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The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1969

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THE UBYSSEY
:^\.
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Vol. LI, No. 4
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1969
228-2305
—bruce stout photo
EIGHT INCHES of good Canadian meat is more than any chick should eat. Second-year arts co-ed who
didn't want to be named gobbles her SUB sandwich even though it costs more this year than last. She
said you can't beat the meat SUBchefs stick in their sandwich buns.
Dope info
brings GS
$2,000 fine
By MURRAY KENNEDY
The Georgia Straight may well be finished.
Judge B. M. Isman Thursday convicted the Georgia Straight and
publisher Dan McLeod of counselling another person to commit a
criminal offence.
The Straight was fined $1,500 while McLeod got $500 or
twenty-five days. -McLeod was also placed on three years probation.
Both were given until November 1 to pay.
Similar charges against managing editor Bob Cummings were
dropped for lack of evidence.
The charges resulted from the printing of an article entitled
"Plant Your Seeds" which appeared in the March 28 edition. The story
consisted of step-by-step instructions on the growing and cultivating of
marijuana.
McLeod said after the trial that the paper may survive—but he
wasn't sure.
"Our readers have helped us in the past so we'll just have to wait
and see. We may be able to raise the $2,000, but there are still 15
charges more."
These are for alleged obscenity.
Thursday's conviction was the third in less than a year. The
Straight and McLeod have already been fined following earlier
convictions for criminal libel and obscenity.
Defence lawyer John Laxton said there has not been a case of this
nature for over 60 years.
"The justice department has really been dragging the bottom to
find some way to charge them," he said.
Chief prosecution witness Penny York testified she purchased the
March 28 edition ofthe paper and had read the article in question.
The prosecution contended she was in that way counselled to
grow pot although she admitted that the thought never once entered
her mind.
Miss York is secretary to Murray Hyde, the chief drug prosecutor
for the justice department.
Laxton based his defence primarily on the fact that Miss York
was instructed to purchase and read the paper for the explicit purpose
of bringing a charge against the paper.
"Common sense would show that she was not in a position to be
in any way counselled or influenced by the article," Laxton said.
Continued on page 3: see ENTRAPMENT
Legal aid helps hassled students at no cost
By ROBIN BURGESS
It was the same old legal hassle.
A student, new to Vancouver, had run
into conflict with his landlady over the
condition of the accommodation and left
with the understanding his rent money
would be returned.
Now, after two weeks of ringing her
doorbell and phoning he'd come to Legal
Aid to find out just what his position was.
Art Ewert, Law 3, doodled thoughtfully
and listened. Periodically he interrupted to
ask questions.
How much money was involved? $40.
Had a new contact been made? Yes.,
What   did   the   landlord   say   when   the
student asked for his money?—She said
she'd pay when she rented the room again.
Short of going to court, there was little
the student could do. Ewert advised him to
wait, give the landlady a chance and then
perhaps one of the Legal Aid students
could phone her and hint that her former
, tenant was considering taking formal
action.
LEGAL AID INTIMIDATES
The word "Legal Aid" can sometimes
intimidate a particularly stubborn person
into fulfilling their obligations, said Ewert.
It was all Ewert could do to help, he
was sorry. The student left partially
satisfied.
"We want to do as much as we can but
there's only so much we can do," said
Ewert.
The law students involved in Legal Aid
cannot appear in adult court or receive any
fee for their advice, he explained.
"We'll give advice to the best of our
ability, but we're extremely guarded. We
don't want to do any harm," he said.
BREWED OVER COFFEE
Legal Aid was born over coffee one fall
afternoon last year.
A core of interested law students got
enthusiastic about the idea of combining
practical experience with a needed service
and used former Alma Mater. Society
vice-president Carey Linde's office to
dispense legal advice to students at noon
hours.
This year Legal Aid has acquired its
own office in SUB 237 and a grant of $200
from the AMS. From noon to 1:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday students
tangled in some legal web can come and
hear the word straight from the book.
As this first student left, another,
clutching a sheaf of papers took the seat
opposite Ewert and explained his problem.
He'd filed for a divorce and intended to
present the case himself since lawyer's fees
could run as high as $500.
But he was unsure of court procedure
and wondered if a Legal Aid student could
come with him to court.
MARITAL DIFFICULTIES
Ewert explained the law students were
not really familiar with court procedure
and advised him to get in contact with
Mike Harcourt, a downtown lawyer, for
more comprehensive advice.
While the majority of the problems
involve housing or loan beefs a surprisingly
large number concern marital and family
difficulties, said Ewert.
He described cases he's had in which
two students living commonlaw are being
badly hassled by the girl's father. They
come to Legal Aid concerned about what
the father can do. "Legally can he yank his
daughter back home?" they ask.
"No problems are solely legal. If it's a
really bad case we'll take it upon ourselves
to do something about it by making phone
calls or trying to contact a social worker.
"But this would be all on our own
time," Ewert said.
Finding the time to deal with all the
cases that want help is a big concern of
Ewert's;
Students drop by the Legal Aid office at
an average of four or five a noon hour, he
said. Although 40 law students have
expressed an interest in helping, Ewert is
anticipating that most of the support will
dwindle away come exam time.
"We might have to close up the office
altogether when exams start," he said.
In fact, Legal Aid is only one of a
number of projects UBC law students are
currently involved in.
SECOND PROJECT STARTED
The second project began during the
summer when four students volunteered to
set up legal aid scheme throughout the city
in connection with the Vancouver
Inner-City Service Project.
The Inner-City Project, a service and
learning plan which has operated in the
city for several years, employs students
from various faculties who work in their
own fields of training.
Under the direction of Inner-City
lawyer Mike Harcourt and other
downtown lawyers, the students hold
panels in the Kitsilano and Grandview areas
to which the general public can come for
legal advice.
Throughout    the    summer,    the   law
students  listened  and  dealt  with cases
Continued on page 2
See LEGAL Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,   1969
J-Idwsa Jut a jcoMc/urfs plant
By MAURICE BRIDGE
Are you hassled? Is something or someone
on this monster campus giving you a bad time?
If this is your case, then Flower in a
Concrete Plant is your place. Just put your
gripe in writing and send it to Flower, Ubyssey
office, SUB.
Question: Where can I get one of those
birth control handbooks? Things are getting a
bit tense and I could really use one. Please
answer soon, this is important.
Answer: Hold on, I'm coming'! The finance
committee approved the purchase of another
10,000 booklets Monday, and they are
expected to be available within two weeks.
Needless to say, student response to them has
been overwhelming.
But since your problem is a bit pressing to
wait two weeks, there is an immediate
alternative which should be acceptable.
Many doctors in this city will prescribe
birth control pills, or devices, to chicks without
hassling about age (within reason) or marital
status. If your doctor is not inclined to help
you, check around and find out which doctors
will.
Also, a friend in need is Family Planning of
B.C., 198 West Hastings (684-3515) who can
help   in   this   way.   Their   criteria   are   the
responsibility of the girl, her need, the
physician's opinion, and her medical status.
This is a good service, so don't abuse it.
As for the campus scene, the Thunderbird
shop reports no conceptives in stock or on
order, but after Trudeau's omnibus bill, there's
a good chance of something in the future.
Question: This university is becoming a
huge bog! I'm afraid the roads will swallow up
my car, if I don't get washed away on one of
the sidewalks first. What gives with the
situation?
Answer: Right now you'd better get hip
waders or waterskis, as no immediate end is ih
sight. The canals ... er... roads are the
responsibility of the B.C. highways department,
and their exact ideas are not known.
As for sidewalks, ombudsman Sean
McHugh has a letter in to ancillary services head
J. F. McLean and is awaiting a reply on the
sidewalk leading from "C" lot, which has been
known to be a trifle moist.
Also, the possibility of short-cut sidewalks
across the lawns in front of SUB is being
considered by SUB management committee
today. Whether or not the walks will
materialize remains to be seen.
More about roads and walks next week. In
the meantime, better learn to swim.
Political undertones
in McGill editor firing
MONTREAL (CUP)-After three hours of
debate, the student council of McGill University
Tuesday night fired Mark Wilson, editor of the
McGill Daily, the campus student newspaper.
The reason given was that Wilson had not
registered at the university -is a student.
But during the" meeting, student council
members made it clear they disagreed with Wilson's
editorial radicalism.
On Wednesday night the council named Law
student Chris Portner as interim editor of the Daily.
Portner is described as being a political moderate.
The daily staff thereupon resigned following a
staff meeting.
Following Portner's appointment, former
managing editor Danny Roden read a statement to
the council denouncing the firing of Wilson.
"We regard council's move in firing Mark
our unanimous choice for editor-in-chief, as a
political move cloaked in the legalistic positions
invented by some staff members.
Wilson pointed out that it was impossible to be
a student and at the same time do a competent job
as editor of Canada's only university daily.
He said that to register as a part-time student,
as former McGill Daily editors had done, was a
sham.
There are at least seven college papers in the
country edited by full time non-students, Wilson
said none of them daily papers.
But he said that if the students council was
determined to keep what he called "the hypocrisy"
he might sign up as a part-time student.
Although McGill students last year voted
approval to a new constitution, it has not been
approved by the university's 'academic senate, and
the campus is still legally bound by a constitution
which states the Daily editor must be a registered
student.
When a councillor suggested at Tuesday's
meeting that a referendum be held on Wilson's
status, the Daily editor told the council to "stop
screwing around" and make up their minds.
The council voted 9-4 to fire him.
LEGAL AID
Continued from page 1
involving marital, landlord,*
financial, criminal, employer and
personal injury problems.
Dave Bell, student chairman of
the project, hopes to continue the
scheme during the winter. But the
question is still up in the air.
Law students working for the
Inner-City Project have recently
been representing youngsters in
juvenile court. The cases are
mainly transfer applications—the
hearings which decide if a juvenile
will be tried in adult or juvenile
court.
Students with no court
experience at all have the task of
convincing the court that
17-year-old car thieves are not
ready for adult court.
If they fail and the youngsters'
cases are transferred the young
"delinquents" may end up with
damaging police records.
"We're playing in the big
leagues now," said Ewert.
But lawyer Mike Harcourt isn't
worried about the law students'
abilities.
"The law students are doing a
better job than most lawyers," he
said.
CUSO
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
We Are Interested in YOUR Ideas!
• PUBLIC RELATIONS
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All Welcome    -    Today Noon, SUB Room 224
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Council money will aid
cool service project
Cool Aid came to council
Tuesday night.
It came in the person of Mike
Harcourt, a Vancouver lawyer and
chairman of the board of the Cool
Aid project.
Harcourt said the Cool Aid
treasury is down to $500, and
asked the Alma Mater Society
council for a cash grant and
permission to use campus facilities
for a benefit dance.
"We've got a lot of really
fucked-up kids at Cool Aid, and
we're still getting 60 people a
nigh, " Harcourt said.
Cool Aid applied to Vancouver
city council for funds last year.
"City council awarded the
SPCA $5,000 for the care of dogs,
and gave us $2,500 for the care of
human beings," Harcourt said.
His group is awaiting response
to a brief sent to the federal
government. The brief is intended
to back up a Cool Aid request for
federal assistance.
Council voted unanimously to
grant $200 to Cool Aid as soon as
possible and to refer the matter of
further financial assistance to the
budget committee.
Council also voted to
co-operate in promoting, and
providing facilities for a campus
benefit dance.
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■y ■< Friday,  September   19,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
SFU challenges
student parity
By JIM DAVIES
The students of Simon Fraser University have voted to investigate
the university tenure comittee following the committee refusing
appointment and tenure to 11 PSA faculty.
In a meeting in the SFU gym Thursday chaired by student society
president Norm Wickstrom, some 50 students voted that the Canadian
Association of University Teachers and the Canadian Union of Students
jointly investigate the tenure committee's decisions and that the report
be completed by Oct. 31.
"We must assert and maintain student parity in issues of this
sort," said Greg Basham, SFU student society treasurer.
"Any tenure committee recommendations based on what may
prove and what seem to be political decisions will be refused by the
students."
The PSA department has been under constant harassment from
the administration.
Mordecai Briemberg, PSA student-faculty elected chairman,
stated in The Peak Wednesday that workers in no other occupation
would have tolerated without taking action so much harassment from
their employers as the PSA department has tolerated from the
administration.
Since \he trusteehsip, it has been felt, particularly in the PSA
department, that students and faculty no longer had any real power in
the functioning of the university.
In Thursday's meeting students demanded that charges of
administrative incompetency of the PSA by the tenure committee be
clarified.
SFU president Kenneth Strand has been given until Monday to
act or at least respond to the demands of the PSA department. If
Strand fails to respond the PSA general assembly has said it will hold a
strike vote.
Strand has said he will establish his own investigation committee
but this is not compatible with the PSA department.
An entrapment/
McLeod charges
Continued from page 1
Judge Isman replied that Laxton knew quite well that, as he put it
"common sense and the law are not the same thing."
Before sentencing, Laxton pleaded for minimal fines since the
gravity of the crime is not overwhelming. "Similar articles have even
appeared in Maclean's," he said.
Laxton urged that the fines not be designed to put the paper out
of business: "Anything over $500 would put the paper in serious
financial difficulties," he said.
In sentencing McLeod and the Straight, Judge Isman said he does
not take a kindly view towards this sort of thing.
"Even freedom of the press has its limitations," he said.
He said that in view of past convictions, the defendants showed
no evidence of rehabilitation. Therefore he saw no alternative but to
impose stiff fines.
McLeod said the whole thing was "an entrapment" by the justice
department and Miss York.
"They may have been legally justified to do this to us, but there
is certainly no moral justification," he said.
Miss York was not available for comment.
Whether or not an appeal will be launched is undecided. Laxton
said there is good grounds for an appeal, but the decision will have to
be made by McLeod and the Straight.
When questioned about legal fees, Laxton laughed. He said the
fines will lower the priority of fees for awhile.
"We don't make any money from the Georgia Straight," he said.
However, he said the would continue to represent the paper until the
bitter end.
HODGE, BROTHERS .. . "nothing accomplished, we'll meet again".
Brothers visits UBC, makes
no promises, no commitments
By NATE SMITH
If B.C. universities are going to limit enrolment,
out-of-province students should be the first to go,
education minister Donald Brothers said Tuesday.
"If we're going to restrict enrolment, I'd prefer
to see B.C. students given first priority, and students
from other parts of Canada given second priority,"
Brothers said.
"Then, if we have room, we can admit students
from other countries."
Asked if he thought UBC's new policy of
numerically restricting first year enrolment would
hinder B.C. students, Brothers said: "You'll have to
ask your own board of governors, they have
control over that."
Brothers made the comments after a 90-minute
Sports centre
opens in month
The new facilities of the Thunderbird winter
sports centre will open in mid-October.
Stan Floyd, manager of the winter sports centre
said the total cost of the expansion is $1,113,193.
It is being paid for by the profits from the
original sports centre, a $750,000 loan and by the
university.
The original building, built in 1964, was
financed jointly by the Alma Mater Society, the
university, and private contributors.
The expansion includes a new dual ice-rink,
squash and handball courts, a viewing gallery with
connecting lounges and an extension to the sporting
goods sales service.
Continued on page 17
See WORLD'S
—bruce stout photo
TREES CRINGE as the Mini-Minor Express zips through University Boulevard Thursday, hosing the sidewalk for the
one hundred forty-nine thousandth, six hundred and second time. Temporary aquatic hazard was reputedly the result of
Boulevard River overflowing its banks.
private meeting with Alma Mater Society president
Fraser Hodge and external affairs officer Mike
Doyle.
"I had an invitation from the student president
to come over for an informal discussion," Brothers
said. "We discussed no particular topics and reached
no conclusions."
Hodge later said he and Brothers talked about
wider representation on the board of governors and
university capital and operating grants.
"He didn't promise anything and wouldn't
commit himself to anything," he said.
Hodge said Brothers asked him for a list of
possible candidates for the remaining vacancy on the
board. He said he would submit the list of four to
six names, including students, to Brothers in about
two weeks.
After the meeting, Hodge escorted Brothers on
a tour of the campus, highlighted by visits to the
library and assorted huts.
"We discussed whether huts are an adequate
place to run a university," Hodge said. "I
understand his impression is that they are."
