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The Ubyssey Jan 31, 2011

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Array Betterthan seven year-olds... probably SINCE 1918
AMS PRESIDENT
BIJAN AHMADIAN
THREATENS
COUNCIL WITH
LEGAL ACTION. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.01.31
JANUARY 31,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N° XXXVI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubysseyca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Fabrizio Stendardo
Amelia Rajala
Catherine Guan
Mike Dickson
Crystal Ngai
Kellan Higgins
David Elop
Tim Blonk
Gerald Deo
Charles To
Josh Curran
Front cover and E-Week illustrations by
Indiana Joel.
40 Beer Patch illustration by Virginie
Menard.
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-r-p. q. f^ University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come help
us create this baby! Learn about
layout and editing. Expect to be
fed. • Every Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you
working on a progressive project,
but need funding? Do you have
an idea, but can't get it off the
ground? Apply to the Resource
Groups for funding! Come in,
pitch your idea to us and we will
consider fully or partially funding
your project. • Every Monday
1 lam in SUB 245 (second floor,
north-east corner). For more info
email resourcegroups.ams®
gmail.
ALPHA OMICRON PI RECRUITMENT
EVENT* UBC's newest sorority,
Alpha Omicron Pi, is looking for
more members to join its colony
class! There are opportunities to
take on leadership roles, volunteer
and gain service hours, create
lasting bonds of sisterhood and
friendship, socialize within the
Greek system, network with
women with similiar interests all
over the world and overall enrich
your UBC experience. • Informal
recruitment events on Feb. 5 and
27, email ubcaoiirecruitment®
gmail.com for more information.
SKATING AT ROBSON SQUARE • Free
public skating rink, with skate and
helmet rentals, skate sharpening
and a concession stand on site.
• Ongoing til Feb. 28, Sunday-
Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday-
Saturday 9am-llpm, free.
MONDAY, JAN. 31
SAAM CLOSING RECEPTION • Come
to the closing reception of Sexual Assault Awareness Month
(SAAM) at UBC. Cake and tea will
be provided. • l-2pm, Centre for
Student Involvement, Brock Hall.
TUESDAY, FEB. 1
DEAN OF ARTS GAGE AVERILL ON
PROFTALK* On UBC CiTR Radio's
Prof Talk, with host Farha Khan,
Dean of Arts and Haitian scholar Gage Averill will discuss his
new role at UBC as well as his
recent Grammy nomination for
his project, Alan Lomax in Haiti: Recordings for the Library of
Congress, 1936-1937. • 3pm,
CiTR 101.9FM, go to citr.ca for
more information.
WINETASTINGAND DINING EVENT:
EXPLORING AFFORDABLE WINES •
Many do not consider wine a
luxury, but rather a necessity
for a full and healthy life. This
Taste and Dine event will focus on a few of the many inexpensive yet attractive wines
currently available through local liquor stores. Joseph Collet,
Green College Executive Chef,
has matched the wines with fine
winter fare. • 6:30-9:30pm, Graham House, Green College, $46
regular, $28 students, purchase
tickets at gc.reception@ubc.ca
or call (604) 822-8660.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2
WORK YOUR BA: ARTS INTERNSHIP
PROGRAM INFO SESSION* The UBC
Arts Internship Program provides current undergraduate
Arts students with the opportunity to gain meaningful work
experience in the private and
non-profit sectors. Arts internships are part-time, unpaid positions and can provide you a
stepping stone to your future career. • 12-lpm, Buchanan B310.
THURSDAY, FEB. 3
OLD RED NEW RED • Ever wonder
what the greatest Engineering
prank of all time was? Some might
claim the Statue Stunt of 1963 to
be it! Stephen Whitelaw (AGIE
'65) and Art Stevenson (CHEM
'66) will retell the infamous story of the prank that duped the
entire campus and university art
community. You're all invited to
join the current Engineering student body to make this the largest ORNR ever. • 6:30-9:30pm,
Cecil Green Park House.
GLADIATOR* Bravely go where
many UBC students have gone
each year before. This is your
chance to take on your toughest competitors and compete in
your favourite American Gladiator challenges—as a team!
Whetheryou are navigating your
way through a colossal maze,
racing through the inflatable obstacle course or duking it out on
the joust, this event is filled with
non-stop action. • 4pm-12am,
SRC Gyms, 6-10 registrants.
$80-$175, register by Jan. 27,
roster due Jan. 28.
JULES MASSENET: CENDRILLON (CINDERELLA) • The UBC Opera Ensemble and the UBC Symphony Orchestra will be performing
Jules Massenet's Cendrillon,
based on Charles Perrault's 1698
version ofthe Cinderella tale. Performed in French with English
subtitles. • 7:30-10:30pm, Chan
Centre, $35 adults, $25 seniors,
$20 students, call (604) 822-
6725 or go to ticketmaster.ca
to reserve. Tickets also available at the door.
FRIDAY, FEB. 4
STOREWIDESALE»The UBC Bookstore is having their February
sale—up to 75 per cent off a
broad selection of merchandise!
• All day, UBC Bookstore.
COLD WAR CONFIDENTIAL • This
symposium expands on John
O'Brian's focus on photography during the Cold War in Canada. Symposium speakers will
explore links between culture
(art, photography, literature), the
environment and nuclear propaganda and protest in the Cold War
era. • 10am-3pm, Belkin Art Gallery, go to belkinartgallery.com
for more information.
SATURDAY, FEB. 5
TAILGATER F00TBALLT0URNAMENT
• Can't get enough football between the college bowl season
and the Super Bowl? Well, before you park your butt on the
couch for six hours to watch the
big game, come out and make
some of your own history on the
gridiron. Tailgater Football is the
perfect way to get jacked up for
the biggest weekend in football!
• 11am-5pm, UBC Wright Field,
5-8 registrants, $51-$100, register by Jan 31.
TUESDAY, FEB. 8
LUNAR NEW YEAR CELEBRATION •
Celebrate the Lunar New Year at
UBC, which includes a food sale
(Sri Lankan, Korean, Vietnamese
and assorted desserts), all the
tea you can drink, a live music
performance and a silent auction of framed artwork (cash or
cheque only). • 11:30am-2pm,
CK Choi Building Lounge.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9
DOUBLE DOUBLE FOIL AND FUMBLE • Double Double Foil and
Fumble is a joint production between UBC's Theatre and Creative Writing faculties. It follows
the story of five university-aged
friends as they get together to
weave some magic; only none
of them know what they're doing, half of them don't believe in
magic and some of them have
ulterior motives. • Run until Feb.
12, Dorothy Somerset Studios,
tickets by donation, proceeds
go to Pride UBC.
Accountable.
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Send us your
events for
February!
This page
needs filling
up every
issue!
events@ubysseyca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc 2011.01.31/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
President deflects censure with legal threats
Ahmadian and his lawyer, Noah Sarna. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian
was able to successfully evade
being censured by Council after
threatening the society that he
leads with legal action.
The censure motion was
brought forward in response to
Ahmadian's actions during AMS
elections, especially hisbiting criticisms of then VP External Jeremy
McElroy. The motion resulted in a
12-12 tie, one vote short of a successful censure. Six councillors abstained, including President-elect
McElroy. Ahmadian said that he
would sue the AMS if such a motion passed, arguing that he was
not provided with proper notification of the motion to censure.
"I hate to be put in this awkward position to sound like I'm
threatening, but I need you to
know about the potential damages," he said. He went on to
cite a question asked on the bar
exam, which he plans on taking, that asks if the applicant
has ever been censured by an
organization.
