.   International   House.   Speakers,
etc.,   bring  your, lunch.
NEWMAN CENTER
Wine  and   cheese  party  Sunday  7:30
p.m.. St. Mark's music room for mem-
- bers only RSVP by Thurs. BYOB.
NEXT WEEK
NEW DEMOCRATS
Assistant to  Tom Berger  and TEAM
aldermanic    candidate    tell    how    B.C.
govt, short-changes Vancouver. Tues.,
Nov. 26, noon, Bu.  102.
BIG BLOCK WOMEN
Meeting   Monday   noon   SUB   meeting
room E.
ALPHA   OMEGA
Ukranian varsity  club meets Monday
noon, SUB 215.
SFFEN
Meeting noon today, SUB club workroom.
PEUS
Mr.  R.  Osborne  speaks  on  plans for
new facilities, Monday, Nov. 25, Rm.
211-213 W.M. Gym.
ROCK  CONCERTS
Guess Who at noon, Nov. 27, SUB
ballroom, 50 cents; Tomorrow's Eyes,
noon,   Nov.   28,   SUB   ballroom.
SKYDIVING
Important meeting Mon., Nov. 25,
noon, Bu. 219.
EXPERIMENT   COLLEGE
Dr. Laplan's ideas, Monday noon, Bu.
100.
VEDANTA   PHILOSOPHY
Swami Vividismananda, Indian monk,
speaks Monday at SFU: Hindu Religion and Philosophy at noon, Rm.
3150, Academic quadrangle; Yoga—
Its Method and Goal at 8 p.m. in formal  dining  room.
CVC
Dance with Rosalind Keene & the
Apollos, Nov. 23, SUB party room.
8:30   p.m.-12:30.   Members:   $1.50.
UBC  CONSERVATIVES
Speakers    forum:     Charles    McLean,
Nov. 25; David Sinclair, Dec. 2, noon,
council  chambers.
GRAD   CLASS
First council meeting, Nov. 25, noon
in SUB 213.
MUSSOC
Publicity meeting in clubroom, noon
Monday.
_ Gears sell old exams
Exams are less than three
weeks away.
In recognition of this dreaded
fact, the engineers have printed
up some past Xmas exams.
The money collected will be
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,  DARK  SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
donated to the Cup of Life
Fund (formerly the Cup of Milk
Fund), which is sponsored by
the Vancouver Sun.
These exams, mainly directed to frosh types, will go on
sale Monday, Nov. 25.
Class blitzes will occur
throughout the week. And if
you don't go to your classes,
they will be sold every noon
hour in SUB.
sin*** (£11
' EAT IN -.TAKEOUT*. DELIVERY
CELEBRATE THEIR 46th
ANNIVERSARY
With  The  Bridal  Bouquet  Diamond   Event
WIN an ALL EXPENSE PAID WEDDING
No purchase necessary to win. Just register your names at
any of MILLERS 3 stores and you CAN WIN $500.00.
However,  if you  purchase your diamond  and  wedding   ring  at
Millers and you are declared Ihe winner, you win an extra $500.
HURRY - REGISTER YOUR NAMES NOWI
This offer closes Dec. 31, 1968.
Convenient Credit Terms arranged with  Courtesy
Discount to U.B.C. Students and Personnel
655  Granville  St. 683-6651
Vancouver
47  W.   Hastings St.,      682-3801
Vancouver
622   Columbia   St. 526-3771
'    New  Westminster
lliillcrs
Vancouver stores Open Fridays Until 9.  New Westminster Store Open Thurs. & Fri.  Until 9
-   CLASSIFIED   -
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales lor larger ads on request.
Claatilied ads are no* accepted by telephone end
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office.* 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OP B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
COME TO THE PHARMACY GOOF
Ball — Nov. 23 — SUB Ballroom —
B<!   There
'THE BrG MOTHER", 111 DUNS-
muir, Benefit. Monday & Tuesday.