"He said university boards often aren't as
efficient as they should be and put up buildings that
are too expensive," said Hodge.
According to Hodge, Brothers said universities
should be able to raise money on their own and not
depend entirely on the provincial government.
"We pointed out to him that the university
already raises 50 per cent of the capital costs for
many of the buildings and that students paid 75 per
cent of the cost of SUB," Hodge said. "We told him
we still need a little help from the provincial
government."
Brothers was accompanied by deputy education
minister Neil Perry, whose committee is currently
preparing a report on post-secondary education in
B.C.
"I kept asking Perry what's in his report and he
just grinned," said Hodge. "I don't know if that's
good or bad."
Brothers said the Perry Commission report may
be presented to the next session of the legislature.
He said the report will be made available to
provincial MLA's, but may not be made public.
"I don't see how they will be able to justify
keeping it secret," Hodge said later.
Brothers strutted around the campus for almost
four hours, but did not speak to any general
gathering of students.
He said he has not made any specific plans to
speak to a student meeting, but admitted it might
be a good idea some time in the future.
"I'm trying to increase my rapport with
students and hear what the problems are on
campus," Brothers said.
He pronounced the t in the word rapport.
He said he wants to understand students'
problems and give students an understanding of the
"realities" of educational financing.
Hodge said he and Brothers agreed to meet
again within the next two months. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
subcribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a
founding member. Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign
correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305; editor,
228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 19.1969
Die, baby, die
To say that we have been absolutely disgusted by
the Sun's coverage of the stabbing murder of nurse
Myrna Louise Inglis is something of an understatement.
To say that we are ashamed that a newspaper and
the people who work for a newspaper could sink to such
depths of sensationalist garbage is again putting it
mildly.
But we know it is true.
It is an unfortunate fact of life that many
newspapers—like the Sun—have failed to outgrow that
early 20th century mentality fostered by William
Randolph Hearst that demands you put the worst
imaginable blood and gore on the front page in order to
attract readers.
It is unfortunate that there are people at the Sun
and other newspapers who believe and cultivate this
myth to the point exhibited in Tuesday's Sun.
The story written under a Lorraine Shore by-line is
quite clearly bunk, cheap filth designed to capitalize on
that morbid interest that cheap papers like the Sun have
themselves created in the public.
The story was obviously written exactly the way
the Sun deskmen and executives wanted it. Perhpas it
was even re-written by a deskman. In either event, it was
trash.
Clearly, the Sun executives—always on the lookout
for some degrading event that will sell newspapers and
add to their $3.7 million annual profit-seized upon the
unfortunate death of Miss Inglis as a great
money-making promo gimmick.
Miss Shore was clearly assigned the story in a bid
to draw out and prolong and even create an atmosphere
of terror and fear.
We regret that she did not have the gumption to
throw the assignment back at the desk with unkind
words and some statement of professional principles.
Instead, she went along with the profit-oriented
rubbish, prostituted her craft and created a phoney
story of nervousness (with a photographer trailing in a
car and another reporter walking behind) that can only
serve to terrorize Vancouver residents and hurt Miss
Inglis' family.
Ask what can be the reasons for printing such a
story?
Certainly, there is the "redeeming social value."
Officials will be prompted to give better protection to
young working girls, especially nurses, especially at St.
Paul's, especially in the West End.
But Dr. Frederick Werthem, in his book, A Sign
For Cain: An Exploration of Human Violence, points
out that newspapers actually precipitate violence by
printing such stories.
Ask what the Sun has really done to alleviate social
problems. What stories have you read sympathetic to
the problems of Skid Road, Indians, welfare recipients?
Nothing but wishy-washy, condescending,
tokenistic features by such illustrious reporters as Jes
Odam, a relic of the ambulance-chasing age where blood
is money and disaster is dollars.
We are disgusted, ashamed and disapointed. Yes,
disappointed. We somehow expect that in this day when
to be progressive is even an "\n" thing, that the Sun
could maintain this primeval fascination with misery.
Somehow we just cannot come around to the Sun
ethic—the business ethic— that you create a market and
then feed that market to fill your pockets.
The Sun has created a market for violence.
Someday, for an afternoon's entertainment, go
down to the Pacific Press building, stand on the
sidewalk and listen for the cheers.
Every hurrah is another death.
IIS   M©
LETTERS TO  THE   EDITOR
Lousy thieves
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Last Friday evening, Cecil
Green Park hosted the first
function of the Young Alumni
Club and a large number of UBC
students attended. It is fairly safe
to assume that most of them
enjoyed the session, however
some individuals saw fit to remove
one of the ballroom rugs, the cost
of same being in excess of
$500.00.
Criminal charges have not as
yet been laid, and they will not be
pressed if the rug is returned
with no questions asked.
There is a strong possibility
that if the rug is not returned, the
Young Alumni Club will be
discontinued as it is financialy
unable to meet the replacement
costs of items stolen by students
attending at its functions.
ROBERT JOHNSON
president, Young Alumni Club.
Job Hunting
Editor, The Ubyssey,   Sir:
I wonder if you are aware of
the inept and inefficient manner
in which the University Placement
Office is run. I recently had
occasion to consider the
University as a potential job
source. With this in mind, I
arrived at the Placement Office
and inquired about the types of
positions available. I was
presented with a printed form
listing only job title, Department,
and salary scale-in code. I
noticed two positions which
sounded interesting, so I asked
what qualifications each required.
They didn't know. Then I asked
what the translation of the salary
scale code was. Again, they didn't
know. I was told that the only
thing I could do was to apply for
the positions, and they would led
me know if I met the
requirements. But what if they
didn't meet my requirements?
They didn't know.
I consider it a potential waste
of both the applicant's time, and
the Placement Office's time, if a
man is required to apply for a
position for which he may not
even be qualified, or for which the
pay may be too inadequate for his
needs. Would it be such a hardship
to allow the front desk people at
the Placement Office to answer
such questions as I posed? I doubt
it.
AN UNEMPLOYED GRAD
Letters to the editor must be
signed and include the writer's
faculty and year or address. A
pseudonym may be used if
requested but unsigned letters will
not be printed.
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for brevity,
grammar, legality and taste.
Letters should be typed, if
possible, and triple spaced.
Letters to the editor can be
sent to The Ubyssey office in SUB
by Campus mail or can be
delivered personally.
Apathy rules
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I came to the University last
year with visions of activism in
university affairs. I had read and
been told about the apathetic
majority of students and was
determined to avoid this group.
Since then however I have slipped
into apathy.
Why?
I am directionless. I do not
know exactly what I want to do.
That is why I came to the
university, to find out. I have
turned out to meetings, I have
listened, I have talked to the
people in command hoping to get
a piece of the action. But I am
directionless, the concrete
proposals and actions which they
immediately expect of this
volunteer just aren't there. I need
someone to guide me, direct me.
If I were given a job, I would do
it. But because I don't say this is
what I'll do and because I don't
have any experience everybody
says "he's a nobody."
It seems the bureaucracy wants
only a positive, active, popular
individual. Anyone who, like me,
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City  Nate Smith
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports   Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't City     John Gibbs
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday ... *. Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Spaketh the editor-in-chief to the
lowly city editor: "Feast thine peasant
eyes on yon eager horde of slaves.
Verily, thou shalt probably never see
its like again."
The omnipotent one was right.
There were so many staffers that John
Andersen, John Mo ret and Fran
McGrath had nothing to do. There
were so many staffers that Murray
Kennedy   and   Jim   Davies   had  to be
takes a fragile half-step forward is
rudely shoved back instead of
given the encouragement to
follow through with the other
foot.
What the apathetic majority
needs is a little gentle patient
encouragement. So far there is
none. So far I am apathetic.
DAVID SCHMIDT
arts II
Foolish editor
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your editorial comments of
the 16th instant to hand and I am
moved to admonish your
impoverished endeavor to
penetrate critically to the
intellectual core of the university.
To weigh this situation in realistic
scales, to take off the outer
wrappings and lay bare the inner
truth, is no May-day undertaking,
I grant you. Close examination of
your statements and queries,
however, reveals an incompetence
that pales the very stars into
insignificance by comparison, and
exposes, to my satisfaction, your
charter membership in the Hee
Haw fan club.
In future, please settle down to
do a series of full-length portraits
and omit the scanty odds and
ends which appear to be the sum
total of your experiences. At least
recognize and be painfully
conscious of your doubtful
interpretations, your hasty
generalizations, your downright
guesses.
A man may be a fool and not
know it—but not if he is an editor.
ALEXIS BELL
arts 2
At least we know our grammar.
-Ed.
exiled to the boondocks for the day.
There were so many staffers Dave
Keilor and Brian McWatters drew
blood in their death struggle to use the
phone.
Robin Burgess wrote two heavy
features, while Maurice Bridge tried
to seduce Ginny Gait when he wasn't
pretending to work.
Bill Jones, Shane McCune, Urve
Torva, Leslie Plommer, Sandy Kass,
Leslie Minot, Jan O'Brien, Tom
Mundell, and Jennifer Jordan plunged
into the circus ring, while Quigley and
Elaine Tarzwell stood arond looking
like Barnum and Bailey. Tony
Gallagher sweated over the sports
copy.
The crowding was not quite as
serious in the darkroom, where Olrk
Visser, Richard Sullivan and Tony
Strayski where still able to perform the
usual dark and dirty deeds.
All and sundry are herewith
reminded of the year's first staff party
and all-purpose debauch at Ladner's
Saturday night. Friday,  September   19,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
EVERYONE LOSES...
...IN SFU PURGE
Administration chokes department
By ANDRAS HORVAT
What would students at UBC
do if the academic and
administrative competence of a
number of professors was
questioned? What if the professors
all belonged to the same
department, and that department
was one well known as an
exponent of student-faculty
equality?
What should we suspect might
be the motives of a university
president and his dean of arts, if
at first they publicized the fact
that the academic standards of
that department were
considerably deteriotating because
students were participating in the
running of the departments and
serving on budge tl, curriculum,
library, grievance, salary,
promotions, and tenure and other
committees.
Then what should we suspect
of a university administration
which did not care to deal with
the duly elected head of that
department, but instead
unilaterally directed faculty
members of other departments to
take over the handling of that
department's affairs, effectively
barring any student participation,
and threatening disciplinary
action if the department doesn't
co-operate with the new set-up.
since 1967. No wonder students
think that the listing of
Bottomore's name is but an
administration hoax, and that
Bottomore isn't coming back at
all. To this day, Bottomore has
made no statement concerning
any return to Simon Fraser, and
yet on the 24th of July Acting
President Kenneth Strand listed
his name as a PSA trustee without
making any statements concerning
an apointment for Bottomore.
Actually, administration
harassment goes back farther than
July 24th. On April 25th this year
Dean of Arts Dale Sullivan asked
PSA department chairman
Mordecai Briemberg for a
memorandum concerning the
organization and operation of
PSA.
Chairman Briemberg replied
with a clear outline of student
faculty participation within the
PSA Department. Here is a
condensed version of that
memorandum:
• There are two plenums, one
of faculty, one of students,
• Meetings of both plenums
are publicized and open,
• No decision of either
plenum goes into effect until that
decision is agreed to by the other
plenum,
• There are two sets of parallel
With Wyllie's resignation, the
administration maintained that
the department had no chairman,
and on July 11 at 2 p.m. Sullivan,
gave three hours for PSA to
decide on three alternatives for
the government of the
department. This meant that he
was not placing any trust
whatsoever in the ability of the
PSA to govern itself and that the
department should choose one of
three better ways which he
Sullivan had set up. On July 14,
the PSA perceiving that there
were essential differences of
opinion between the PSA and
members   of  other   departments
Rash action needed
Then, finally what if eight out
of the 20 professors in that
department were fired, through
recommendation for non-renewal
of tenure?
Without a doubt, students
would be forced under the
circumstances to do something
rash, like occupy the office of the
dean of arts, or barricade
themselves in their own
department. Then the downtown
press would denounce the
occupation as violent student
radicalism, and then president
Ken Strand could call in the
RCMP quickly re-establishing the
peace and tranquilily of the
multiversity.
Actually, I didn't mean to let
the cat out of the bag, that is
mention Mr. Strand's name, but I
guess most of my readers figured
out that I was not talking about a
South American junta, but the
administration trusteeship of the
committees of equal size, each
elected by, and among, the
membership of the respective
plenums. (There follows a list of
the usual set of departmental
committees, one for each
plenum.) mmmmmmm
The administration does not
recognize the PSA department
chairman for more than one tern
at a time.
Therefore, early in the summer
Briemberg was replaced by R. W.
Wyllie, who resigned July 7 over
what seems to have been
objections from the university
tenure committee concerning
student participation on the PSA
tenure committee.
The exact reason for Wyllie's
resignation is not clear, however it
would seem to be a matter of
tactics in dealing with the
administration. In the circular of
July 7 in which Wyllie declared
his resignation as acting chairman,
History ot dissent
PSA (political science, sociology
and anthropology) department at
Simon Fraser University.
That department has been the
subject of controversy ever since
its inception by T. B. Bottomore,
the well known British
sociologist. In fact when
Bottomore left in 1967, it was
because of disagreements within
that department concerning
student participation. I can only
suppose that the PSA people
wanted more, and that the
administration wanted less, if any
at all.
Now the administration has
hinted that Bottomore will return.
In fact his name was on the list of
faculty members to be placed on
the administration trusteeship,
despite the fact that Bottomore
has not taught at Simon Fraser
he points out that Mrs. Kathleen
Gough Aberle and others were
"still committed hard-liners."
Wyllie did not feel that he could
represent the department
properly, calling the policy which
PSA wished to implement,
"suicidal."
PSA are probably the best
lecturers at SFU so their contact
with students is intimate and
much more solid than those of
other faculty. This close
relationship between students and
department lead members of
other faculty to question the
objectivity of the grading and of
the tenure committee in PSA.
The first question regarding
grading can be easily dismissed as
die-hard conservative objections,
or possibly jealousy on the part of
faculty who could not generate
the enthusiasm necessary to
encourage their own students to
do hard work. PSA students and
Participation dead
invited everyone to come and
discuss any gripes they had
concerning the department.
Notwithstanding this move by
the department Kenneth Strand
sent the following memo to arts
dean Sullivan:
"I have received your report on
the vacancy created by the
resignation of Prof. R. W. Wyllie
as acting head of the PSA
department. I have also received
and examined your proposal
regarding a trusteeship.
The acdemic vice-president and
I concur with your judgment
concerning the nature of
conditions in the PSA department
and the necessity of taking the
action which you recommend, on
the basis of this decision I have
done the following;
• obtained authorization from
the board of governors to institute
a trusteeship
• placed the PSA department
in administrative abeyance until
such time as an administrative
trusteeship can be
established . . .
K. STRAND
In    the   attached   appendix
Strand      made      explicit      the
non-participation  of students on
faculty have received several
letters of sympathy from
professors of other universities
who have had nothing but praise
for the academic competence of
PSA students. Good grades can
mean satisfaction on both sides,
not simply faculty student
collusion. The objections to
student membership on the tenure
committee are again rather
senseless. After all, a prof has to
be a good teacher not simply a
researcher, and there is no better
way of testing this than allowing
students to have a say in who is to
teach them.
However we should remember
that there was dissension within
the ranks of the PSA and even the
chairman who the department
elected resigned in despair.
Could the reason for this
despair have been the inability of
PSA department people to get
along with members of other
departments? Again, I hate to rely
on rumor but it has been said that
faculty meetings at SFU were
crowded by PSA students, that
speakers were shouted down, and
in effect confrontation has been
sought.
Faculty jealousy
the trusteeship committee in the
following manner:
"This committee is to consist
of the following: Two persons
chosen by the president from a
list of five persons either from
PSA or from the faculty of arts,
designated by the fulltime faculty
on campus of the PSA department
but neither subject to direct veto
or ratification by students." Other
subheadings clarifying
qualifications for membership also
give no voice to students.
I think it is important to m ake
mention on of a few
non-documentable facts regarding
the adverse attitudes towards the
PSA department. The members of
The above is of course rumor,
but Kenneth Strand, while being a
hardened administrator, is not one
to prey on innocent faculty
members. So we can suppose that
the rumors could be partly
substantiated.