Ahmadian's lawyer, Noah Sarna, was present throughout the
majority ofthe meeting and told
Council that they should consult
a lawyer before they considered
taking any actions against the
president.
"You're exposing the society
to considerable legal potential
liability," said Sarna. 'And the
administrative component of
it is just one end of it. There
are also employment law issues and possible defamatory
issues that need to be explored
and considered.
"The last thing thatyou want
and the last thing thatyou need,
is that sort of legal problem."
The censure motion was
brought to the floor after a nearly hour-long in-camera session,
which was closed to the media,
in which council discussed "executive dynamics."
Dave Tompkins, speaker of
Council, said that the motion was
brought to the floor after the incamera session because some
councillors had been threatened
with defamation lawsuits if they
spoke publicly.
Tompkins, whose position
is non-political and usually remains above contentious debates, was dragged into the fray
on Wednesday, as Ahmadian
raised the possibility of suing
him as well and said he perceived
Tompkins to be biased.
"Sue me, Bijan," said Tompkins
at one point after Ahmadian, who
sits next to him, whispered in his
ear. "I have no money."
He made it very clear that he
strongly disapproved of Ahmadian's threats.
"One of my rules is that all
council members can speak their
mind freely...which is why I get
my back up when people threaten and intimidate them," said
Tompkins.
He also said that he believed
that Ahmadian knew a censure
motion was coming, based on
the fact that he brought a lawyer.
Tompkins went on to argue that
Ahmadian had never brought up
these sorts of arguments for previous censure attempts, and had
supported the censuring of Blake
Frederick and Tim Chu for initiating a human rights complaint
to the United Nations over the
cost of tuition lastyear.
Ahmadian countered that although he knew a general censure motion may appear, he did
not know what the exact wording of the motion would be and
could therefore not prepare a
proper defense.
Alongside his actions during the elections, Engineering
Councillor Andrew Carne cited
a variety of reasons he believed
Ahmadian should be censured.
These included Ahmadian's communications with the university regarding land use, comments he made to the National
Post which could be considered
defamatory, how the Gaza donation was dealt with, failing to respect the values of the AMS and
the fact that he was threatening
the AMS with a lawsuit.
McElroy mostly stayed out of
the debate, but argued that censuring is done by student societies for a variety of reasons. He
pointed out that the University
of Victoria Student Society censured their director of finance
in November for showing up to
work late.
After hours of debate, Ahmadian was finally able to avoid censure by issuing an apology for
some of council's grievances,
including the way he criticized
McElroy.
"First and foremost [I apologize for] the distorted portrayal
of my colleague Jeremy in that
video last week and the unfair
comments there. We have accomplished lots as a team and I
think that video did not do a fair
job of portraying that."
Ahmadian's term expires on
February 11. tl
Primate experiments draw criticism from activists
FABRIZIO STENDARDO
fstendardo@ubyssey.ca
STOP UBC Animal Research, an
animal advocacy group, held a
protest outside the Vancouver
Art Gallery last Thursday to urge
UBC to end research on non-human primates. It was aimed at a
proposed experiment that plans
to study the development of Parkinson's disease in monkeys.
The experiment, L91, would
involve injecting four rhesus
monkeys with the compound
Lactacystin, which eventually
leads to the onset of symptoms
of Parkinson's disease.
"We feel that this type of
research and end product is
horrendous to us," said STOP
spokesperson Anne Birthistle.
At the rally, four people were
dressed as monkeys in prison
uniforms behind bars "to show...
concern about the imminent
doom awaiting the monkeys
in the Parkison's research," according to Birthistle. She was,
however, pleased with how the
event turned out. "We had a great
response."
VP Research John Hepburn referred to the protest as a "publicity stunt" and said that he
The Animal Care Centre at UBC. DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
supports the research. "Frankly, I'm not interested in stopping a line of research for Parkinson's disease."
STOP hopes to obtain the
monkeys to stop them from being killed. Birthistle said they
are willing to buy the primates.
"We have public support in raising funds to purchase them."
However, she said STOP would
rather not pay for the monkeys. "We feel that they really
belong to the taxpayers, who
fund much of the research at
UBC [and] would prefer tha t
UBC donate them."
Birthistle says STOP has
asked Fauna, a non-profit animal rescue organization founded in 1997, for help in finding
the monkeys a permanent home.
"We'd like to give them sanctuary away from the pain and suffering their lives have entailed
up to now.
"We definitely would help to
provide financially for their
care for the rest of their lives."
However, she was unaware of
how much this support would
cost, only saying it would be
"substantial."
However, Hepburn said that
UBC will neither donate nor sell
the monkeys because they are
needed for research even after
they die. "Part of the [proposed]
experiment involves post-mortem examination of brain tissue,
which is not done without euthanizing the animals." In addition, he said that monkeys are
expensive, so even if they don't
die, UBC will still care for them.
"The monkey colony is maintained and we want to make sure
they are kept in good shape."
The spokesperson for the experiment, Doris J. Doudet, who
is also a professor of medicine
and neurology at UBC, was unavailable for comment.
Hepburn said he was unaware
of the requests and that no direct contact has been made between the university and STOP.
He explained that experiment
L91 has yet to be approved for
funding, as the most recent attempt was denied by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
He also stated that there was no
chance the experiment would
happen before April 1, 2011. va
NEWS BRIEFS
ASHLEYLOCKYERPHOTO/
THEUBYSSEY
UBC'S TRIUMF FACILITY TO
MAKE MEDICAL ISOTOPES
TRIUMF, a research lab at UBC,
will help make Metro Vancouver
self-sufficient in its supplies of
medical isotopes.
TRIUMF will become an alternative source for the most
widely used medical isotopes for
cancer treatments. Technetium-
99m, which is usually produced
at Ontario's Chalk River nuclear reactor, will now be made at
two other facilities in Toronto and
here at UBC, thanks to a $6-mil-
lion federal government grant.
The Chalk River facility was
shut down for repairs in 2009,
which caused health agencies
world-wide to scramble for alternative supplies of the isotopes.
While Chalk River reactors have
been repaired and are back online, the long-term future ofthe
reactors remains uncertain.
TRIUMF, the subatomic physics lab, is owned and operated
by a consortium of Canadian
universities. Tim Meyer, a TRIUMF spokesperson, said that
UBC labs could be supplying
the isotopes to the BC Cancer
Agency by March 2012.
RYERSON UNIVERSITY RADIO SHUT
DOWN
CKLN, Ryerson University's
campus radio station, has had
its broadcasting license revoked
by the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). The CRTC said
the station violated license conditions and regulations and was
not able to provide quality control for its programming. The licensing conditions required program logs, submission of audible on-air tapes and completion
of annual returns. Several warnings had been issued to CKLN,
but CKLN failed to comply with
CRTC conditions.
The CRTC's decision followed
proceedings and public hearings
that took place last month. Investigations into operations at
CKLN by the CRTC began in
July 2009 after complaints were
made about its day-to-day operations, management and ability
to stay on the air, as well as an
unbalanced representation on
the board of directors.
CKLN has a history of conflict
among its staff. The station went
off-air intermittently for seven
months in 2009 when the building manager was forced to lock
out staff, volunteers and management for security reasons.
Findings from a consultation
in fall 2009 revealed that there
was minimal student involvement at the station, tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.01.31
$700 Gaza donation officially approved
Fate of Resource Groups and external donations uncertain
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
After three months of debate
and $13,000 in legal costs, the
AMS has passed the final motion to allow the transfer of $ 700
from the Socialjustice Centre
(SJC) to Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights (SPHR) intended to fund the Canada Boat
to Gaza this spring.