50c per nite. Four groups each nite.
Open  7:30 p.m.
DANCE!! THE HOPBRAUHAUS
German Beer Garden. Live band —
SUB Ballroom. Nov. 29, 9-1. Admission  $1.50.
GIANT STROBE LIGHT FOR RENT.
Reserve early for your next party,
dance,  or drunk.   Phone  922-1451.
SWING    WITH    THE    WTGGY    SYM-
* phony at Totem Park this Saturday,
8:30  to midnight.
PHARMACY PRESENTS  THE GOOF
Ball.   Nov.   23,   SUB  Ballroom.
GERMAN CLUB POLKA PARTY I.H.
Saturday, Nov. 23, 8:30-12:30. 11.25
each, $2.00 couple. Band, refreshments.   Everyone   welcome!
Greetings
12
Xmas
SPECIAL
$1.25
68    -    INVITATION    -    69
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST: THEORY OF MARBLES
(hard cover Upensky in disguise).
Desperate   for   return.   Call   263-6604.
LOST: ENG. 340 NOTEBOOK IN
Brock bsmt. Nov. 9. Reward. Phone
Bill   733-3733  after   6:00.
LOST: TUES., NOV. 12, SET OF
keys in brown leather case. Phone
Murray   266-7236.
LOST ONE MAN'S GREEN RAIN-
coat Thurs. Angus Rm. 315. Phone
738-6257.  Ask for Brent.
LOST: UBC JACKET FROM COAT
rack, Place Vanier dance Fri. night.
Phone  Fraser  224-9927.
LOST: BROWN U. TEXAS CALU-
lus, UBC "?"—notebooks. Text "Les
mains Sales". Peter, Rm. 410, 224-
9017.
LOST FRIDAY, RED WALLET,
Freddy Wood parking lot. Please
return   to   Nancy,   874-3701.   Reward.
Rides U Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO FROM
Pt. Roberts, Tswaw. Second term
for   8:30.   Phone   435-0693,   Dave.
RIDE WANTED POR TWO FROM
West Van. 20th & Gordon call 926-
1208  Max.
Special Notices
15
SKI APEX — STAY TWIN LAKES
Guest Ranch in Penticton. Make up
a group for an exceptional ski weekend. For a minimum of 12 people
we provide accommodation, lodge
facilities and meals, Friday night
to Sunday for only $12 per person.
For complete details write or wire
Twin Lakes Guest Ranch, Box 37,
Penticton.
TODAY   —   LINCOLN   ALEXANDER
M.P. — Angus 116. Free!
HEAR THE GUESS WHO SING ALL
their big hits — once only, Wed
noon —  SUB Ballroom.
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Card*, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find It across from
tha Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20***^ All
risks Insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott.
299-9422.
C.U.S.O. WORKSHOP ON AFRICA.
Intn'l. Hse. Sat., Nov. 23, 10:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Panel discussion will feature African Students and returned
volunteers.  Everyone is welcome.
CHRISTMAS IS COMING BUT
Youth Cards are here Now. Fly half
fare until your 22nd birthday only
$3. Call to get yours delivered personally. Deirdre SwingAir Rep. 738-
1678.
Travel Opportunities
16
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1948 DODGE IN GOOD OPERATING
condition. Rebuilt 1956 Dodge six
installed 2 years ago. $100.  733-9665.
1958   FORD.   WGN.   V8   AUTO.   RUNS
well.   $300.   224-9380.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
a t i
and
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.   Lee  682-71*6  or  WE  s-2067
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Call at
1162  Seymour  St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
1965 MUSTANG FAST-BACK, 289 4-
speed. Good shape, red line tires.
Phone   688-5195.
1956 VW. NEW BRAKES, SOUND
engine, trans. $150. 536-6878 or 228-
2726.
MUST  SELL  '61  FIAT-TUDOR.