However, now that eight out of
20 of the PSA faculty have been
purged by the university tenure
committee, certainly not for
academic reasons, the only
conclusion to make is that such
actions by the tenure
committee-especially the firing
of Mrs. Kathleen Aberle an
obviously competent
anthropologist—do not invite
rational discussion of the issues.
No matter what the specific
consequences of this crisis may
be, everyone is bound to lose as a
result of open confrontation.
Students have already lost as their
first foothold on participatory
democracy in the university, the
PSA has been destroyed. The
eight faculty members who have
been let go went not because of
student criticism. SFU has
everything to lose: some good
profs who discriminate between
criticism and harassment.
And finally the Toronto Star
on July 26, came to the
conclusion that Canada has
something to lose with the
phasing out of PSA, as the Star's
editorial fears for the future of
the PSA as a centre of Canadian
studies.
CAMPBELL
CHARGED
The Ubyssey is constitutionally
required to print the following
notice of a student court hearing:
"Take notice that the students'
court will hear charges of acting
unconstitutionally and without
legally delegated authority
preferred against Charles
Campbell, treasurer of the Alma
Mater Society, in room 205-207,
SUB, at 1:00 p.m. Monday, the
twenty-second day of September,
1969."
A. WATCHORN
clerk of the court.
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
STUDENT NIGHT
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY
For details: See our booth on Clubs Day or contact your
Unitrend Rep — Law Faculty or telephone Playhouse
Theatre Company 684-5361. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969
SOUR GRAPES ARE SERIOUS'
AMS takes the easy way out
By CAREY LINDE
Writer Linde is current law students association president.
In 1968-69 he served as AMS vice-president, resigning in
the second term.
Without doubt, this year's student council executive
is the most ineffective, bumbling and incompetent
gathering of fledgling bureaucrats to assemble in the AMS
offices in recent memory.
First, there is Fraser Hodge, president. Wishing he had
somewhere else to go, something else to do, he is merely
biding time before his term is out. He ran for president
because it seemed the thing to do. He is the first student
in the history of the AMS to get a salary for being
president. He is getting the unprecedented sum of $3,600
for his year. In return, the students get a president
without any plan, pattern or idea of what his
administration is to accomplish.
It is difficult if not impossible to get a personal
statement out of him as to how he thinks on any given
matter at hand. Uncertain of his capacity to handle the
job, afraid of going down as a bad president, he tries to
follow the consensus, other people's leads. At executive
meetings he decides where the forces are, and goes with
them. Such unfaltering lack of incentive will insure that
his fears come true.
Tony Hodge, the vice-president, ran for the job
because it would be fun, and like Billy Budd, he thought
there was only good in the world. Half-way through his
term, he has awakened to the fact that as a council, the
AMS has done a big fat nothing to date. Only now is he
starting to give his position the concern it deserves. He is
no longer the smiling happy innocent he once was.
Potentially one of the more competent on the
executive, Tony still doesn't follow his own best
judgments. Through some sort of filial rationalization he
doesn't go against the non-leadership of his older brother
Fraser.
Treasurer Chuck Campbell, a competent bureaucrat,
runs the whole show. He does it merely because the
treasurer has the power over money, and money is the
only item of concern to this year's executive. Money and
the inability to modernize the staff are dragging him
under: when he ran for the position last spring, he told
several of his supporters that the number one proiority in
his term of office would be to replace AMS general
manager Ron Pearson. He now bluntly denies he ever said
it. As for the rest on the executive, the easy way out is the
best.
The secretary, Ann Jacobs, has effectively been
removed from her role in the groups deliberations. The
only one in the bunch with the courage to stay with her
convictions, she is thinking of resigning because she feels
she serves no purpose. It seems that her ideas, coming
from a female, threaten the mental midget males on the
executive. They pass her complaints off as sour grapes,
and go about their games.
Mike Doyle, external affairs officer, doesn't know
what he is doing. Getting a great kick out of having his
own office, telephone and title, he goes day to day,
thinking and doing different things whenever he feels like
it. Occasionally he tries to be real. He may improve.
Co-ordinator Dave Grahame is perhaps the most
incompetent of them all. Eager to please, easily
offended, his only friend in life is Chuck Campbell. Chuck
was the only person-the ONLY one-to really help him
on his campaigning. More than any of the others, Dave
Grahame is perpetuating the 1950's atmosphere that
pervades the whole AMS operations. Like Chuck
Campbell, when he got into office his head swelled up so
big he no longer needed to think about the students, and
he hasn't since.
Dave Gibson is imcompetent and dishonest. His title
is internal affairs officer. If you didn't know that a
student was running against education minister Donald
Brothers in Trail, it is because Dave Gibson didn't do his
job. He was in charge of publicity. There wasn't much.
On Sept. 4, at a meeting attended by himself, two
other members of the executive, five members of council,
several staff members in the building, and students—thirty
people in all-it was Dave Gibson who moved that a
motion be put to council to fire Ron Pearson. He gave his
word that he would lobby in support of it. He felt it was
"inevitable", "necessary", and "the right time". The
meeting followed his lead, and mistakenly, it turns out,
trusted him.
He subsequently informed an executive meeting that
it was all a manoeuver on his part to find out what the
opponents to Pearson were going to do. With his tail
between his legs, his enormous ego guarded, he reversed
his position. When the issue of Mr. Pearson's job came up
to council, Dave Gibson remarked that Mr Pearson was
"indispensable". He lied, purposefully by his own
admission, to council members, staff and students. Dave
Gibson certainly is dispensable.
Such, dear Alice, are the politically unco-ordinated
mice managing your million-dollar student society.
Council awaits
Boyd's return
By LESLIE PLOMMER
When Dermot Boyd, former SUB games area supervisor, returns
from Ireland within the next ten days, the Alma Mater Society council
will be waiting for him. (Lucky Dermot!)
A motion passed in council Tuesday night tabled the issue of
Boyd's dismissal until he is available to appear before council to state
his case and answer questions.
"Certainly it is not too much to ask of this council that you wait a
week to let Mr. Boyd be heard," said law student association president
Carey Linde, speaking on behalf of Boyd.
Linde also urged council not to "pull the rug out from under
student court" by passing a motion ratifying the action of AMS
president Fraser Hodge, co-ordinator Dave Grahame, and treasurer
Chuck Campbell in re-classifying the position of games area supervisor.
Their action has changed the position from one held by a full-time
salaried person, to one held by a student. The change leaves Boyd
without a job.
Student court Monday will consider the constitutionality of firing
Boyd without approval of council.
"Be careful that you do not become part of the plan to bail out
the treasurer," Linde cautioned council.
"Council has been confronted with a fait accompli," said medical
school representative Russ Ellison.
"The position has been re-classified without any motion in this
council."
In response to criticism form some members of council, Campbell
said the action of re-classifying the games area position was taken in
line with the policy of giving students as many jobs in SUB as possible.
Campbell said he would "take full responsibility for the Tightness
or wrongness of the action, but not for the way in which it was carried
out."
"Hey, Martha, I'm lost again. This place is just too damn
big. I'm depressed and this is only my second week at
University. Help!"
"Relax, Matilda, I know a perfect way to meet some boys
and have a good talk. There's this rap session in the SUB
Ballroom on the 4th of October . . ."
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Pf Plenary How to ball in Europe on $5 a day
By JACQUES KHOURI
The ferry boat from Robyhavn
to Puttgarden was very much like
the one used in the
Vancouver-Victoria run. That
morning I said goodbye to the
people I has spent the past two
months with. I had grown
attached to them and to
Copenhagen, and was sad to leave.
It's ironic how travel gives you the
chance to- meet so many good
people, yet with the same breath
it also separates you from them.
"Are you going to Hamburg?"
I turned around. The voice that
broke my reverie belonged to the
tall German-looking fellow who
had stood behind me to exchange
money before we left Denmark.
I replied in the affirmative.
"We have a car. Do you like to
come with us?"
And that's how my Great
European Adventure started. He
was called Boaz, bom in Russia
and had just served three years in
the Israeil army. Ruthie, his wife,
was from Yemen and had the
mysterious beauty and sex appeal
that only eastern girls possess. By
the time we drove into the city, it
was as though we had known each
other for years.
"In Hamburg there is only one
place to go," Boaz winked
knowingly. "The Reeperbahn."
It was 3:30 a.m. on a Saturday
when we reached the St. Pauli
quarter. The streets were jammed
with Mercedes and Volvo's, and
the sidewalks were crowded with
people laughing and talking
loudly. Almost everywhere you
looked there was either a
restaurant or bar or discotheque.
At the door of each night club
stood a fast-talking character,
trying to cajol the passersby in.
lp£ 2 WO I
Most of them called to us in
English.
"Sir! Sir! You want to see a
good strip tease show? Twenty
marks! But for you," he'd add
intimately, "only ten marks!
Come in, please, and see!"
Hamburg,    Boaz    enlightened
me, was the only place in the
world where you could see all
your sexual fantasies: homos,
lesbos, heteros, bi's—you name it.
I believed him. We decided to try
one place on Hein-Hoyer Strasse
(or was it Hamburger Berg?).
Inside, there was a semi-circular
stage with a large mirror in the
back. Besides us, there were seven
other customers and three girls
who looked like performers. They
looked bored and amused
themselves by exchanging inside
jokes.
After a while the sharpie in the
front closed the curtain which
served as a door. To the sound of
"Harlem Nocturn" blasting shrilly
through the stereo, one of the
girls came on stage. She stripped
quickly and completely. The
second one, with bigger breasts
and less pubic hair, was also
through in five minutes, without
displaying much talent. The last
girl was best. She offered slow,
sensuous movements and even
seemed to enjoy herself. But the
big moment we were
anticipating —the lesbian
orgasm—didn't come. Instead,
since it was a slow night, and as
the girls weren't really in the
mood, the management decided
to play stag movies.
We left the club, a little wiser,
but still green. I was
disgusted with myself—particularly because I had actually looked
forward to peeping at human
beings commercialize their
feelings. There were prostitutes all
around me, standing, waiting.
Some were only eighteen or
nineteen years old, quite pretty,
and even looked innocent (in a
second-hand way). Only the
mascara and forced sexuality gave
them away. Many lived in an
eleven-storey building called the
Palais D'Amour, in which each
had a separate, one-bedroom
studio for entertaining clients.
As I think back, Hamburg
didn't appeal to me as much as
Amsterdam. It was mainly
because, in the latter city, people
were kinder, less ruthless in the
pursuit of money. At first, I
didn't know where to go from the
central train station, so I just
walked until I reached the
national monument. There lay a
hundred or so flower children and
other wanderers, parked in their
sleeping bags, some playing
guitars, I saw two policemen
walking by and turned to one of
them:
"Excuse me, do you know
where the prostitutes who sit on
store windows are?"
The     officer     smiled
benovolently. "Just go down
there for two blocks and turn
right."
In a couple of minutes I arrived
at the O.Z. Voorburgwal, where
on both sides of the canal the
prostitutes lay (and were laid). As
I strolled by, my appetite was
whetted. I stopped by a luscious
blonde who had an intellectual air
about her.
"How much?"
"Twenty-five."
That was $6.25, which was
ridiculously cheap. But then, I
was supposed to be travelling on
$5 a day. I moved on. Towards
the end of the block, my
resistance was wearing thin. I
came upon a very sexy, dark-eyed
woman sitting on a chair inside
her window, a red light
silhouetting her form; her
decolletage was low.
"How much?"
"Twenty-five." Then she added
sultrily, "Clothes off."
"How long?"
"As long as it takes. Or sixty
for half an hour."
I tried to keep a straight face as
I added nonchalantly, "Do you
give discounts for students?"
... Amsterdam university, by
the way, is only a stone's throw
away from O.Z. Voorburgwal. . .
By ROON
My trips this summer consisted of 54 two-way
excursions to that skin flick haven just south of the
border, the Sea Vue in Blaine.
Blaine, as any guzzler knows, is the beer drinking hub
of the lower Fraser Valley, and the Sea Vue, as any
voyeur knows, is the porno house at the end of that
brightly neon-lit strip called "main drag." Yes, Aunt
Mable and I made the 60—mile round trip 54 times,
which amounts to about exactly 3,240 miles all told.
Once there, of course, we tripped out all over again,
as the cameras did body geography over all shapes and
sizes of nude, and sometimes pulsating women's forms.
One notable aspect of these movies in recent months is
the ever-increasing exposure of what is commonly called
"beaver." It used to be that most of the movies showed
only a little mammary, (and aged and wrinkled at that.)
Now the story is different. In some, though not all the
films, the most luscious, nubile and beautiful of young
vibrant chickies romp. around in their birthday suits
showing all to the grinning patrons. This is not to say all
the movies are good or even have any cinematic or
otherwise saving graces. They don't. At least most don't.
They're porno, baby, and that's what everyone goes there
for.
The quality has increased, though, in recent months
now with most of the features in living color with bright,
clear (the way the boys like it) photography.
And instead of the boring psycho-sex trip of the
earlier black and white banalities, the newer flicks are fun.
Most of them could best be described as humorously
erotic or erotically humorous, or dirty fun. But there are a
lot of older baddies still hanging around and every double
bill usually consists of one oldie and one newer one. The
ones you have to avoid have titles like A Taste of Flesh,
Body 4 Hire,   or   Hot and Greasy .
Some recent good flicks, are Brand of Shame (the
western that puts you back in the saddle), Down and
Dirty, and Hotspurs (another fun-western).
Down and Dirty, showing this week reveals an
incredible amount of beaver. Most of the chicks in this
movie are so-so but there are a couple of nubile lovelies
here that will really put a wrinkle in your jeans. I'm mean
like beeoootiful!
BOUNCING
BEAVER
IN BLAINE
To derive full benefit from this voyage into paradise,
however, one has to know when to go. Freaking on the
audience reaction is half the fun of it all.
Friday and Saturday nights, when they have two
shows, at 8 and 10, are the most riotous nights. A lot, I
mean a lot, of male students from this here university can
be seen polluting the air with their beery, bated breath as
they guffaw at the screen, During the late show, a lot of
the older drunks who've crawled in from nearby pubs also
provide floorshow entertainment with various styles or
running commentary.
These are good fun nights.
Week nights are a different story. That's when the
serious voyeurs attend. Most sit there, drooling mouths
agape, while their hands fumble about in their pockets.
Funny thing, when they leave after the show, they
still have their hands in their pockets. Sunday night for
many is the best night of all. Sunday is couples only day.
Two major groups can be seen here.
The first is the middle aged couples (usually three or
four together) who sit with the males huddled giggling and
nudging each other in the ribs and the females gasping and
whispering in each others ear.
The other group consists of guys who want to make
their girl friends homy and the girls they want to lay.
Then of course there is the middle class intellectual
slummer, like me, who gets half cut and comes along for
yuks.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19,  1969 ^■^: *V ;*4^1'%f^|lFi#^*^***T^
Dear Roon:
Sorry to have found that I missed you by just a few hours at the
Lakehead and I must assure you that I didn't leave eleven empty beer
cans just to torment you about the missing twelfth.
However, although I didn't realize it at the time, when I departed
from Port Arthur the old saying of "Cheer up, the worst is yet to
come" was about to unfold as the best description of my return to
Vancouver: so sit back and get ready for a long story starring my car
and me.
Chapter 1 — Sunday, Aug. 31st
A rather uneventful day other than the beautiful drive from Port
Arthur to Duluth, Minnesota so there's not much point in writing about
it.
Chapter 2 — Monday, Sept. 1st
We drove through Minnnesota and North Dakota. About mid
afternoon I noticed that the car began to run a little hot. This annoyed
me because I thought I'd solved all possible heating problems when I
took my thermostat out on the trip to the Lakehead. We stopped for
supper at Minot, North Dakota and all the water boiled out of the
radiator. After supper I filled both the gas tank and the radiator with
gas and water respectively and we drove slowly to Estevan,
Saskatchewan for the night.
Chapter 3 - Tuesday, Sept. 2nd to Thursday, Sept. 4th
We drove the undred odd miles to Regina with the car running
quite hot and I decided this foolishness must end. Not being too sure
what to do I consulted the local Ford Service Department for advice:
"Your thermostat is sticking."