However, debate has been
spurred around AMS Resource
Group structure and funding,
and policies around external
donations generally.
Since it was first proposed,
the $700 donation has caused
considerable debate amongst
AMS council and the larger student body.
In December, council put the
motion on hold until they were
satisfied that the non-profit organization was not linked to ter-
rorism and did not leave the
AMS liable, as some critics had
suggested.
An email returned to VP Finance Elin Tayyar from Fin-
trac, a financial tracking organization that investigates money laundering and transfers to
terrorist organizations, silenced
the concerns of Council.
"Fintrac does not maintain
a list of organizations, charities or non-profit groups that
are in good standing. It will
not verify or evaluate groups
about which you requested information," quoted Tayyar. "Because these guys aren't on their
list, they aren't being investigated and looked into [as possible
terrorists]," he said.
However, due to the extensive
debate and uncertainty caused
by transfer and subsequent
The Resource Group offices on the top floor of the SUB
donation, the Resource Group
structure is being re-examined
by AMS Council.
"The Resource Group changes
we feltwere importantto make,
given some of the things that
happened this year," said Ben
Cappellacci, VP Academic and
University Affairs. "[They] advocate for specific political interests, and while we feel it's important that these have the support of students, we also felt like
students shouldbe able to make
decisions about whether or not
they feel their support should be
given to the Resource Groups."
The Resource Groups will be
part of a fee restructuring referendum held in March which,
if passed, will enable students
to opt-out of the current $1.50
Resource Group fees, which the
SJC is part of.
"Essentially, by allowing the
students to opt out of the resource group fee, we're giving
students the choice here to say
that 'Yes, I agree with the resource groups and I want to support them with my money' or T
won't,'" said Cappellacci.
He admitted that the Canada
Boat to Gaza donation had partly prompted the restructuring,
but said they had also wanted to
take a look at the fees in general,
many of which they felt could be
streamlined and made more accountable to all students.
GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Tayyar plans to bring up even
further changes at a meeting in
the near future.
"We're looking at essentially stopping all donations from
all mandatory fees that are collected from students. That includes any kind of donations
that the AMS Council or anyone can donate," he said. "That
would stop these kinds of transfers that are just a direct donation to an outside organization. We're changing the rules
to say that all mandatory fees
have to be spent on things that
all UBC students will have access to."
According to Tayyar, the SJC
is "in support ofthe changes."
Gall Levit, a second-year Arts
student, told AMS Council that
she attempted to participate in
SJC meetings but was unable
contribute her views due to what
she perceived as "hostility." She
argued that changes are needed.
"It think it should be a lot
about trying to engage a wide
amount of students because they
[receive] $10,000. Their main
purpose shouldbe trying to involve as many students in their
decisions as possible," she said.
"The SJC seemed like they liked...
their own exclusive little group,
with very radical views."
Active SJC member Gregory
Williams said that this debate
has taken up hundreds of hours
of their time, and has been "a
complete mess."
"While the debate on the fund
transfer is over now, [things are]
just heating up because the LPC
[Legislative Procedures Committee] is just starting that review," said Williams. "We're
still going to be in committee
rooms fighting this for months
and months."
While many are aware ofthe
referendum, the possible code
amendment is less well-known.
Former president of SPHR Omar
Chaaban said that the amendment hasn't yet been discussed
at length by the Resource Groups
that he knows of. He hopes that
the referendum does pass as he
values that it gives students a
choice, but that the code amendment fails at Council.
"It's like a blanket boycott
kind of thing. It's all or nothing. . .it's kind of authoritarian to
me. My fear is that it will pass.
They don't want to talk about
these issues. They want to talk
about the easy stuff." tl
U of A suspends frat for five years
Three-month investigation revealed widespread hazing at DKE chapter
ALEXANDRIA ELDRIDGE
The Gateway (University of Alberta]
EDMONTON (CUP)-After a
three-month investigation into
hazing activity, the University
of Alberta administration has
suspended the Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE) fraternity chapter
for five years.
Frank Robinson, the U of A's
dean of students, announced
Thursday morning that the university made this decision after their investigation revealed
that hazing activity had taken
place. Some ofthe hazing allegations raised in October included forcing pledges to eat their
own vomit, forcing pledges into
a plywood box and depriving
them of sleep.
Robinson could not go into
detail about the hazing or the
investigation, but added that
they are not pursuing charges against individual students
and DKE has complied with this
decision.
"The DKE fraternity has acknowledged that hazing took
place over a number of years
and that this behaviour was participated in by both student and
alumni members from this U
of A chapter," Robinson stated.
During the five-year suspension, the group will be ineligible to register as a student group
at the university, meaning they
will lose the ability to use the
university's name or insignia,
use the university's liquor or
gaming licenses, rent university property or equipment, or
participate in university governance or other activities.
"I've taken this serious action
as a result of ongoing concern
for the safety and well-being of
our students and for the entire
university community. As a result ofthe suspension, the DKE
fraternity is no longer allowed to
officially identify themselves as,
or carry on activities, as if they
are associated with the U of A
in any manner," Robinson said.
After a period of three years,
DKE may apply to have the suspension lifted at Robinson's discretion, provided they can demonstrate good behaviour during the period of suspension
and provide a plan for future
activities. During the period
of suspension, the Dekes will
also be meeting with Robinson
periodically.
"One aspect is a sanction and
the other part I like to think of
as more of a restorative model. We have agreed to work with
[the fraternity] and help them
come back, as opposed to simply slamming the door," Robinson said.
"The actions taken in this
case concerning the Dekes have
been motivated to ensure that
our student groups remain a
positive force in student life."
The DKE house at U of A.
After the five-year period,
the group will have to re-apply
and will only regain their student group status at Robinson's
discretion.
"After the suspension is lifted
in five years, they will be like any
other frat or sorority. We watch all
of our fraternities, we watch sororities, we watch clubs, and if we
have a problem, we'll deal with it."
The last time a fraternity was
sanctioned at the U of A was in
DAN MCKECHNIE PH0T0/THE GATEWAY
1999, and in that case, it was
also DKE.
Rory Tighe, a students' union
vice-president, was pleased with
the university's action and felt
that the restorative model Robinson has prescribed is a good
approach.
"I'm glad the university took a
stronger stance than the alumni council. I hope this will accomplish the goal," Tighe said.
"I do think that this required
a harsh sentence and I think
that was appropriate. I'm hoping that this does lead to what
the dean said—rebuilding the
community and allowing the
Greek system to get back to
its height."
Interfraternity Council President Mike Siebert also released
a statement expressing his satisfaction with the university's
decision.
"This group has acted in an
immature and selfish manner
and by doing so has undermined
the positive impact that fraternities strive for," he wrote. "As
long as they are suspended as
a student group, they will continue to have their membership
from the IFC suspended."
In December, DKE International provisionally suspended the U of A chapter for three
years. A local alumni council
will be formed to monitor the
activities ofthe chapter and revise the initiation process.
DKE posted a statement on
their website apologizing to the
university community for their
actions.
"We agree that hazing has no
place at the University of Alberta
or in fraternity life, and we, the
Delta Phi chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon, apologize to the international fraternity, the University of Alberta, the university community and the other
fraternities at the university." 2 011.01.31 /UBYSSEY. CA/S PORTS/5
SPORTS
EDITOR MARIE VONDRACEK»sports@ubyssey.ca
Coach Reimer under the scope
Three straight CIS championships make coach a constant for T-Birds
MIKE DICKSON
Contributor
Chemistry.