Good    condition.    Excel,    brakes,
clutch. $400 or best offer. Ph. 224-1677
betw.  7-8  p.m.
1965 CORVAIR CORSA—JUST TEST-
ed, everything perfect. Immaculate
blue exterior, black leather interior.
See it yourself. Offers from $1,400.
736-6281.
1960 METIOR, 4-DOOR V-8 AUTO,
trans., good motor, body fair condition.   $250.   Ph.   224-7660.
GOOD      TRANSPORTATION.      1952
Chev,   $100.   Phone   263-6180.
GIRL FRIEND PREGNANT, MUST
sell 1961 Zephyer, $350 or best offer.
Fort  Camp   9-14  or  584-4494.
'56 CONSUL NEEDS TRANS. BUT
motor, rubber, brakes good. $69.50.
738-0214.
Automobile—Parti
23
4 FENTON   MAGS   14".   $175.00   PLUS
rims. Phone 261-0820 between 5-7:30.
REVERERATOR FOR CAR. AT-
taches under dashboard. $10 firm.
For information call George 731-3757.
WANTED     TWO    USED     45     DCOE
Weber  carbs.   Phone   John   922-1451.
Motorcycles
26
56 DUCATI 350CC S-BAGS, ACCES-
sories. $400 or best offer. Phone
228-9521  ask for Bill.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SILK SCREEN POSTERS. BEAU-
tifully made. Lowest Possible cost.
24   hr.   service.   731-7301.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available in  Vancouver
For Rates That Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580 Howe 684-0522
Home Entertainment
35
GUARANTEED EXPERT AND
EFFICIENT   REPAIRS
Color T.V.  — Black  and White  T.V.
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment —  Tape  Recorders
ALEXANDER AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record  Department
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS.
Costumes for all occasions. NEW
ADDRESS: 3567 W. 41st. Phone
263-9011.
Scandals
37
DON'T MISS THE "GUESS WHO".
Next Wed. noon — SUB Ballroom.
Only 50c.
THE NEW COFFEE HOUSE. "THE
Big Mother", 111 Dunsmiur facing
the  Greyhound Bus   Depot.
RENT THE PAISLEY MULTICOL-
ored Strobic Light-Show to make
your party or dance happen. Reasonable rates. Paul 731-7301 .
DON'T BE A DROP-OUT! MAKE
sure you graduate by becoming one
of UBC's fastest readers. In eight
weeks you'll read dynamically and
have better comprehension of what
you read. To register for November
or  January  classes,  call   732-7696.
OTHER BANDS ADMIT THEY CAN-
not match the Wiggy Symphony.
Dance Saturday night,  Totem  Park.
WILL LORD TOPPINGTON APPEAR
as a suckling pig dancing an 18th
C. minuet Nov. 28? Buy your ticket
before Fri. and find out. English
office,   Buchanan,   4th   floor.
LEAD SINGER NEEDED FOR COM*
mercial Rock Band. Call Hunt 985-
1646  or Ray  987-1706.
Typing
40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
— experienced essay and thesis
typist.  Reasonable  rates.  TR  4-9253.
1957 HILLMAN MINX, FOUR SPEED.    EXPERIENCED    ESSAY     TYPIST.
Like  new.   $125.  Phone  266-0184. Reasonable.  Phone  681-8992.
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
EXCELLENT EARNING OPPOR-
tunities for serious spare-timers.
Call 985-9220 from  10-1 and 3-5 p.m.
X'MAS COMING — LIKE TO EARN
extra money in spare time? No obligation. Phone Mr. Wu 263-5982
weekdays   9   a.m.   -   12  noon.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors.  736-6923.
1st AND 2nd YEAR MATHS, CHEM.
physics by science and engineering
graduate.   731-1930  or  731-3491.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GOING TO EUROPE, MUST SELL:
10-speed racing bike, $50. 2—12"
speakers in bass reflex cabinets,
2/$50. G.E. 2M mobile XCVR, $25.