"Do you want to see it? It's in the back seat. I took it out a week
ago."
"Oh, well, you should put a new one in—that'll make it run
cooler."
"How do you mean? All a thermostat does is slow the water flow
in the cooling system down and the way I figure it, the faster the water
flows the more heat is carried from the block to the radiator." (A fine
showing of applied thermodynamics.)
"No, the thermostat will make it run cooler."
So, with a great effort to subdue my engineering I accepted his
advice, bought a thermostat and installed it. I found a leaking rad hose
which I thought would account for it losing water. With some
reservations we left Regina for Edmonton to visit a good friend of mine.
To my great dismay, by the time we were twenty miles down the
highway the temperature was right back up. Well, goddam it, I thought.
It ran like this yesterday so it'll run hot today. We drove uneventfully
for an hour or so until a place called Davidson, Saskatchwan where with
no warning other than a few knocking sounds the motor seized up.
Well, there we were in Davidson, Saskatchewan, a thriving metropolis of
seven grain elevators, four gas stations, a tractor dealership and
twenty-five to thirty old houses. It was clear the car needed serious
repair work which neither I nor anyone else in Davidson, Saskatchewan
could carry out with the facilities available there. So I decided the best
approach was to see what possible means were available to transport the
car to Vancouver. I approached the local CNR agent who informed me
it cost S350 to ship the car to Vancouver so I ruled that out as a
possibility. 1 asked him how much it would cost to ship it to Saskatoon
where the work could be done and he said it couldn't be shipped to
Saskatoon because they didn't have loading facilities at Davidson. 1
then began to look for a farmer who had a truck available who could
transport it to Saskatoon buy trying to find a farmer with a truck
available in the middle of haying season is a tough feat at the best of
time. Feeling somewhat down with it all 1 headed for the only pub in
Davidson to sit and ponder the question for awhile. Over the third beer
I realized the solution to my problem lay with my friend in Edmonton,
so I phoned him long distance and told him of my plight and asked him
if he was interested in driving to Davidson and towing my car back
some 408 miles. Without any hesitation he agreed that that was the best
solution but said that he couldn't get away from his job that day or the
next day and invited us to come to Edmonton on the train to spend a
couple of days there. So we caught the train from Davidson to
Saskatoon at about ten o'clock at night, waited till 3:30 in the morning
for the Transcontinental from Saskatoon to Edmonton, arriving at
about 9:00 in the morning in Edmonton.
The next problem was to obtain a solid tow bar which would fit
my car so we could tow it the 400 odd miles. I checked with several
local rental organizations and the going price for a tow bar for a two
day rental was in the neighbourhood of $15 to $25. Feeling this was a
little high I phoned a machine shop and asked them what they would
charge to build a tow bar that would fit my car and the answer was
$25. Feeling that this also was a little high I approached another
machine shop, told them I felt the steel was worth approximately $.15
a pound, labour to build a tow bar should be no more than $8 an hour
and should take at most an hour and a half—would they build a tow bar
for me and they agreed to. By standing over them and prodding them
along I built myself a tow bar at a cost of $12. In the course of our
driving around Edmonton looking for a tow bar we-managed to break
the gear shift linkage on my friend's car. So late Thursday night we
started to tear apart the transmission linkage on his car and by 2:00 in
the morning we had it all over his dining room table but we had found
the problem.
Chapter 4 - Friday, Sept. 5th
By 8:30 in the morning wc had his car and transmission back
together and we left for Davidson, Saskatchewan. Approximately half
way to Davidson we developed a thumping noise in his car on the
highwayandwe stopped, took all the wheels off, all the bearings apart to
see if we could find out what that problem was. After considerable time
we realized that it was a re-capped tire coming apart so we changed tires
and proceeded on to Saskatoon where we bought a new tire. Even with
these delays we made the trip from Edmonton to Davidson in seven
hours.
On our arrival in Davidson we tore into my car doing various
compression tests, oil pressure tests and so on. The car at this point
would run although it ran roughly and heated up quickly. With oil
pressure up high we concluded that there was nothing wrong with the
bearings and with no oil consumption we concluded that the rings and
so on were in good shape as well. However, the compression was down
to 70-100 pounds per cylinder which indicated that the valves were
badly needing grinding. So we hooked up the tow bar and began the
long drive back to Edmonton.
Chapter 5 - Saturday, Sept. 6th
We arrived at Edmonton at 6:30 in the morning after 22 hours on
the road. After stopping for breakfast we decided the best thing to do
was to take the heads off the motor right away and get them ground on
Saturday, put the motor back together Saturday night and we could
drive to Vancouver Sunday. I phoned a number of outfits in Edmonton
none of which would grind the valves on Saturday. One place I phoned
said he had another set of 289 heads which I could buy fromhimfor the
heads off my motor plus the price of a valve grind. When I went around
to see him he informed us that he couldn't take my heads without
doing several tests on them and that he felt they might be cracked but
he would sell us the other heads for $90 each. This was defintely out of
the question so we went to the liquor store and bought a few cases of
beer and went back to my friend's apartment for the afternoon.
Chapter 6 — The Last Chapter
With many pressing matters in Vancouver I abandoned my car on
Sunday and flew home with the understanding that I would return to
Edmonton later that week. In the interval my friend was going to take
the heads around, have the valves ground and have the heads pressure
tested to determine if they were ciacked. 1 returned to Edmonton on
Thursday the 1 lth and found that the results of the test indicated the
heads were not cracked. At this point we concluded that the only
problem with the car was the bad valves so we proceeded to put the
motor back together, we started it up and drove out on the highway to
test it. Again, much to my great dismay, the temperature went right up.
By this time we had tried every theory we could possibly think of and
couldn't figure out the problem with the car. So the next morning 1
threw all my stuff in it and headed for Vancouver knowing that I was
either going to make it with the car in one piece or else it was going to
blow up properly. Well as the day wore on and 1 guess by the grace of
God the car began to run cooler until in the last hundred miles before
Vancouver when I was driving at 75-80 miles an hour the temperature
was right down to normal.
The end of the story is quite simple: I have my car back in
Vancouver now, it doesn't run well but it does run; it's not reliable; I
don't know what's the matter with it; I don't know when it's going to
break down again. The whole adventure cost me several hundred dollars
and I as yet do not know what's the matter with that car. Anyway I
very seriously doubt whether I will ever again drive across Canada.
Yours truly,
Fraser D. Hodge,
President.
o
D
G
E
P
O
D
G
E
pf Shree
Friday,  September   19,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY SNACKERY
TENTH AVENUE
4423 W. 10th Ave.
DUPLICATING
TERRA NOVA
COMPANY
3308 Dunbar at 17th
Telephone 733-2031
COPYING
Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10%  UBC  Discount
JIM   ABERNETHY,   MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
HOW I   QOt  f ir6Q   *rom t^ SUN m^ en^ up mrk'm9 for a Gaglardi
By PETER LADNER
Summer "holidays" started with a groan.
I was back on with the Sun as a cub reporter, groaning at the
thought of a summer in the city (oh dear), working for the Sun (oh
no), and then getting shunted out to their New Westminster bureau
(oh God)—a hole in the wall where not a few unwelcome reporters
have been sent to keep them out of trouble and work.
Work at the New West, bureau consists of checking the clock,
B.S.ing about old stories, checking the clock, calling the copshop to
see if there are any more clues about the raccoon loose in Queen's
Park, checking the clock, and going home.
Conversation at the New West, bureau consists of: "Say Jack,
did you catch the underwear ad on page 17 of today's Province?"
and "It's about time we had another murder out here dammit."
And of course the inevitable: "Here's one for you,
Peter. Phone the Mission dog-pound and find out if there's been any
rise in the number of Daschunds there.
"It should be good for a couple of paragraphs in the
three-star."
Then one night a week you had to go to a council meeting in
New Westminster, Port Coquitlam, Richmond or someplace.
Between chapters of your book you'd pray that something exciting
would come up so you'd have something to write a story about.
The meetings would highlight on a Mrs. Mallard's protest
about vandalism to ducks on a local lake, or some similar issue that
bored everyone except a few concerned citizens in uptown
Richmond and your editor.
Finally the drudgery ended.
I got canned. Wisely ignoring Sun starlet Allan Fotheringham's
advice to stay away from panel discussions, I agreed to be a student
representative on a PTA panel to discuss the old faithful, "Students
and Drugs". It was at Hillcrest Elementary in Coquitlam—one of
those silently-Socred suburban areas, and the crowd in the school
gym was very pro PTA—Parents, Teachers and Alcohol. At one point
they exploded into a chorus of clapping, whistles, and sighs of relief
when a 10-year-old kid stood up and said, "If pot's as bad as
everyone says, why don't they give pushers 30 years in jail?"
So  I played defensive, reminding them that everyone who
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thinks about LSD doesn't automatically run to the nearest 10-storey
window and try to fly, and that marijuana has roots in earth, not in
hell.
After the speeches and the Narcotics foundation film about
the horrors of all drugs and the virtues of being honest about the
drug situation, a woman stood up during the question period:
"A high school principal recently told me that all the known
pot smokers in his school had poor marks, had lost interest in
school, seemed quite satisfied with getting poor marks, and so were
doomed never to get anywhere in life. Is this sort of irresponsible
behaviour common among people who take these drugs?"
"Not at all," I replied, "You can be a perfectly decent, upright
citizen (all the parents started identifying like mad) and still smoke
pot regularly. (End of identity, beginning of faux pas
extraordinaire).
"I shouldn't say this because there's a Sun reporter here (I had
spoken to him earlier), but I know of about 20 people where I
work—at the Sun—who smoke pot fairly regularly and still remain
responsible citizens."
The audience hardly budged, but the reporter's pencil was
flying. He put the statement in his story—slightly watered
down—and it appeared in print at the bottom of his story diluted
beyond recognition. The whole story was buried inside the;
entertainment section.
"In reply to a question from the audience, University of B.C.
student Peter Ladner said it was quite possible to be a responsible
citizen and smoke marijuana," was what got printed.
Thirty-six hours later I could say "Fie on you, Stu Keate"
without worrying. I had been fired for what was officially called
"incompetence" but seemed more like bad judgment with a touch of
bad attitude thrown in. Granted, I had been incompetent. The
number of pot-smokers at the Sun was actually closer to 30 than 20,
according to later studies.
So there I was out at the UBC employment office a few days
later, liberated but unemployed.
A few weeks later, I was further liberated while temporarily
employed delivering telephone books—the easiest $12.16 I've ever
made. It was supposed to take me at least six hours, but I happened
to get out to my delivery area in (where else?) New Westminster just
as school was getting out. I had just opened my trunkful of
telephone books and was fumbling around with my list of delivery
addresses when two bright-eyed little girls came running up.
"What are all these for?"
"I'm going to deliver them to all the houses around here,"
"Oh boy, can we help?"
"Sure. You take one to this house here, and your friend can
take these two to that house across the street."
Pretty soon I was driving Peter's Procession down 17th St.: 8
kids and 112 telephone books packed into my Austin. Every 20
yards we'd stop, I'd jump out and tell them where the books had to
go, and they'd fight—no kidding—over who got to take the books.
Three hours later, we were all on first-name terms and the job
was done. They refused to let me pay them anything. "You need the
money more than we do," they insisted. It was enough to melt a
thick layer of cynicism off an ex-journalist.
By the end of June I.was working for a friend 1 had met in the
UBC placement office when he had come in looking for an
employee. I was in Suite 16 at Robson and Granville, sweating under
the heat of their display lamps as I pasted a clear, glare-reducing film
to t!ic window. Chris (el bosso) came in, walked up to me and said,
"How would you like a new job?"
"What is it?" I shot back.
"My brother needs another youth crew foreman to work with
him up at Mahood Lake. It's in Wells Gray Park, accessible only by a
54-mile road off the highway. You and my brother will be in charge
of 3 guys aged 16—18 who've been hired by the parks branch to
build a campsite there. You have to stay there for two months and
the pay is good. Your boss will be Chuck Gaglardi, Phil's brother,
who lives up there full-time to take care of the park. He's supposed
to be a helluva good guy."
And so he was. From then on it was a helluva good summer.
Coming in as a city boy, two months of working for Chuck
and living in and around the beauty of Mahood Lake had me
converted to the outdoor life.
Here I discovered a completely new breed of people, living in a
land of clear air, clean water, and quiet nights. People as smart as
any I've known, but who couldn't twist their minds around the
intellectual niceties of alienation, student discontent of mass society.
These people were frontier people, not just close to nature,
but part of nature, as we all are, but as few of us know. They knew,
and they were proud of it, and enjoyed it.
August in the Cariboo is definitely the Good Life.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969 BOOK TRIP
Schroeder and Friend
local boy
makes good
THE OZONE MINOTAUR
by Andreas Schroeder,
Sono Nis Press, Vancouver
1969. Price $5.
By GEORGE McWHIRTER
Those people who read last
week's    Province    may    fail   to
recognize any resemblance
between the urbane, plain-talking
book critic who writes there and
the tense young poet who wrote
The Ozone Minotaur. Be
assured-they are the same. The
critic is, as the dust jacket informs
us, one of Andreas Schroeder's
many disguises.
He is B.C. grown (not born),
and although his poetry is clearly
North American there are traces of
many European influences,
especially those of the German
and French surrealists. Schroeder
was bom in Hoheneggelsen,
Germany of Mennonite parents
and he exercises the same tight
control on his poetry that his
former, co-religionists do on their
morals.
These are not poems to relax
by (those readers who prefer their
poetry soft and sweet, or heavily
weighted in favour of emotion
instead of intellect—please turn
off). The tightness of the poems
compreses one of the main virtues
of the book, and perhaps one of
the faults. We rarely roll unto a
great breaker, instead Andreas
Schroeder takes us, perception by
perception, across edges as sharp
as those of an axe. He is wary
enough not to let the pain we
experience become dulled by
monotony. We learn a geography
of surprises, sometimes hanging
upside down from slender webs,
sometimes interrupted by our
own hysterical laugher as he
deliberately leads us, grimacing
like madmen, to attack a
horizontal.
But laughter is not an absolute
relief, instead the extension of an
effect. In the same sway the
silences-which are part of the
poet's tense, rhythmic
patterns—are never used to
soothe. They are silences carved
out of pure space, a chunk of
dead air at the end of a telephone
receiver when it is lifted off the
hook and no one answers.
Tensions becomes not only one
mood but a permanent condition
in The Ozone Minotaur. It might
have been better at times to let
the beast run off the leash (this
may be my own personal
preference  for  the   rampage,  a
chance to look at the lion tamer
whipping up his animals),
However, Schroeder is still a
young poet and his control is a
point in his favour. In future
books we can look forward to his
loosening up, letting his ideas
roam with the confidence that he
can still bring them back within
his immediate power.
If this review seems high on its
own imagery, it's a good way of
avoiding quotation, and at the
same time reflecting a strong
point in the book.Schroeder is an
image man. Often, with satanic
and almost geometric precision,
he will bring the extremes of his
awareness together like protractor
points to prick us into looking in
strange directions—toward
realities that are there even as
they vanish. Originality is the
keyword here-although I must
add the reservation that the
originality and progression of the
individual images confuses the
total impression in some poems.
The accuracy and tightness of
control might deceive us into
thinking that Schroeder is a mere
technician. Far from it. There is
no doubt that he works his
material, sometimes overmuch,
but he does rely on his intuition
as a kind of ultimate compass.
Because of this, and because of
the world he inhabits, he is clearly
a surrealist—but still a very
conscious poet and
responsible . .. One of the
standard switches in the surrealist
gadgery is infrequently—if
ever-used: that neat device of a
sudden transformation that will
end a poem, the fireman's pole
which suddenly sprouts out of
nowhere and down with the
surrealist  slides out.
The Ozone Minotaur exists in
a kind of moonlit element. Here
Schroeder himself seem
particularly happy. When he
reaches his arm into it, the limb
enlarges and refracts: the gain in
size does not mean a loss in
definition at the same time—the
illusion, his distorted angle,
appears to be, but never is—quite
calculable.