That's been the key ingredient
in the success of the UBC women's volleyball team in recent
years. It's also prime recruiting
material when it comes to head
coach Doug Reimer choosing his
squad, a system that has served
the Thunderbirds well during
their three-year reign as national champions.
"As a coach, you want to create an environment where players want to be here and want to
get better every day, which is
something we've tried to grow
here over the last fewyears," Reimer said.
The players have bought into
Reimer's system and continued
their winning ways not only with
their talent on the court, but their
character off it as well.
"What's great about Doug is
that he considers you as a person, not just a volleyball player," starting setter Brina Derksen-Bergen said.
"He creates a great atmosphere that makes you want to
be here every day."
Her sentiments were echoed
by returning national team outside hitter Kyla Richey, who believes the Thunderbirds' success
stems from their willingness to
support each other.
Triple CIS banner winning head coach Doug Reimer.
"I definitely think it's our team
relationship," Richey said. "After
every season we've won, people
asked us why we did, and we've
got a great team full of talent, but
you can't do anything with talent
without chemistry. It's not just
the best 6 players on the court
but the best 17."
That combination of chemistry, talent and hard work was on
full display last weekend as the
T-Birds swept the University of
Brandon Bobcats two games to
zero, not losing a single set in
the process.
"The support we have for each
other is great in both good and
bad situations, and adds to your
team confidence as well as individual confidence," Derksen-Bergen said.
Reimer's experience, which includes being the head coach of
the women's national team from
1997-2000, has taughthim to recruit not just the best volleyball
players, but the best people too.
"Each of the three years has
been different," Reimer said. "But
the biggest commonality between
them has been good chemistry
GERALD DEO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
amongst the group. We want to
make sure we've got good people
who are working hard and keeping the environment fun, one that
people want to be a part of and let
the chips fall where they will."
Reimer has been nominated
for CIS Coach of the Year, along
with the '09-10 T-Birds squad.
The squad, which closed a 25-0
season with a third consecutive
CIS championship, is up for CIS
Team ofthe Year. Graduated outside hitter Liz Cordonier is also
up for her second CIS Female Athlete of the Year award, tl
BIRD DROPPINGS
UBC MEN'S HOCKEY SWEPT BY
LETHBRIDGE
The Lethbridge Pronghorns and
the Thunderbirds remain tied for
sixth place, with the 'Horns having one game in hand over the
'Birds after sweeping UBC 5-2
and 5-1 in Lethbridge.
Lethbridge keeper Scott
Bowles put in a stellar performance on Friday, stopping 33
shots. Jordan White was forced
to make only 21 saves.
Entering the third period only
one goal down, UBC fell victim
to a third period Lethbridge hat
trick from Andrew Courtney,
which propelled the 'Horns to
a crucial 5-2 win, bringing them
two points behind.
Before the ice was even dry
in the third, Courtney struck for
his first, then again four minutes and twenty-three seconds
later on the power play, Courtney scored again, putting the
puck over a sprawling White to
make it 4-1.
Brennan Sonne brought the
gap down to two with 108 seconds left, but upon pulling the
goalie, Courtney completed his
hat trick with an empty net goal.
The 'Horns did not let up on
Saturday, jumping to a three-
goal lead by the halfway point.
UBC's Max Grassi responded by
tapping in a cross-crease pass
from Justin McCrae. However,
they didn't get any closer, as the
Pronghorns added two more to
pull away for a 5-1 victory, completing the weekend sweep. tl
Laura Moss
Director, UBC International Canadian Studies Centre,
is pleased to invite you and your friends to the
Brenda and David Mctean Public tecture Series in Canadian Studies by
John O'Brian
McLean Chair in Canadian Studies
THE BOMB IN THE
WILDERNESS:
Nuclear Photography, the Atomic Age, and Canada
at the Liu Institute for Global Issues (6476 NW Marine Drive)
Tuesday evenings at 7 o'clock
January 25   On Photographing a Dirty Bomb
February 1    Vox Crapulous (Reception to follow)
February 8    Picturing Nuclear Risk
John O'Brian will examine the place of photography in the
construction of nuclear narratives since World War II.
To what extent, he will ask, is the mushroom rloud, the meta-symbol
of the atomic age, laced with Canadian content?
http://www.c3nHKlianstudies.ubc.ca/
Think our stories are lame? Come write em.
MarieVondracek | sports@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc
got ideas on water?
In keeping with our vision for a complete, sustainable community on campus,
UBC is developing a Water Action Plan to better manage water on campus -
and we want your input.
Please join us at our upcoming full-day planning session to share your ideas
as a springboard for the development of a draft vision, targets and actions
UBC should take to realize its goals for water management.
$
water
VISION & ACTION PLAN SESSION
February 8th, GSS ballroom, Thea Korner House
6371 Crescent Rd„ UBC
9:OOam-3:OOpm
Prepare to stay for the full day working session
Lunch will be served
RSVP to the working session by February 3rd:
email Stefani Lu to RSVP (stefani.lu@ubc.ca) and note your dietary preferences.
more information: sustain.ubc.ca/campus-water
a place of mind
CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY PLANNING
campus sustainability 6/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2 011.01.31
NCAA decision expected this year
After years of reports and discussions, UBC hopes a final decision will be made this spring
UBC against the NCAA's Minnesota. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
The NCAA: To join or not to join?
It's a decision that UBC will
make in the coming months after releasing a report discussing
the issue. And if that sounds like
deja vu, it's because it is.
President Stephen Toope has
said that UBC intends to decide
whether to apply for Division II
membership in the US-based National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) bythe end of this semester. They've released a report
on the topic for discussion—18
months after an earlier report
on the same topic was written.
However, the new report takes
into consideration discussions
that have taken place with the
Canadian Interuniversity Sport
(CIS) over the past two years.
"What I wanted to see was
whether anything could change,"
said Toope. "Because I wanted to
be comparing apples to apples,
I didn't want to compare some
historic view of the CIS to some
prospective view of the NCAA.
So what I wanted to ensure was
that we had actually explored all
the options with the CIS to see
if indeed things could change,
or would change, before making any determination about the
NCAA and that's why it's been a
year and a half."
For much of last decade, UBC
Athletics, led by Director Bob
Philip, have advocated a move
to the NCAA, arguing it would
provide more competition for
UBC and make it easier to keep
student-athletes in Canada. The
issue moved to the forefront in
2008 when NCAA Division II,
which is the second-tier league
in the association, invited international schools to apply for
membership.
While SFU immediately signalled their intentions to apply,
and entered the league lastyear,
UBC created a NCAA Division II
Review Committee to investigate the issue. In March 2009,
they issued a 588-page report,
which did not make a recommendation either way, but revealed that ofthe 537 people who
filled out a survey on the issue,
52 per cent were against moving to the NCAA.
However, in an interview last
month, Toope seemed to take
issues with the value of those
responses.
"Mostpeople didn't have a clue
about what they were talking
about. I'm being very serious,"
he said.
"Ifyou actually broke down
the views—there were a whole
bunch of things which predicated views, which I think actually
were not well thought through,"
said Toope citing confusion over
whether UBC would be joining
Division I or II as one example.
"My only hope in the NCAA
discussion is we actually talk
about real things, we don't talk
about visions that people have
about what CIS is or what NCAA
is. I want to be as clear as possible as to what we're actually debating and then we're going to
have a real discussion around it."