Transistors: odds & ends. 733-1575,
17:00-18:30,  23:00-08:30  hrs.	
ONE   PAIR   OF    LACE    SKI   BOOTS.
$15.00. Phone Ed,  224-9957.
BOOKS FOR RADICAL THINKING
students. Feature works of Marx,
Lenin, Malcom X, Che Guewera H.
Marcus, F. Fanon, etc. Vanguard
Books,   1208  Granville.	
SKIS, HEAD MASTER 205CM STEP-
in safety release $80. Phone 224-3343.
WESTINGHOUSE 19" PORTABLE
TV Model P-8969, new, guarantee,
reg. $279.00, will sell $250.00 or nearest offer.  Phone 224-7230.	
TWO 5.60/5.90x15 WHITEWALL
snow tires mounted in Volkswagen
rims. 2 month's use. $50.00. Phone
922-6364 ask for Skip or leave name
and number.
MARTIN GUITAR 018. CONCERT
model with case, as new. Best offer!
988-0752. Must sell!
BLACK   HARDTOP   FOR    M.G.B.
Phone  263-0174 after  6  p.m.
ENGLISH 200 NOTES SECT. "A".
Full term compiled by English Grad
student $2.00. 24 pages. 988-0847 or
926-1205.
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD        UBC's STUDENT
CALLS    TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c at Bookstore
Also at Publications Office &
Information Office, SUB
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED SINGLE AND DOUBLE
rooms for spring term. Prefer male
students.  Phone  after 7,  733-5255.
TWO SHARING FURNISHED BSMT.
rooms. Ext. phone, fireplace, priv.
entr.   Marpole.   263-9700.
ROOM OR BOARD AND ROOM FOR
1 girl to share with same. TV. 224-
4790  or  4674 West 8th.
ROOM WITH HOME PRIVILEGES.
Pt. Grey area. Ph. 856-2201 (Alder-
grove) on weekend, or 732-8448
(Vancouver) till new phone installed.
TWO LlA R G E COMFORTABLE
sleeping rooms available in family
home. $45.00. Call after 5 p.m. —
261-4109.
RIGHT AT GATES: 4500 BLOCK W.
11th. Fully furnished rooms: 1 large,
1 or 2 persons $60. 1 smaller single
$40. Private entrance, phone, kitchen, bathroom, all inclusive. Phone
874-9436 after 6. Available Dec. 1 or
sooner.
ALL STUDENT HOUSE. GOOD
studying facilities, kitchen, etc. 3rd
& Burrard. Phone 736-7128. Male
only. 	
MALE STUDENT. SINGLE ROOM,
share frig, shower with another.
Kit. priv., sep. entrance. Non-
smoker.   Vacant   now.   $45.   733-8778.
ROOM FOR RENT. KITCHEN FA-
cilities. Separate entrance $35 per
month.   Call   733-9758  after  7:00  p.m.
Room & Board
82
LIVE IN A STUDENT COMMUNE.
$65 month room. 4306 W. 13th. See
us  any  weekday,  6  p.m.-8   p.m.	
ON CAMPUS ST. ANDREW'S HALL,
Men's residence. Share double room,
224-7720  or   224-5742.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
2120 Wesbrook, 224-9074. Call after
5:30.   Quiet   hours,   good  food.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
2 MEN TO SHARE STUDIO LOUNGE.
224-5245  after 5.
TIRED OF LANDLORDS? OURS IS
dead! Have a room for senior student. Either sex. Cheap! Yew &
8th.   732-8074.
WANTED MALE STUDENT TO
share West End apt. with same.
Phone   Neil   at   688-2074.
WANTED MALE STUDENT TO
share apartment. $75 per month.
Phone  736-5196.
PRIVATE ROOM FOR GIRL IN
mixed Kits apartment to share
facilities and expenses with three
others.  733-5679.

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