It is an intense, an original, a
beautifully presented and
well-tended-but not a great
book: there are few of those huge,
over-riding waves of poetry,
although the pressure is always
high and there is a constant
tremor, a purely electrical
disturbance that generates from
something inside Schroeder
himself.
pf lug
Tonight the Freddy Wood
theatre engages in some hysterical
happenings with the opening of
Boy meets Girl, a 1930's farce by
Bella and Samuel Spewack. The
outside of the FWT will be turned
into Grauman's Chinese Theatre
with the arrival of dignitaries and
other assorted freak-outs relevant
to the occasion.
Naturally, such a play could
not be complete without the
attendance of its authors, so Bella
and Sam will be on had. As part
of their trip here, the two will also
be giving a lecture (free) in the
FWT today at noon. Bring your
lunches, questions, and nostalgia.
ipC 5ivei
a novel
way
to eat
THE EDIBLE WOMAN
by Margaret Atwood.
McClelland & Stewart
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Marion, the working-girl,
heroine of Margaret Atwood's
novel, is someone any neurotic
college girl can readily identify
with.
She's engaged to be married,
but thinks of her pregnant friend
Clara as a repellent vegetable with
huge tuberous bud swelling her
body. She thinks her room-mate
Ainsley is kinky for deciding to
have   an   illegitimate   child-and
coldbloodedly using Marion's
friend Len as a stud—but Marion
getsurges to climb under the bed,
kiss a stranger in a laundromat,
and bolt from a group to race off
down the street.
Known for her book of poems,
"The Circle Game," Margaret
Atwood had drawn a character
whose bursts of unappealing
behavior contrast rather strangely
with the general picture we are
given of her. At times, less
attention is paid to filling in
Marion's world than those of the
surrounding characters.
Still, it is clear that the
confusion Marion wades into (and
eventually out of) is a direct result
of her confused ideas about what
acts are really sensible.
Her engagement to what is
essentially a cardboard cutout,
even to her, sends everybody at
the office into a fluster of
congratulations. But it drives
Marion into another kind of
fluster.
She doesn't want housewifery
and the situation of poor pregnant
friend. She doesn't want to fulfill
her femininity like Ainsley,
absolute stereotype of halfwit
girls who run their lives by their
Psychology 100 textbooks.
Ainsley bursts into hysterical tears
when the teacher at the prenatal
class reminds her that she forgot
the chapter on the need for
father-figuers.
But Marion certainly doesn't
want to grow old along with
interviewing, becoming one ofthe
efficient dietician types at the
office.
After a while, she can't eat the
Planned Pig or Planned Sheep
either, nor hamburger, nor
weiners. Gradually she is forced to
cross off eggs, milk, canned rice
pudding, and finally, just before
the wedding, everything else.
Her food problem, her fiancee
problem, Ainsley's baby problem,
all get solved at a catalclysmic
pre-wedding party. The Edible
Woman is made and destroyed,
and Marion settles down to a
happpily schizoid way of life that
is certainly a vast improvement
over her Sensible Period.
It's a most appealing version of
the Adolescent Thrashing Around
novel. It shows a poet's way with
words— example: "the
bibblebibblebibble of feminine
conversation." And as Paul
Krassner said of another
novel—"Good Grief, it's a very
funny book."
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OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON
684-4496
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861-8713
670 SEYMOUR
685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS
688-7434
BEAT THE BUS
Make your grades better by making it to class in time..
Solve your transportation problems with a good car . . .
Take   advantage   of   our   Fall   Clearance   Sale   and   save.
1969 AUSTIN AMERICA—2 dr. Sedan, auto., 6000 miles—$69.00 per month
1965 FALCON SEDAN—Radio, Economical, 23,000 mile$-$37.00 per month
1964 PONTIAC—4 dr. Sedan, 6, Stick, only 35,000 miles—$33.00 per month
1963 FORD SEDAN—Two Tone, 6, Stick $30.00 per month
1963 FAIRLANE WAGON-V8. A.T. R., New Tires and Paint, Exc.
$37.00 per month
1963 VALIANT V200 CONVERTIBIE-6, A.T., R., New Tires, Red with Red
and  White  Buckets.  Sharp.  One  owner. $36.00 per month
1962 MERCURY SEDAN-V8, A.T., P.S., P.B., R.-One owner.
$31.00 per month
1962 RAMBLER CLASSIC  SEDAN-6,  AT.,  R., Exc. $30.00 per month
1962   GALAXIE  SEDAN-V8,  Std.,   Radio $25.00 per month
1959 FORD SEDAN—V8, A.T., R., Good $25.00 per month
1956 BUICK CENTURY SEDAN-V8, A.T., R., really clean and good
$25.00 per month
For those who want a new 1970 car ... see the Cortina, Maverick,
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Friday,  September   19,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY EAT IN -TAKE OUT- DELIVERY*
-3261 W. Broadway     736-7788:
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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September 25
is
CLUBS DAY
»TRIP
By PAT MOAN
Speaking of trips, Encounter with Mars ain't a bad show. It ain't
good either.
The fourth planetarium production is an esoteric documentary
highlighting the '69 Mariner space-probe. As the announcer says,
nothing surprising has come out ofthe twin Mariners.
And that comment sets the stage (screen?) for the rest of the
show.. It is educational and informative. It is al^ bp^ig^shellinS;
ifeWany places. p'^yy'.y*^W^:X:
The travelling pipe music and drivelling commentary make a
great duo for a lullaby.
However, once you learn to tune out on thallasoids, infra-red
spectrometers and gibbouses, there are lots of goodies for your own
private visual trip.
The dome-shaped screen, in case you haven't seen it, is almost
worth the buck admission—regardless of what is plastered on it.
Whatever kind of light they use has a black-light effect which
illuminates shirts and skirts below the horizon as well as the stars
above.
To begin with things look pretty real. Then we "move into the
country to see the sky better." The moon swells to a bloated
marshmallow, there are bands on some of the planets and the groovy
old stars start throbbing like they have gone crazy, surreal, in fact.
At this point Jolly John Tanner (that's right) interrupts to tell
you about the Gibbous Moon, a big word for the First Quarter,
dropped in to make the show "educational".
"We are going to spend a day on the moon," he says. (What's
this got to do with Mariner? It's tokenism for the moon-buffs,
explains the planetarium booklet, which you can buy for only 50
cents.)
The "day" actually lasts a few seconds and the view is mostly of
the rest ofthe universe, not the moon.
A few bits of assorted junk for filing if you have an Ann
Landers type of mind like mine: you can see stars even during the
day on the moon; scientists switched east and west on the moon so
astronauts wouldn't get confused. Now west is to your left when
facing north on the moon, just like on earth.)
Now that moon-freaks are out of the way and not about to
incite a riot in the theatre, on to Mars. The mysterious red planet,
says, the planetarium, may really be more important than the moon
anyway. (Besides, they can't afford a moon show.)
There are now four fuzzy black and white pics from Mariner
Four, 1965 blocking out most of the sky. (They look suspiciously
like Kodak Brownie pics, complete with thumb on lens.)
But, we are told, scientists "gasped" when they saw them.
Great! There really are little green Martians up there. Well, not
quite. But there is a thallasoid. (A large crater, this one 75 miles
across.)
Back to sleep.
Now all this would be pretty exciting except I've seen it all on
Buck Rogers.
The lights come on and a magnificent erection of a projector
raises its steely blue head and does a slow turn for the 100-odd
people crowding its base.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC    WOOD    THEATRE
•  Theatre Excitement
Theatre Excitement
BOY MEETS GIRL
by Bella and Samuel Spewack ( A happy farce about Hollywood)
September 19-27,8.30 p.m.
Directed by Donald Soule. Settings by Richard K. Wilcox. Costumes by   Kurt Wilhelm
STUDENT SEASON'S TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 19-27
Nov. 7-15
Jan. 16-24
March 6-14
"Boy Meets Girl"
'The Crucible" by Arthur Miller
"Exit the King" by lonesco
"As You Like It" by Shakespeare
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ROOM 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE -IT IS FOR YOU
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969 1
^,J. *$&&=&
PFMUSIC
j&
^±
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
^
^
12*   [,-1    |
•*■  v-M "-**1
3E
The Colonial Music Hall
opened on August 14, and closed
shortly after. Rented by local
impresario Mark Derrick to
replace his Big Mother, the former
movie house had been hastily
renovated to very vaguely
resemble the Retinal Circus,
Vancouver's former rock music
environment which closed around
last Christmas.
About half the seats on the
" main floor of the theatre had been
torn out to make space for
dancing, and the centre balcony
was filled up with the light show
apparatus.
The famous seats on the sides
enclosed by railings had been
preserved, however, while the
amphitheatrical stage end of the
theatre had been papered over for
light show projections. The most
exciting aspect of the place was its
sound, which was unusually clear.
Opening night featured the
Seeds of Time in one of their
more hilarious sets, plus Aum, a
San Francisco blues group of
reasonably high quality. But
Derrick had failed to take various
necessary precautions, so the
powers-that-be in Vancouver City
Hall closed up the theatre which
had been operation during its
initial three days without either a
license or various permits.
Now, after almost a month of
hassling and preparations, word
comes that the Music Hall is now
licensed and legal. It opens (again)
tonight featuring Vancouver's
most musical group, Spring, The
Seeds of Time, and High Flyin
Bird. On Sunday is a benefit
concert for the handicapped
featuring The Poppy Family, and
0=~'
TT
next weekend, The Deviants from
England arrive. More about The
Deviants in next week's PF,
though.
In the meantime, go downtown
tonight -or tomorrow night and
sample the sounds and sights of
Vancouver's newest and most
exciting rock music environment.
It's at the corner of Granville and
Dunsmuir.
* * *
Judging from the advertising
for the Vancouver Opera
Association's upcoming
production of Salome, you'd
think they were presenting a revue
from the Smilin' Buddha. The ad
in the chaste Vancouver Sun last
weekend stated "See the
SEXATIONAL dance of the seven
veils."
I wonder if the production will
be as raw as the one in Munich
several years ago, which was so
torrid that no one under eighteen
was allowed to see it.
* * *
A mild (ahem) stir might have
been caused by the two-part
interview conducted by Wayne.
Darrell in last week's and this
week's Province with local
promoter Neil J. Godin and
CKLG boss types Roy Hennessey
and Daryl Burlingham.
Godin, former pop columnist
for the New Westminster
Columbian, is a promoter who has
tried hard in the past. He
co-promo ted the Aldergrove
Beach Pop Festival as well as the
not-so-successful Andy Kim and
Buffy St. Marie concerts.
He  is purportedly about to
fM*=f
~zrHp£ 7evem
Get an early start in
the fall fashion parade.
Boutique Pia is ready
with swinging young
clothes for the girl on
the go. Loads of colors,
suede, wool . . . lots of
flair -accessories.
3621 W. Broadway
733-2726
1412 Marine, W. Van.
922-3610
"3r
*y
be sued for his remarks about
Mafia backing of the Thunderbird
Peace Festival which appeared in
print in The Columbian.
Hennessey is CKLG's present
program director, while
Burlingham is, along witfi Real
Roy, one of the older boss jocks
the station.
All of which didn't make for a
particularly exciting interview,
and not exactly a definitive
statement on the Vancouver Pop
scene.
A more logical choice for
interview candidates would have
been Frank Callaghan, CKLG's
manager, Red Robinson, former
fiend of the airwaves on CFUN,
and Fred Latrimo, former LG
jock who dropped out to work
with the Georgia Straight, then
the CBC, and now with CKVN.
Come to think of it, that
doesn't sound like a bad idea ...
1                                            THE MEDITERRANEAN
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SHOP
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MUSIC REPAIRS
m                                TEACHERS       -
ACCESSORIES
^^               4339 West 10th Ave.
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SNACKERY
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4423 W. 10th Ave.
Weekend
Written and directed by
Jean-Luc Godard
Photography by Raoul Coutard
Wtlh Mireille Dare, Jean
Yanne, Jean-Pierre Leaud,
Juliet Berto
Show Times: 7:30, 9:30
Sunday:
3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
varsity theatre
CA 4-3730
September Clearance
of 1969
ELNA
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THESE WERE LISTED AT $260.00
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NOW
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Patches, button holes
Sewing on buttons
Satin stitch, lace work and insertions
Quilting, eyelets, shell hems, etc.
AVAILABLE ONLY THROUGH:
ELNA SEWING MACHINES LTD.
450 W. Hastings (at Richards)
5935 Fraser (at 43rd)
688-6915
321-6191
Friday, September  19,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY This space is for comment and discussion
by PF's readers for the edification ofPF's readers.
FORUM
YANKEE STAY HERE ...
just make a commitment to Canada
ipS Sight)
By JOHN TAYLOR
Possibly it is too late to be proposing a rationale
against the foreign takeover of Canadian universities since
it is virtually fact. Foreign-born faculty are now in control
or in positions of- influence in every department of
importance in most major Canadian universities, including
the University of B.C. It is perhaps too late because that
influence is increasing rather than diminishing as the
lecturers and assistant professors hired from abroad when
the universities were expanding in the early years of this
decade are now becoming associate and full professors and
even department heads.
The paralysis of the Canadian academic community
in the face of such a takeover can be traced to the
Canadian inferiority complex and the strength of the
arguments against the prohibition of foreign-born
academics. The inferiority complex has two aspects: the
unreal one, probably stemming from the long British and
then American tutelage, that Canadians are incapable of
originality and quality; and the real one, measurable in the
paltry output of PhD's, that most Canadian universities
until recently were inferior to British and American
institutions. The argument aganist prohibition of
foreign-bom academics also has two aspects: the
compelling aspect that we should seek profs as we seek
capital to ensure our prosperity and our place atop the
heap; and the phoney "liberal" argument that no-one,
especially academics, should be discriminated against on
any grounds whatsoever because national standards are
invidious in a global world. Implicit in this notion is the
conceit that the standards of professors, whatever their
stripe, are universal, right and good. Such thinking only
indicates that General Bullmoose has now acquired a PhD.
But there is an argument against the specifically
American takeover of Canadian universities. It is based on
the fact that the takeover is American and America is the
world's first-ranking problem. The study of living
alongside this giant nation is a worthy study because it is
difficult, is profound and is of world importance since at
least half the world's population also lives, as Canadians,
Czechs and Indians do, alongside one of the three world
giants-the U.S., the U.S.S.R. and China. In addition,
Canadians have  an  important and basic lesson for the
world if they can solve the problems of two nations within
a single jurisdiction. It is a problem within the
competence of this nation and few others, just at the
problem of two races within a single state is a nearly
exclusive problem of the U.S. Neither problem is going to
be solved within a United Nations or by means of outside
coercion. Both problems have to be lived with and are of
equal importance.
The point for Canadians is that it is worthwhile not
being part of the United States (as it was not worthwhile
being a client state of Britain or France). And the point
for academics in Canada and their students is that training
for living alongside a giant is different than that required
for living in that giant or living in the world as a whole.
Absence of such training has particularly grave
implications for the English-speaking Canadian. He is as
close to the U.S. as the French and Spanish speakers in
Quebec and Mexico, but does not have the protection of
a different language. In many respects the threat to
English-Canadian autonomy is more grave than the threat
to Czech or Vietnamese autonomy. The soldier with a
loaded gun is an explicit problem which invites explicit
answers. The ten-percenter appealing to the profit motive
in a smoke-filled room is insidious and difficult to
contend with, as is CBS and Time—Life Inc. Equally
difficult to contend with is the compelling American
lecturer with his captive audience, his lack of stake in the
community, his orientation to non-Canadian problems,
probably his lack of recognition of Canada as an
independent foreign country, and his lack of knowledge
about one problem the Americans don't have—the
problem of living with America. Such a lecturer becomes,
in effect, an agent of American imperialism who is
exploiting Canada, probable with the best good will in the
world.