Last year, the CIS had a committee examine the merits of a
flexible scholarship model, which
would allow universities to offer
full-ride scholarships to a limited number of student-athletes,
while limiting the total amount
of money available per sport. Currently, scholarships are limited
to tuition and mandatory fees,
and athletes musthave an 80 per
cent average out of high school
and maintain a 65 per cent average throughout university.
"The principle is to keep the
best student athletes in Canada," said UVic Director of Athletics Clint Hamilton in 2009.
"Currently, the scholarship situation is such that it's limiting
our ability to do that."
At last June's Annual General
Meeting, the CIS decided not to
vote on any proposal. In a report
prepared for delegates, it was
claimed that "although the Flexible Model that was proposed 'received some support,' it did not
garner significant support in its
current format."
Toope said he hoped the ideas
from the CIS would allow clarity to people's opinions at UBC.
"My only hope is people actually look at the report, look at the
information we've tried to provide and then have a conversation about real things, not false
things." til
'Birds bring out the brooms
Thunderbirds sweep Lethbridge with only fifteen healthy skaters
MARIE V0NDRACEK
sports@ubyssey.ca
When the weekend began with
a technical malfunction of the
national anthem, UBC women's hockey took up the slack
and belted out the final chorus
themselves, making it audible to
even the farthest fans. This act of
'holding the rope' has been the
trademark of this hockey club
time and time again.
Just as with the sound system
breakdown, the Thunderbirds
did not begin lighting up the
board until the final frame. Entering the third period one goal
down, Amanda Asay opened the
scoring by beating a rushing
goalie to the loose puck at the top
ofthe circles and calmly sliding
it into the empty goal. Four minutes later, Laurajordan, a rookie who has been given very few
opportunities prior to this weekend, put the puck in net and fellow rookie Tatiana Rafter fired
a low hard shot past the keeper.
"Jordan was given the opportunity, she stepped up and she
did a great job," said UBC head
coach Nancy Wilson of Jordan's
play.
With only and all three lines
rolling, Asay and Rafter both
potted their second ofthe night
to help the 'Birds earn a hard-
fought 4-1 victory.
"The team showed lots of
character tonight; the [injured] kids are begging the
doctor to let them play. Those
who are playing are inspired
by the kids who are sitting off.
They're playing hard for them.
Our bench is not down. They're
showing a lot of character and
BIRDS   f<_f
liJiE
1
gjjg 'HORNS
§OTBGM
'BIRDS
5
WiBE
#     °
£$|  'HORNS
Third-year Kelsey Halvorson stepped into a forward's role due to injuries
I'm very proud of them," said
Wilson.
The Thunderbirds earned a
night's rest before facing off
again on Saturday, when they
came out flying. After pausing
to honour fellow teammates
Lisa Bonang, Melinda Choy and
Kirtsen Mihalcheon with a golden helmet for their 100th CIS
career game, Tamara Pickford
opened the scoring six and a
half minutes in, upon reception
of a pass from Kaylee Chana-
kos through three pairs of legs.
Chanakos offered Pickford an
early birthday present by threading another pass through to
Pickford for her second of the
night.
"I don't think anyone had a
bad game tonight, but especially Pickford with two goals. And
it's her birthday on Monday, so
it's an early birthday present
for her," said Wilson. "Pickford
is an older player in the dressing room and she comes prepared. She works hard on and
off the ice."
TIM BL0NK PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Once again Asay and Rafter
each added a goal to the board,
the latter reeling in a stretch
pass from third-year defense-
man Jocelyn Marren from her
own end. While Melinda Choy
made 17 saves in her 106th CIS
game and earned her seventh
career shutout, Rafter and
Asay combined for six goals
this weekend to help the Thunderbirds (7-12-1) earn a sweep
over the Pronghorns (4-15-3).
"The past two or three series, Asay has really stepped
up her game...[and] Rafter has
great hands with a quick release. She had a beautiful goal
tonight and she's had a couple
this year already," commented Wilson.
Even though UBC is out ofthe
playoff race, they're arguably
playing their best hockey ofthe
season and having fun.
"You're always having fun
when you're finding time to
move the puck. They're working hard and they're getting the
results." til 2 011.01.31/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/7
THUNDERBIRD ATHLETE COUNCIL
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
MEN'S ALPINE SKI TEAM
UBC men's alpine ski team prepped and ready to go. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
The men's Alpine ski team has earned
a spot as athletes of the week for their
performance at the peak of Vancouver on January 22 and 23. UBC played
host to an array of American schools
on Grouse Mountain for the first league
race of 2011 and the first United States
Ski Collegiate Ski and Snowboard Association (USCSA) Northwest Conference race to be held in Canada in 16
years. Despite warm and overall unfavourable conditions, the team was on
fire, finishing first in the team standings
both days. On Saturday, the Men tore
up the slopes,dominating the top ten in
a field of over 70 athletes:rookie Austin Taylor took gold, followed closely
by Mike Bisnaire in third, veteran Ben
Middleton in fourth and Alex Binks in
fifth. Mike Cadman and Taylor Drury finished in eighth and ninth, respectively.
The women also finished first on Saturday and then second on Sunday, tl
—Amelia Rajala
The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery and
UBC International Canadian Studies Centre
COLD
WAR
CONFIDENTIAL
SYMPOSIUM
FEBRUARY   4,10-3pm
at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery
Daniel Grausam, Washington University
Finis Dunaway, Trent University
Martha Langford, Concordia University
John Langford, University of Victoria
Please RSVP for the Symposium by January 28
to rsvp.belkin@ubc.ca (lunch included).
Do you know what's key in a sports setting?
Ifyou answered yes, come write with us.
marie vondracek | sports@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
how about waste?
In keeping with our vision for a complete, sustainable community on campus,
UBC is developing a Waste Action Plan to better manage waste on campus -
and we want your input.
Please join us at our upcoming full-day planning session to share your ideas
as a springboard for the development of a draft vision, targets and actions
UBC should take to realize its goals for waste management.
@
waste
VISION & ACTION PLAN SESSION
February 10th, GSS ballroom, Thea Korner House
6371 Crescent Rd, UBC
9:OOam-3:OOpm
Prepare to stay for the full day working session
Lunch will be served
RSVP to the working session by February 7th:
email Stefani Lu to RSVP (stefani.lu(a>ubc.ca) and note your dietary preferences.
more information: sustain.ubc.ca/campus-waste
a place of mind
CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY PLANNING
campus sustainability 8/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.01.31
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
E-HISTORY:
THE CAIRN
"Erected in humble
appreciation of
the diversified
and continuing
contribution to
campus life by the
Engineers."
—Plaque on the
Cairn, circa 1966
The E. The Cairn. An impotent
phallus. Whatever you choose
to call it, the big old rock with
an "E" on it on Main Mall is
the source of many a campus
legend. Luckily, the engineers
are not ones to forget their storied history. They have recorded the story of the E on Heu-
story, the Engineering Undergraduate society's wiki. The
Ubyssey presents an abridged
history of the E.
The first Cairn, literally a pile
of rocks, was erected in 1966.
It was destroyed several days
later by the groundskeepers.
Another E was built in 1968.
This time a hole was dug in the
middle of Main Mall, filled with
scrap, cemented over and embossed with a red E. The Board
of Governors had it destroyed
several days later.
The administration
was convinced
only a charge of
dynamite could
destroy it.
Another E, allegedly modeled on a tank trap, was built
on Main Mall in 1969. At five
feet tall, the administration was
convinced only a charge of dynamite could destroy it.
In 1970, the administration reportedly contracted
Plant Ops to clear the site for
$10,000. The EUS bid $1000
on the project, and was given
a go-ahead. The monument
was moved by crane to its current location.