The presence of America along our borders, assuming
the existence of an independent Canada as a desirable
object, means that nearly every subject in Canadian
universities requires a different orientation from those in
American universities. I accept neither the arts nor the
sciences, neither physical education nor nuclear physics. A
main theme of the humanities and social sciences should
be the creation and the preservation of a body of thought
and a viable political and social unit in the face of severe '
pressures, both internal and external, both past and
present. After all, creation and preservation are the
primary functions of a university, and the decision of
what to create and what to preserve is a value judgment
for a community, possible even for a community of
scholars. The answer is not the creation of a Canadian
studies program within a university, but the making of the
university a Canadian studies program. The Canadian -
orientation is just as valid in the sciences as the arts. The
whole scientific matrix is different here than in the U.S.
We have different geography, plant and animal life, and
resources. We have the second largest nation in the world
with a tiny, widespread population. The problems implied
in this environment are different from those in America
and require a different body of theory and technology for
solution. There is plenty of scope here in both the pure
and applied fields. Science and the arts, even fine arts, are
not universal. They are parochial, and for too long in
Canada they have been American parochial. To concede
to the American point of view in either the arts or the
sciences is to concede to its doubtful Tightness (and .
righteousness), and to emasculate the Canadian scholar
and the Canadian nation and condemn them as
unworthy.
Nevertheless, Canadian univeristies still must get the
best possible man for the job regardless of race, color,
creed or nationality. But with two qualifications.
Canadians must define the job. And the foreign-born
academic must obtain Canadian citizenship with all
possible haste. Otherwise he has, as one British statesman
put it, power without responsibility—the prerogative of
the harlot through the ages. The same goes without saying
for all department heads, deans, key administrative
personnel and presidents. In fact, the recent problems
with presidents at UBC is partly attributable to the fact
non-Canadians were trying to head a Canadian university;
at Simon Fraser, a Canadian was trying to head an
American University. If Canadian universities do not
Canadianize, possibly one day the rationale of Lord
Durham, as he applied it to the French Canadian in an
attempt to elevate him by anglicizing him, will be applied
to the whole Canadian nation to elevate it by
Americanizing it: There can hardly be conceived a
nationality more destitute of all that can invigorate and
elevate a people .... owing to their peculiar language and
manners. They are a people with no history and no -
literature.
Mr. Taylor is a PhD. candidate in Canadian history at
UBC. He holds a BSc. in physics.
SAVE UP TO $125 FOR $1.75!
GO PLACES 2 FOR 1
INVITATION
THE STUDENT ENTERTAINMENT BOOK
ON  SALE  NOW:  SUB  INFORMATION
BOOK STORE
HE & SHE CLOTHING
IN COOPERATION WITH FROSH ORIENTATION COMMITTEE
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE
invites you to participate in
FROSH SYMPOSIUM
(A Groundling's  Guide  to  the  Floating   Island-
Gullivers Travels)
The program will consist of general talks on the
nature of the Arts and Sciences; informal discussions with professors centred around the relevance and importance of particular first-year
courses, such questions as knowledge for
whom? and knowledge for what? and general
discussion on the function of the university in our
society; plus a social evening. All interested students are urged to attend and bring their own
experiences and questions to the fore.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 20th
Beginning 10:30 a.m.
S.U.B. 2nd Floor
"eaw flftfefl'IS THE DEFINITIVE
YOUTH ODYSSEY OF THE 60'S! A BOLD J
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ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
685-6828
851   GRANVILLE
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969 Friday,  September   19,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
'No guitars
for ideal
dedication
The Leon Ladner bell tower
had not yet been officially
dedicated, one year after its
erection.
That does not necessarily mean
it isn't going to be dedicated,
according to Dr. Malcolm
McGregor, UBC's director of
cermonies.
Student indignation was
aroused last year over the
$150,000 cost of Ladner's Last
Reaction.
Many people thought
McGregor feared a student
demonstration at a public
dedication, and therefore had not
called a ceremony.
"I'm not afraid of anything,
and certainly not of students," he
said,
He said he will arrange
whatever outdoor ceremony
students want, if he is seriously
approached. Interested students
should contact him at classics
department, Bu. 267.
McGregor's ideal ceremony
would consist of a speech by
Ladner and a concert planned in
conjunction with the UBC
organist.
The proposed concert would
exclude any student guitarists, as
McGregor said he has a personal
objection to the guitar.
Library hits thieves
BELL TOWER ... still closed
The library indulges in the
typical bureaucratic lust of
oppressing and restricting the
actions of youth by prohibiting
briefcases in the library ... right?
Wrong.
The real reason, of course,
behind the ruling is an attempt
to cut down the number of books
"permanently borrowed" from
the library.
"We've tried allowing cases in
the stacks and then checking them
on the way out but we haven't
had much success," said Doug
Mclnnes, assistant librarian in
charge of public service.
Mclnnes sypathized with
students' fears that their
briefcases might be stolen but
pointed out that the library spent
almost $9,000 last year to install
Social workers
of the future
The Inter Professional Health
Education Council will hold a
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday for
all persons interested in social
work.
The meeting is of prime
interest to social science students
who plan to enter a profession.
The meeting will be held in
SUB 207, 209 and 211.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS)-A
scourge of acne struck this island
capital Thursday, causing
permanent psychological damage.
lockers. Students deposit 25 cents
in the locker which is returned
when he claims his brief case. But
Mclnnes admitted the locker
facilities are inadequate at
present.
"It's the inconvenience to
other borrowers that we're mainly
concerned about," said Mclnnes,
"Inevitably books in the most
demand are taken."
"If a guy walks out with a
book he's not hurting the library,
he's hurting the guy next to him,"
agreed head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs.
But despite precautions the
problem of hundreds of books
disappearing  annually continues.
Many of the large universities
have virtually eliminated theft by
prohibiting students in the stacks,
said Mclnnes.
"In this we're quite liberal," he
added. "Not too many allow
undergraduates full use of the
stacks. But we believe students
should have access to the books."
Both Stubbs and Mclnnes
emphasized that any students
with more questions about library
rules or procedure are welcome to
come and discuss them with the
staff.
Science coffee
party bombs out
By JAN O'BRIEN
Only 300 of the 3,900 science students attended Thursday's
"science coffee party."
"The idea was to give first year students a chance to discuss with
their profs and older students any problems they are having," said Fred
Buckwold, Alma Mater Society representative for the science
undergraduate sociey, sponsor of the party in the SSUB ballroom.
Chemistry prof K. B. Harvey blamed the poor turnout on a
physics lecture held at the same time.
Many students had not heard of the party and just happened to
be in the room at the right time.
"We had no idea there was a coffee party, we just came to play
cards," said one student.
One first year student said: "I'm unhappy because I'm not able to
use the lab to build bombs, it's only open to scheduled lab sessions."
"This is great," said a female student, "we don't get much mixing
in a class of 300."
"There is a chronic need for volunteers for the SUS Black Plague
and for the social committee," said Al Burke SUS social co-ordinator.
"Last year 35 or 40 people did all the work."
SUS president Dave Koop said he hopes SUS can break down into
departments with the department clubs handling most ofthe activities.
"The science faculty is too diversified for us to handle well," Koop
said.
Two new department clubs, a math club and a living science club,
were formed as a result of the party.
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL SCHOOL SUPPLIES
YOUR NAME OR INITIALS EMBOSSED
FREE ON BRIEF CASES AND
UMBRELLAS PURCHASED HERE
5754 University Blvd
224-3202
pan-love photos
zap them with a beautiful
creature portrait — huge,
different, multiple-image, or
how you've thought it could
be — straight stuff, too,
children and adults.
4100 W 16th Ave. 224-7663
Does Student Government
Supplement Your
Education?
OF COURSE NOT; BUT IT'S A
GOOD WAY TO FAKE IT!
Interested in rapping with all the political heavies? Contcat
Mike Doyle, or Tony Hodge at the A.M.S. in SUB.
LOOK!
Mr. Dino, well-known
hairstylist, formerly
of 1st Lady Coiffures,
announces the
opening of a brand
new salon.
Mr. Dino and his
highly-skilled stylists,
Maria and Maybelle,
and his manicurist,
Hilda, wish to
welcome old friends
and new clients to
their new location.
(Dino.  & £nrilfo~  dtcurfsL  QoiffwisL
4532 W. I Oth Ave. 224-7440
SUB FILMS PRESENT:
AROUND THE
WORLD IN
80 DAYS
September 18-21
Thursday 12:30
Friday 12:30,4:30,7:30
SUB      75c
Saturday 7:30
Sunday 2:30 Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969
GOOD TEACHING NOT ENOUGH'
OHRC takes Haggar's complaint
TORONTO (CUP)-A
Lebanese-born political science
professor has filed charges with
the Ontario Human Rights
Commission against five provincial
universities and colleges, stating
they refused to hire him because
of his national origins and
political beliefs.
George Haggar, 34, laid the
charges against King's College,
which is an affiliate of the
University of Western Ontario,
Seneca College of Applied Arts
and Technology, Waterloo
Lutheran University, Lakehead
University and York University.
Haggar charges that King's
College refused to consider his
application for a teaching vacancy
because he has publicly attacked
Zionist ideology and been a
spokesman for the Canadian Arab
community.
King's college, a former Roman
Catholic school, had its own
administration but is governed by
the UWO academic senate and
board of governors.
Lutheran did not renew his
contract in 1967 because,
according to then-acting president
Henry Endress: "Through
numerous channel, you have made
it very clear that you are not
happy with the philosophy,
operation and personnel (at
Lutheran)".
At the same time, Endress
described Haggar as "a good
teacher, probably a very good
one."
In January, 1968, the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers investigated the case,
and found that Lutheran had
acted legally in terminating
Haggar's contract because it
contained a clause forbidding
teachers "to attack or in any way
disparage the Christian religion."
A CAUT official described the
Waterloo Lutheran policy as
"decidedly unacceptable" and
said the university's methods of
dealing with appointments and
tenure "are unacceptably
authoritarian; nor can any degree
of benevolence in aplying them
disguise or justify this fact."
Last year, Haggar was fired by
Southern University in New
Orleans, La., when as president of
the faculty association, he joined
students in a 190-day strike during
which Louisiana governor John
McKeithen was captured and held
to win student demands. Haggar
was ordered deported to Lebanon
but returned to Toronto.
"I   answered   more   than   30
X-'P'-io-.al to    ,
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advertisements in the past two
years, from academic journals,
and did not get a single
interivew," Haggar said. "In most
cases they did not acknowledge
receipt' of my letters or replied
that my application was on file.
He also received a letter from
Lakehead University saying the
job he was applying for did not
exist, "and I subsequently saw the
advertisement for it at least four
times."
He also applied at Seneca
College, where, after several
favorable interviews, he was told
by one official he would get the
job if he managed to "get rid of
my Mediterranean mentality and
emotionalism."
He was also told "the
Mediterranean mentality doesn't
amount to anything, people with
it never go anywhere."
An   officer   with  the  Ontario
Human Rights Commission said
Sunday he would investigate
Haggar's complaints.
"We will investigate all his
complaints, but four of his
allegations that he was denied
employment opportunity are
legally outside our jurisdiction
because they took place prior to
the amendment," he said.
SNACKERY
TENTH AVENUE
4423 W. 10rh Ave.
ENGLISH
COACHING
Students interested in helping to coach new Overseas
students with their English
should meet in Rm. 400, I.H.
at 12:30 today.
DEBATING SOCIETY PRESENTS:
Voluntary  AMS   Membership?
A Debate Focusing on the Fundamental
Concepts of Student Organization
Monday, Sept. 22 12:30 Bu. 104
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry Brownlee,  Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
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2180 ALLISON
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FOR NEW & USED
Books
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACKS
• MAGAZINES
Monarch Notes and
Study Guides &
Coles Notes
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE — 224-4144
VANCOUVER 8, B. C.
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• Morning Coats
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• Shirts  and  Accessories
• 10%   U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal  Wear Rentals
631   Howe 688-2481
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DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 7500
Special Discount to Students and Faculty
566 Seymour 685-2271
Victoria Store — 1209 Douglas, Tel. 385-4431 Friday, September  19,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
General knowledge   exam may     Co-eds inyade dorm
soon decide who comes to UBC
General knowledge may decide whether or
not your younger brother or sister makes it into
UBC.
"The senate is presently considering
entrance examinations for progessive first year
students," Registrar Jack Parnall said Thursday.
"As these exams will be administered in
the winter they will have to be a general
knowledge type of test," he said.
Senate was told September 10 by the
senate committee on enrolment policy that
entrance examinations for first year students
were under consideration.
Parnall said senate was "reasonably
satisfied" with the high schools' examinations
of the students' examination ofthe students'
ability in certain specialized subjects. But they
would like to compare students from different
schools over the province on general
knowledge.
"The student who fares better on the
general examination will obviously have a
better chance than the student who does
equally well on the provincial exam but poorly
on the general test," Parnall said.
These exams, however, will not come into
effect until 1971-72 at the earliest.
For next year UBC is simply limiting
enrolment of first year students to 3,400—a
drop of about 340 students from this year's
quota—on the basis of provincial government
exams.
By DAVID KEILLOR
The Anglican Theological College has gone co-ed.
After 42 years of operation the college residence has opened its
doors to 35 female residents.
"This is an experimental year for co-education at the college,"
Rev. R. N. Mugford,   dean of residence, said Thursday.
"It was felt that a wider constituency of Anglican students would
be served and the social life of the college would improve by developing
inter-social relations."
The residence has many of the regulations that other on-campus
residence have. Open house will be held Sunday afternoon until 5 p.m.
In the female wing this is apparently enough visiting time. "Strict
enforcement of visiting hours allows us to be more relaxed because we
are not checking the halls before going for a shower," said Barb
Newton, arts 2.
From the male residents point of view conditions have improved.
"The atmosphere is more casual now—there was almost a party in the
lounge last night," said Doug Moore, arts 2.
World's largest ice arena
Continued from page 3
In terms of actual ice area, the dual-rink is the
largest arena complex in the world. When the
50-foot section separating the rink is removed it can
be used for large public skating sessions and indoor
speed skating.
The new sports complex is the largest single
exhibition building in B.C. and UBC convention
manager Dal Richards is attempting to rent the
exhibition area to various convention groups during
the off-season.
In sympathy
with bust
TORONTO (CUP)-George
Tathan, dean of faculty at York
University, volunteered
Wednesday to provide moral
support for a student convicted of
possession of marijuana—by going
to jail with him.
The student would need moral
support ' during the "traumatic
experience of being incarcerated,"
he said.
But James Cotroneo didn't
have to take him up on the offer.
He was sentenced to a fine of
$200 and allowed 15 days to pay.
At the trial of Cotroneo and
fellow-student Leonard
Shirchenko, Tathan testified
Cotroneo had worked in the
university's anti-drug center since
his arrest in January and had
helped many students who had
drug problems.
*~
PANGO-PANGO (UNS)-High
blorg priest Flectus Parnofsky is
reported ailing. Informed sources
said Uncle Flectus' death could
have grave repercussions for world
peace.
Levis
BACK - TO - CAMPUS
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size this fall. On the field or behind a desk, you will be the TRENDSETTER! Mr. Big 'n Tall Shop Ltd. carry a full line of styles, colours and
fabrics from LEVIS, selectively chosen to provide yo-j with the best, no
matter what the occasion.
Q THINK BIG. . .THINK OF
550 GRANVILLE ST. VAN. 2, 681-7814
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Wed. Sept. 24 at 8:30 p.m.
TIM BUCKLEY
FOLK-ROCK BALLADEER
with
THE RETINA - CIRCUS LIGHT SHOW
REGULAR PRICE: $4.50, $4.00, $3.50, $2.50
TICKETS NOW ON SALE!
THE BAY BOX OFFICE, MAIN FLOOR THE BAY,
DAILY 10-5 - PHONE 681-3351
A FAMOUS ARTISTS PRESENTATION
QUEEN  ELIZABETH  THEATRE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3 AT 8:30 P.M.
,^v
HiKI
international
buffet & dance
TONIGHT
5:30 SHERRY
6:30 DINNER
• dishes   from
12 countries
8:30 DANCING
* 2  bands
WICKED ORANGE
AND THE TRIO
new  overseas
students  —  $1.00
students  —  $1.75
faculty &
community     $2.50
at I.H. corner
West Mall/Marine
STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEES - EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
QonfahmcsL on.
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
S.U.B. BALLROOM
Odjobah. I - S
All UBC students are invited to participate in a discussion on
student affairs at UBC. Presentations on the following topics
are solicited from all those interested in the direction of the
Alma Mater Society at UBC.
1*
2.
4.
5.
Voluntary unionism.
The role of students in negotiations with the
Senate, the Administration,  various levels of
government, and the general public.
The student government as a service organization.
The Students' Council as a federal government
or what?
The role and effect of Students'  Council in
academic reform.
Contact Tony Hodge or Mike Doyle, c/o A.M.S/Sub.
Secretarial assistance is available. Please reply by September 25.
STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEES - EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
AMERICA'S B^ymmX   GREATEST   TRUMPET
SHOWMAN
WITH
PEE-WEE
AND THE
YOUNG
SET
LV
4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50
a^I^X^       QUEEN EllZABETH THEATRE
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 10
8:30 p.m.
ON STAGE!
IN  PERSON!
GLENN
YARBROUGH
4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50
CAPTAIN VANCOUVER BOOKS
HONORED ON THIS SHOW!
TICKETS NOW ON SALE I
THE BAY BOX OFHCE, MAIN FLOOR THE BAY,
DAHY 10 to 5—PHONE 681-3351
PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED
Charge Your Tickets to Your Bay Charge Account Page   18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  19,  1969
Proposed il of A body could
shaft convicted students
EDMONTON (CUP)--A new disciplinary body
could be in the works at the University of
Alberta-one empowered to place students found
guilty of civil offenses in double jeopardy, and
which could expel a student within two days after
the commission of an offence without the student
being present at his own hearing.
Students who were supposed to be
involved in the creation of the body have charged
that a draft proposal for its creation was passed
illegally-befor they even got a chance to see it.
The new judicial body, called a "General
Disciplinary Board," was revealed in an interim
report of a committee on campus law and order to
the general faculty council of the university.
It calls for the creation of a five-member which
would deal with offences including "offences
punishable as crimes," and violations of university
regulations relating to causing disorder, parking and
canvassing on campus.
The board would be composed of three faculty
members and two students, chosen from a panel of
potential   members   by   "a   senior   clerk   in   the
registrar's office."
The board would summon a person in writing
to hearings, and failure to appear could result in a
fine, refusal of transcripts or marks, suspension or
expulsion.
A person found guilty of an offence would be
subject ot penalties similar to those for
non-appearance.
Steve Hardy, a graduate student sitting on the
law and order committee, claims the draft report
containing the proposal was passed without a
quorum present at the meeting. He had not even
been invited to the meeting, Hardy said.
Hardy also said the report, if implemented,
would give the university a "great deal of power
over the lives of the students."
SFU COMPUTER
Radical
new prof:
Irving IBM
Irving IBM is the latest
educational experimenter at
Simon Fraser University.
Irving greets a new student by
introducing himself and getting to
know the student by his first
name, then typing a short
examination to find out how
much the student knows.
Irving isn't a rude faculty
advisor, nor is he a diabolical
scientist. Irving is an IBM
computer.
And he's teaching part of a
first year chemistry course.
Irving's teaching method is
basicaly question and answer: if
the answer is right, he goes on to a
more complicated question.
If the answer is wrong, Irving
points out the error, and, if
necessary, backtracks to remedial
lessons and easier problems.
SFU chemistry prof S. K.
Lower has come up with the
encouraging statement that the
system is designed to supplement
the regular lectures and
laboratories in the course rather
than replace them.
He said the student is not
communicating with the
computer, but with his professor
through the medium of a
computer.
Still, it's Irving who knows the
student by his first name.
WANTED
People and Ideas
All STUDENTS or FACULTY interested in participating
in a WORKING Committee, please come to:
ROOM 125 SUB
TUESDAY, SEPT. 23, 12:30
Help Organize . . .
TREK
WEEK
(October 19-25)
WHAT  IS  IT:
(1) Co-ordinate existing events (T-cup, Teach-ins, Alumni  Reunion Days)
(2) Work  with  faculty,  clubs  and Alumni  organizations  to  plan  new
(3) fund  raising  events  for  charities
(4) a  promotion  of  the  University and  its  students
WHAT HAS TO BE DONE:
(1) Co-ordinate existing  events (T-eup, Teachers, Alumni  Reunion  Days)
(2) Work  with  Faculty,  Clubs  and  Alumni  organizations  to   plan   new
events
(3) Organize a TREK back to Vancouver
(4) Organize   seminars,  speakers, etc.
(5) Finalize a complete  P.R.  program
THIS   IS   AN   INDEPENDENT  COMMITTEE   OF   AND   FOR   U.B.C.
UBC CURLING CLUB
GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 12:30, BU. 100
Elections   -   Registration
Full Turnout Essential
BEGINNERS WELCOME — ESPECIALLY GIRLS
— Lessons Given —
MEN'S or MIXED TEAMS - BONSPIELS - PARTIES - COMPETITIVE or SOCIAL
Jke
^cwlptvima   \Jne
that takes the place of two
*225
Budget Terms, of course
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN  GEM SOCIETY
Granville ot Pender Since 1904
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Committee Appointments
Students are needed for all types of committee work. The
Alma Mater Society is looking for any student interested
in contributing to his university—that should mean you.
Submit applications in writing to A.M.S. Secretary. Please
reply by Wednesday, September 24, 1969. The following
committees need members:
1. Men's Athletic Committee
2. Winter Sports Centre Committee
3. Traffic and Parking Committee
4. Bookstore Committee
5. Future Housing Committee
6. Elections Committee
7. Eligibility Committee
The position of Returning Officer is also open, and applications are being accepted in the same manner as for the
above committees.
Conference on Student Government
October 4, 5
SUB BALLROOM
AH students are invited for the purpose of a serious,
thorough discussion on the nature and purpose of the student government at the University of B.C.
Presentations are invited on the following topics:
1. Voluntary unionism.
2. The role of students in negotiations with the
Senate, the Administration, various levels of government, and the general public.
3. The student government as a service organization.
4. The Students' Council as a federal government or
what?
5. The role and effect of Students' Council in academic reform.
Contact Tony Hodge or Mike Doyle, c/o A.M.S./Sub.
Secretarial assistance is available. Please reply by September 25.
Open House Committee Positions Vacant
The Open House Committee for 1970 requests applications
for the positions of:
Vice Chairman
Clubs Co-ordinator
Secretary
Special Events Co-ordinator
Guides Co-ordinator
Service Co-ordinator
High School Tour Co-ordinator
Written applications should be turned into the A.M.S.
General Office by Wednesday, September 24, at 4:30 p.m.
Please include interests in application in letter form. Friday, September   19,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
Birds will try it again;
hippy leads the way
By TONY GALLAGHER
Round number two of the football
Thunderbirds season will get underway at 2:00
p.m. Saturday at UBC stadium, and if they should
fashion a victory it will be the first since November
1967.
The opposition comes in the form of the tough
College of Idaho Coyotes who have the typically
fearful credentials; 26 returning lettermen, an
all—American candidate at quarterback and an
opening day 26-6 victory over Eastern Oregon.
The impressive quarterback goes under the
name of Lon Droxel. Last week he completed 12
out of 14 passes against Eastern Oregon and last
year passed for 1380 yeards in seven games.
Attempting to stop the Coyotes' passing attack
will be the Birds' belabored secondary led by the
155 pound "hippy" safetyman Bill Henderson. With
hair down to his shoulders Henderson attacks
opposing ball carriers with such ferocity that he has
earned the starting safety job in two weeks.
Other changes in the Bird line-up will include
the insertion of Doug Eaton at middle linebacker,
replacing Dave Corcoran who is a doubtful starter
due to a separated capsule in his left shoulder.
The weather will dictate the starting
quarterback as coach Frank Gnup feels that only
veteran Roger Gregory has sufficient experience to
run the offense in the rain. If the field is dry
Kelowna rookie Al Larson will start, moving
Gregory to left halfback with Paul Danyliu running
out of the fullback spot.
Another problem for the Birds is a speedster
namedE. V. Carolina who runs at a 9.6, 100 yard
clip out of his running back position on the Idaho
offense. Gnup is hopeful that the improvement in
his linebackers will be sufficient to keep Carolina
contained and force them to pass more often than
they wish.
The Birds' next game will be on the road
against Williamette University, Sept. 27.
—dick button photo
UBC ATHLETES TOKYO BOUND Lionel Pugh (coach), Peggy
Busch, Thelma Fynn, Brenda Eisler.
Lionel leads ladies
to Pan-Pacific Games
By DICK BUTTON
UBC track coach Lionel Pugh will be leaving for Tokyo's Pan
Pacific Games next week, taking only two of UBC's best women
athletes with him.
Thelma Fynn and Brenda Eisler, along with seven other B.C. girls
and four from the rest of Canada will be competing for the medals at
the Pan Pacific Games next week, then will compete in possibly two
other international track meets.
Thelma holds the Canadian junior and juvenile 800 meter and
juvenile 1500 meter records. Brenda set a new Canadian record for the
long jump at the Canada Games in Halifax this summer with a jump of
19 feet,   11H inches.
Peggy Busch, specialist in the 200 meter hurdles can not compete
in Tokyo as this event is not being run. She holds the Canadian senior
record which she set at the National Track championships in Victoria
two weeks ago.
Coach Pugh rates this year's UBC women's track and field team
the best ever, and the most powerful in Canada right now.
He is looking forward to his most successful year.
Rugger Chappies tackle
first game of season
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team opens its 1969 schedule at
Wolfson field Sunday, 1 p.m.
against the Kats.
The Birds have had only five
practices and coach Donn Spence
expects them to be at a
disadvantage against their better
conditioned opponents.
The Birds would like to win
this game since the Kats have been
league champions eight out of the
last nine years.
Last year the Thunderbirds
tied the Kats in an exhibition
game 6-6 but were defeated twice
in league play. »
Some  of the  top  players  on
Field Hockey
The Thunderbird field hockey
team opens its season of B.C.
Field Hockey Association league
play against Jokers Saturday, 1:30
at New Spencer field.
The Braves will also play at
1:30.
both teams will not play because
of the regional trials to decide
players for B.C.'s team which are
taking place on the weekend.
There will be four new faces in
the Birds' lineup for the first
game.
Bud Bishop and Ian Prattis are
new faces to UBC rugby fans
while John Squeo and Spence
McTavish have graduated from the
Braves.
The rugby team was one of last
year's most successful varsity
squads and ended their season by
winning all but one game of an
exhibition tour of the eastern U.S.
and Canada.
Intramural
Notices
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
P.E. Girls softball and
university girls volleyball entries
are due by Sept. 22rd in the
Women's Intramural Offices. The
deadlines for the swim meets are
Sept. 25th.
*     *     *
VOLUNTARY REC.
Sign up for the Red
Cross-Royal Life Instructors clinic
in Mr. Korchinsky's office, rm.
208 War Memorial gym.
The voluntary recreation
program still needs instructors for
their program. Classes run M, W, F
in the morning and T, Th also in
the morning. If you can teach, see
Mr. Korchinsky, rm. 208.
Women's Practice Times
Broadway & Hollywood
in the Thirties
by Samusd and (Bulla Spawack
Authors of BOY MEETS GIRL
in the Frederic Wood Theatre
Friday, September 19, at 12:30 p.m.
SPORT MANAGER
Badminton      Sandra Kolb
Basketball       Jennifer French
Curling Robin Knowles
Field Hockey Lynn Berry
Figure Skating  Enquiries
Golf Heather Munro
Gymnastics     Elaine Bryson
Skiing
Joy Ward
FREE ADMISSION
ADMISSION FREE
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORSI
549 Granville St.
PHONE      PRACTICE
943-3437   Sept. 24 5:30-7:30
p.m.; Women's Gym
733-4785    M. 4:30 p.m.,
Memorial Gym
988-7943    Sat. 10:15 a.m.-12:15
p.m.; Oct 1 7:15-
9:15 p.m.; Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center
228-2295    Until Sept. 25;
Chris Spenser Field
4:30 each afternoon
228-2295
T 12-2 p.m.;Th 2:15-
3:15 p.m. Thunderbird
Sports Center
263-6677   To be announced
731-5665   M. 6-8 p.m.; T 4-
6:30 p.m.; Th 12-2:30;
4-6:30 p.m.; Sat. 12-
5 p.m.; Apparatus Gym
224-9879   T.&Th. 6:30-
224-9873    7:45 p.m.;
Apparatus Gym
UNS-Chief Great wet blorg
Phillipic Wench, while playing the
national pastime of justbouncing
hurt himself grieviously it was
learned yesterday.
Commemorative services are
planned for the whole weekend. Page  20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September   19,   1969
'TWEEN CLASSES
Legal aid
available
in SUB
TODAY
LEGAL  AID  PANEL
Legal advice will be given every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon,
rooms 237 and 237A, SUB.
VARSITY  OUTDOOR  CLUB
Membership applications and general
inquiries noon daily in SW corner
SUB basement. Also, splash and dance
today. Swim 6:30-8:30 p.m. Dance 8-
12   p.m.    "Wiggy   Symphony"    Mem.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Meeting today noon, SUB 117. Every-
one welcome.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Organizational meeting today noon,
SUB  10SB.
SUB  ART  GALLERY
Want to be a member of SUB Art
Gallery? Leave name, phone no. and
address at Fine Arts Office, Lassere.
DANCE CLUB
Organize work committee for Clubs
Day today noon, Partyroom.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Paul Stevens on "Communication** today noon, Rm. 207-209.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting today noon, upper lounge,
International   House.
ARTS   U.S.
Free  dance  with   "The   Patch",   SUB
ballroom today noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting today noon,  SUB  125.
SUB  FILMS
"Around the World in 80 Days", Sept.
19, 20, 21. Today 12:30, 4:30, 7:30.
Sat. 7:30. Sun. 2:30.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
International buffet and dance today,
5:30 -12:30. Two bands: "Wicked
Orang*e" and "A Trio". Tickets: new
overseas student $1.00; students $1.75;
faculty and community $2.50. Also,
students interested in coaching foreign students in English meet today
noon in  I.H.  Rm.   400.
CLAM
Educational: Slides and Discussion of
Winnipeg General Strike, 1919. Club's
lounge,  8 p.m.   tonight.
SATURDAY
ARTS  U.S.
Those interested in intramural sports
sign lists in Bu. main floor foyer
until   Sept.   25.
ACADEMIC   ACTIVITIES   COMM.
Frosh symposium Sat. 10:30 a.m., SUB
Gym.
COMMERCE UNDERGRAD SOC.
Dance Sat. "The Black Earth" 9-1,
SUB Ballroom. Couples $1.50; singles
$1.00.
MONDAY
HELLENIC  SOCIETY
7:30   P.m.   at  Internatinal   House.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate 12:30 ill Bu. 104 on voluntary
AMS membership.
SRTC
Organizational    meeting,   noon,    SUB
245.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
General meeting 12:30, SUB 111.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
12:30, STUB 211.
UKRAINIAN  VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, SUB 211 at noon.
TUESDAY
IPHE
Meeting 6:30, SUB 125, 105A and 105B.
SOCIAL  CREDIT
Executive meeting 12:30, Bu. 224.
PCSF
12:30,  Bu.   106—The  Coyote  Catches?
The Roadrunner.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting about Clubs  Day,   12:30,  Angus 24.
CONSERVATIVES
Road   Runner   cartoons,   Bu.   106   at
noon.
AQUA   SOC.
Underwater films,   SUB   Aud.    12:30—
9:30, 35 cents.
TUESDAY,   SEPTEMBER   23   -   35c
Aqua  Soc.  presents:
• WORLD WITHOUT SUN
• OCTOPUS  HUNT
• ON THE ROCKS
Continuous Showings  12:30-9:30
SUB THEATRE
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SPLASH AND DANCE. FRIDAY,
Sept. 19. Swim—Empire Pool —
6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Dance—to Wiggy
Symphony Memorial Gym — 8 -
12   p.m.	
WIN $457 BY JOINING UBC
Radio Billboard Club. Ticket holders are also entitled to reduced
admission to special . campus
events. Tickets on sale in Sub
across from Information Desk.
50c.	