The Cairn was defaced consistently for the next ten years.
In 1980, Arts students tried
and failed to flip the E with a
forklift.
In 1981, the Cairn was renewed and made two feet larger. In 1988, Forestry students
with a backhoe and drills reduced the E to rubble. Over
the next year, the Cairn was
rebuilt (allegedly with a propane tank in the centre to destroy any vandals).
In 1989, the E as we now
know it was completed, and
it has stood ever since.
Source: Heustory, the EUS wiki.
WEEK
Prank you very much
MIKE DICKSON
Contributor
Pranks. They are the result of engineers—mathematically gifted
minds with a legendary reputation for consuming drink and a
bent for problem-solving—getting together around E-week and
unleashing their skills in creative ways.
But the art of the prank has
been declining for some years
within the Engineering faculty both in number and execution. Past stunts have ranged
from suspending future Prime Minister Kim Campbell
in a tree with a
hammock   in
1964 to stealing
the Speaker's
Chair out of the
Victoria Legislature in 1978
and holding it___
for $1000 ran---^
som to be paid
to Children's
Hospital.
However, the infamous failure to suspend a Volkswagen Beetle from Ironworker's Bridge in 2009 got five UBC
engineering students arrested
and, explained Engineering VP
Events Nigel Myers, was a poor
demonstration of their professional skills.
"It reflects on how you have
to go about your job as an engineer," Myers said. "You have to
prepare for all the variables and
plan ahead carefully,
which in retrospect
they didn't do."
Careful
planning
has been
include filling Omar III with concrete (1980) and welding Omar IV
around a tree (1981). Engineers
also dismantled Omar 2008 into
a Christmas card for the FUS,
which read, "Save a tree: Bulldoze a Hippie."
If a job is worth doing, it's
worth doing
volved in
subjecting the various incarnations of Omar, the Forestry
Undergraduate Society car, to
engineering originality. These
well—but in recentyears,
many just haven't been worth
doing.
"In the last few years ideas
have been lacking originality,"
Myers said. "It looks to continue
being that way for some time to
come."
A common thread from
past engineers to present has
been their focus on charity.
2008 saw the creation of a gigantic red engineering jacket
filled with clothes for the needy
draped around the English Bay
inukshuk, while in 2009 engineering students handed out red
scarves to the homeless.
"Pranks have never been endorsed by the Engineering Undergraduate Society," said EUS
VP Communications Will
Gallego. "The EUS does
not condone pranks of
any kind."
It is teamwork
that pulls off the
spectacular,  as
the 1969 pranksters who stole
Stanley Park's
1800-pound
Nine O'clock
Cannon can
attest. Its ransom
generated over $1200 for the
Children's Hospital, tl
Engineers are encouraged to come
out to E-week, which hosts a career
fair on Wednesday and Thursday
from 10am—3pm.
Forty brews and booby traps too
The fact and the fiction behind the Engineering faculty at UBC
CRYSTAL NGAI
Contributor
They happen everyyear: engineering pranks, events, competitions and celebrations.
But what about the outrageous
things you hear about but don't
get to witness firsthand? These
are the myths that get passed
down from year to year. Are
they more than myths, though?
Enter the 40 beer challenge.
It's not exactly a myth, but neither is it something you hear
being promoted openly. To clarify, it is an "engineering thing,"
isolated from the EUS, that
occurs every term. Those who
attempt the feat are giv
en a time limit of 12
hours to down 40
cold ones. Victors
are awarded bragging rights and a
special "40 beer
badge" for their
red jacket.  For
lightweights, there
is the one-fifth under 200 pounds challenge. This replaces
40 beers with a number of brews equivalent to
one fifth ofthe participant's body
weight.
EUS VP Communications and
administration representative William
Gallego  said,
"You can find
engineers
around campus    with
the 40 beer
patch, so it's
obvious that
it still goes on,
and people do actually finish it."
If you see an engineer bearing this remarkable symbol on their red
jacket, ask them about their
experience. They will probably be happy to tell you.
Then there is the buzz regarding the Engineering Cairn
(the giant E on Main Mall). It is
rumoured that there are several propane tanks hidden inside
or below the Cairn to dissuade
those who might want to destroy or remove the landmark.
"I've heard that story myself,
but there is no way in telling
unless you destroy the Cairn,"
said Gallego.
It cannot be entirely validated
as a fact, only a real possibility.
But it would not be advised not
to try and find out yourself, tl 2011.01.31/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/9
Adding substance to your liquid lunch
Culinary tips from the "Cooking With Beer" champ
CATHERINE GUAN
Contributor
Beer is the sustenance of the
masses, or at least, the college
masses. But no other faculty can
challenge the engineers for their
long-standing devotion to and liberal consumption ofthe beverage.
During E-Week, interdepartmental rivalry heats up in the
kitchen. Armed with their favourite brew, the engineers show off
their culinary chops at "Cooking with Beer." The rules are simple. "You can make anything you
want as long as it has a substantial amount of beer in it," said
Omid Javadi, the winner of the
2009 cook-off.
"I knew I was a good cook," said
Javadi. "We just wanted to blow everybody away." His winning entry was a Guinness Rye Pot Roast.
"Lager would be good for something like beer-battered chicken,"
but his advice for novices is that
"you can't go wrong with Guinness Rye." What could be better
than beer with a little whiskey?
Javadi's first attempt at cooking
with beer was a perfect disaster.
"We used one of those kettles ...
filledhalf of itwith water and half
of it with beer to cook some eggs,
and called that our entry." He admitted, with a rueful laugh, that
"the smell of boiling beer stunk
up the Cheeze."
At "Cooking with Beer" at the
Cheeze this Friday from 12:00 to
1:30 pm, students can taste some
strange and wonderful concoctions. Or, you can experiment in
your own kitchen. But be sure double up on the amount of beer. After all, good chefs always sample
their ingredients first, til
GUINNESS GRAVY
Directions
1. Place one cup liquid from slow
cooker in pot. Add remaining
Guinness, bring to a simmer.
2. Saute mushrooms in oil.
3. Mix three tbsp cornstarch
with small amount of water.
4. Enjoy the non-Newtonion
concoction.
5. Add more water to cornstarch,
and then add it to the pot.
6. Mix liquid as mixture thickens.
GUINNESS SMASHED POTATOES
AND VEGETABLES
• 5 red potatoes
• 3 cups liquid from slow cooker
• 0.5 kg baby carrots
• 1 can cut green beans
• Va can Guinness
• 2 tbsp butter
• Salt, pepper, garlic and milk
to taste
Directions
1. Remove liquid from slow cooker, place in pot alone and bring
to simmer.
2. Wash and cut potatoes into
eighths.
3. Add carrots, green beans and
potatoes to liquid.
4. Cook vegetables thoroughly,
remove potatoes, and place in
a bowl.
5. Add Guinness, milk, salt, pepper, butter and garlic to potatoes.
6. Mash the shit out of the
potatoes.
7. Return carrots/beans/liquid
to slow cooker to warm. Serve
separately.
SLOW COOKER GUINNESS TOP
SIRLOIN ROAST
•1.5 can beef broth
•1 can French Onion soup
•1/2 can Guinness
•1 Guinness Rub Sirloin Roast
(see below)
•1.5 oz Canadian Club rye
Directions
1. Place all liquid in slow cooker.
2. Place roast in center of liquid.
3. Cook on medium for six hours
in slow cooker.
GUINNESS RUB SIRLOIN ROAST
•2 tbsp paprika
•1 tsp cayenne pepper
•2 tsp thyme
•2 tsp rosemary leaves
•1 tbsp salt
•1 tbsp garlic
•2 tsp pepper
•1 tsp Guinness
•1 tsp rye
•1 tbsp olive oil
Directions
1. Mix dry ingredients.
2. Mix in wet ingredients.
3. Rub on entire surface of roast.
E-WEEK EVENTS
At its core, E-Week is an annual celebration of Engineering. But it is
also a competition between each
department in the faculty for bragging rights. Engineers compete
in a number of challenges to earn
points for their team. We've taken a slice of some ofthe most epic
competitions and social events E-
Week has to offer.
MONDAY
Four Legged Race—Cheeze @
6pm: Teams of three engineers are
bound at the ankles and forced to
collect clues from across campus.
Glory ensues.
TUESDAY
Godiva Band March @ 10am:
High school band kids get to relive the good old days and show
off their faculty pride with this
annual march through campus.
This event used to feature a naked woman on a horse as an homage to an 11th century English
noblewoman who rode naked to
protest taxation. The practice was
called off in 1986 after the murder of 14 women at Dawson College in Montreal.
Chariot Race—Main Mall @ 2pm:
Each engineering department designs and races a human-powered
chariot.
WEDNESDAY
E-Ball Soccer Tournament—Main
Mall @ lpm—Full-contact soccer
with a six-foot-tall ball.
THURSDAY
True Engineer—The Cheeze @
4pm—Teams are given some basic supplies and one hour to engineer a device to perform a mystery task.
Arts Career Expo pacifies post-grad anxiety
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
When Dr Gage Averill, Dean of
Arts, gave his opening speech
at Thursday night's Arts Career Expo (ACE), he seemed
to touch a nerve.
"Anybody here whose parents ever asked 'How are you
going to make any money?'"
Nervous laughter and several
dozen raised hands followed.
"I know that line," he said.
Averill, in many ways, embodies the changing attitudes of academia. His approach to the faculty follows the movement from
"chalk talk" to a more discussion- and dialogue-based style
of learning.
Itmaybe due, inpart, to his unlikely past. Before he was thrust
into the university, Averill made
a living as a school bus driver, a
tractor driver, handyman, espresso server, musician and "failed
Time-Life book seller."
"Be open to accident," he said.
According to Carol Naylor, Associate director of Career Development, it's a message that is
particularly important for Arts
students. "An Arts degree is, by
definition, flexible," she said.
Naylor works for Career Services as part of the Center for
Arts Student Services (CASS).
She emphasized that, upon graduation, it is no harder for an
Arts student to find a job than a
student from any other faculty.
"The challenges differ," she admitted, "but there's this myth
that an Arts degree is somehow
less employable."
This "less-than" mentality echoes the comments with
which Averill opened ACE, and
a long-held belief that a BA is
not a valuable degree. UBC is
part of the BC Post-Baccalaureate Survey, a research initiative that tracks post-secondary
graduates two and five years out
of university.
"The challenges
differ, but there's
this myth that
an Arts degree
is somehow less
employable."
CAROLNAYLOR
CAREER SERVICES
"The stats show that in Arts,
it's no different," said Naylor
ofthe 2007 survey. "There are
some differences—maybe a little less average salary two years
out—but by five years out that
gap isn't as big.
"One ofthe questions they ask
is 'To what level is what you're
doing now related?' For Arts it
shows that it is less related, but
to me that doesn't mean less
satisfied or less rewarding.
Arts students are out-scoring
in terms of jobs satisfaction."
A Macleans article dated November 18, 2010 noted a rise
in budget cuts to the humanities in both the Canada and the
US, partly as a way of diverting
money to college curriculum
and trade schools. Averill called
these cutbacks "shortsighted
and retrograde" and stressed
that the pattern will not follow
to UBC. "The increasing focus
of this campus is on an Arts education that is more real-world,
to use a tired phrase."
In an ACE panel entitled
"Why I hire BAs," the word "experience" was thrown around
a number of times. Carol Naylor echoed this importance.
"I think of that old research
term 'necessary but not sufficient.' The degree is not less
than your experience, but without that experience, it's not
enough."
She pointed out that the Faculty offers several ways of facilitating this experience. Both the
Arts Internship and Tri-Men-
toring programs exist to provide practical knowledge and
guidance within a selected field.
While it's best for students to involve themselves in co-curric-
ular activities as early as possible, it's never too late.
"My sense is that students
walk around with the feeling
that there is a single mistake
they can make that will doom
their entire future," Naylor said.
"Every small decision you make
has the potential to be a career
decision." tl
Arts ± Dishwashing GEOFF LISTER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY 10/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2011.01.31
GAMES & COMICS
PHILOSOPHRENIC, BY RACHAEL FREEDMAN
CROSSWORD
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
THEP-EIS /OOTHIMG
SAZAEMON, BYMEIKISHU
COMICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
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CAN I GET IN TO
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LAST DITCH EFFORT, BY JOHN KROES (LDE-0NUNE.COM]
PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
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20. Uncertainty
23. Halogen element
27. Bridge positions
28. Ladies of Sp.
29. Slanted
34. Capital city of Yemen
36. Difficult question
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40. Reticent
43. Hot time in Paris
44. Vessel
45. Carried
46. Speaks
48. Dweeb
49. Pays to play
53. Stylish
55. Commodities
60. Hurler Hershiser
61. Observed
62. Demote
67 Eye layer
68. Part of Q.E.D.
69. Discourage
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Submit your comics
to our website at
ubyssey. cal volunteer I
submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
4. Siouan speaker
5. Gannet
6. Bedouin
7. Words of denial
8. Capital ofthe Ukraine
9. mater
10. Baffled
11. Haunted house sounds
12. Something drawn out
13. Mends a shoe
21. Cry River
22. Ogle
23. Point in question
24. Praying figure
25. Move rhythmically
26. Golfer Aoki
30. Sudden burst
31. Rope used to guide a horse
32. Bendable twig, usually of a
willow tree
33. Delt neighbor
35. Surprise attack
37 Seizes with teeth
38. Declares
39. Woman's one-piece undergarment
41. Floor covering
42. Accent
47 Radical '60s org.
49. Love affair
50. Audacity
51. Forest makeup
52. Acclaim
54. Not hesitant
56. Between ports
57 Soft ball brand
58. Expensive
59. A big fan of
63. Fuzzy buzzer
64. Loss leader?
65. Sun talk
66. Directional ending
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
* Complete 30-Hour Seminars
* Convenient Weekend Schedule
* Proven Test-Taking Strategics
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* Simulated Practice Exams
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* Personal Tutoring Available
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordscminnrs.ca 2011.01.31/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/ll
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
CONCERNING THE ENGINEERS
Engineering students are hairy-palmed troglodytes with less social intuition than graphing
calculators. They make the Computer Science
department look like charm school. Engineers
wear bright red jackets so that other students
can see them coming from a distance and take
flight before the smell hits. It's similar to the way
lepers in the Old Testament days were forced to
shout "unclean!" whenever in the company ofthe
uninfected. And much like leprosy, the scent of
an Engineer at close proximity can cause one's
nose to fall off.
There was a time when printing the kind of libel
you just read above in the Editorial section of The
Ubyssey would push Engineers—or "Redshirts,"—
to acts of revenge. Allan Fotheringham, an editor
in the '50s who would go on to dominate the back
page of Macleans, was abducted by members of
the faculty for calling Engineers "uncouth louts."