PLANT YOUR SEED WITH THE
Black Earth, Sat., Sept. 20. Sub
Ballroom, 9-1. Admission 1.50
couples.   1.00   single	
STARVED? TRY AN INTERNA-
tional menu. Eat your fill of foods
from 16 countries at the International buffet Friday, Sept. 19, at
International House. Sherry 5:30,
dinner 6:30. Dancing with 2 bands
8:30-12:30. Overseas students 1.00.
Faculty and students 1.75. Com-
munity   2.50.	
CARL GRAVES AND THE SOUL-
Unlimited, Saturday, Sept. 20,
Forget Auditorium, 11th & Main,
Vancouver.    8:30-12:00.	
LOVE YOUR GUTS OUT AT PLACE
Vanier. Mother Tuckers and Five
Man Cargo, Sept. 19, nine-one.
Our price $1.25. Cheap. Ian says so
Barb.
Greetings
12
SORORITIES WANT YOU! SIGN
up for rush at Panhellenic House
(beside I.H.) today!
Lost & Found
14
LOST: BROWN WALLET. BUCH-
anan Lounge, Wed., Sept. 10th.
Need I.D. desperately. Ph. 266-
2736.	
LOST: GINGER MALE CAT, PRE-
sident's Row, Campus. Reward.
228-8045.	
SHIRLEY FROM GOLDEN B.C.,
left purse in white Ford Tuesday
near campus call Tim at 224-6031.
LOST: BLACK SHEAFER FOUN-
tain Pen," vicinity Bookstore. Sentimental value. Please call G. W.
Cook.  224-9700   (Rm.   122).	
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
black attache case, taken from
Angus 104, Wed. noon Phone
Steve,   224-7778.	
LOST: NR . BUCH. 202 AT 2:30
on Wednesday, one pair brown
square frame glasses. Please con-
tact  Louise   Mooney,   ph.   224-0063.
TO FIFTH YEAR EDUCATION
student with history and geography majors going to vicinity of
41st and Fraser Street, Wednesday, Sept. 17th at 5:00 p.m. Hair
piece in paper bag in back seat
of his dark colored car, left by
girl hitch-hiking on S.W. Marine
Dr., behind Totem Park, going
to Oakridge. Contact Barb Katz,
Totem Park residence or leave
hair   piece   at   Main   Office.	
LOST: BROWN AND GOLD LEA-
ther bag, left in Commerce student's car. Reward. Phone 224-
7474.
Rides & Car Pools
15
DRIVER WANTS TWO RIDERS
from Richmond. Call Dave at
278-2770.	
RIDE WANTED FROM EAST
Burnaby, 16th Ave. and 1st Street
for   8:30's.    Call   Joanne,   521-1730.
Special Notices
16
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Complete hair care. 5736
University   Blvd.   Tel.   228-8942.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. 4 BAR-
bers to serve you. Open 6 days a
week.   5736  University   Blvd.	
UNDERWATER FILMS AQUA
Soc. presents Tuesday, Sept. 23,
World Without Sun, Octopus
Hunt, On The Rocks. Continuous
showings, 12:30 - 9 30. 35c. S.U.B.
Theatre.	
JOIN THE BOWLING CLUB 12.30
Bu.    102.    Tues..    Sept.   23rd.
AFRICAN STUDENTS ASSOCIA-
tion first general meeting at International House on Saturday,
September 20, 1969, at 2:30 p.m.
All African students welcome.
BE WHERE THE ACTION IS.
Mrs. Evelyn Wood will be at
home Sunday at 2 and 4 p.m.
1900 West Broadway.
Bring this paper with you for a
very   special   Student   Price.	
RUSH SORORITIES REGISTER
Friday, Sept. 19, 20 or 21 at Pan-
hellenic   House.	
AQUA SOC. DIVE TO BOWEN
Island, Sept. 20, Sat. Sign in Out-
door  Clubs   Lounge.	
CURIOUS ABOUT THE GREEKS?
Get the complete picture by rushing sororities this fall. Call 261-
8850.
Travel Opportunities
17
BLOW IT ALL AT PLACE VA-
nier tonite. Mother Tuckers and
Five   Man   Cargo,   9-1.   Trip.	
WANTED: ONE-WAY CHARTER
ticket to London for end of Sept.
Phone   Diana,   733-1550.	
GO   GREEK!   RUSH   A   SORORITY
—sign   up   at   the   booth   in   SUB
Main  Hall.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
SERIES    ONE    CINEMA.    16    Tickets.   Phone   224-0539.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MECHANICS—UNUSUAL SKODA
V8.   Fred   732-5867.	
'57 CHEV 2-DOOR WAGON,
standard six, radio. $150.00. Phone
228-9184,   4-6   p.m.	
1968 ROADRUNNER '383', AUTO-
matic, radio, disc-brakes. Excellent condition, nine wide-ovals
included.   Call  Peter 224-9062.
1966 CORVAIR AUTOMATIC, 46,-
000 miles. Leaving for France
this month. Offers over $900.
876-4836.	
GET 35 MILES/GALLON FOR
only $395 for '61 Singer (Hillman)
convertible automatic. New tires.
228-9597.	
1960 VW, RADIO. $250. AFTER
6:00   p.m.    988-4564.	
'56 VW IN GOOD RUNNING CON-
dition. $200. Please call after
6   p.m.   733-3596.	
'61 V.W., GOOD CONDITION.
Must   sell.   $350.   922-1528   after   5.
'63 ACADIAN 6 STD., RADIO. Excellent condition, new motor $750.
278-2477.	
1962 AUSTIN HEALY. EXCEL-
lent condition, 3 spoke type
wheels, semperets Hdtp. O.D.
Mkll  $1,850.   Rod   AM  1-4414.	
'60 SPRITE, RBBORED ENGINE
competition, clutch, new top, snow
tires.    After    6:30,    926-3937.
1962 FORD GALAXIE, AUTO,
trans., new brakes, tires, radio,
6-cyl. Excel, cond. (offers). 228-
9256.	
1957 MORRIS 1000 2-DOOR, NEW
brakes and battery, good running
order.   Phone Gordon at 922-5247.
'53 PONT. 2-DOOR COUPE, 15,000
mi. on re-built Chev engine. Will
run  forever.  Offers!  433-5132.	
1960 PONTIAC CONVERT. EXCEL-
lent condition. New engine, radio,
$700 or nearest. Tel. 922-7344.
FOR SALE 1960 METEOR SEDAN.
Reliable     transportation,     $165.00.
Call Dennis at 327-2633.	
FOR    SALE    1964    V.W.    CUSTOM.
New   paint,   interior   tires,   clean.
Need $$. Phone 732-5933 evenings.
'61 FALCON, BRAND NEW TRANS-
mission (std.) Low mileage,  6-cyl.
eng.,   radio.   Reliable,   comfortable,
good looking. Only $475.. Call Rob
327-5114.	
'65 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, LOW
mil., new trans., brks., clutch,
tires, two tops. 261-7713. Rick.
1962 VOLKS DELUXE, EXCEL,
cond., very clean, new engine,
radio.   Ph.   321-1673.	
1955 AUSTIN A-50. GOOD RUN-
ning  condition.   $200.   261-8567.
'59 FORD SEDAN 6-CYL. STAND.
New battery and shocks. $225.00.
926-1567 eves.	
1966 RENAULT 1100 IN TOP CON-
dition.  Ideal student  car.  45 mpg.
Call AM 1-0970  this weekend.
'62 VOLVO 544. GOOD CONDITION.
Radio.  $800.  922-1437.	
'61  MONARCH 4-DR.,   352  CU.  IN.,
P.S., P.B., A.T., radio. 325-1444 or
874-6596.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
AUSHEAL    3000    WIRE   WHEELS.
Very good cond., $18 ea. 876-2748.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
'69 MAY YAMAHA 80cc. AS NEW
warranty 2500 miles. Best offer,
Paul   926-1069   after   6   p.m.	
1969 YAMAHA 80cc, HELMET $275
firm.   Call   224-4804.	
650 TRIUMPH TR6R MOTORCYCLE
good condition includes Lo-ckable
Fibreglass bags; Windshield.
Phone 266-7425; Glenn after 6:30
p.m.	
1968 BSA 650. BEST OFFER, JON
Leitch  224-9986 or  leave  message.
FOR SALE 1969 TRIUMPH 500. Excellent condition. Must sell! $800.
Phone 224-3035.	
1967 YAMAHA 305, 4700 MI. $500.
261-7821.	
350 TWO STROKE TWIN JAWA
'66. $350. 2500 miles. Call George
after 5 p.m., 325-4502.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
TWO GREAT BANDS; MOTHER
Tucker's Yellow Duck plus Five
Man Cargo. Place Vanier. Sept.
19.	
PAINTED SHIP BAND AVA1L-
able. Special rates for Campus
clubs. fraternities, sororities,
guaranteed.  Fuzk.   Call 278-6354.
GREAT R&B SINGER LOOKING
for new group (age 25). Call
261-1255   every   day.
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
A FREE PREVIEW OF EVELYN
Wood Reading Dynamics will be
held Sunday, 2 and 4 p.m., 1900
West Broadway. For a very special Student Rate, bring this paper
•with you.	
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS FROFES-
sional production of graphs charts,
maps, illustrations and formulations, scientific advertisements
and displays.  Phone 733-4506 eves.
WANTED: SECOND HAND BIO-
logy 101 Keeton, short or long,
F'rish Weiss textbooks. Chem 120
Guyon Jones Intro to Solution
Equilibrium, Math 220, Calculus
Second Course. Call Jack 874-9641.
Photography
34
CANON   FOR  SALE.   WITH   LOTS
of extras.   Call Ron at  733-8791.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
STROBES FOR RENT. OTHER
party lighting. Strobes $10.00 per
day. Spectacular Productions.
434-2648.
Scandals
37
COME AND SEE WILLIE COY-
ote destroy the Roadrunner in
Buch 106 12:30 p.m. Sept. 16, 17,
23,   24.	
NAKED WALL? COVER UP
with silkcreen prints by local artist.   All   editions   limited.   $3.00   -
$10.00.    Phone   738-2963.	
YES VIRGINIA — TONITE AT
Place Vanier, Mother Tuckers and
Five Man Cargo appearing days
before each go on a cross country
tour.  Peace.	
THERE IS ONLY ONE EVELYN
Wood. For students only, a preview of the world's finest Reading Program will be held Sunday
at 2 and 4 p.m. Bring a friend —
drinks are on the house. 1900 West
Broadway. Bring this paper with
you for a very special Student
Price.	
ROGER KOPF. ALL IS FORGIVEN.
Call Grant Nielson at 522-4961.
Love, Raylene.	
FIND OUT THE INSIDE STORY
on Sororities — sign up for Fall
rush today and Saturday at Panhellenic House.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.	
EXPERIENCED & RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please   call   277-5640.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
page. Essays 30c page. 5c per copy.
Fast, efficient service. Phone 325-
0545.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
WANTED: EXPERIENCED RADIO
announcer for part time work.
Phone Tom Peacock 684-5131
(9:00-noon). 	
Male or Female
53
MUSICIAN NEEDED FOR WEST
Indian band. Call Archie at 937-
3295.
Work Wanted
54
TIRED
of   unreliable   Domestic   Help?
We   offer
Personalized    Service
fully   experienced   in
house    cleaning
Bonded   &  Insured
Reliable Crew of 3
Own Equipment & Transportation
WALLS   WASHED   &
RUG    _    UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Painting*  by
Affiliated  Company
EXECUTIVE  HOME
MAIDS LTD.
922-4568
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.	
INSTRUCTION
Language Instruction
61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French,  Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take   advantage    of    this    amazing
offer:   only   six   students   maximum
per group.
For   the   best   tutoring   in   language
conversation,    call    ub    today    (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 786-5401.
CONVERSA-SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
 1603 W.  4th   (at Fir)
Music
62
Special Classes
63
FALL CLASSES STARTING NOW
In HATHA and PRANAYAMA
Yoga. For inf. and student rates
phone    434-1887.	
LEARN TO READ THE GREEK
New Testament. Thurs. eves.
Teachers has Ph.D. For inf. phone
224-5591.	
DON'T BE THE ODD ONE OUT—
join the smart ones and attend a
Free Preview of Evelyn Wood
Reading Dynamics — the world's
largest and most respected
Reading Program—Sunday—2 and
4 p.m. 1900 West Broadway.
Bring this paper with you for a
very  Special  Student  Price.	
Tutoring
64
FRENCH LANGUAGE AND Tutoring by Frenchman. Eves and
Sat. All levels taught. Call 684-
6887 or see Raymond at Civil
Engineering,    Rm.    109.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
TEN SPEED RACING BIKE.
Centre pull brakes, Alpine gear.
New. Call Gerry 327-2808 after 5
p.m.	
SONY TC255 STEREO TAPE
deck. Forced to sell. Ph. Larry
224-9833. Fort Camp Hut 4 Rm.
11.	
FOR SALE, NEW 8 TRACK CAR
stereo plus 8 tapes. Phone Bob
224-1068 after 5 p.m.	
MATTRESS NEAR NEW 48" WIDE
$20.   Phone   266-4043.	
BUY  PRE-SALE TICKETS FOR
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW-Only 75c and SAVE
After  Publication   Price   Will   Be
$1.00
FUN SAILBOAT, 20' FLYING
Dutchman class boat, top shape.
1720.   922-3789.	
STUDENTS' SPECIALS (THIS
Week Only). Single Hollywood
beds complete 49.50 and up. Ready
to finish chairs 6.95 and up.
Chests of drawers 14.95 and up.
6 drawer Mr. & Mrs. chest 18.95
each. 3 shelf bookcases 6.95 and
up. Klassen's, 3207 W. Broadway.
RE 6-0712. Beer bottle drive-in
at  rear of store.	
NORWEGIAN BLUE SILVER FOX
stole, 3 full, large pelts. Sacri-
fice.   In   excel,   cond.   731-0869.
FREE PASSES TO GUESTS OF
Invitation 69/70 Booklet holders
to movies, restaurants, night
clubs, etc. Don't miss yours.
$1.75 at  Sub Information.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ONE 3RD OR 4TH YEAR STU-
dent to share 2-bedroom house
with couple. Rent $80. 2746 W.
41st   Ave.   266-8980.	
MALE STUDENT HOUSING ON
Campus opening on Sept. 16 at
5760 Toronto Rd. Room -.$50) or
room plus board ($110). Linen
changed weekly. Large studio
room. No transportation problems. Accommodation for 28.
Comfortable lounge. Enforced
quiet hours. Contact Ron Dick at
address   or   at   home   224-0327.
FURN. ROOM. MALE NON.
smoker. Light — washing — sandwiches. Breakf. arranged. Close to
UBC.   Phone  224-7141.	
BRIGHT LARGE DOUBLE ROOM
with balcony. Males preferred.
Kitchen facilities for breakfast
only. $85 double, $65 single. Call
224-6510   after  six.	
SLEEPING ROOM, 375 W 22ND.
$50 monthly. Breakfast possible.
Under or Grad, student. MALE.
874-2417.
Room & Board
82
MALE, ALL MEALS, LAUNDRY,
essays typed. Private room. 3919
W.   9th.   Phone   224-1609.	
LARGE ROOM, PRIVATE BATH.
41st & Dunbar. Will consider
board or some kitchen privileges.
Mature   student.   Phone   266-9007.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
WILL SHARE MY MOD. FURN.
home non-smoker. 490 E. 28th
Ave. Also furn. 2-bdrm. mod.
home, 7873 Wedgwood, Burnaby.
Leave name, phone, mail box or
address   above.	
TO SHARE — HSKPG. SUITE.
Preferred: upperclass English
student. 3 rms., bath, furnished,
utilities, fireplace, $50. 321-6955
after  6.   Ask   for  Dave.	
1 BDRM. FURN. APT. TO SHARE
with one female student. 4th year
student preferred. Phone Barb at
879-4561 during the day or 731-
1634  in  the  evenings.	
FEMALE SENIOR STUDENT OR
grad to find and share apt. or
house with same. Call Rosalind,
266-8035.
Unfurn. Houses & Apis.
84
FEMALE STUDENT TO SHARE
new apartment in Kits. 307—1805
Yew St. Phone 732-6961 after 6
p.m.

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