He was chained to a clock in downtown Vancouver and had to be rescued by firemen. In the '60s,
Michael Valpy—a senior writer for the Globe and
Mail—was punished for similar crimes by being
attached to a pillar in the Engineering building
and forced to wear dunce cap. In the 70s, current
Vancouver Sun writer Mike Sasges was thrown in
a pool for criticizing the Engineers.
It's a time-honoured tradition: we mock the Engineers for being sexist, greasy-haired, slide-rule-
clutching sub-humans. They exact some sort of
physical revenge, like abducting head members
of our staff or collecting all the issues on campus and burning them. The fact that The Ubyssey's Coordinating Editor has yet to be abducted
by Engineers this decade—this century, in fact-
shows how far their faculty has fallen from its
former glory.
Not that we would ever encourage the Engineers
to kidnap Justin McElroy (who can be found in
The Ubyssey office most days of the week, wears
a red NBC jacket, can be habitually seen clutching a bottle of Coke and usually catches the 99
B-Line home from the bus loop). But even if we
did expressly suggest that the Engineers do such
a thing, we would not fear the repercussions.
After all, two years ago, the Engineers couldn't
even manage to suspend a VW bug from the Steel
Worker's Memorial Bridge. Lastyear, cowed, perhaps, by their previous failure, they didn't even
attempt such an escapade.
You heard us right. They were so scared of
failure, they didn't even show up. Which begs
the question: if they cannot manage such a paltry prank as the public planting of the Forestry
beetle, then what do we, the all-powerful media,
have to fear from them?
In fact, it is questionable whether most Engineers are even capable of reading this editorial.
Taking seven classes per term in maths and sciences, your average Redshirt does not get much
exposure to English literature—or to the company of human beings capable of using words for
the expression of complex thoughts or emotions.
The scraps ofthe English language that UBC Engineers do manage to pick up during their undergrad years primarily come in the form of cat-
based internet memes and rejections from members ofthe opposite sex.
Engineers should spend this week reflecting
on what a sad shade of its former self their faculty has become and plan an act of havoc that will
regain them a fraction of their departed glory.
More likely, though, they'll just hide in the Cheez
(Hey, you're getting a new social space! And only
a decade after Arts and Science students did!)
with their cheap beer and tiny population of female students—who are all dating guys in Arts.
Enjoy E-Week, you sissies, tl
The 80s: When Engineers would ransack our office without fear of repercussion. PHOTO ARCHIVE/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Our series of tubes is under attack!
i
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
This last week, anti-government protests have rocked Egypt, leading to
the government cutting off Egyptian
internet and cell phone use on Thursday. As coverage ofthe events in Egypt
continues, literally thousands of articles have zeroed in on this issue
specifically.
From China to Iran to Myanmar,
government suppression of communication services has been met with
dismay from those of us in Western
countries. Quashing freedom of expression seems to strike a direct nerve
to most in Canada, but our underlying assumption is that usage ofthe internet here is safe and unrestricted.
What is it we value about openness of
communication, and are those values
going unchallenged?
There are a number of ways, both
subtle and direct, in which use ofthe
internet is becoming less open. But
here, it isn't the government that is
the direct cause. Proponents of net
neutrality, for instance, complain of
internet service providers (ISPs) supplying preferential access to websites,
like Comcast does in the US by not
counting access of NBC sites (which
it partially owns) towards your data
allowance.
The concern is that as trends continue, ISPs may eventually begin to
tighten bandwidth control to an extent
that sites and applications approved
by the company are the only ones effectively worth accessing. At the extreme end of the spectrum, certain
sites are locked off altogether: this
has already occurred in the past, when
Telus blocked subscriber access to a
Telecommunications Workers Union
website.
More pressingly in the battle for
net neutrality than outright censorship, however, is that our ability to
use the internet may be further stymied by the introduction of metering,
or usage-based billing (UBB), by ISPs.
Essentially, in addition to your basic
subscription to broadband it would require you pay extra for every byte you
download or upload. Bell Canada, Rogers and Shaw are having their plans
to switch to this model approved by
the CRTC as we speak. Er, write.
Beyond the claims made by some
that this is just a money-grabbing
scheme, what is the problem with this
system? It would hamper our ability to communicate via the internet,
of course. Think about the funding-
strapped media outlets—The Ubyssey
included—whose ability to increase
their production of video- and flash-
based web contentwould be hampered
by this model.
How many would opt to not bother at all, leaving Canada in the dust
when it comes to the internet? It also
affects your ability to access that content. This isn't just going to affect people using P2P networks to download
films. Think about the kid growing
up who wants to watch NOVA or the
Discovery Channel online, but whose
parents can't afford that extra bit of
bandwidth.
The way we use the internet is gradually shaping our ability to communicate
with it, as well. In a polarizing feature last summer, Wired predicted the
death of the "web," referring specifically to web browsers, as the method
through which we use the internet. Although web browser usage has continued to rise, as a total portion of web
traffic it has been going down steadily
since the early 2000s. Now the trend is
moving to applications, like the ones
on your iPhone.
This isn't a condemnation of iPhone
applications. We at The Ubyssey have
a fondness for quite a few. But now,
rather than directly choosing the way
we communicate with the internet,
we are increasingly leaving it up to
the people who control our apps to
determine where we go. In effect, we
are trading away range and ability for
ease of use and convenience.
Even our access to those apps is
being directed. Normally, iPhone users are only able to install applications which appear on their iTunes
web page. And Apple has attempted
to resist the legalization of "jailbreak-
ing" their iOS as an example of this.
Jailbreaking, a process which allows
users to switch their phone to other
non-approved networks and install
applications of their choosing, was
recently upheld as a right in the US-
much to Apple's chagrin (in Canada,
there still are no laws for or against
jailbreaking).
The Egyptian government's decision
to directly suppress access to modes of
communication is condemable. However, in light of the uproar over their
actions, we should keep in mind what
really matters about those rights, tl
Letters. We like them. Even when they're not about the AMS. Especially when they're not about the AMS.
Make em under 300 words and it's even better. Send them to feedback@ubyssey.ca. And Engineers,
ifyou can manage to string together five or six coherent sentences in a row complaining about us,
we promise we'll print that too.
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubyssey.ca
U     THEUBYSSEYca 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.01.31
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
UBC not only hosted the 2011
Canada West swimming championships this weekend, they
came away victorious.
Both the men's and women's
swim teams defeated their
archrivals from Calgary in the
three-day competition. UBC's Savannah King, who was named
Canada West Female Rookie of
the Year, finished in first in the
400m freestyle with a time of
4:11:51. The CIS national championships will take place February 24-26 in Calgary, vl
JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/T
amS Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
31.01.11
BLOW
W/THE SONNY
AND THE SUNSETS
SATURDAY, FEB. 5 @ BILTMORE CABARET
amsevenisuDC.com
Visit ams.ubc.ca and SAVE $1
off any single purchase
of $6 (or more) at
the AMS Outlets:
Valid at PendulumjRestaurgn^Blue Chip Cookies, The
Moon, Bernou\l\irsliTiielljlorwur,Roil, and Pie R Squared.
PITCHER OF
BEER AND
NACHOS$15
This special is available
Mondays, Tuesdays &
Thursdays after 5 p.m.
Valentines
February 9th to 11tf
SUB Main Concourse
10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Over 30 vendors!
Lot's of (iinky
and fun gift
ideas for your
sweet Valentine!
THE     PENDULUM
R       E       S       T       A
RANT
Breakfast
on campus!
Panini Sandwiches
luesadill
Andmor
Lower level SUB
STAY UP TO DATE WITH THE AMS
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y Twitter:
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